Walter Stewart (c.1293 - 1326) MP

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Nicknames: "6th High Steward of Scotland/Walter Fitzalan", "Walter Stewart Steward Of Scotland", "6th High Steward of Scotland", "High Steward", "6th High Stewart of Scotland", "16181"
Birthplace: Dundonald Castle, Kyle, Ayrshire, Scotland
Death: Died in Bathgate Castle, Bathgate, West-Lothian, Scotland
Occupation: 6th High Steward of Scotland
Managed by: Dominique Robson
Last Updated:

About Walter Stewart

6th High Steward of Scotland

Links:

--------------------

SOURCES: 1) GENEALOGY: Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons; Pages 225; 226; G929.72; C6943ra; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

2) GENEALOGY: The Royal House of Stuart; Page ix; G929.7; A224ro; (oversized) Denver Public Library

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward

Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle)[2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[7]

-------------------- Walter, Lord High Steward of Scotland -------------------- He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland

-------------------- From the web site: http://wapedia.mobi/en/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland

Wiki: Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland Walter Steward (1293 [1] - 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle) [2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 [3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army. [2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas. [4] This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn. [5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court. [2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen. [2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian). [6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II. [3]

-------------------- Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle)[2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland. Contents [hide]

   * 1 Biography
   * 2 Ancestry
   * 3 References
   * 4 Further reading

[edit] Biography

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[3] Preceded by James Stewart High Steward of Scotland 1309–1326 Succeeded by Robert II of Scotland

[edit] Ancestry Ancestors of Walter Stewart[show]


















16. Alan fitz Walter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland






8. Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland









17. Alesta






4. Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland












18. Gille Críst, Earl of Angus






9. Bethóc









19. Marjorie of Huntingdon






2. James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland















1. Walter Stewart


















24. Patrick II, Earl of Dunbar






12. Patrick III, Earl of Dunbar









25. Euphemia






6. Patrick IV, Earl of March












3. Cecilia















28. William Comyn, jure uxoris Earl of Buchan






14. Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan









29. Marjory, Countess of Buchan






7. Marjorie












30. Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester






15. Elizabeth









31. Helen of Galloway






[edit] References

  1. ^ Anderson, William, The Scottish Nation, Edinburgh, 1867, vol.ix, p.513, states he was 21 years of age at Bannockburn.
  2. ^ a b c d Anderson (1867) vol.ix, p.513
  3. ^ a b Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713.
  4. ^ John Prebble The Lion in the North
  5. ^ Peter Traquair Freedom's Sword
  6. ^ Angus, William, editor, Miscellaneous Charters 1315-1401, in Miscellany of The Scottish History Society, vol.5, 1933, p.9.

-------------------- Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland

Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle)[2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.

Biography

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[3]

[1] Anderson, William, The Scottish Nation, Edinburgh, 1867, vol.ix, p.513, states he was 21 years of age at Bannockburn. [2] Anderson (1867) vol.ix, p.513 [3] Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713. [4] John Prebble The Lion in the North [5] Peter Traquair Freedom's Sword [6] Angus, William, editor, Miscellaneous Charters 1315-1401, in Miscellany of The Scottish History Society, vol.5, 1933, p -------------------- Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland, 1293 – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army. According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas. This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.

-------------------- He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army. According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas. This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.

-------------------- The title High Steward of Scotland was first bestowed on Walter the Steward in 1191 by David I. Malcolm IV made the position hereditary, and Walter's son inherited the title and took the surname Stewart. The historical origins of the title lay in the role of the King's food bearer: in practice it meant a very senior adviser and member of the court. The 6th High Steward played an important role at the Battle of Bannockburn and married the King's daughter. Robert was their only child. -------------------- Walter_6th STEWART. Born 1292. Married 1315, Marjory BRUCE,

        died 2 MAR 1316, , , , Scotland, daughter of Robert_I THE_BRUCE
        and Isabel MAR.  Died 9 APR 1326, , , , Scotland.  !GENEALOGY:
        Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons; Pages 225; 226; G929.72;
        C6943ra; Denver Public Library; Genealogy !GENEALOGY: The Royal
        House of Stuart; Page ix; G929.7; A224ro; (oversized) Denver
        Public Library

             Children of Walter_6th STEWART and Marjory BRUCE:

