Walter Woodworth, of Scituate

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Walter Woodworth

Birthdate:
Birthplace: perhaps , Kent, England
Death: Died in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of unknown father of Walter Woodworth and unknown mother of Walter Woodworth
Husband of Mrs Woodworth
Father of Benjamin Woodworth; Thomas Woodworth; Sarah Woodworth; Elizabeth Woodworth; Walter Woodworth and 7 others

Occupation: Will was dated Nov. 26, 1685 and submitted to Probate Mar. 5, 1686
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Walter Woodworth

Walter Woodworth (1612 – February 25, 1686) was among the original colonial settlers of America and ancestor of many prominent Americans.

According to the site http://www.woodworth-ancestors.com (retrieved 15 May 2011), which seems to keep up with DNA results:

Walter Woodworth is is the common ancestor of around 96% of all Woodworths in the US.

Walter Woodworth was born about 1610 in Kent, England and died on 2 March 1685/86. His will was written 26 November 1685 and proved 2 March 1865/6. In the late 1800's:

"Mr. Frank E. Woodward, of Malden, Mass., has unearthed the last Will of Walter Woodward, of Scituate, coming upon it quite by accident among the records of deeds in Plymouth County, Mass." see document, 1685 - Will & Inventory of Walter Woodworth.pdf, attached.

Parents: Not known. see notes below.

Married:

  1. abt 1638 possibly to a woman whose name is not known. She was born Abt 1614, Kent, England and died Aft 1676.

10 children include:

  1. Thomas Woodworth, b. Abt 1641, Scituate? Plymouth d. Between 13 Feb 1718 and 17 Mar 1719, Scituate, Plymouth
  2. Sarah Woodworth, b. Abt 1643, d. Aft 1685
  3. Joseph Woodworth, b. Abt 1645, Scituate, Plymouth d. Abt 20 Apr 1719, Scituate, Plymouth
  4. Elizabeth Woodworth, b. Abt 1647
  5. Benjamin Woodworth, b. Abt 1649, Scituate, Plymouth d. 22 Apr 1728, Lebanon, New London Co., CT
  6. Mary Woodworth, b. 10 Mar 1650/51, Scituate, Plymouth d. Aft 1 Jan 1719/20
  7. Martha Woodworth, b. Abt 1657, Plymouth, Plymouth d. Aft May 1721
  8. Isaac Woodworth, b. Abt 1660, prob. Scituate, Plymouth d. 1 Apr 1714, Norwich, New London Co., CT
  9. Mehitable Woodworth, b. 15 Aug 1662, Scituate, Plymouth
  10. Abigail Woodworth, b. Abt 1664-1665

Brief Biography

from: Walter Woodworth: Plymouth Colony section

Walter settled in the Plymouth Colony, coming from Kent, England in 1633. He first appeared in the tax records of the Plymouth Colony in 1633.[1] Woodworth settled in 1635 amongst the "Men of Kent" in Scituate, Massachusetts, which included Nathaniel Tilden, Edward Foster, Humphrey Turner, Isaac Chittenden, and William Hatch, who were influential in the building the settlement.[2]

Walter took up residence at the third lot on Kent Street along the oceanfront at the corner of Meeting House Lane, where he built a home.[3] He would acquire more property throughout his life in Plymouth Colony including a tract on the Herring Brook, a tract on Walnut Tree Hill, which in colonial times was referred to as Walter Woodworth Hill, and 60 acres (240,000 m2) in Weymouth.[4] He would serve as surveyor of highways (1645-1646, 1656) and arbiter (1645, 1662-1663).[1]

He was a member of the First Church and had 10 children, who were Thomas, Sarah, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Joseph, Mary, Martha, Isaac, Mehitable, and Abigail.[3]

