Władysław II Wygnaniec of Poland, książę (1105 - 1159) MP

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Birthplace: Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
Death: Died in Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire
Managed by: Nancy Sawalich
Last Updated:

About Władysław II Wygnaniec of Poland, książę

Władysław II Wygnaniec (ur. 1105, zm. 30 maja 1159) – książę zwierzchni polski, krakowski, sandomierski, wschodniej Wielkopolski, kujawski, śląski i zwierzchni pomorski w latach 1138-1146. http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/W%C5%82adys%C5%82aw_II_Wygnaniec

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SILESIA.htm#WladyslawIIdied1159B ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Władysław II the Exile, (Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec; Kraków, Kingdom of Poland, 1105 – May 30, 1159, Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire) was High Duke of Poland, 1138-1146. He was the son of Bolesław III Wrymouth, Duke of Poland, and Zbyslava, daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev.

In 1125 Władysław married Agnes of Babenberg, granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV. They had three sons: Bolesław I the Tall, Duke of Silesia; Mieszko I Tanglefoot, Duke of Opole; Konrad I of Głogów and a daughter, Richeza of Poland, who married Alfonso VII, King of Castile and León.

Following the death of his father, Bolesław III Wrymouth, Władysław II, as his eldest son, became High Duke of Poland. He controlled the high-ducal provinces of Kraków and Gniezno and also his hereditary province of Silesia.

In 1145 he attempted to take control of the country. In 1146 he accepted overlordship by the emperor and became founder of the Silesian Piasts. He was banned by the bishop of Gniezno and mutilated the voivode, the Danish castellan Peter Wlast (Polish: Piotr Włostowic). Władysław was driven into exile in 1146 by his younger brothers, and in 1159 he died at the Altenburg Kaiserpfalz of Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa.

In 1163 the province of Silesia was granted to Władysław's sons by Poland's Duke Bolesław IV the Curly. Subsequently Silesia was divided into as many as 17 separate duchies among Władysław's descendants and successors, until the Silesian Piasts died out with George IV William of Legnica in 1675.

-------------------- Wladislaw II, Duke of Poland (1) M, #113328, b. 1105, d. 1159 Last Edited=30 Jul 2005 Consanguinity Index=2.34%

    Wladislaw II, Duke of Poland was born in 1105. (3) He was the son of Boleslaw III, Duke of Poland and Zbyslawa of Kiev. (2) He married Agnes Babenberg, daughter of Leopold III 'the Saint' Markgraf von Österreich and Agnes Salian, between 1125 and 1127. (3) 

He died in 1159. (3)

    Wladislaw II, Duke of Poland was a member of the House of Piast. (4) Wladislaw II, Duke of Poland also went by the nick-name of Wladislaw 'the Exile' (?). (4) He gained the title of Duke of Silesia in 1138. He gained the title of Duke of Cracow in 1138. (2) He gained the title of Duke of Poland in 1140. (1) He was deposed as Duke of Cracow and Silesia in 1146. (2)

Child of Wladislaw II, Duke of Poland -1. unknown (?)+ (4)

Forrás / Source: http://www.thepeerage.com/p11333.htm#i113328 -------------------- Władysław II the Exile From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Władysław II the Exile, (Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec; b. Kraków, Kingdom of Poland, 1105 – d. Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire, 30 May 1159) was a High Duke of Poland and Duke of Silesia from 1138 until 1146. He was the eldest son of Bolesław III Wrymouth by his first wife Zbyslava, daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev.