           43       i   Robert_II STEWART, b. 1315, Scotland, d. 1390,
                        Scotland

-------------------- Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[3] -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Walter Steward (1293 – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle) was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army. According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas. This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II. -------------------- Given Name: Walter III Surname: Stewart Suffix: 6th High Steward of Scotland 1 2 3 4 5 Sex: M Birth: 1292 in Dundonald Castle, Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland 1 6 2 3 7 8 Death: 9 Apr 1327 in Bathgate Castle, Bathgate, West-Lothian, Scotland 1 6 5 3 7 8 Burial: 1326 Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland 9 Ancestral File #: 9FGX-6J 6 10 11 12 7 13 14 FCOM: Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland Event: Alt. Death Alt. Death 9 Apr 1326 Bathgate Castle, West Lothian, Scotland 2 Event: Alt Death Sep 1327 Change Date: 3 Jul 2007 at 14:29 Note: Walter Stewart, 6th Great Steward of Scotland; born 1292; Regent of Scotland during Robert I (The Bruce)'s absence in Ireland 1316, defended Berwick against an English army, made a raid with Douglas that nearly kidnapped Edward II from Yorkshire 1322; married 1st 1315 Marjorie, Lady of Scotland (died 1316), daughter of Robert I (The Bruce), and had issue; married 2nd Isabel, daughter of Sir John Graham of Abercorn, and died 9 April 1327. [Burke's Peerage]

------------------------------------ Walter Stewart, b. 1292, d. 9 Apr 1326; m. (1) Marjory Bruce, by whom Robert I, King of Scots; m. (2) Isabel Graham, sister of Sir John Graham of Abercorn. [Magna Charta Sureties] Note: I think MCS means Robert II, King of Scots as their child, of course she was daughter of Robert I. Walter Stewart, b. 1292, d. 9 Apr 1327 (buried at Paisley, Scotland), High Steward of Scotland, son of James Stewart (d. 16 July 1309) and Egidia de Burgh. [Magna Charta Sureties]

-------------------- http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102096

Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland1 M, #102096, b. 1292, d. 9 April 1327

Last Edited=6 Oct 2002 Consanguinity Index=0.2%

    Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland was born in 1292. He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland and Cecilia de Dunbar.1 He married Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland, daughter of Robert I Bruce, King of Scotland and Isabella, Lady of Mar, in 1315. He married Alice Erskine, daughter of Sir John Erskine.1 He married Isabella Graham, daughter of Sir John Graham.1 He died on 9 April 1327.1 He was also reported to have died on 9 April 1326.
    Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland gained the title of 6th High Steward of Scotland.1

Children of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Isabella Graham Sir John Stewart+ 1 Sir Andrew Stewart 1 Egidia Stewart+ d. b 14061 Child of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Alice Erskine Jean Stewart 1 Child of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland+ b. 2 Mar 1316, d. 19 Apr 1390 Citations [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 214. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

-------------------- Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle) was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.

He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on 24 July 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Malton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on 2 March 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II. -------------------- From Wiki Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle)[2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II. -------------------- From thePeerage.com:

    Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland was born in 1292. He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland and Cecilia de Dunbar. He married Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland, daughter of Robert I Bruce, King of Scotland and Isabella, Lady of Mar, in 1315. He married Alice Erskine, daughter of Sir John Erskine. He married Isabella Graham, daughter of Sir John Graham. He died on 9 April 1327. He was also reported to have died on 9 April 1326.
    Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland gained the title of 6th High Steward of Scotland.

Children of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Isabella Graham

   * Sir John Stewart+
   * Sir Andrew Stewart
   * Egidia Stewart+ d. b 1406

Child of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Alice Erskine

   * Jean Stewart

Child of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland

   * Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland+ b. 2 Mar 1316, d. 19 Apr 1390

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle)[2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[4] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[5] This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[6]

Upon the liberation of The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border, and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[7]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attemopt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[8]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[9]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjory met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[10]

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army. Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland --------------------

