Vladimir Grand Prince of Novgorod

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Володимѣръ I Yaroslavich Ярославич (Smolensk), Князь Новгородский

Nicknames: "Владимир Ярославич", "кн. Новгородский"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Veliky Novgorod, Province of Novgorod, Russia
Death: Died in Smolensk, Province of Smolensk, Russia
Place of Burial: St. Sophia Cathedral, Veliky Novgorod, Province of Novgorod, Russia
Immediate Family:

Son of Yaroslav I the Wise, Grand Prince of Kiev and Ingegerd "Anna of Novgorod" Olafsdotter, Princess of Sweden
Husband of Anna; Oda Von Stade, Countess and Countess Kilikia von Dithmarschen
Father of Rostislav Vladimirovich Prince of Tmutarakan, Duke Of Tmutorakan; Ярополк Владимирович Рюрикович, Prince Of Novgorod and Aliarina
Brother of Izyaslav Yaroslavich, князь; Anastasia of Kiev; Svyatoslav II Yaroslavich; Vsevolod I Yaroslavich, prince of Kiev; Elizaveta - Elisif Yaroslavna and 7 others

Occupation: Grand Prince of Novgorod, князь смоленский, Prince of Smolensk (1054-1057), Prince of Novgorod (1036-1052), князь новгородский (1034-1052), Pr of Novgorod (1036-52), founder of St.Sophia Cathedral, Novgorod
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Володимѣръ I Yaroslavich Ярославич (Smolensk), Князь Новгородский

Vladimir Yaroslavich (Russian: Владимир Ярославич) Prince of Novgorod

Born: 1020 Died October 4, 1052 reigned as prince of Novgorod

Father: Yaroslav I the Wise Mother: Ingigerd

Vladimir Yaroslavich reigned as prince of Novgorod from 1036 until his death. He was the eldest son of Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev by Ingigerd, daughter of king Olof Skötkonung of Sweden.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm

IZIASLAV [Vladimirovich], son of VLADIMIR I "Velikiy/the Great" Grand Prince of Kiev & his first wife Rogneda of Polotsk (-1001). Prince of Polotsk. The Primary Chronicle records the death of Izyaslav in 1001. m ---. The name of Iziaslav´s wife is not known. Iziaslav & his wife had two children, Vseslav Iziaslavich and Bryacheslav Iziaslavich.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_of_Novgorod

In the state affairs he was assisted by the voivode Vyshata and the bishop Luka Zhidiata. In 1042, Vladimir may have been in conflict with Finns, according to some interpretations even making a military campaign in Finland. In the next year he led the Russian armies together with Harald III of Norway against the Byzantine emperor Constantine IX. He predeceased his father by two years and was buried by him in St Sophia Cathedral he had built in Novgorod. His sarcophagus is in a niche on the south side of the main body of the cathedral overlooking the Martirievskii Porch. He is depicted in an early twentieth century fresco above the sarcophagus and on a new ephigial icon on top of the sarcophagus. The details of his death is unknown, however his son Rostislav and his descendants were in unfriendly relationship with the descendants of the Yaroslaviches triumvirate (Iziaslav, Sviatoslav, and Vsevolod). Three of Vladimir's younger brothers Izyaslav I, Svyatoslav II and Vsevolod I all reigned in Kiev, while other two (Igor and Vyacheslav) died in their early twenties after which their lands were split between the Yaroslaviches triumvirate. Coincidentally, the Vyshata of Novgorod pledged his support to Rostislav in the struggle against the triumvirate.

Vladimir's only son, Rostislav Vladimirovich, was a landless prince who usurped power in Tmutarakan. His descendants were dispossessed by their uncles and were proclaimed as izgoi (outcast), but gradually managed to establish themselves in Halychyna, ruling the land until 1199, when their line went extinct. In order to downplay their claims to Kiev, the records of Vladimir's military campaigns seem to have been obliterated from Kievan chronicles. As a result, medieval historians often confuse him with two more famous namesakes — Vladimir the Great and Vladimir Monomakh. The name of Vladimir's consort is uncertain either. According to Nikolai Baumgarten Vladimir was married to the daughter of count Loepold of Staden, Ode. Others (Aleksandr Nazarenko) disregard that assumption or claim a different person. Vladimir's memory was better preserved in foreign sources. In Norse sagas he frequently figures as Valdemar Holti (that is, "the Nimble"). George Cedrenus noticed Vladimir's arrogance in dealing with the Byzantines. -------------------- Vladimir Yaroslavich / Владимир Ярославич

(1020 – October 4, 1052)

Prince of Novgorod from 1036 until his death 1052. He was the eldest son of Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev by Ingegerd Olofsdotter also known as Anna of Novgorord, daughter of king Olaf Skötkonung of Sweden.