Life

[edit]Governor of Silesia As the eldest son, Władysław's father decided to involved him actively in the government of the country. Some historians believed that Boleslaw III give Władysław the district of Silesia before his own death, in order to create an hereditary fief to his eldest descendants. Around 1125 Władysław married with Agnes, daughter of Leopold III, Margrave of Austria; this union made him closely connected with the Holy Roman Empire and the Kingdom of Germany: Agnes was a granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV and half-sister of King Conrad III. Thanks to Władysław, Silesia was saved during the wars of 1133-1135 with Bohemia: he stopped the destruction of the major areas of his district after the Bohemian forces crossed the Oder River. In 1137, during the meeting with the Bohemian rulers in Niemcza, in which was decided several disputed matters, Władysław stood as godfather in the baptism of the youngest son of Duke Sobeslaus I, the future Wenceslaus II. [edit]High Duke of Poland Boleslaw III died on 28 October 1138. In his will, he divided his country between his sons. As the oldest son, the supreme authority in the country was assigned to Władysław with the title of High Duke (Princeps). In addition to Silesia, he received the Seniorate Province (which included Lesser Poland, eastern Greater Poland and western Kuyavia) and the authority over Pomerania. His half-brothers Boleslaw IV and Mieszko III, received the Masovian Province (composed of Masovia with eastern Kuyavia) and the Greater Poland Province (composed of western Greater Poland) respectively, as hereditary fiefs. In addition, Władysław also received Łęczyca (which was granted by Boleslaw III to his widow Salome of Berg in perpetuity as a widow land and reverted to the Seniorate upon her death) and in the future (when he reached the legal age) he was in the obligation to provide another of his half-brothers, Henry, with the district of Sandomierz (but only for life), which was separate from the Seniorate. The youngest of his half-brothers, Casimir wasn't assigned any province; it is speculated that he was born after Bolesław III's death. At the time of the death of his father, Władysław was already an adult man, with many years of marriage and at least one surviving son (Boleslaw, born in 1127; the date of birth of the second son, Miesko, is still debatable and varies between 1130 and 1146). Follow the examples of Bolesław I the Brave in 992, Mieszko II Lambert in 1032, and his own father in 1106, the High Duke almost immediately tried to restored the unity of the country. Given his life experience and military leadership, it is expected that in the end, he was successful. [edit]The First Conflicts with the Junior Dukes The disputes of Władysław with his stepmother Salome and his half-brothers began openly in 1141, when the Dowager Duchess, without the knowledge and consent of the High Duke, commenced to divide the Łęczyca province between her sons. Also, she tried to resolve the marriage of her youngest daughter Agnes and with this to find a suitable ally for her sons. The most appropriate candidate for a son-in-law had to be one of the sons of the Grand Prince of Kiev, Vsevolod II Olgovich. After hearing the news about the events in Łęczyca, Władysław decided to made a quick response, as a result of which the Grand Duke of Kiev, not only broke all his pacts with the Junior Dukes, but, also, arranged the betrothal of his daughter Zvenislava with Władysław's eldest son Boleslaw. The wedding took place one year later, in 1142. His ties with the Kievan Rus' benefited him during 1142-1143, when Władysław decided to fight against the districts of his brothers. Władysław's victory was beyond dispute, being backed by his alliances with Russia, Bohemia and the Holy Roman Empire. [edit]The Włostowic Affair and the Second part of the Fight with his brothers During Wladyslaw's reign, the voivode Piotr Włostowic had the greatest and decisive impact. A firm follower of Boleslaw III, he soon acquired an enormous political significance in the country, covering the most important court offices. In his prerogative as Voivode he had the right to appoint officials in local authorities across Poland, including in the areas of the Junior Dukes, which made him the person from which decisions were determined the fate of the state. The increased power of Włostowic developed in deep negative relations with Władysław, and especially with his wife Agnes, who considered Włostowic a traitor. On 27 July 1144 Salome of Berg, Boleslaw III's widow and Włostowic's bitter enemy, died. In accordance with the will of Boleslaw III, her province of Łęczyca reverted to the Senoriate, so, in agreement with the Junior Dukes, Włostowic planned a coop in order to take the contested district, perhaps as emoluments for the younger Henry. Also in this case, Władysław appealed for aid to his Kievan allies. Without waiting the arrival of food he sent his troops against the forces of Boleslaw IV and Miesko III; unexpectedly, Władysław suffered a defeat. It wasn't until the arrival of the Kievans that the fate of the battle and the war turned to Władysław's side. Immediately, a favorable treaty of peace was made, which permitted Władysław to take full control over Łęczyca; however, he had to give to the Kievan -in exchange for his aid- the Polish castle in Wiźnie. In the meanwhile, more and more worse conflicts between Władysław and Piotr Włostowic continued. The position of the Palatine in the civil war was clearly against the High Duke. This attitude didn't correspond to Wladyslaw's concept of autocracy, and after this episode he thought more and more about the total removal of their brothers from their lands. By 1145 it seemed that a reconciliation between the High Duke and Włostowic was possible, as evidenced by the fact the invitation to Włostowic's son wedding, made to Władysław by the voivode. At the beginning of the following year the High Duke, however, decided to bet everything on one card: eliminate Włostowic from his way for good. He ordened one of his knights, Dobek, to capture him. Dobek arrived at Włostowic's court in Ołbino, and during the night captured the voivode with his men. Duchess Agnes demanded Włostowic's death, but Władysław decided instead to make an example out of him: he was blinded, muted and sentenced to exile. Włostowic was respected and had many friends, and his fate caused many people to switch their allegiance to the Junior Dukes. Further, the blinded Włostowic went to Russia, which had so far supported Władysław, and convinced them to break their alliance. [edit]Deposition and Escape to Bohemia At the beginning of 1146 Władysław finally decided to made the final attack to his half-brothers. Initially, it seemed that victory of the High Duke was only a matter of time, since the he managed to take Masovia without obstacles and forced Boleslaw IV to withdraw to the defense of Poznan. There, unexpectedly, began the disaster to Władysław. The reasons for this must be seen was the insecurity of other districts, where mighty rebellions erupted against Władysław's dictatorial politics. The rebels quickly growing power thanks to the support of the Archbishop of Gniezno, Jakub I ze Żnina, who excommunicated the High Duke -as a punishment for the fate of the voivode Włostowic-, which resulted in an additional series of rebellions. The defeat at the end was thanks not only to the combined forces of Boleslaw IV in Poznan with the troops of the other Junior Dukes, but also by the own Władysław's subjects, who was a total surprise to him. The High Duke was forced to fled abroad; shortly after his wife Agnes and children joined with him, after their unsuccessfully attempts to defend Kraków. The Junior Dukes had a complete success, and Władysław was now under the mercy of his neighbors. Initially, the High Duke and his family stayed in the court of his namesake and ally Vladislaus II in Prague. Władysław never returned to Poland. [edit]Exile in Germany. Unsuccessful expedition of King Conrad III Soon after his arrival to Bohemia, his brother-in-law King Conrad III of Germany offer to him his hospitality. Władysław shortly after moved to Germany and paid tribute to King Conrad and asked for assistance in regaining the throne.[1] Initially appeared that Władysław regains power over Poland very soon. The expedition against the Junior Dukes for yet launched in 1146, but due to spillages of the Oder River and the pressures on the German king by Albert the Bear and Conrad of Meissen the campaign finally failed. Władysław of course not lost the hope of changing his fate, but for now he have to accept the postpone his return, particularly when Conrad III made an expedition to the Holy Land. During this time, the former High Duke ruled the Saxon town of Altenburg and his dependencies. Without waiting for a German aid, Władysław and his wife Agnes went to Rome and asked to the Pope for help, but this attempt was also unsuccessfully. [edit]Death and Legacy In 1152 King Conrad III died and was succeeded by his nephew Frederick Barbarossa. With this, the hopes of Władysław to return to Poland were reborn. Following the inducements of Władysław and his aunt Agnes, the new Emperor launched a new expedition against Poland in 1157. The campaign was a success but unexpectedly Barbarossa did not restore Władysław to the Polish throne. Bolesław IV was declared the vassal to Frederick Barbarossa and was compelled to pay tribute to him. In compensation, the Emperor forced Bolesław IV to promise the restitution of Silesia to Władysław's sons.[2] At this time, it appears, Władysław knew that his battle for supremacy in Poland was finally lost. He remained in exile at Altenburg, were he died, two years later. It wasn't until 1163 that Bolesław IV finally granted the province to Władysław's sons. Subsequently Silesia was divided into as many as 17 separate duchies among his descendants and successors, until the Silesian Piasts died out with George IV William of Legnica in 1675. [edit]Marriage and children

