Sir Walter Long, Kt., MP

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Walter Long, Kt., MP

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in Gloucestershire, England
Place of Burial: St. James Church, Draycot Cerne, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Long, MP; Barbara Carne and Barbara Longe
Husband of Catherin Longe; Mary Long and Katharine Thynne, Maid of Honour to Queen Elizabeth
Father of Annetjike Wall; Barbara Long; John Long, of Wraxall; Dau Long; Thomas Long and 14 others
Brother of Jewell Long; Henry Long; Mr. LONGE and Ann Snell

Managed by: Carole (Erickson) Pomeroy, Vol. ...
Last Updated:

About Walter Long, Kt., MP

Family and Education

  • b. 21 Apr. 1560, 1st son of Robert Long† of Wraxhall and Draycot Cerne by Barbara, daughter of Sir Edward Carne† of Ewenny, Glamorgan
  • m. (1) Mary, daughter of Sir Thomas Pakington of Hampton Lovell, Buckinghamshire, 2 sons, 1 daughter;
  • m. (2) bef. 9 June 1594, Katherine, 4th daughter of Sir John Thynne of Longleat, maid of honour to Queen Elizabeth, 4 sons, 6 daughters
  • succeeded father 1581.
  • Knighted. 1589.[1]

Offices Held

  • Justice of the peace for Wiltshire from 1591, q. from c.1592,
  • Deputy Lieutenant 1601, 1608,[2]
  • sheriff 1602-3.

Biography

Long came into his inheritance less than two months after reaching his majority. His family united the manors of Wraxhall and Draycot Cerne during the fifteenth century, and in the sixteenth was one of the wealthiest in the county: towards the subsidy of 1576 Sir Robert paid £8 on an assessment of £60 in Draycot Cerne, which was the same as Sir John Thynne was paying at Longleat. On his father’s death, Walter succeeded to Draycot Cerne, and other Wiltshire manors. As Wraxhall, Charlton, North Bradley and Atworth formed part of his mother’s jointure he had to wait for these until her death in 1607. The estate had, moreover, to provide annuities for the three younger sons and a marriage portion for Anne, the wife of Thomas Snell, of Kington St. Michael. Although Sir Robert made Walter his sole executor, he had enfeoffed his personally at Draycot (farm stock and implements, a coach and two coach horses, 15 feather beds ‘of the best’ and bedsteads, furniture, plate and grain) to a formidable list of overseers who were to take their orders for its disposal from his widow. Apart from his wife’s brother Thomas Carne and Sir Richard Berkeley, these overseers were men of substance in Wiltshire: (Sir) John Danvers, (Sir) Edward Baynton, Richard Kingsmill, Edward Hungerford of Rowden, Michael Erneley and John Snell. Their names were a tribute to the father’s standing in the county and a promise of future regard for the son.[3]

In September 1586 Long was put in charge of the light horsemen and demi-lances of the county. Following his father’s and grandfather’s example, he saw active service during the next few years, and was knighted in Ireland. Back again in Wiltshire, he was one of those used in 1591 and 1592 by the Privy Council to inquire about trouble and trouble-makers in the shire and in the following year he represented it in Parliament. His admission to Gray’s Inn in 1594 was presumably a recognition of his position rather than a preparation for it. Nevertheless, there is little to suggest that Long was zealous in public service; in a complaint of the slackness of Wiltshire j.p.s in January 1599, the justices in his division were singled out as having given ‘no attendance at all ... in the performance of the last service of that county for Ireland’. In the nineties he became embroiled in a bitter feud with the Danvers family, whose head had been his father’s feoffee and overseer. Whether the feud had had its origin, as Lady Danvers averred, in robberies committed by Long and his brother Henry, for which old Sir John had sent them to prison, or was not of the Longs’ making (for Sir John was quite capable of giving the first cause of offence himself, its outcome was sensational. On 4 Oct. 1594 Sir Charles and Sir Henry Danvers, with 17 or 18 followers, burst in on a group of j.p.s gathered at John Chamberlayne’s house at Corsham and shot Henry Long dead where he sat at dinner with his brother Sir Walter, his brother-in-law Thomas Snell, Anthony Mildmay and Henry Smyth. The Danvers brothers fled the country, and were not to be promised a pardon until four years later, and that conditionally on paying Sir Walter £1,500.[4]