Notes

  • Walter Woodward was born in England in about 1612, and died in Scituate, Plymouth Colony, early in 1686; parentage unknown. He is the primary ancestor of most of the Woodworths in America, although it is rumored that a brother also immigrated.
  • Walter's parents, birth location, and where he grew up are unknown. Speculation that his parents were Thomas and Elizabeth (Tyson) Woodward of Childwell Parish, Lancashire, England is clearly proven to wrong, based on three conditions:
  • 1. Thomas and Elizabeth had five children, and none were named Walter. See children of Thomas Woodward and Elizabeth Tyson.
  • 2. Thomas and Elizabeth's son Henry Woodward, who migrated to Northhampton, MA, was educated, and referred to as a "physician". Walter signed his name with an "X" on his will, indicating that he was uneducated. It is highly unlikely Thomas and Elizabeth would highly educate one child and not educate the other at all.
  • 3. The DNA of Dr. Henry Woodward does not match the DNA of Walter Woodworth. If Henry and Walter were the sons of Thomas Woodward, the alleged brothers Henry and Walter would have the same DNA. Descendants of Henry Woodworth have had their DNA tested, and their DNA representing Dr Henry does not match Walter's, and therefore they cannot be brothers. Emphasizing: Per DNA, Thomas and Elizabeth (Tyson) Woodward cannot be Walter's parents.
  • Emigrated from Plymouth, England 3/20/1620, on a ship "Mary and John", one of 10 ships located at Kent. n.b. not proven
  • Settled in Scituate, Massachusett (Plymouth Colony) from Kent County, England.
  • Walter was planter and surveyor of Pilgrimages. First record in 1632.
  • From "History of Scituate", by Samuel Deane: Walter Woodworth was freeman in Scituate in 1640, and settled amongst the men of Kent, 3d lot on Kent street, south side of Meeting-house lane in 1635. He had other lands in 1635, viz. on the first Herring brook 30 rods below Stockbridge's mill: and on the northwest side of Walnut tree hill.
  • He married about 1639/40. No record has been found of his wife's name. She was living in March 1676, but had died by 26 November 1685, when Walter made his Will, naming ten children.
  • Some have speculated that Walter married Elizabeth Rogers, the daughter of Thomas Rogers of the "Mayflower." Elizabeth Daniel, authoress of Thomas Rogers, Pilgrim and Some of His Descendants, 1980, states,

"Whether Thomas Rogers really had a daughter Elizabeth at all is a matter of theory. There are records in Leyden, Holland, that suggest that two daughters lived there with their mother, but there is no absolute proof. Whether one or both of these possible daughters ever came to America, we don't know....”

  • Walter may have indentured himself for a time in order to pay his passage expenses, as the records do mention Walter as having "come as a servant" to Plymouth Colony. Plymouth Court Records of 2 Jan. 1633/4 order "that whereas by indenture many are bound to give their servants land at the expiration of their terms, it is ordered that they have it at Scituate or some other convenient place, where it may be useful." That land given to Walter is shown on a map below on this web page.
  • There is no record of his presence on any of the many ships which sailed from England to the Colonies in the 17th century. Many early Scituate settlers were from County Kent in England, and it has been thought that Walter may have come from there as well, perhaps as one of Rev. John Lothrop's followers from Edgerton in Kent. Rev. Lothrop, first pastor of the church in Scituate, arrived in Boston, Sept. 1634 on the "Griffin," with some 30 members of his congregation, both from London and Kent. This was six months after Walter is first recorded in Plymouth Colony.
  • 1. Several books published in the 1800s contain information now proven wrong by current genealogists. Two major problems in Walter Woodworth genealogy in the early generations are that there was
  • (a). A son Benjamin reported as killed in King Phillips War, and yet survived to become the executor for his father Walter's will who lived into old age. They appear to have assumed he was killed in King Phillips war because records disclosed that the widow of a Benjamin Woodward killed in King Philip's war received government compensation. They were unaware there were two Benjamin Woodwards, with ours being a survivor of that war. This error was introduced by at least the two following books: History of Scituate, Mass From Its First Settlement to 1831, by Rev Samuel Deane; and Descendants of Walter Woodworth of Scituate, Mass, 1898, by William Atwater Woodworth.
  • (b). A son Walter, Jr, who never was a son of Walter, Sr. This myth came about due to a much belated addition to records in Little Compton, MA. This doesn't mean there wasn't a younger Walter somewhere in the area --- he just wasn't this Walter's son.