In 1125 Władysław married with Agnes (b. ca. 1108/1113 - d. Altenburg, 24 January 1160/63), daughter of Margrave Leopold III of Austria and Agnes of Germany, who in turn was a daughter of Emperor Henry IV. She was also the half-sister of King Conrad III of Germany.They had five children: [3] Bolesław I the Tall (b. 1127 - d. 8 December 1201). Mieszko I Tanglefoot (b. ca. 1130 - 16 May 1211). Ryksa (b. 1140 - d. 16 June 1185), married firstly in 1152 to Alfonso VII, King of Galicia, Castile and León, secondly in 1162 to Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Provence and thirdly in 1166 with Count Albert of Eberstein. Konrad Spindleshanks (b. 1146/57 - d. 17 January 1190). Albert (d. young, ca. 1168).

Władysław II the Exile From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Władysław II the Exile, (Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec; Kraków, Poland, 1105 – May 30, 1159, Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire) was High Duke of Poland, 1138-1146. He was the son of Bolesław III Wrymouth, Duke of Poland, and Zbyslava, daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev. In 1125 Władysław married Agnes of Babenberg, granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV. They had three sons: Bolesław I the Tall, Duke of Silesia; Mieszko I Tanglefoot, Duke of Opole; Konrad I of Głogów and a daughter, Richeza of Poland, who married Alfonso VII, King of Castile and León. [edit]Biography

Following the death of his father, Bolesław III Wrymouth, Władysław II, as his eldest son, became High Duke of Poland. He controlled the high-ducal provinces of Kraków and Gniezno and also his hereditary province of Silesia. In 1145 he attempted to take control of the country. In 1146 he accepted overlordship by the emperor and became founder of the Silesian Piasts. He was banned by the bishop of Gniezno and mutilated the voivode, the Danish castellan Peter Wlast (Polish: Piotr Włostowic). Władysław was driven into exile in 1146 by his younger brothers, and in 1159 he died at the Altenburg Kaiserpfalz of Emperor Frederick I. In 1163 the province of Silesia was granted to Władysław's sons by Poland's Duke Bolesław IV the Curly. Subsequently Silesia was divided into as many as 17 separate duchies among Władysław's descendants and successors, until the Silesian Piasts died out with George IV William of Legnica in 1675.

-------------------- Władysław II the Exile High Duke of Poland Wladyslaw II Wygnaniec.jpg Reign 1138–1146 Born 1105 Birthplace Kraków, Kingdom of Poland Died 30 May 1159 [aged 54] Place of death Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire Predecessor Bolesław III Wrymouth Successor Bolesław IV the Curly Wife Agnes of Babenberg Offspring With Agnes: Bolesław I the Tall Mieszko I Tanglefoot Richeza, Queen of Castile and León, Countess of Provence and Everstein Konrad Spindleshanks Albert Royal House Piast Father Bolesław III Wrymouth Mother Zbyslava of Kiev

Władysław II the Exile, (Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec; 1105 – 30 May 1159) was a High Duke of Poland and Duke of Silesia from 1138 until 1146.

He was the eldest son of Bolesław III Wrymouth by his first wife Zbyslava, daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev. Life Governor of Silesia

As the eldest son, Władysław's father decided to involve him actively in the government of the country. Some historians believe that Boleslaw III gave Władysław the district of Silesia before his own death, in order to create an hereditary fief for his eldest descendants.

Around 1125 Władysław married Agnes, daughter of Leopold III, Margrave of Austria; this union gave him a close connection with the Holy Roman Empire and the Kingdom of Germany: Agnes was a granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV and half-sister of King Conrad III. Thanks to Władysław, Silesia was saved during the wars of 1133-1135 with Bohemia: he stopped the destruction of the major areas of his district after the Bohemian forces crossed the Oder River.

In 1137, during the meeting with the Bohemian rulers in Niemcza, in which several disputed matters were decided, Władysław stood as godfather in the baptism of the youngest son of Duke Sobeslaus I, the future Wenceslaus II. High Duke of Poland

Boleslaw III died on 28 October 1138. In his will, he divided his country between his sons. As the oldest son, the supreme authority in the country was assigned to Władysław with the title of High Duke (Princeps). In addition to Silesia, he received the Seniorate Province (which included Lesser Poland, eastern Greater Poland and western Kuyavia) and the authority over Pomerania. His half-brothers Boleslaw IV and Mieszko III, received the Masovian Province (composed of Masovia with eastern Kuyavia) and the Greater Poland Province (composed of western Greater Poland) respectively, as hereditary fiefs. In addition, Władysław also received Łęczyca (which was granted by Boleslaw III to his widow Salome of Berg in perpetuity as a widow's pension and reverted to the Seniorate upon her death) and in the future (when he came of age) he was obliged to provide another of his half-brothers, Henry, with the district of Sandomierz (but only for life), which was separate from the Seniorate. The youngest of his half-brothers, Casimir wasn't assigned any province; it is speculated that he was born after Bolesław III's death.