Before that time, however, Long had found his own form of satisfaction. Sir John Danvers’s tenants, who had exchanged their own commons, ‘unprofitable and overgrown with brambles’, for new ones, saw the chance, on his death in December 1594, of enjoying both old and new ground. Seeking Sir Walter’s advice, they were referred to one Stumpe of Malmesbury and the Inner Temple, who outlined a course of action. Working in 14 shifts of but two each, since three and over constituted a riot, they plucked down the pales and hedges enclosing their old common, now improved land worth 13s. an acre, while Long rode cross-country to egg them on with: ‘Well done Masters. This is the way. If you do not prevail, I will give you as much land out of my park. Hold together, for there was never multitude held together, and failed of their purpose’. The j.p.s, directed by the Privy Council to inquire into these proceedings, described them as a ‘great and dangerous rout’, the relay system notwithstanding, and in June 1596 Long was charged before the Star Chamber with being its originator and sentenced to imprisonment and a fine of £100. Later that year his steward was severely dealt with by the same court for having abused his office of coroner in Long’s interest.[5]

Long served his term as sheriff, as his father, grandfather, great-grandfather and great-great-grandfather had done before him, and was a deputy lieutenant, because he was the reigning Long of Long’s division. He owed his election as knight of the shire to his position in the county and to the entrenchment of his family there; but he appears to have cut no figure during his one experience although as knight for Wiltshire he may have attended the subsidy committee (26 Feb.), a legal committee (9 Mar.) and a cloth committee (15 Mar.). Out of his life of 50 years the last were racked by gout which drove him to the spa at Bath.

He died 28 Sept. 1610. The legend that, dominated by his second wife, he was persuaded by her and her lawyer brother (Egremont Thynne) to disinherit John, his heir, in the interest of Walter, the eldest son of his second family, receives support from conveyances cited in his inquisition post mortem and from the terms of the elaborate will which he made on 20 and 25 Dec. 1609. A later compromise gave Draycot Cerne to John and Wraxhall to Walter, dividing the manors that had been united for seven generations. Lady Long married Sir Edward Fox of Gwernoga, Montgomery, soon after her year of mourning was out. She had acquired her son Walter’s wardship and took care that Fox should agree before the marriage to her retaining it; but, in her will, written three years later, she expressed a particular desire that he should have the wardship after she was gone. Two things she failed to do: pay Sir Walter’s debts and administer his will.[6]

Ref Volumes: 1558-1603

Author: S. T. Bindoff

Notes

  • 1. C142/197/95, 334/65; Wards 7/20/303, 47/133; Wilts. Vis. Peds. (Harl. Soc. cv, cvi), 117-18; Vis. Worcs. (Harl.Soc. xxvii); LC 2/4/4.
  • 2. VCH Wilts. v. 82, 85.
  • 3. Wilts. Vis. Peds. loc. cit.; Two Taxation Lists (Wilts. Arch. Soc. recs. br. x), 53; PCC 36 Darcy.
  • 4. CSP Dom. 1581-90, p. 357; 1595-7, p. 34; 1598-1601, p. 78; HMC Bath, iv. 2; APC, xxii. 289, 355-6, 490-2, 501-2, 542; xxiii. 15, 244, 331-2; xxix. 502; Wilts. Arch. Mag. xliii. 519-20.
  • 5. Wilts. Arch. Mag. 447-8.
  • 6. Wilts. N. and Q. viii. 237; C142/334/65; PCC 85 Wingfield and marginal note; D’Ewes, 474, 496, 501; PCC 126 Lawe and marginal note.

