Walter C John (1920 - c.1998)

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Nicknames: "Hok si da Shug Ya Mani"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Santee, Nebraska
Death: Died in Nebraska, United States
Occupation: died in 1998
Managed by: Elizabeth-Gaye Jeans
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Walter C John

The US Army in WW2, like the Marines, had an Indian code talker program. It used Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota native american soldiers in MacArthur's South West Pacific Theater and in Europe.

http://www.crstvets.org/code-talkers

Walter C. John was born February 4, 1920, in Santee, Nebraska. He was an enrolled member of the Santee Sioux Nation of Nebraska.

His parents were Mr. & Mrs. Charles and Esther (Wolf) John.

His Dakota name: “Hok si da Shug Ya Mani” (Walking Strong Boy) and also known as “Cody”.

He was the oldest of six children, three brothers: Homer, Phillip, and Gerald. He had two sisters: Julia (John) Goodteacher, and Clara (John) Denney.

He had attended Marty Mission Indian School, Marty, South Dakota.

Our father had entered the U.S. Army, on October 15, 1941, and was honorably discharged December 7, 1945. He spent 1 year, 7 months and 26 days stateside and had done 2 years, 5 months, and 27 days in Foreign Services.

His battles and campaigns were on the islands: Bismarck Archipelago, New Guinea and the Southern Philippines.

Decorations and citations: American Defense Service Medal, American Service Medal, Philippine Liberation Medal, with 2 Bronze Service Stars, Cir 136 WD 45, WWII Victory Medal, Good Conduct Medal, and Asiatic Pacific Service Medal.

While being stateside he, was in training to be a radio operator, with other Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota native soldiers. (L.D.N.’s) they spoke their native “dialects” (languages) which were understood by each native soldier in the unit. The language became the U.S.Army secret advantage towards ending the war. Their language was used as the code: a system of symbols (as in communication with special meanings) Webster Dictionary. Their training started in Fort Hood, and Fort Bliss. In “History Books of the U.S. Army” it states that their language was a code to confuse the Japanese Army.

The Army outfit of Code Talkers was so secret that it was kept classified, until the 1970s, when it was declassified.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=36101292&ref=wvr -------------------- http://www.crstvets.org/code-talkers

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PFC Walter C. John, Sioux Code Talker's Timeline