At the time of the death of his father, Władysław was already an adult, with many years of marriage and at least one surviving son (Boleslaw, born in 1127; the date of birth of the second son, Miesko, is still debatable and varies between 1130 and 1146). Following the examples of Bolesław I the Brave in 992, Mieszko II Lambert in 1032, and his own father in 1106, the High Duke almost immediately tried to restore the unity of the country. Given his life experience and military leadership, it is expected that in the end, he was successful. The First Conflicts with the Junior Dukes

The disputes of Władysław with his stepmother Salome and his half-brothers began openly in 1141, when the Dowager Duchess, without the knowledge and consent of the High Duke, commenced to divide Łęczyca province between her sons. Also, she tried to resolve the marriage of her youngest daughter Agnes and thus to find a suitable ally for her sons. The most appropriate candidate for a son-in-law had to be one of the sons of the Grand Prince of Kiev, Vsevolod II Olgovich. After hearing the news about the events in Łęczyca, Władysław decided to make a quick response, as a result of which the Grand Duke of Kiev not only broke all his pacts with the Junior Dukes, but also arranged the betrothal of his daughter Zvenislava to Władysław's eldest son Boleslaw. The wedding took place one year later, in 1142.

His ties with the Kievan Rus benefited him during 1142-1143, when Władysław decided to fight against the districts of his brothers. Władysław's victory was beyond dispute, being backed by his alliances with Russia, Bohemia and the Holy Roman Empire. The Włostowic Affair and the Second part of the Fight with his brothers

During Wladyslaw's reign, the voivode Piotr Włostowic had the greatest and most decisive impact. A firm follower of Boleslaw III, he soon acquired enormous political significance in the country, covering the most important court offices. In his prerogative as Voivode he had the right to appoint officials in local authorities across Poland, including in the areas of the Junior Dukes, which made him the person from whose decisions was determined the fate of the state. The increased power of Włostowic fostered deep negative relations with Władysław, and especially with his wife Agnes, who considered Włostowic a traitor.

On 27 July 1144 Salome of Berg, Boleslaw III's widow and Włostowic's bitter enemy, died. In accordance with the will of Boleslaw III, her province of Łęczyca reverted to the Senoriate, so, in agreement with the Junior Dukes, Włostowic planned a coup d'état in order to take the contested district, perhaps as emoluments for the younger Henry. Also in this case, Władysław appealed for aid to his Kievan allies. Without waiting the arrival of food he sent his troops against the forces of Boleslaw IV and Miesko III; unexpectedly, Władysław suffered a defeat. It wasn't until the arrival of the Kievans that the fate of the battle and the war turned to Władysław's side. Immediately, a favorable treaty of peace was made, which permitted Władysław to take full control over Łęczyca; however, he had to give to the Kievan -in exchange for his aid- the Polish castle in Wiźnie.

In the meanwhile, more and more worse conflicts between Władysław and Piotr Włostowic continued. The position of the Palatine in the civil war was clearly against the High Duke. This attitude didn't correspond with Wladyslaw's concept of autocracy, and after this episode he thought more and more about the total removal of his brothers from their lands.

By 1145 it seemed that a reconciliation between the High Duke and Włostowic was possible, as evidenced by the invitation to Włostowic's son wedding, made to Władysław by the voivode. At the beginning of the following year the High Duke, however, decided to bet everything on one gamble: eliminate Włostowic from his life for good. He ordered one of his knights, Dobek, to capture him. Dobek arrived at Włostowic's court in Ołbino, and during the night captured the voivode with his men. High Duchess Agnes demanded Włostowic's death, but Władysław decided instead to make an example out of him: he was blinded, muted and sentenced to exile.

Włostowic was respected and had many friends, and his fate caused many people to switch their allegiance to the Junior Dukes. Further, the blinded Włostowic went to Russia, which had so far supported Władysław, and convinced them to break their alliance. Deposition and Escape to Bohemia

At the beginning of 1146 Władysław finally decided to made the final attack on his half-brothers. Initially, it seemed that victory of the High Duke was only a matter of time, since he managed to take Masovia without obstacles and forced Boleslaw IV to withdraw to the defense of Poznan. There, unexpectedly, began Władysław's disaster. The reason for this, it must be seen, was the insecurity of other districts, where mighty rebellions erupted against Władysław's dictatorial politics. The rebels quickly grew in power thanks to the support of the Archbishop of Gniezno, Jakub I ze Żnina, who excommunicated the High Duke -as a punishment for the fate of the voivode Włostowic- which resulted in an additional series of rebellions. The defeat at the end was thanks not only to the combined forces of Boleslaw IV in Poznan with the troops of the other Junior Dukes, but also by Władysław's own subjects, which was a total surprise to him. The High Duke was forced to flee abroad; shortly afterwards his wife Agnes and children joined him, after their unsuccessful attempts to defend Kraków. The Junior Dukes had a complete success, and Władysław was now under the mercy of his neighbors. Initially, the High Duke and his family stayed in the court of his namesake and ally Vladislaus II in Prague. Władysław never returned to Poland. Exile in Germany. Unsuccessful expedition of King Conrad III

Soon after his arrival in Bohemia, his brother-in-law King Conrad III of Germany offered him his hospitality. Władysław shortly after moved to Germany and paid tribute to King Conrad and asked for assistance in regaining the throne.[1] Initially it appeared that Władysław would regain power over Poland very soon. The expedition against the Junior Dukes was launched in 1146, but due to flooding of the Oder River and the pressures on the German king by Albert the Bear and Conrad of Meissen the campaign finally failed.