------

  • 'Sir Walter Long1
  • 'M, #193217, b. circa 1565, d. 1610
  • Last Edited=11 Sep 2011
  • ' Sir Walter Long was born circa 1565 at Wiltshire, England.2 He married, firstly, Mary Pakington, daughter of Sir Thomas Pakington and Dorothy Kitson.2 He married, secondly, Catherine Thynne, daughter of Sir John Thynne.2 He died in 1610.2 He was buried on 30 October 1610 at Draycot, Wiltshire, England.2 His will was probated on 30 October 1610.2
  • ' He was also known as Sir Walter Long.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.).3 He was the son of Sir Robert Longe and Barbara Carne.2 He held the office of High Sheriff of Wiltshire.2 He lived at South Wraxall Manor, Wiltshire, England.2
  • 'Children of Sir Walter Long and Catherine Thynne
    • 1.Henry Long2 d. 1672
    • 2.Barbara Long2
    • 3.Mary Long2
    • 4.Charles Long2
    • 5.Anne Long+2
    • 6.Henry Long2 b. c 1586, d. c 1586
    • 7.Thomas Long2 b. c 1587, d. 1673
    • 8.Frances Long2 b. c 1589
    • 9.Sir Walter Long+2 b. b 1594, d. c 1637
    • 10.Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Long, 1st Bt.4 b. 1598, d. 13 Jul 1673
    • 11.Jane Long+2 b. c 1600
    • 12.Dorothy Long2 b. c 1602
    • 13.Olivia Long2 b. c 1604
    • 14.Elizabeth Long2 b. c 1606
  • 'Child of Sir Walter Long and Mary Pakington
    • 1.John Long+2 b. c 1585, d. 14 Aug 1636
  • Citations
  • 1.[S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume III, page 258. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
  • 2.[S1381] Cheryl Nicol, "re: Long Family," e-mail message to Darryl Lundy, 5 July 2005 to 14 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Long Family."
  • 3.[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1757. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
  • 4.[S15] George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Baronetage, volume III, page 257.
  • http://thepeerage.com/p19322.htm#i193217
  • _____________
  • 'The Virginia magazine of history and biography, Volume 26 By William Glover Stanard, Virginia Historical Society
  • The Virginia magazine of history and biography, Volume 26 By William Glover Stanard, Virginia Historical Society
  • Pg. 202
  • John and Margaret (Snell) Berkeley, had issue:
    • 1. Sir Maurice3, married Barbara, daughter of Sir 'Walter Longe'; 2. John, unmarried 1630; 3. Henry, unmarried 1630; 4. William, unmarried 1630; 5. Edward, unmarried 1630; 6. Thomas, unmarried 1630 (all then in England); 7. Mary married ___ Conway of Gloucester; 8. Frances, born 1596, unmarried 1623; 9. Elizabeth married Sir John Sutton, Lord Dudley, Bedfordshire.
  • _________________________
  • 'Sir Walter Long
  • '(Sheriff of Wiltshire)
  • 'Born: ABT 1555
  • 'Died: Oct 1610
  • 'Buried: 30 Oct 1610, Draycot
  • Father: Robert LONG of Wraxall and Draycot (Sir) (See his Biography)
  • Mother: Barbara CARNE
  • 'Married 1: Mary PAKINGTON (dau. of Thomas Pakington and Dorothy Kytson)
  • Children:
    • 1. John LONG (b. ABT 1575 - d. 14 Aug 1636) (m. Anne Eyre)
    • 2. Thomas LONG (b. ABT 1577 - d. BEF 1609)
    • 3. Barbara LONG (b. ABT 1580 - d. AFT 20 Dec 1609) (m. Maurice Berkeley)
  • 'Married 2: Catherine THYNNE (dau. of Sir John Thynne and Christian Gresham) (m.2 Hugh Fox)
  • Children:
    • 4. Walter LONG (b. ABT 1585 - d. Jul 1637) (m.1 Anne Ley - m.2 Elizabeth Master)
    • 5. Frances LONG (b. ABT 1589)
    • 6. Son LONG (b. ABT 1592)
    • 7. Son LONG (b. ABT 1594)
    • 8. Henry LONG (b. ABT 1596)
    • 9. Robert LONG (1º Bt.) (b. ABT 1598 - d. 13 Jul 1673)
    • 10. Anne LONG (b. ABT 1600)
    • 11. Dorothy LONG (b. ABT 1602)
    • 12. Olive LONG (b. ABT 1604)
    • 13. Elizabeth LONG (b. ABT 1606)
    • 14. Thomas LONG (b. ABT 1608)
    • 15. Jane LONG (b. ABT 1609)
  • ' English knight and landowner, born in Wiltshire, the son of Sir Robert Long and his wife Barbara Carne.
  • ' Long and his brother Henry were involved in a dispute with their neighbours, the Danvers, and Long supported the claims of Danvers tenants to rights of common, which in 1596 resulted in the Star Chamber deciding that Long was to blame for hedge-breaking on the Danvers enclosures, and he was fined £200 for 'a great riot' over the hedge-destroying incident. Twenty eight people had been involved, according to the judge, and many Wiltshire Yeomen were fined. The dispute between the Longs and the Danvers' became a violent and deadly feud, eventually resulting in the murder of Henry Long.