--------------------

From the English Wikipedia page on Vladimir of Novgorod:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_of_Novgorod

Vladimir Yaroslavich (Russian: Владимир Ярославич) (1020 – October 4, 1052) reigned as prince of Novgorod from 1036 until his death. He was the eldest son of Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev by Ingigerd, daughter of king Olaf Skötkonung of Sweden.

In 1042, Vladimir may have been in conflict with Finns, according to some interpretations even making a military campaign in Finland.[1] In the next year he led the Russian armies against the Byzantine emperor Constantine IX.

He predeceased his father by two years and was buried by him in St Sophia Cathedral he had built in Novgorod. His younger brothers Izyaslav I, Svyatoslav II and Vsevolod I all reigned in Kiev.

Vladimir's only son, Rostislav Vladimirovich, was a landless prince who usurped power in Tmutarakan. His descendants were dispossessed by their uncles but gradually managed to establish themselves in Halychina, ruling the land until 1199, when their line went extinct.

In order to downplay their claims to Kiev, the records of Vladimir's military campaigns seem to have been obliterated from Kievan chronicles. As a result, medieval historians often confuse him with two more famous namesakes — Vladimir the Great and Vladimir Monomakh.

Vladimir's memory was better preserved in foreign sources. In Norse sagas he frequently figures as Valdemar Holti (that is, "the Nimble"). George Cedrenus noticed Vladimir's arrogance in dealing with the Byzantines.

Further reading

Volkoff, Vladimir. Vladimir, the Russian Viking. Overlook Press, 1985.

References

^ The first indisputable Novgorodian expedition to Finland was done in 1191. Suomen varhaiskeskiajan lähteitä. Gummerus Kirjapaino Oy, 1989. ISBN 951-96006-1-2. See also online description of the conflict from Laurentian Codex as hosted by the National Archive of Finland. In Swedish.

--------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Russia Rurikid:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnnaIaroslavnadied1075

VIACHESLAV Iaroslavich ([1033/36]-Smolensk [1055/57]).

The Primary Chronicle records the birth of Vyacheslav son of Vladimir in [1034/36][173].

In accordance with the terms of his father's testament, he succeeded in 1054 as Prince of Smolensk.

The Primary Chronicle records the death of Vyacheslav son of Yaroslav at Smolensk in [1056/57][174].

m ---. The name of Viacheslav´s wife is not known.

Viacheslav & his wife had one child:

1. Boris Viacheslavich (b. c.1056, d. 3 October 1078 at the Battle of Nezhatina Meadows, Prince of Chernigov in 1077, Prince of Tmutorokan 1077-1078)

From the Russian Wikipedia page on Vyacheslav Yaroslavich:

http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%92%D1%8F%D1%87%D0%B5%D1%81%D0%BB%D0%B0%D0%B2_%D0%AF%D1%80%D0%BE%D1%81%D0%BB%D0%B0%D0%B2%D0%B8%D1%87

Вячеслав Ярославич (1036 - 1057) - князь смоленский с 1054, один из младших сыновей Ярослава Мудрого и Ингегерды

Родился, вероятно, в Киеве, где жил до совершеннолетия. Еще при жизни отца молодой Вячеслав был женат на Оде, дочери графа Леопольда Штаденского. В 1054 после смерти Ярослава получил от своего старшего брата Изяслава Смоленское княжество. Через три года, однако, Вячеслав умер, оставив малолетнего сына Бориса.

In English:

Vyacheslav Yaroslavich (1036-1057) was Prince of Smolensk (1054-1057), and one of the younger sons of Yaroslav the Wise and Ingegerd.

He was born probably in Kiev, where he lived until adulthood. During his life as a young father, Vyacheslav was married to Audet, daughter of Count Leopold Shtadenskiy. In 1054, after the death of Yaroslav, he received from his older brother Iziyaslav the Smolensk Principality. Three years later, however, Vyacheslav died, leaving the principality to his infant son, Boris.

--------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Russia Rurikid:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/RUSSIA,%20Rurik.htm#AnnaIaroslavnadied1075

VLADIMIR Iaroslavich (1020-Novgorod 1052, bur Novgorod Church of St Sophia).

The Primary Chronicle records the birth of Vladimir son of Iaroslav in 1020[154]. Snorre names "Valdemar, Vissivald and Holte the Bold" as the children of "King Jarisleif" & his wife[155].

His father installed him in 1043 as Prince of Novgorod.

He subjugated the Finnic tribe of Yam to secure Novgorod's control over the Gulf of Finland[156].

Psellos records that Vladimir led an attack on Constantinople in [1045], apparently in revenge for the death of some Scythian noble in a brawl, but was defeated and forced to retreat[157].