Władysław of course did not lose hope of changing his fate, but for now he had to accept the postponement of his return, particularly when Conrad III made an expedition to the Holy Land. During this time, the former High Duke ruled the town of Altenburg and its dependencies in the Imperial Pleissnerland.

Without waiting for German aid, Władysław and his wife Agnes went to Rome and asked to the Pope for help, but this attempt was also unsuccessful. Death and Legacy

In 1152 King Conrad III died and was succeeded by his nephew Frederick Barbarossa. With this, the hopes of Władysław of returning to Poland were reborn. Following the inducements of Władysław and his aunt Agnes, the new Emperor launched a new expedition against Poland in 1157. The campaign was a success but unexpectedly Barbarossa did not restore Władysław to the Polish throne. Bolesław IV was declared a vassal to Frederick Barbarossa and was compelled to pay tribute to him. In compensation, the Emperor forced Bolesław IV to promise the restitution of Silesia to Władysław's sons.[2]

At this time, it appears, Władysław knew that his battle for supremacy in Poland was finally lost. He remained in exile at Altenburg, in the Holy Roman Empire, where he died two years later.

It was not until 1163 that Bolesław IV finally granted the province to Władysław's sons. Subsequently Silesia was divided into as many as 17 separate duchies among his descendants and successors, until the Silesian Piasts died out with George IV William of Legnica in 1675. Marriage and children

In 1125 Władysław married Agnes (b. ca. 1108/1113 - d. Altenburg, 24 January 1160/63), daughter of Margrave Leopold III of Austria and Agnes of Germany, who in turn was a daughter of Emperor Henry IV. She was also the half-sister of King Conrad III of Germany.They had five children:

  1. Bolesław I the Tall (b. 1127 - d. 8 December 1201).
  2. Mieszko I Tanglefoot (b. ca. 1130 - 16 May 1211).
  3. Richeza (b. 1140 - d. 16 June 1185), married firstly in 1152 to Alfonso VII, King of Galicia, Castile and León, secondly in 1162 to Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Provence and thirdly by 1167 to Count Albert III of Everstein.
  4. Konrad Spindleshanks (b. 1146/57 - d. 17 January 1190).
  5. Albert (d. young, ca. 1168).

-------------------- Władysław II the Exile, (Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec; Kraków, Kingdom of Poland, 1105 – May 30, 1159, Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire) was High Duke of Poland, 1138-1146. He was the son of Bolesław III Wrymouth, Duke of Poland, and Zbyslava, daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev.

In 1125 Władysław married Agnes of Babenberg, granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV. They had three sons: Bolesław I the Tall, Duke of Silesia; Mieszko I Tanglefoot, Duke of Opole; Konrad I of Głogów and a daughter, Richeza of Poland, who married Alfonso VII, King of Castile and León. -------------------- Władysław II the Exile High Duke of Poland Wladyslaw II Wygnaniec.jpg Reign 1138–1146 Born 1105 Birthplace Kraków, Kingdom of Poland Died 30 May 1159 [aged 54] Place of death Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire Predecessor Bolesław III Wrymouth Successor Bolesław IV the Curly Wife Agnes of Babenberg Offspring With Agnes: Bolesław I the Tall Mieszko I Tanglefoot Richeza, Queen of Castile and León, Countess of Provence and Everstein Konrad Spindleshanks Albert Royal House Piast Father Bolesław III Wrymouth Mother Zbyslava of Kiev

Władysław II the Exile, (Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec; 1105 – 30 May 1159) was a High Duke of Poland and Duke of Silesia from 1138 until 1146.

He was the eldest son of Bolesław III Wrymouth by his first wife Zbyslava, daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev. Life Governor of Silesia

As the eldest son, Władysław's father decided to involve him actively in the government of the country. Some historians believe that Boleslaw III gave Władysław the district of Silesia before his own death, in order to create an hereditary fief for his eldest descendants.

Around 1125 Władysław married Agnes, daughter of Leopold III, Margrave of Austria; this union gave him a close connection with the Holy Roman Empire and the Kingdom of Germany: Agnes was a granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV and half-sister of King Conrad III. Thanks to Władysław, Silesia was saved during the wars of 1133-1135 with Bohemia: he stopped the destruction of the major areas of his district after the Bohemian forces crossed the Oder River.

In 1137, during the meeting with the Bohemian rulers in Niemcza, in which several disputed matters were decided, Władysław stood as godfather in the baptism of the youngest son of Duke Sobeslaus I, the future Wenceslaus II. High Duke of Poland

Boleslaw III died on 28 October 1138. In his will, he divided his country between his sons. As the oldest son, the supreme authority in the country was assigned to Władysław with the title of High Duke (Princeps). In addition to Silesia, he received the Seniorate Province (which included Lesser Poland, eastern Greater Poland and western Kuyavia) and the authority over Pomerania. His half-brothers Boleslaw IV and Mieszko III, received the Masovian Province (composed of Masovia with eastern Kuyavia) and the Greater Poland Province (composed of western Greater Poland) respectively, as hereditary fiefs. In addition, Władysław also received Łęczyca (which was granted by Boleslaw III to his widow Salome of Berg in perpetuity as a widow's pension and reverted to the Seniorate upon her death) and in the future (when he came of age) he was obliged to provide another of his half-brothers, Henry, with the district of Sandomierz (but only for life), which was separate from the Seniorate. The youngest of his half-brothers, Casimir wasn't assigned any province; it is speculated that he was born after Bolesław III's death.