  • ' The mutual animosity came to a head in 1594, when their father Sir John Danvers, from the magistrate's bench, committed one of Sir Walter Long's servants for robbery. Sir Walter rescued the servant from the justice, and, after complaining to the judge at the next assizes, Sir John had Sir Walter locked up in the Fleet Prison. He then committed another of Sir Walter's servants on a charge of murder. On leaving prison, Sir Walter and his brother provoked various brawls between their own followers and Sir John's, resulting in one servant being killed and another grievously wounded.
  • ' Sir John Danvers was one of the executors of Sir Robert Long's will, indicating that perhaps the feud was started between the sons, and had not been carried over from a previous generation. Perhaps it began as a result of the attempts of Sir Walter Long - recently returned from military service in Ireland, strengthened by his marriage to Catherine Thynne of Longleat, and with one of his houses, Draycot, only a few miles from the Danvers seat at Dauncey - to challenge the Danvers' predominance. Sir Charles Danvers developed a close friendship with Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, and served under him in Ireland, later taking a prominent part in the revolt there. On the other hand, Sir Walter Long, through his Thynne connection, developed a friendship with Sir Walter Raleigh, who was deeply hostile to Essex. There was an established conservative group of gentry with whom the Danvers' associated, and who were opposed to the rival Knyvet-Long faction, which was backed by the Thynnes at Longleat.
  • ' It was the Danvers family itself, and not their followers, that were the target of the Longs, and Henry Long wrote insulting letters to Sir Charles Danvers calling him a liar, a fool, a puppy dog, a mere boy, and promised that he would whip his bare backside with a rod. Sir Charles was very angry. His mother later wrote to Lord Burghley describing the letters as 'of such a form as the heart of a man indeed had rather die than endure'. Accompanied by his brother and some of his men, he went to an inn at Corsham where Sir Walter and Henry Long were dining with a group of magistrates. Sir Henry Danvers drew his pistol, ('a certain engine called a dagge') and shortly after Henry Long was dead. The Danvers brothers got away and took refuge with their friend Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton at his seat, Whitley Lodge near Titchfield, who happened to be in the midst of his twenty-first birthday celebrations.
  • ' Southampton was patron of William Shakespeare and some literary critics have conjectured that the feud may have inspired Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, and that Romeo's exile may allude to Southampton's protection of Sir Charles and Sir Henry Danvers, whom he aided in their escape to France.
  • ' According to historian John Aubrey, immediately after the murder of her son Henry, Lady Barbara Long, by then a widow and possibly a lady at court, informed the Queen of the 'verie strange owtrage committed by Sir Charles Danvers and Sir Henrie Danvers, Knights', although no indictment was ever preferred against them by either the Long family or the state. Aubrey also wrote that the events relating to the Danvers' escape and concealment hastened the death of the Danvers' father, and their mother soon remarried, to Sir Edmund Carey, a cousin of the Queen, in order to influence the granting of a pardon for her sons, which later eventuated, and the Danvers' returned to England in Aug 1598.
  • 'Long was a friend of Sir Walter Raleigh, (Raleigh's brother Carew had married Long's mother-in-law, widow of the first Sir John Thynne of Longleat), and according to historian John Aubrey, Long was the first in the country to introduce the fashion of smoking tobacco, his friend Raleigh being the first to bring it to England. Long's home of South Wraxall Manor is one of the houses in England where legend says tobacco was first smoked by the two Sir Walters, although the same legend has been told of other locations. Aubrey also alludes to Sir Walter Long's ostentatious lifestyle, saying he kept a trumpeter, and on at least one occasion, he rode to Marlborough with thirty servants and retainers.