The Primary Chronicle records the death of Vladimir "Yaroslav's eldest son" at Novgorod in 1052 and his place of burial[158]. As he predeceased his father, his descendants were ignored in the latter's testament and were subsequently considered ineligible to succeed as Grand Princes of Kiev.

m --- ([1022]-1066). The name of Vladimir´s wife is not known.

Baumgarten identifies the wife of Vladimir as Oda, daughter of Luitpold Graf von Stade & his wife Ida von Elstorf [Brunswick][159]. This is based partially on the Annales Stadenses which name "Odam sanctimonialem de Rinthelen" as daughter of "Lippoldo filio domiine Glismodis" and "Ida [de Elsthorpe]", specifying that she married "regi Ruzie" by whom she had a son "Warteslaw", returned to Saxony with her son after her husband died[160].

Vladimir & his wife had one child:

a) ROSTISLAV Vladimirovich ([1045]-Tmutorakan 3 Feb 1067, bur Tmutorakan Church of the Holy Virgin).

The Primary Chronicle names Rostislav, son of Vladimir and grandson of Yaroslav, recording that in 1064 he fled to Tmutorakan from where he expelled Gleb and occupied the throne himself, only to be expelled the following year by his uncle Svyatoslav who re-established his son Gleb, whom Rostislav expelled again[161].

Prince of Rostov, Novgorod and Volynia 1056-1064.

Prince of Tmutorokan 1064-1065.

The Primary Chronicle records that Rostislav was poisoned by the Greeks 3 Feb 1067 at Tmutorakan and his place of burial[162].

From the Wikipedia page on Vladimir of Novgorod:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_of_Novgorod

Vladimir Yaroslavich (Russian: Владимир Ярославич) (1020 – October 4, 1052) reigned as prince of Novgorod from 1036 until his death. He was the eldest son of Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev by Ingigerd, daughter of king Olof Skötkonung of Sweden.[1]

In the state affairs he was assisted by the voivode Vyshata and the bishop Luka Zhidiata.

In 1042, Vladimir may have been in conflict with Finns, according to some interpretations even making a military campaign in Finland.[2] In the next year he led the Russian armies together with Harald III of Norway against the Byzantine emperor Constantine IX.

He predeceased his father by two years and was buried by him in St Sophia Cathedral he had built in Novgorod. His sarcophagus is in a niche on the south side of the main body of the cathedral overlooking the Martirievskii Porch. He is depicted in an early twentieth century fresco above the sarcophagus and on a new ephigial icon on top of the sarcophagus.[3]

The details of his death is unknown, however his son Rostislav and his descendants were in unfriendly relationship with the descendants of the Yaroslaviches triumvirate (Iziaslav, Sviatoslav, and Vsevolod). Three of Vladimir's younger brothers Izyaslav I, Svyatoslav II and Vsevolod I all reigned in Kiev, while other two (Igor and Vyacheslav) died in their early twenties after which their lands were split between the Yaroslaviches triumvirate.

Coincidentally, the Vyshata of Novgorod pledged his support to Rostislav in the struggle against the triumvirate.

Vladimir's only son, Rostislav Vladimirovich, was a landless prince who usurped power in Tmutarakan. His descendants were dispossessed by their uncles and were proclaimed as izgoi (outcast), but gradually managed to establish themselves in Halychyna, ruling the land until 1199, when their line went extinct.

In order to downplay their claims to Kiev, the records of Vladimir's military campaigns seem to have been obliterated from Kievan chronicles. As a result, medieval historians often confuse him with two more famous namesakes — Vladimir the Great and Vladimir Monomakh.

The name of Vladimir's consort is uncertain either. According to Nikolai Baumgarten Vladimir was married to the daughter of count Loepold of Staden, Ode. Others (Aleksandr Nazarenko) disregard that assumption or claim a different person.

Vladimir's memory was better preserved in foreign sources. In Norse sagas he frequently figures as Valdemar Holti (that is, "the Nimble"). George Cedrenus noticed Vladimir's arrogance in dealing with the Byzantines.

Further reading

Volkoff, Vladimir. Vladimir, the Russian Viking. Overlook Press, 1985.

[

References

1.^ Traditionally, Ingegerd is associated with Anna of Novgorod, who is buried in the cathedral in another niche near Vladimir. However, Soviet archaelogists who opened her sarcophagus found the remains to be that of a woman in her 30s, whereas Ingegard is said to have lived into her fifties. Thus it is thought that Vladimir's mother, Anna, was Yaroslav's first wife and is not the same person as Ingegerd.

2.^ The first indisputable Novgorodian expedition to Finland was done in 1191. Suomen varhaiskeskiajan lähteitä. Gummerus Kirjapaino Oy, 1989. ISBN 951-96006-1-2. See also online description of the conflict from Laurentian Codex as hosted by the National Archive of Finland. In Swedish.