At the time of the death of his father, Władysław was already an adult, with many years of marriage and at least one surviving son (Boleslaw, born in 1127; the date of birth of the second son, Miesko, is still debatable and varies between 1130 and 1146). Following the examples of Bolesław I the Brave in 992, Mieszko II Lambert in 1032, and his own father in 1106, the High Duke almost immediately tried to restore the unity of the country. Given his life experience and military leadership, it is expected that in the end, he was successful. The First Conflicts with the Junior Dukes

The disputes of Władysław with his stepmother Salome and his half-brothers began openly in 1141, when the Dowager Duchess, without the knowledge and consent of the High Duke, commenced to divide Łęczyca province between her sons. Also, she tried to resolve the marriage of her youngest daughter Agnes and thus to find a suitable ally for her sons. The most appropriate candidate for a son-in-law had to be one of the sons of the Grand Prince of Kiev, Vsevolod II Olgovich. After hearing the news about the events in Łęczyca, Władysław decided to make a quick response, as a result of which the Grand Duke of Kiev not only broke all his pacts with the Junior Dukes, but also arranged the betrothal of his daughter Zvenislava to Władysław's eldest son Boleslaw. The wedding took place one year later, in 1142.

His ties with the Kievan Rus benefited him during 1142-1143, when Władysław decided to fight against the districts of his brothers. Władysław's victory was beyond dispute, being backed by his alliances with Russia, Bohemia and the Holy Roman Empire. The Włostowic Affair and the Second part of the Fight with his brothers

During Wladyslaw's reign, the voivode Piotr Włostowic had the greatest and most decisive impact. A firm follower of Boleslaw III, he soon acquired enormous political significance in the country, covering the most important court offices. In his prerogative as Voivode he had the right to appoint officials in local authorities across Poland, including in the areas of the Junior Dukes, which made him the person from whose decisions was determined the fate of the state. The increased power of Włostowic fostered deep negative relations with Władysław, and especially with his wife Agnes, who considered Włostowic a traitor.

On 27 July 1144 Salome of Berg, Boleslaw III's widow and Włostowic's bitter enemy, died. In accordance with the will of Boleslaw III, her province of Łęczyca reverted to the Senoriate, so, in agreement with the Junior Dukes, Włostowic planned a coup d'état in order to take the contested district, perhaps as emoluments for the younger Henry. Also in this case, Władysław appealed for aid to his Kievan allies. Without waiting the arrival of food he sent his troops against the forces of Boleslaw IV and Miesko III; unexpectedly, Władysław suffered a defeat. It wasn't until the arrival of the Kievans that the fate of the battle and the war turned to Władysław's side. Immediately, a favorable treaty of peace was made, which permitted Władysław to take full control over Łęczyca; however, he had to give to the Kievan -in exchange for his aid- the Polish castle in Wiźnie.

In the meanwhile, more and more worse conflicts between Władysław and Piotr Włostowic continued. The position of the Palatine in the civil war was clearly against the High Duke. This attitude didn't correspond with Wladyslaw's concept of autocracy, and after this episode he thought more and more about the total removal of his brothers from their lands.

By 1145 it seemed that a reconciliation between the High Duke and Włostowic was possible, as evidenced by the invitation to Włostowic's son wedding, made to Władysław by the voivode. At the beginning of the following year the High Duke, however, decided to bet everything on one gamble: eliminate Włostowic from his life for good. He ordered one of his knights, Dobek, to capture him. Dobek arrived at Włostowic's court in Ołbino, and during the night captured the voivode with his men. High Duchess Agnes demanded Włostowic's death, but Władysław decided instead to make an example out of him: he was blinded, muted and sentenced to exile.

Włostowic was respected and had many friends, and his fate caused many people to switch their allegiance to the Junior Dukes. Further, the blinded Włostowic went to Russia, which had so far supported Władysław, and convinced them to break their alliance. Deposition and Escape to Bohemia

At the beginning of 1146 Władysław finally decided to made the final attack on his half-brothers. Initially, it seemed that victory of the High Duke was only a matter of time, since he managed to take Masovia without obstacles and forced Boleslaw IV to withdraw to the defense of Poznan. There, unexpectedly, began Władysław's disaster. The reason for this, it must be seen, was the insecurity of other districts, where mighty rebellions erupted against Władysław's dictatorial politics. The rebels quickly grew in power thanks to the support of the Archbishop of Gniezno, Jakub I ze Żnina, who excommunicated the High Duke -as a punishment for the fate of the voivode Włostowic- which resulted in an additional series of rebellions. The defeat at the end was thanks not only to the combined forces of Boleslaw IV in Poznan with the troops of the other Junior Dukes, but also by Władysław's own subjects, which was a total surprise to him. The High Duke was forced to flee abroad; shortly afterwards his wife Agnes and children joined him, after their unsuccessful attempts to defend Kraków. The Junior Dukes had a complete success, and Władysław was now under the mercy of his neighbors. Initially, the High Duke and his family stayed in the court of his namesake and ally Vladislaus II in Prague. Władysław never returned to Poland. Exile in Germany. Unsuccessful expedition of King Conrad III

Soon after his arrival in Bohemia, his brother-in-law King Conrad III of Germany offered him his hospitality. Władysław shortly after moved to Germany and paid tribute to King Conrad and asked for assistance in regaining the throne.[1] Initially it appeared that Władysław would regain power over Poland very soon. The expedition against the Junior Dukes was launched in 1146, but due to flooding of the Oder River and the pressures on the German king by Albert the Bear and Conrad of Meissen the campaign finally failed.