  • 'In 1602 Long was appointed Deputy Lieutenant of Wiltshire under Edward Seymour, 2nd Earl of Hertford.
  • ' Sir Walter Long married firstly, Mary Pakington of Westwood, Worcestershire, who was on friendly terms with Elizabeth I, and gifts to the Queen from Lady Long, which included an item of 18 ounces of gilt plate, were recorded in the Jewel House records in 1588. Mary was the sister of Sir John Pakington.
  • ' Long married secondly, Catherine, daughter of Sir John Thynne of Longleat. Long was the last of the family to own both manors of South Wraxall and Draycot together, and through the contrivances of his second wife Catherine, Sir Walter disinherited his son John from his first marriage, in favour of Walter, the eldest son from the second, but a compromise later led John to receive the estate at South Wraxall, and his half-brother received Draycot.
  • ' Another legend related by Aubrey, concerns a promise made by Catherine to her husband on his death-bed, that she would not remarry, but she soon afterwards married Sir Edward (or Hugh) Fox, which as the story goes, caused the portrait of Sir Walter to fall from the wall the moment the bride and her new husband entered the room.
  • 'Sir Walter died in October 1610 and was buried at Draycot on 30 Oct 1610.
  • For more information see: Long family of Wiltshire
  • http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/WalterLong.htm
  • _________
  • 'Sir Walter Long (1560–October 1610) was an English knight and landowner, born in Wiltshire, the son of Sir Robert Long and his wife Barbara Carne.
  • Public Service
  • ' He was elected knight of the shire (MP) for Wiltshire in 1593.
  • ' In 1601 Long was appointed High Sheriff of Wiltshire and in 1602 Deputy Lieutenant of Wiltshire under Edward Seymour, 1st Earl of Hertford.
  • The two Sir Walters
  • 'Long was a friend of Sir Walter Raleigh, (Raleigh's brother Carew had married Long's mother-in-law, widow of the first Sir John Thynne of Longleat), and according to historian John Aubrey, Long was the first in the country to introduce the fashion of smoking tobacco, his friend Raleigh being the first to bring it to England. Long's home of South Wraxall Manor is one of the houses in England where legend says tobacco was first smoked by the two Sir Walters, although the same legend has been told of other locations. Aubrey also alludes to Sir Walter Long's ostentatious lifestyle, saying he kept a trumpeter, and on at least one occasion, he rode to Marlborough with thirty servants and retainers.
  • Feuding neighbours
  • 'Long and his brother Henry were involved in a dispute with their neighbours, the Danvers, and Long supported the claims of Danvers' tenants to rights of common, which in 1596 resulted in the Star Chamber deciding that Long was to blame for hedge-breaking on the Danvers' enclosures, and he was fined £200 for 'a great riot' over the hedge-destroying incident. Twenty eight people had been involved, according to the judge, and many Wiltshire Yeomen were fined. The dispute between the Longs and the Danvers' became a violent and deadly feud, eventually resulting in the murder of Henry Long.[1]
  • Family
  • 'Sir Walter Long married firstly, Mary Pakington of Westwood, Worcestershire, who was on friendly terms with Elizabeth I, and gifts to the Queen from Lady Long, which included an item of 18 ounces of gilt plate, were recorded in the Jewel House records in 1588. There were two children from this marriage.
  • ' Long married secondly, Catherine, daughter of Sir John Thynne of Longleat. Long was the last of the family to own both manors of South Wraxall and Draycot together, and through the contrivances of his second wife Catherine, Sir Walter disinherited his son John from his first marriage, in favour of Walter, the eldest son from the second, but a compromise later led John to receive the estate at South Wraxall, and his half-brother received Draycot.[2]
    • There were at least thirteen children from his second marriage, including:

Sir Robert Long, 1st Baronet

  • *Sir Walter Long (c.1594-1637) (father of Sir James Long, 2nd Baronet)
  • ' Another legend related by Aubrey, concerns a promise made by Catherine to her husband on his death-bed, that she would not remarry, but she soon afterwards married Sir Edward Fox, which as the story goes, caused the portrait of Sir Walter to fall from the wall the moment the bride and her new husband entered the room.
  • ' Sir Walter died in October 1610 and was buried at Draycot on 30 October 1610.
  • See also
  • Sir Robert Long (c.1517-c.1581) for more on the murder of Henry Long
  • Walter Long (of South Wraxall) for more on the descent of the manor of South Wraxall
  • See also: Category:Long family of Wiltshire
  • Further Reading
  • Inquisition Post Mortem: An Adventurous Jaunt Through a 500 Year History of the Courtiers, Clothiers and Parliamentarians of the Long Family of Wiltshire; Cheryl Nicol 2011
  • Hand of Fate. The History of the Longs, Wellesleys and the Draycot Estate in Wiltshire. Tim Couzens 2001 ISBN 1 903341 72 6
  • References
  • 1.^ Power and Protest in England, 1525-1640 - Alison Wall 2000 ISBN 0-340-61022-0
  • 2.^ Anecdotes of the aristocracy, Vol. 1; Sir Bernard Burke
  • Sources
  • History of Parliament LONG, Sir Walter (1560-1610) of Wraxhall. Wilts
  • Longleat House: Seymour Papers, ref. SE/BOX XV/22
  • Brief Lives - John Aubrey, Andrew Clark 1898

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Long_(1565%E2%80%931610)

  • __________
  • 'The Berkeley manuscripts. The lives of the Berkeleys, lords of the honour, castle and manor of Berkeley, in the county of Gloucester, from 1066 to 1618; (1883)
  • http://www.archive.org/details/berkeleymanuscri00smytuoft
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/berkeleymanuscri00smytuoft#page/235/mode/1up
  • 4. Jone Berkeley youngeft daughter of this lord Thomas, was on Midfommer day in the nineteenth year of king Henry the 8th maryed at Yate, her fathers houfe, to Nicholas Poynz, (after knight,) . . . .
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/berkeleymanuscri00smytuoft#page/239/mode/1up
  • 9. The faid Frances daughter of the faid Jone Berkeley, was maryed to S'r John Berkeley of Beverfton caflle, knight, by whom fhee had iffue John Berkeley, Jone, Katharine and Margaret. Which John, by Mary his wife daughter of John Snell Efqr, had iffue, 1 Maurice, 2 John, 3 Henry, 4 William, 5 Edward, 6 Thomas, 7 Mary, 8 ffrances, 9 Elizabeth, and 10 Anne. Whereof the faid Maurice, by Barbara his wife daughter of 'S'r Walter Longe', hath iffue Edw'd; and others ; And the faid Mary his fifter is marryed to Edward Conway of Gloucefter fhire. The other eight are unmarryed . 1623. As alfo is Jone the eldeft fifler of the faid John Berkeley, leading a Nunnes life at Bruffells, beyond feas ; And now lady Abbeffe there . 1630.
  • ______________
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Sir Walter Long, Kt., MP's Timeline

1546
1546
Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom
1560
April 21, 1560
Wiltshire, England
1575
1575
Age 14
Of, Wraxall, Wiltshire, England
1577
1577
Age 16
Of, Wraxall, Wiltshire, England
1582
1582
Age 21
Draycot Cerne, Wiltshire, England
1586
1586
Age 25
Draycot Cerne, Wiltshire, England
1587
1587
Age 26
Of Wraxall,Wilts,ENG
1587
Age 26
Draycot Cerne, Wiltshire, England
1589
1589
Age 28
Draycot Cerne, Wiltshire, England
1593
1593
Age 32
Draycot Cerne, Wiltshire, England