Links

citations

  1. New England Historic Genealogical Society" pdf document.
  2. "History of Plymouth County, Massachusetts" p.408, Retrieved 25 dec 2008.
  3. Descendants of Walter Woodworth, Atwater, 1898 p. 9 n.b. this source is considered to contain errors.

sources

  1. [S1323] Correspondent: Woodworth, Marvin, note of November 10th, 2003.

-------------------- Walter settled in the Plymouth Colony, coming from Kent, England in 1633. He first appeared in the tax records of the Plymouth Colony in 1633. Woodworth settled in 1635 amongst the "Men of Kent" in Scituate, Massachusetts, which included Nathaniel Tilden, Edward Foster, Humphrey Turner, Isaac Chittenden, and William Hatch, who were influential in the building the settlement.

Walter took up residence at the third lot on Kent Street along the oceanfront at the corner of Meeting House Lane, where he built a home. He would acquire more property throughout his life in Plymouth Colony including a tract on the Herring Brook, a tract on Walnut Tree Hill, which in colonial times was referred to as Walter Woodworth Hill, and 60 acres in Weymouth. He would serve as surveyor of highways (1645-1646, 1656) and arbiter (1645, 1662-1663).

He was a member of the First Church and had 10 children, who were Thomas, Sarah, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Joseph, Mary, Martha, Isaac, Mehitable, and Abigail.

Walter was also the progenitor of the Woodworth political family. -------------------- Walter Woodworth first appeared in Plymouth records on the tax list of 1633/4. He moved to Scituate by 1643.There he held several offices including surveyor of highways (1645, 1646, 1656) and arbiter (1645, 1662/3, 1665). He was included in the June 1662 list of servants and ancient freemen eligible for land, and received one share of land at Saconnet [Little Compton, Rhode Island].

-------------------- "History of Scituate", by Samuel Deane. Walter Woodworth was freeman in Scituate in 1640, and settled amongst the men of Kent, 3d lot on Kent street, south side of Meeting-house lane in 1635. He had other lands in 1635, viz. on the first Herring brook 30 rods below Stockbridge's mill: and on the northwest side of Walnut tree hill. Children with * after first name are verified in his will. Others are from other sources and must have additional verification. It should be noted however, that birth dates are from the "other" source.

"Little Compton Families", page 798. Walter Woodworth resided in Scituate, Massachusetts. He came from Kent County, England, to Scituate, MA, in 1635 and was assigned a third lot on Kent Street at the corner of Meeting House Lane, where he built his house. In 1664, he was a member of the first church of Scituate. He made a purchase of 60 acres of land at Weymouth, MA in 1666. He also owned land in Little Compton. His will; "... Walter Woodworth of Scituate of New Plymouth in New England... I give and bequeath unto Thomas, my eldest son, upland containing acres lying in Scituate. To two sons Thomas and Joseph... Acres of marsh land equally in Scituate. To son Thomas one third part of my land that Seconet which I purchased. The other two thirds to sons Benjamin and Isaac Woodworth except two acres which I give to my son Joseph, ten of which I give to my daughter Martha, all therest of my land at Seconet which is yet to be purchased I give unto my sons Thomas and Joseph equally. To son Benjamin my dwelling house, bar and other housing with all my land. Benjamin to pay 70 pounds to my son Joseph and my six daughters Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, Mehitable and Abigail 10 pounds apiece. I herewith attach my hand and seal this 26th day of November 1685..." His will was proved 2 March 1865/6.