3.^ T. N. Tsarevskaia, Sofiiskii Sobor v Novgorode.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_of_Novgorod

Vladimir of Novgorod

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Vladimir is buried in this cathedral he built in Novgorod.

Vladimir of Novgorod

Prince of Novgorod

Reign 1036-1052

Spouse Anna (Aleksandra)

Issue

Rostislav Vladimirovich, Yaropolk

Full name

Vladimir Yaroslavovich

House Riurik Dynasty

Father Yaroslav the Wise

Mother Anna

Born 1020

Died October 4, 1052 [aged ~32]

Novgorod

Burial St Sophia Cathedral, Novgorod

Vladimir Yaroslavich (Russian: Владимир Ярославич) (1020 – October 4, 1052) reigned as prince of Novgorod from 1036 until his death. He was the eldest son of Yaroslav I the Wise of Kiev by Ingigerd, daughter of king Olof Skötkonung of Sweden.[1]

In the state affairs he was assisted by the voivode Vyshata and the bishop Luka Zhidiata. In 1042, Vladimir may have been in conflict with Finns, according to some interpretations even making a military campaign in Finland.[2] In the next year he led the Russian armies together with Harald III of Norway against the Byzantine emperor Constantine IX. He predeceased his father by two years and was buried by him in St Sophia Cathedral he had built in Novgorod. His sarcophagus is in a niche on the south side of the main body of the cathedral overlooking the Martirievskii Porch. He is depicted in an early twentieth century fresco above the sarcophagus and on a new ephigial icon on top of the sarcophagus.[3] The details of his death is unknown, however his son Rostislav and his descendants were in unfriendly relationship with the descendants of the Yaroslaviches triumvirate (Iziaslav, Sviatoslav, and Vsevolod). Three of Vladimir's younger brothers Izyaslav I, Svyatoslav II and Vsevolod I all reigned in Kiev, while other two (Igor and Vyacheslav) died in their early twenties after which their lands were split between the Yaroslaviches triumvirate. Coincidentally, the Vyshata of Novgorod pledged his support to Rostislav in the struggle against the triumvirate.

Vladimir's only son, Rostislav Vladimirovich, was a landless prince who usurped power in Tmutarakan. His descendants were dispossessed by their uncles and were proclaimed as izgoi (outcast), but gradually managed to establish themselves in Halychyna, ruling the land until 1199, when their line went extinct. In order to downplay their claims to Kiev, the records of Vladimir's military campaigns seem to have been obliterated from Kievan chronicles. As a result, medieval historians often confuse him with two more famous namesakes — Vladimir the Great and Vladimir Monomakh. The name of Vladimir's consort is uncertain either. According to Nikolai Baumgarten Vladimir was married to the daughter of count Loepold of Staden, Ode. Others (Aleksandr Nazarenko) disregard that assumption or claim a different person.

Vladimir's memory was better preserved in foreign sources. In Norse sagas he frequently figures as Valdemar Holti (that is, "the Nimble"). George Cedrenus noticed Vladimir's arrogance in dealing with the Byzantines.

[edit] Further reading

   * Volkoff, Vladimir. Vladimir, the Russian Viking. Overlook Press, 1985.

[edit] References

  1. ^ Traditionally, Ingegerd is associated with Anna of Novgorod, who is buried in the cathedral in another niche near Vladimir. However, Soviet archaelogists who opened her sarcophagus found the remains to be that of a woman in her 30s, whereas Ingegard is said to have lived into her fifties. Thus it is thought that Vladimir's mother, Anna, was Yaroslav's first wife and is not the same person as Ingegerd.
  2. ^ The first indisputable Novgorodian expedition to Finland was done in 1191. Suomen varhaiskeskiajan lähteitä. Gummerus Kirjapaino Oy, 1989. ISBN 951-96006-1-2. See also online description of the conflict from Laurentian Codex as hosted by the National Archive of Finland. In Swedish.
  3. ^ T. N. Tsarevskaia, Sofiiskii Sobor v Novgorode.

This page was last modified on 14 July 2010 at 21:54.

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Vladimir Grand Prince of Novgorod's Timeline

1020
1020
Veliky Novgorod, Province of Novgorod, Russia
1038
1038
Age 18
Tmutorakan, Russia
1047
1047
Age 27
Novogord, Russia
1052
October 4, 1052
Age 32
Smolensk, Province of Smolensk, Russia
1052
Age 32
Novgorod, Novgorod, Russia
1052
Age 32
Veliky Novgorod, Province of Novgorod, Russia
1054
February 20, 1054
- 1057
Age 32
Smolensk, Russia
1931
March 3, 1931
Age 32
March 3, 1931
Age 32
March 3, 1931
Age 32