Władysław of course did not lose hope of changing his fate, but for now he had to accept the postponement of his return, particularly when Conrad III made an expedition to the Holy Land. During this time, the former High Duke ruled the town of Altenburg and its dependencies in the Imperial Pleissnerland.

Without waiting for German aid, Władysław and his wife Agnes went to Rome and asked to the Pope for help, but this attempt was also unsuccessful. Death and Legacy

In 1152 King Conrad III died and was succeeded by his nephew Frederick Barbarossa. With this, the hopes of Władysław of returning to Poland were reborn. Following the inducements of Władysław and his aunt Agnes, the new Emperor launched a new expedition against Poland in 1157. The campaign was a success but unexpectedly Barbarossa did not restore Władysław to the Polish throne. Bolesław IV was declared a vassal to Frederick Barbarossa and was compelled to pay tribute to him. In compensation, the Emperor forced Bolesław IV to promise the restitution of Silesia to Władysław's sons.[2]

At this time, it appears, Władysław knew that his battle for supremacy in Poland was finally lost. He remained in exile at Altenburg, in the Holy Roman Empire, where he died two years later.

It was not until 1163 that Bolesław IV finally granted the province to Władysław's sons. Subsequently Silesia was divided into as many as 17 separate duchies among his descendants and successors, until the Silesian Piasts died out with George IV William of Legnica in 1675. Marriage and children

In 1125 Władysław married Agnes (b. ca. 1108/1113 - d. Altenburg, 24 January 1160/63), daughter of Margrave Leopold III of Austria and Agnes of Germany, who in turn was a daughter of Emperor Henry IV. She was also the half-sister of King Conrad III of Germany.They had five children:

  1. Bolesław I the Tall (b. 1127 - d. 8 December 1201).
  2. Mieszko I Tanglefoot (b. ca. 1130 - 16 May 1211).
  3. Richeza (b. 1140 - d. 16 June 1185), married firstly in 1152 to Alfonso VII, King of Galicia, Castile and León, secondly in 1162 to Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Provence and thirdly by 1167 to Count Albert III of Everstein.
  4. Konrad Spindleshanks (b. 1146/57 - d. 17 January 1190).
  5. Albert (d. young, ca. 1168).

-------------------- Wikipedia: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wladyslaw_II._%28Polen%29 Władysław II. (Polen) aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie (Weitergeleitet von Wladyslaw II. (Polen)) Wechseln zu: Navigation, Suche

Władysław der Vertriebene (auch: Władysław II. von Polen, Władysław II. von Schlesien, Władysław II. der Verbannte, polnisch Władysław II Wygnaniec; * 1105 in Krakau; † 30. Mai 1159 in Altenburg in Thüringen) war 1138–1146 Herzog von Schlesien sowie, als Władysław II., Seniorherzog von Polen. Er war der Begründer der schlesischen Linie der Piasten. Familie [Bearbeiten]

Władysław entstammte der polnischen Dynastie der Piasten. Seine Eltern waren Bolesław III. Schiefmund und die ruthenische Prinzessin Sbysława Swjatopolkowna, Tochter des Großfürsten Swjatopolk von Kiew. Nach deren Tod vermählte sich Bolesław mit Salome, Tochter des Grafen Heinrich von Berg-Schelklingen. Aus dieser Ehe entstammten vier Töchter sowie die Söhne:

   * Bolesław IV. „Kraushaar“
   * Mieszko III. „der Alte“
   * Heinrich von Sandomir (starb im Kindesalter)
   * Kasimir II. „der Gerechte“

Um 1126 vermählte sich Władysław mit Agnes (~1110–1157), einer Tochter von Markgraf Leopold von Österreich. Der Ehe entstammten die Tochter

   * Richeza, seit 1152 in erster Ehe verheiratet mit König Alfons von Spanien

sowie die Söhne:

   * Bolesław I. von Schlesien „der Lange“, ab 1163 Herzog von Schlesien
   * Mieszko I. von Oppeln „Kreuzbein“, ab 1163 Herzog von Schlesien, ab 1173 Herzog von Ratibor-Teschen, ab 1202 Herzog von Oppeln, 1210–1211 Seniorherzog von Polen
   * Konrad, ab 1178 Herzog von Schlesien in Glogau

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Nach dem Tod von Władysławs Vater Bolesław, 1138, wurde Polen an dessen vier Söhne verteilt. Um die Einheit zu wahren, bestimmte Bolesław im Testament außerdem, dass dem jeweils Ältesten seiner Nachkommen das Krakauer Gebiet mit dem Seniorat zufallen soll. Władysław erhielt Schlesien und, da er der Älteste war, auch das Krakauer Seniorat, damit das Supremat über das übrige Polen sowie die Oberherrschaft über die anderen Herzöge, seine jüngeren Brüder, zu. Obwohl sich Władysław bemühte, die Einheit Polens zu wahren, kämpften bald die anderen Herzöge sowie Teile des Adels gegen ihn. Auf dem Hoftag zu Kaina in Sachsen hatte Władysław im April 1146 ganz Polen vom Reich als Lehen angenommen. Daraufhin wurde er vom Gnesener Erzbischof exkommuniziert und bald danach, zusammen mit seiner Familie, von seinen Halbbrüdern vertrieben. Władysław fand Aufnahme beim römisch-deutschen König Konrad III., einem Halbbruder von Władysławs Ehefrau. Dieser wies ihm die Burg Altenburg als Wohnsitz zu. Sein Nachfolger als Herzog von Schlesien und das Krakauer Seniorat wurde sein nächstälterer Bruder Bolesław IV. Kraushaar.