From "The Genealogy of Walter Woodworth" website, http://members.aol.com/wildwudy/pubpage.htm Errors in Early Walter Woodworth Genealogy 1. Several books published in the 1800s contain information now proven wrong by current genealogists. Two major problems in Walter Woodworth genealogy in the early generations are that there was (a). A son Benjamin reported as killed in King Phillips War, and yet survived to become the executor for his father Walter's will who lived into old age. They appear to have assumed he was killed in King Phillips war because records disclosed that the widow of a Benjamin Woodward killed in King Philip's war received government compensation. They were unaware there were two Benjamin Woodwards, with ours being a survivor of that war. This error was introduced by at least the two following books

-- History of Scituate, Mass From Its First Settlement to 1831, by Rev Samuel Deane

-- Descendants of Walter Woodworth of Scituate, Mass, 1898, by William Atwater Woodworth (b). A son Walter, Jr, who never was a son of Walter, Sr. This myth came about due to a much belated addition to records in Little Compton, MA. This doesn't mean there wasn't a younger Walter somewhere in the area --- he just wasn't this Walter's son. WALTER WOODWORTH was born in England in about 1612, and died in Scituate, Plymouth Colony, early in 1686; parentage unknown. He is the primary ancestor of most of the Woodworths in America, although it is rumored that a brother also immigrated. He married about 1639/40. No record has been found of his wife's name. She was living in March 1676, but had died by 26 November 1685, when Walter made his Will, naming ten children. Some have speculated that Walter married Elizabeth Rogers, the daughter of Thomas Rogers of the "Mayflower." Elizabeth Daniel, authoress of Thomas Rogers, Pilgrim and Some of His Descendants, 1980, states, "Whether Thomas Rogers really had a daughter Elizabeth at all is a matter of theory. There are records in Leyden, Holland, that suggest that two daughters lived there with their mother, but there is no absolute proof. Whether one or both of these possible daughters ever came to America, we don't know....” Walter may have indentured himself for a time in order to pay his passage expenses, as the records do mention Walter as having "come as a servant" to Plymouth Colony. Plymouth Court Records of 2 Jan. 1633/4 order "that whereas by indenture many are bound to give their servants land at the expiration of their terms, it is ordered that they have it at Scituate or some other convenient place, where it may be useful." That land given to Walter is shown on a map below on this web page. There is no record of his presence on any of the many ships which sailed from England to the Colonies in the 17th century. Many early Scituate settlers were from County Kent in England, and it has been thought that Walter may have come from there as well, perhaps as one of Rev. John Lothrop's followers from Edgerton in Kent. Rev. Lothrop, first pastor of the church in Scituate, arrived in Boston, Sept. 1634 on the "Griffin," with some 30 members of his congregation, both from London and Kent. This was six months after Walter is first recorded in Plymouth Colony.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Will of Walter Woodworth Walter's will, found in Plymouth, MA, in the late 1800s, provides much information. A map is available showing seven properties that he owned in Seconet mentioned in the will. Seconet is south of Scituate, MA. I In the name of God, Amen. I, Walter Woodward, of Scituate, in the jurisdiction of New Plymouth in New England, in America, being weak in body, but of sound mind and perfect memory, praise to Almighty God for the same, do make this my last will and Testament in manner as followeth: First, and most principally, I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God, my creator, in and through Jesus Christ, my only Saviour and Redeemer, and my body unto decent and ... burial at the discretion of my executors with the advice of the rest of my sons hereafter named.