  1. LDS Baptism: 5 Dec 1899 Temple: Slake
  2. Endowment: 30 Mar 1900 Temple: Slake

Walter the 6th High Steward of Scotland, who married Marjorie/MarjoryBruce, became the progenitors of the Royal House of Stewart from 1315to the death in 1807 of Prince Henry, Cardinal duke of York, brotherof Prince Charles Edward Stewart. Many noble familes have descendedfrom this line, and Stewarts have held or hold the dukedoms of Albany,Rothesay, Lennox; Marquessate of Bute; Earldoms of Menteith, Angus,Atholl, Strathearn, Carrick, Buchan and Galloway. Other Stewartfamilies include Bonkil, Blackhall and Greenock, Castlemilk,Balquhidder, Achnacone, Ardsheal, Ardvorlich, Dalguise, Fasnacloich,Grandtully, and Invernahyle. ABBR SOURCE #370 TITL The Clans and Tartans of Scotland AUTH Robert Bain PUBL Fontana/Collins, Glasgow and London. Editor Margaret O. MacDouglall,1985 Edition. PAGE Royal Stewart page 274. -------------------- Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle)[2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[7]

-------------------- Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland was born in 1292. He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland and Cecilia de Dunbar.

He married Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland, daughter of Robert I Bruce, King of Scotland and Isabella, Lady of Mar, in 1315.

He married Alice Erskine, daughter of Sir John Erskine.

He married Isabella Graham, daughter of Sir John Graham.

He died on 9 April 1327. He was also reported to have died on 9 April 1326.

Children of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Isabella Graham:

   * Sir John Stewart
   * Sir Andrew Stewart
   * Egidia Stewart d. b 1406

Child of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Alice Erskine:

   * Jean Stewart

Child of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland:

   * Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland+ b. 2 Mar 1316, d. 19 Apr 1390

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102096 -------------------- Walter Stewart (1293 – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle) was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland.

He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.

He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army. According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas. This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on 24 July 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Malton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on 2 March 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Walter Stewart (c.1296[1][2] – 9 April 1327 at Bathgate Castle[1]) was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.


He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on 24 July 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Malton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

^ a b G. W. S. Barrow, ‘Stewart family (per. c.1110–c.1350)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. ^ a b c d Anderson, William, The Scottish Nation, Edinburgh, 1867, vol.ix, p.513, states he was 21 years of age at Bannockburn. ^ Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713. ^ John Prebble The Lion in the North ^ Peter Traquair Freedom's Sword ^ Angus, William, editor, Miscellaneous Charters 1315-1401, in Miscellany of The Scottish History Society, vol.5, 1933, p.9.

Marjory, Princess Royal of Scotland, fell into the hands of the English 1306, and was detained a prisoner in charge of Henry Percy till 1314, when she was conducted to Scotland by Walter, the sixth high steward of Scotland, to whom she was married in 1315. She died in March, 1316. Her husband, Walter, born in 1294, brought a noble body of men to the aid of Bruce. In the battle of Bannockburn he and his cousin, Sir James Douglas, commanded the Third division. The same year he was appointed to receive, on the borders, the Queen of King Robert, Marjory, his daughter, and other illustrious Scottish prisoners. On that occasion he formed an attachment for the Princess. He died April 9, 1326. "Had he lived," says an old writer, "he might have equaled Randolph and Douglas; but his course of glory was short." The only child of the Princess Marjory was Robert Stuart, King of Scotland, born March 2, 1316.

Source:The Descent Of General Robert Edward Lee From Robert The Bruce, Of Scotland. By Professor Wm. Winston Fontaine, of Louisville. (From the Southern Historical Society Papers)

-------------------- Walter Stewart (c.1296[1][2] – 9 April 1327 at Bathgate Castle[1]) was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.

He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[2] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[4] This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[5]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[2]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on 24 July 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Malton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[2]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also granted the Farme Castle estate in Rutherglen to him, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

In another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs.

They spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English , he got command of the town which, was laid siege to by King Edward II of England.

Accompanying with Douglas and Randolph, he attempted to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, Yorkshire in 1322. However, Edward escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.

In 1315 Walter married, Marjorie, the only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew in 1316 at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck. It is said that she was pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert.

Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Isabella Graham, The daughter of Sir John Graham. had three Children:

Sir John Stewart, who is also was known as John of Railston. He was invested as a Knight, Sir Andrew Stewart , who also was invested as a Knight, and Egidia Stewart was known as Gille Stewart. From 21 April 1346, her married name became de Lindsay. Her married name became Douglas.

On other hand, Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland had a Child from Alice Erskine, who was born circa 1290. She was the daughter of Sir John Erskine.The child name was Jean Stewart. She married Hugh de Ross, 4th Earl of Ross, son of William de Ross, 3rd Earl of Ross and Euphemia. From his third marriage, Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland by Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland, the daughter of Robert I Bruce, King of Scotland and Isabella, Lady of Mar, She died on 2 March 1316 at Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland, in childbirth. She was buried at Paisley Abbey, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Margorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland was also known as Margaret. She was also known as Princess Marjorie of Scotland. From 1315, her married name became Stewart. They had Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland who was born on 2 March 1316 at Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

He married, firstly, Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan, daughter of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan and Janet Mure, on 22 November 1347, by Papal dispensation, which legitimised their previously born children. He married, secondly, Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Moray, daughter of Hugh de Ross, 4th Earl of Ross and Margaret Graham, on 2 May 1355, by Papal dispensation. He died on 19 April 1390 at age 74 at Dundonald Castle, Ayrshire, Scotland. He was buried at Scone Abbey, Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.

Source http://www.geni.com/people/Walter-Stewart-6th-High-Steward-of-Scotland/6000000003099027666 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Sc... http://theroyalhouseofstewart.com/descendants_of_the_royal_house_of_stewart_015.htm http://thepeerage.com/p10210.htm References:

^ a b G. W. S. Barrow, ‘Stewart family (per. c.1110–c.1350)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. ^ a b c d Anderson, William, The Scottish Nation, Edinburgh, 1867, vol.ix, p.513, states he was 21 years of age at Bannockburn. ^ Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713. ^ John Prebble The Lion in the North ^ Peter Traquair Freedom's Sword ^ Angus, William, editor, Miscellaneous Charters 1315-1401, in Miscellany of The Scottish History Society, vol.5, 1933, p.9.

Further reading:

Burke, Messrs., John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England Scotland and Wales, with Their Descendants &c., London, 1848, volume 1, pedigree LXVIII, and volume 2 (1851) page xlvi. Clay, John W., FSA., editor, The Visitation of Cambridge, 1575 and 1619 by Henery St.George, Richmond Herald, Harleian Society, London, 1897, pps: 7 - 11. Dunbar, Sir Archibald H., Bt., Scottish Kings, a Revised Chronology of Scottish History, 1005 - 1625, Edinburgh, 1899, pps: 126 - 144. Louda, Jiri, & Maclagan, Michael, Lines of Succession, London, 1981. Weis, Frederick Lewis, et all, The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, 5th edition, Baltimore, 2002, p.50. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Walter was the Steward of Scotland. -------------------- Source= http://www.patrickspeople.co.uk/ancestors%20of%20isabella%20gordon/2152.htm -------------------- Sir Walter Stewart, third son of Sir John Stewart and Margaret Bonkyll, received the Barony of Dalswinton, (lands forfeited by the Comyns, enemies of Robert Bruce) for services to King Robert Bruce of Scotland during the wars for independence from England. He was the ancestor of the Earls of Galloway.

The Barony of Garlies, conferred by King Alexander III of Scotland on Sir Walter's grandfather, Alexander, the Fourth High Steward of Scotland, was also granted to Sir Walter by his nephew John Randolph, Earl of Moray, to whom it had come through his mother, Isabel Stewart. Sir Walter's grandfather, Alexander, had been granted the Barony of Garlies by King Alexander III of Scotland 30 November 1263, for Alexander's services to the King in the defeat of the Danes at the Battle of Largs in 1263. The same charter which granted Garlies also granted the lands of Glenmanache, Corsoch, and Kirkcormok, in Dumfrieshire, said charter designing Sir Walter as father of Sir John Stewart of Dalswinton. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland

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Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland's Timeline

1266
1266
Brechin, Angus, , Scotland
1293
1293
Kyle, Ayrshire, Scotland
1305
1305
Age 12
Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, UK
1314
1314
Age 21
1315
March 2, 1315
Age 22
Dundonald,Kyle,Ayrshire,Scotland
1316
March 2, 1316
Age 23
Kyle, Ayrshire, Scotland
1316
Age 23
Dundonald,Kyle,Ayrshire,Scotland
1318
1318
Age 25
Scotland
1322
1322
Age 29
Cunninghame, Ayrshire, , Scotland
1326
April 9, 1326
Age 33
Bathgate Castle, Bathgate, West-Lothian, Scotland