Nachdem sich die Kurie ohne Erfolg für Władysław eingesetzt hatte, gelang es durch die Vermittlung des brandenburgischen Herzogs Albrecht I. „der Bär“ und Konrad von Wettin, die Kämpfe beizulegen. Bolesław verpflichtete sich, auf dem Merseburger Hoftag 1152 zu erscheinen und das Lehensverhältnis anzuerkennen, hielt das Versprechen jedoch nicht ein. Nachdem er auch nicht bereit war, sich am bevorstehenden Feldzugs Kaiser Friedrichs I. Barbarossa zu beteiligen, unternahm dieser 1157 einen Feldzug gegen Polen. Er drang bis vor Posen, in dessen Nähe sich Bolesław im Lager Krzyszkowo aufhielt. Dort verpflichtete er sich gegenüber dem Kaiser zu einer Beteiligung am Italienzug und leistete den Lehnseid. Gleichzeitig versprach er, zum nächsten Hoftag zu kommen und seinen Bruder Kasimir als Geisel zu stellen.

Nachdem Władysław 1159 in Altenburger Exil verstarb, hielt sich Bolesław nicht an das gegebene Versprechen. Nach einer abermaligen Aufforderung am Hoftag zu erscheinen, gab er 1163 Władysławs Söhnen dessen Land zurück, so dass diese nach Schlesien zurückkehren konnten. Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Historische Kommission für Schlesien (Hg.): Geschichte Schlesiens, Bd. 1, Sigmaringen 1988, ISBN 3-7995-6341-5, S. 83–86

Vorgänger

Bolesław III. Schiefmund Herzog von Polen 1138–1146 Nachfolger

Bolesław IV. der Kraushaarige Normdaten: PND: 118834029 – weitere Informationen -------------------- Władysław II the Exile, (Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec; Kraków, Kingdom of Poland, 1105 – May 30, 1159, Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire) was High Duke of Poland, 1138-1146. He was the son of Bolesław III Wrymouth, Duke of Poland, and Zbyslava, daughter of Sviatopolk II of Kiev.

In 1125 Władysław married Agnes of Babenberg, granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV. They had three sons: Bolesław I the Tall, Duke of Silesia; Mieszko I Tanglefoot, Duke of Opole; Konrad I of Głogów and a daughter, Richeza of Poland, who married Alfonso VII, King of Castile and León. -------------------- Władysław II "the Exile" (in Polish: Władysław II Wygnaniec), anglicized as Ladislaus, was a High Duke of Poland and Duke of Silesia from 1138 until 1146.

Władysław's father gave him the district of Silesia before his own death, in order to create an hereditary fief to his eldest descendants. Around 1125 Władysław married with Agnes, daughter of Leopold III, Margrave of Austria; this union make him closely connected with the Holy Roman Empire and the Kingdom of Germany: Agnes was a granddaughter of Emperor Henry IV and half-sister of King Conrad III. Thanks to Władysław, Silesia was saved during the wars of 1133-1135 with Bohemia: he could stop the destruction of the major areas of his district after the Bohemian forces crossed the Oder River.

When his father died, Władysław assumed the title of High Duke (Princeps). In addition to Silesia, he received the Seniorate Province (who included Lesser Poland, eastern Greater Poland and western Kuyavia) and the authority over Pomerania. His half-brothers Boleslaw IV and Mieszko III, received the Masovian Province (composed of Masovia with eastern Kuyavia) and the Greater Poland Province (composed of western Greater Poland) respectively, as hereditary fiefs. In addition, Władysław also received Łęczyca (who was granted by Boleslaw III to his widow Salome of Berg in perpetuity as a widow land and reverted to the Seniorate upon her death) and in the future (when he reached the legal age) he was in the obligation to provide another of his half-brothers, Henry, with the district of Sandomierz (but only for life), who was separate from the Seniorate. Władysław would be having many conflicts with these junior Dukes, his half-brothers.

Władysław attempted to take control of all of Poland in 1145 and muted (removed the tongue) and blinded his rival, the voivode (provincial governor) Piotr Włostowic. But Włostowic was respected and had many friends, and his fate caused many people to switch their allegiance to the junior Dukes (those half-brothers). Further, the blinded and muted Włostowic went to Russia, which had so far supported Władysław, and convinced them to break their alliance. Soon Władysław was forced into exile, eventually to the Holy Roman Empire (Germany), the court of his brother-in-law Emperor Conrad III.

Władysław kept trying to get allies to regain his throne in Poland, but to no avail.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wladislaus_II_the_Exile_of_Poland for more information.

-------------------- Książę krakowski i śląski 1138-46.

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Władysław II Wygnaniec of Poland, książę's Timeline

1105
1105
Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
1127
1127
Age 22
1127
Age 22
Wroclaw,Wroclaw,,Poland
1132
1132
Age 27
Of, Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland
1135
1135
Age 30
Breslau, Nieder Schlesien, Polen
1138
1138
- 1146
Age 33
1146
1146
Age 41
Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland
1159
May 30, 1159
Age 54
Altenburg, Holy Roman Empire
1159
Age 54
Chapelle de l'église St Barthélemy ou du château,Altenburg
1877
April 24, 1877
Age 54