And my temporal estate I dispose of as hereafter followeth: Imprimis. I give and bequeath unto Thomas Woodward, my eldest son, a parcel of upland containing five acres, lying in Scituate aforesaid, bounded by the lands of Henry Ewell on the south and the Common on the north, to be enjoyned to him and his heirs forever. Item: I give unto my two sons, Thomas and Joseph, ten acres of Marsh land, to be equally divided between them, which lyeth by Suzons - bounded by the Marsh of Anthony Collimer on the east, by the Marsh of Thomas Clap, deceased, on the north, in Scituate aforesaid to be enjoyned to them and their heirs forever. Item: I give to Thomas Woodward, my son, one-third part of all my land at Seconet which I purchased. The other two-thirds I give unto my two sons, Benjamin and Isaac Woodward, to be equally divided between them, to be enjoyned to them and their heirs forever, excepting twenty-five acres, of which I do give unto my son Joseph, to be enjoyned to him and his heirs forever. Ten acres of which I do give unto my daughter, Martha, to her, her heirs forever, of which two quantities of land is to be deducted out of the two-thirds of my land lying at Seconet given to my two sons, Benjamin and Isaac aforesaid. All the rest of my land at Seconet, which is yet to be purchased, I give unto my two sons, Thomas and Joseph Woodward, to be divided equally between them, to be enjoyned to them and their heirs forever. Item: I give to Benjamin, my son aforesaid, my dwelling-house with my barns and other outhousing, with all my land, both upland and marshland thereunto belonging, that is to say, twenty acres of upland, be it more or less bounded by land of John Turner to the west and by land of Joseph Otis to the east and six acres of marshland more or less bounded by the land of Joseph Otis to the north east, and by the first herring brook towards the south -- all of which said housings and land with all the appurtenances thereof, the commons and privileges thereunto belonging I give to the said Benjamin, my son, his heirs forever, always provided upon condition that my son, Benjamin, aforesaid, do pay and allow the sum of seventy pounds unto my son, Joseph, and my six daughters, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, Mehitabel and Abigail, ten pounds apiece, to be paid to them at three payments, viz, one-third part of the said seventy pounds to be paid to my said children within three years after my decease and the other two-thirds to be paid in the two following years, that is to say -- in each year a third of the said sum of seventy pounds, and each payment to be paid, the one-half in silver and the other half to be paid in corn and cattell. Further, my will is that my son Benjamin, aforesaid, do allow my two daughters, Mehitabel and Abigail, the lower room or parlor at the northeasterly end of my dwelling house aforesaid, for their use during the time they do live unmarried. Item: I give and bequeath unto my said two daughters, Mehitabel and Abigail, my feather bed with the furniture thereunto belonging and all the rest of my houshold goods I give unto my six daughters, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, Mehitabel and Abigail, to be divided equally among them. The rest of my estate undisposed of by this my last will and testament, I give and bequeath to all my children, all my debts, funeral expenses being first paid, to be equally divided amongst them , Item: I do constitute and appoint my son, Benjamin, aforesaid, the sole executor of this my last will and testament, whom I do appoint my to sons, Thomas and Joseph Woodard, overseers of this my last will and testament.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twenty six day of November, 1685.

The Mark of WALTER WOODWARD X

Signed, sealed and acknowledged in presence of:

THEO. KING, Senior,

THOMAS PALMER,

CHARLES STOCKBRIDGE [1] --------------------

came from Kent Co., England, to Scituate, Mass., 1635. Was assigned the third lot on Kent St., which runs along the ocean front, at the corner of Meeting House Lane, and there he built a house. In that year he owned other land, a tract on the First Herring Brook not far below Stockbridge Mill, where afterwards stood the residence of the poet Samuel Woodworth, and another tract on Walnut Tree Hill, just west of the present Greenbush or South Scituate R. R. Station, which was in early times called Walter Woodworth's Hill, and in 1666 he became a purchaser of sixty acres at Weymouth. In 1640 Walter was assessed nine shillings for the public use, and March z, 1641, freeman; and in June 4, 1645, he was appointed surveyor of highways in Scituate, and again in 1646 and 1656. His name appears frequently on the town records of Scituate as juror, etc. In 1654 he was a member of the First Church, which ordained Charles Chancy as their minister.

-------------------- There is no proof that Walter Woodworth m. Elizabeth Rogers -------------------- Not a known child of Walter Woodworth. Disconnected April 2014

Ref

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Walter Woodworth, of Scituate's Timeline

1612
1612
Kent, England
1630
March 20, 1630
Age 18
Plymouth, UK

Was belived that he was on the ship "Mary and John"

May 30, 1630
Age 18
Nantucket, MA, USA
1636
1636
Age 24
1639
1639
Age 27
Scituate, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
1643
1643
Age 31
Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
1645
1645
Age 33
Scituate, Plymouth County, MA, USA
1647
1647
Age 35
1648
January 6, 1648
Age 36
Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States
1650
March 10, 1650
Age 38
Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA