Walter fitz Otho de Windsor

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Walter fitz Otho de Windsor, of Eaton, Keeper of the Forests of Windsor

Also Known As: "Keeper/ of the reat /Forest/", "Lord of Eaton"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
Death: Died in Brecon, Breconshire, Wales or Hampshire, Middlesex, Surrey, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Other (Otho) Dominus de Stanwell and NN . NN
Husband of Beatrice De Carew and Gwladyus verch Rhywallen
Father of Gerald de Windsor (Constable of Pembroke Castle); William FitzWalter de Windsor, Sr.; Maurice Fitzwalter; Robert FitzWalter de Windsor, Sheriff of Norfolk and Delicia (FitzOtho)

Occupation: Castelan of Windsor, Keeper of the Forest, President of Pembroke County, see......http://www.robertkeating.com/oldhome.htm for explenation in sudden nationality change...very interesting, Castellan of Windsor, Castle Castellan (constable)
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Walter fitz Otho de Windsor

Walter fitzOther de Windsor

Domesday Tenant In Buckingham, Hampshire, Middlesex & Surrey

wife Beatrice. Some sources have him married to Gwladus Verch Rhiwallon but this is not supported by primary evidence at this time.

From Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands Database

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/IRELAND.htm

WALTER FitzOther of Windsor, son of --- (-after 1100). The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Walterus filius Oteri, castellanus de Uuildesore" restored "duas silvas…Virdelæ et Basceat, apud Winckefeld nostram villam" to the abbot of Abingdon, dated to [1100/16], and that "uxorem suam Beatricem cum filio suo Willelmo" effected the transfer 8 Sep[740].

m BEATRICE, daughter of --- (-after 1100). The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Walterus filius Oteri, castellanus de Uuildesore" restored "duas silvas…Virdelæ et Basceat, apud Winckefeld nostram villam" to the abbot of Abingdon, dated to [1100/16], and that "uxorem suam Beatricem cum filio suo Willelmo" effected the transfer 8 Sep[741].

Walter & his wife had [five] children:

1. WILLIAM [I] FitzWalter (-[1154/60]). The Chronicle of Abingdon records that "Walterus filius Oteri, castellanus de Uuildesore" restored "duas silvas…Virdelæ et Basceat, apud Winckefeld nostram villam" to the abbot of Abingdon, dated to [1100/16], and that "uxorem suam Beatricem cum filio suo Willelmo" effected the transfer 8 Sep[742]. He succeeded his father in [1100/16] as forester of Windsor and lord of Eton[743]. The Chronicle of Abingdon records that Henry I King of England notified "Willelmo filio Walteri et Croco venatori et Ricardo servienti et omnibus ministris de foresta Windesores" that he had granted tithes of all venison to Abingdon abbey, witnessed by "…Eudone dapifero" (which dates the notification to [1116/20][744]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Wills fil Walti" at "Forest de Windesor" in Berkshire[745]. Empress Matilda confirmed that "Willelmus filius Walteri" should be "custodiam castelli de Windesh", and the lands which "ipse Willelmus et antecessores sui" had from Henry I King of England, by charter dated to [1141/42][746]. m ---. The name of William´s wife is not known. William [I] & his wife had two children:

a) WILLIAM [II] de Windsor (-[1175/76]). Henry II King of England confirmed to "Willelmo de Windesoriis" the land of "Willelmi filii Walteri patris sui et Walteri filii Otheri avi sui", dated to [1154/60][747]. b) WALTER de Windsor (-before 1184). Dugdale records that “Walter de Windlesores and Christiana his wife” donated "Wormingford…church" to Wix priory, Essex by undated charter[748]. “Walterus de Windlesores” donated "elemosinam ecclesiam de Suinelande" to Wix priory, Essex by undated charter[749]. m [CHRISTIANA de Wiham, daughter of ---. The Red Book of the Exchequer records "Cristina de Wiham i militem" in the fief of "Willelmi de Montefichet" in Essex in 1166[750].] Dugdale records that “Walter de Windlesores and Christiana his wife” donated "Wormingford…church" to Wix priory, Essex by undated charter[751]. Walter & his wife had three children:

i) WALTER de Windsor (-1203). The 1197/98 Feet of Fines records a settlement dated 18 Apr 1198 between "Waltm de Winlesore" and "Willm de Windesor" relating to the barony of "Willi de Windesor avi eorum", with land at "Burneham…Bekenefeld…Etona…Orton…Horslea…Stanewell et Lesmores…Horton…"[752].

ii) CHRISTIANA de Windsor (-before 29 Sep 1206). m DURAND de Lascelles, son of ---.

iii) GUNNOR de Windsor (-[1205/06]). m HUGH de Hosdeng, son of ---.

2. GERALD FitzWalter (-before 1136). He was granted Moulsford, Berkshire and held land in Pembrokeshire[753]. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Geraldus præfectus de Penbroc" laid waste to "Meneviæ fines" in 1097[754]. m (1100) NESTA of Wales, daughter of RHYS ap Tudor Mawr King of Deheubarth [South Wales] & his wife Gwladus ---. The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales names, in 1106, "Nest daughter of Rhys son of Tewdwr and wife of Gerald the steward" and "Gwladus daughter of Rhiwallon, the mother of Nest", when recording that "Owain [son of Cadwgan son of Bleddyn]…accompanied by a small retinue [visited] her as his kinswoman" in the castle in which his father organised a feast and later reentered the castle and abducted her "with her two sons and daughter and also another son that he [=her husband] had by a concubine"[755]. She became mistress firstly of Henry I King of England, and secondly of Stephen Constable of Cardigan, as shown by the Expugnatio Hibernica which records that "Robertus filius Stephani" was freed from prison in Wales, naming "matre…Nesta, Resi magni filia"[756]. Gerald & his wife had three children:

a) MAURICE FitzGerald (-Wexford 1 Sep 1176). The Expugnatio Hibernica names "David Menevensi episcopo et Mauricio Giraldi filio" as brothers of "Robertus filius Stephani"[757]. see IRELAND – EARLS of DESMOND, EARLS of KILDARE.

b) DAVID (-1177, bur St David's Cathedral). The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales names "David Bishop of Menevia and William the Bastard…sons to Gerald the steward" as the brothers of "Robert son of Stephen by Nest daughter of Rhys son of Tewdwr"[758]. The Annales Cambriæ record the succession in 1150 of "David filius Giraldi" as "episcopus Meneviæ" after the death of Bishop Bernard[759]. Bishop of St David's. The Expugnatio Hibernica names "David Menevensi episcopo et Mauricio Giraldi filio" as brothers of "Robertus filius Stephani"[760]. The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1177 of "David episcopus Menevensis" and his burial "in ecclesia Menevensi"[761]. Bishop David had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

i) MILES . The Expugnatio Hibernica names "Milo Menevensis, tam Stephanidæ quam Mauricii nepos…Henrici filius Robertus, Meilerii frater"[762]. Feudal Baron of Iverk, co. Kilkenny. Ancestor of the family of Barron of Brownsford, co. Kilkenny[763].

c) ANGHARAD . She and her husband were parents of the historian "Giraldus Cambrensis". m WILLIAM de Barry of Manorbier. The Expugnatio Hibernica names "Roberto Barrensi" and "Meilerius" as "Stephanidæque alter ex fratre, alter ex sorore nepotes"[764].

Gerald had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

d) WILLIAM FitzGerald of Carew Castle, Pembrokeshire (-1173). The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales names "David Bishop of Menevia and William the Bastard…sons to Gerald the steward" as the brothers of "Robert son of Stephen by Nest daughter of Rhys son of Tewdwr"[765]. The Annales Cambriæ name "Willielmus filius Geraldi" among those who destroyed "castellum Wix" in 1148[766]. m ---. The name of William´s wife is not known. William & his wife had four children:

i) RAYMOND "le Gros" .

ii) GRIFFITH . The Expugnatio Hibernica names "nepos…Mauricii Stephanidæque, Griffinus"[767].


iii) ODO . Ancestor of the Baronets CAREW[768].

iv) daughter . m ---. One child:

(a) DAVID "the Welshman" .


3. ROBERT de Windsor (-before [1128]). Henry I King of England confirmed the grant of land of which his father was seised to "Robert son of Walter of Windsor" and that he granted the same land to "William son of the said Robert", by charter dated 25 Dec [1128][769]. Feudal Baron of Eston, Essex. m ---. The name of Robert´s wife is not known. Robert & his wife had one child:

a) WILLIAM . Henry I King of England confirmed the grant of land of which his father was seised to "Robert son of Walter of Windsor" and that he granted the same land to "William son of the said Robert", by charter dated 25 Dec [1128][770].

4. [MAURICE de Windsor (-after 1130). Round suggests that Maurice was another son of Walter FitzOther[771]. The abbot of Bury St Edmunds granted stewardship of the abbey to "Mauricius de Windleshore" by charter dated to [1115/19], witnessed by "Robertus de Wyndelshore, Reinaldus de Wyndeleshore"[772]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Mauric de Windesor" in Dorsetshire[773]. same person as…? MAURICE de Windsor (-after 25 May 1130). "Maurice de Windsor and Edgidia his wife" donated the church of St Edmund at Hoxne to Norwich Cathedral priory by charter dated 25 May 1130[774]. m EDGIDIA, daughter of --- (-after 25 May 1130). "Maurice de Windsor and Edgidia his wife" donated the church of St Edmund at Hoxne to Norwich Cathedral priory by charter dated 25 May 1130[775].]

5. [daughter m WILLIAM de Hastings, son of --- (-[before 1130]). . Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1155] under which Henry II King of England confirmed to "Ralph de Hastynges dapifero of the queen" the lands formerly belonging to Ralph steward of St Edmund´s and to "Maurice de Windsor maternal uncle of the said Ralph de Hastings" by charter dated to [1155][776].

Sources

  • [740] Stevenson, J. (ed.) (1858) Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon (London), Vol. II, p. 132.
  • [741] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, p. 132.
  • [742] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, p. 132.
  • [743] Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (2002) Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166. II. Pipe Rolls to Cartæ Baronum (Boydell) (“Domesday Descendants”), p. 969.
  • [744] Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, Vol. II, p. 94.
  • [745] Hunter, J. (ed.) (1833) Magnum rotulum scaccarii vel magnum rotulum pipæ de anno 31 regni Henrici primi (London) ("Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30)"), Berkshire, p. 127.
  • [746] Round, J. H. (1892) Geoffrey de Mandeville, a Study of the Anarchy, p. 169.
  • [747] Harleian Roll, p. 8, quoted in Round, W. H. ´The Origin of the Fitzgeralds´, The Ancestor, No. I (April 1902), p. 125.
  • [748] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Wykes Nunnery, Essex, p. 513, citing Morant History of Essex, Vol. I, p. 347 [not yet consulted].
  • [749] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Wykes Nunnery, Essex, II, p. 515.
  • [750] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, p. 350.
  • [751] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Wykes Nunnery, Essex, p. 513, citing Morant History of Essex, Vol. I, p. 347 [not yet consulted].
  • [752] Pipe Roll Society, Vol. XXIII (1898) Feet of Fines in the Public Record Office of the 9th year of King Richard I (London) ("Feet of Fines 9 Ric I (1197/98)"), p. 110.
  • [753] Domesday Descendants, p. 968.
  • [754] Annales Cambriæ, p. 30.
  • [755] Brut y Tywysogion (Williams), pp. 81-87.
  • [756] Dimock, J. F. (ed.) (1867) Giraldi Cambrensis Opera, Topographia Hibernica, Expugnatio Hibernica (London) Expugnatio Hibernica I, II, p. 229.
  • [757] Expugnatio Hibernica I, II, p. 229.
  • [758] Brut y Tywysogion (Williams), p. 213.
  • [759] Annales Cambriæ, p. 44.
  • [760] Expugnatio Hibernica I, II, p. 229.
  • [761] Annales Cambriæ, p. 55.
  • [762] Expugnatio Hibernica II, X, p. 325.
  • [763] Burke´s Peerage II, p. 1679.
  • [764] Expugnatio Hibernica I, IV, p. 235.
  • [765] Brut y Tywysogion (Williams), p. 213.
  • [766] Annales Cambriæ, p. 44.
  • [767] Expugnatio Hibernica I, XLI, p. 292.
  • [768] Burke´s Peerage, I, p. 496.
  • [769] Johnson, C. & Cronne, H. A. (ed.) (1956) Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum (Oxford), Vol. II, 1556, p. 219.
  • [770] Regesta Regem Anglo-Normannorum, Vol. II, 1556, p. 219.
  • [771] Round, W. H. ´The Origin of the Fitzgeralds II´, The Ancestor, No. II (Jul 1902), p. 92.
  • [772] Round ´The Origin of the Fitzgeralds II´, p. 93.
  • [773] Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30), Dorsetshire, p. 14.
  • [774] Dodwell, B. (ed.) (1974) The Charters of Norwich Cathedral Priory, Part 1, Pipe Roll Society NS Vol. XL (London) ("Norwich Cathedral, I"), 120, p. 68 [extract only, in translation].
  • [775] Norwich Cathedral, I, 120, p. 68 [extract only, in translation].
  • [776] Eyton, R. W. (1857) Antiquities of Shropshire (London), Vol. V, p. 136, citing Brakelond´s Chronicle, p. 117.

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The Peerage.com

Walter fitz Otho 1 M, #158363, d. after 1100

Last Edited=29 Apr 2009

    Walter fitz Otho was the son of Otho (?).2 He married '''Gladys ap Comyn''', daughter of Ryall ap Comyn. He died after 1100.3
    Walter fitz Otho was a Castellan Windsor.1 He held the office of Keeper of the Forests in Berkshire, appointed by William the Conqueror.2 In 1086 he was a tenant-in-chief at the time of the Domesday Survey , holding land in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire and Middlesex.1 He held the office of Keeper of Windsor Castle in 1087.2

Child of Walter fitz Otho

  • Maurice fitz Walter1

Children of Walter fitz Otho and Gladys ap Comyn

  • Gerald fitz Walter+4 d. b 1136
  • William fitz Walter1
  • Reinald fitz Walter1

Citations

[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 682. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition. [S133] Unknown, Pedigree Showing the Descent of the Family of King-Tenison from The White Knight (not published). [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 2, page 2297. [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

-------------------- The nobleman in charge of the Norman forces in Wales in the late 11th century. Notably, he was the progenitor of the FitzGerald dynasty, one of the most celebrated families of Ireland and Great Britain. -------------------- Warden of forest in Berkshire, England in 1078. He was appointed by William the Conquerer. -------------------- Constable of Windsor, Keeper of Windsor Forrest, living 1086, and after 1100

James Barnett Adair p13

Walter fitz Other (or Walter de Windsor), the son of Lord Other, was tenant in chief of lands in Berkshire, counties Buckingham, Middlesex, Surrey, and Hampshire at the time of the Domesday Survey in A.D. 1086, and was Castelan of Windsor and Keeper of the Forest before A.D. 1100. Walter married Beatrice. Walter and Beatrice had three children:

William, Castelan of Windsor, ancestor of the Lords Windsor.

Gerald fitzWalter (or Gerald of Windsor).

Robert de Windsor, Baron of Eston, Essex.

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/cgi-bin/gedlkup/n=royal?royal06659

Castellan of the Castle. Some sources show he married Beatrice and some

Gladys daughter of the Prince of North Wales. Listed in the Domeday Book 1087 -------------------- NOTE: Walter FitzOtho de Windsor, Castellan of Windsor and Keeper of the Forest "Walter FitzOther" and Lord of Eton, Castellan of Windsor, 1078; warden of Forests in Berkshire ca. 1066-87. Born: 1037 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales or Stanwell, Staines, Middlesex County, England. Died:1086. Some sources show he married Beatrice de OFFALY and some Gwaladus VERCH RHIWALLON AP CYNFYN in Windsor,England d/o Rhiwallen, Ap Cynfyn Prince of North Wales - Listed in the Domeday Book 1087. Walter came into England with William the Conqueror, and afterward settled in Ireland.

NOTE: He held, among other manors, Stanwell in Middlesex County at the Domesday Survey in 1086.

NOTE: Fitzother was not Constable of Windsor as Windsor was a royal forest until 1066 when William I started construction of Windsor Castle. At the time of the Survey in 1086, Walter Fitzother held a compact group of manors as tenant-in-chief of the King in the counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Middlesex, and Surrey. He also held Winchfield in Hampshire from Chertsey Abbey and a royal manor and some woodlands at Windsor.

NOTE: Otho's son, Walter fitz-Otho Geraldini, was treated as a fellow countryman by the Normans after the conquest of England in 1066. He succeeded to all of Otho's estates and his name is shown in the Domesday Book of 1087 that listed all the landholders of England. Windsor Castle, a great gray pile overlooking the Thames, had just been built amid the forests of Berkshire, and Walter was appointed its first castellan, as well as warden of the forests. He was, it is clear, one of the most Norman of the Normans -- a race renowned for its adaptability, no less than for its valor and ferocity.

--------------------

Gerald was the son of Walter FitzOtho, Constable of Windsor Castle, and Gwladys ferch Ryall. Gerald married the Welsh Princess Nest of Deheubarth, daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr and Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon, around c. 1095.

His titles included: Titles: Castellan of Windsor Title: Lord of Eaton Occupation: Warden of the Forests 1066 Berkshire Occupation: Castellan of Windsor 1078 Before 1100 Keeper of the Forest; Castilian of Windsor Residence: Tenant in Chief at the time of the " Doomsday Book " BIOGRAPHY: Domesday Tenant in Buckingham, Hampshire, Middlesex & Surrey Date: 1078

Walter, Keeper of the Forest, was born in 1037 at Pembroke, Wales or Stanwell, Middlesex, England and he died in 1086. Walter's first wife was Gwladus Verch Rhiwallon, daughter of the Prince of North Wales. Walter was not the Constable of Windsor as Windsor was a royal forest until 1066 when WIlliam I started construction of Windsor Castle. At the time of the Survey in 1086, Walter held a compact group of manors as tenant-in-chief of the King in the counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Middlesex and Surrey. He also held Winchfield in Hampshire from Chertsey Abbey and a royal manor and some woodlands at Windsor.

http://www.familytreesite.org/windsor.htm

-------------------------

PROBABLY CORRECT: The genealogy to a Gheradini family origin is very likely true. English kings did indeed recruit many continental knights and warriors for the conquest of Ireland, who were given noble seats as their reward. In our modern era we see written record of one of the brothers Maurizio Gheradini as a knight in the invasion. However this genealogy was incorrectly placed in doubt because they thought an Irish priest would not know, but those in Florence would know. Why would those in Florence know the history of their ancient kinsmen who left for Ireland a 500 years earlier? It is the Irish priest who would know about those ex-pat Florentines in Ireland, as they had the records of births, death, marriages and history-- not the Florentines. The priest was was more likely correct, the Italian nay-sayers incorrect. How would they know? Yet, there are records of FitzGeralds corresponding with Florentines indicating this ancient connection. There are many noble families of Ireland who descend from warriors who participated in the invasion of Ireland. Another one was William le Hore who supported Strongbow and was given the seat of Pole Hore as his reward. "Le Hore" can be taken to mean "the outsider". He was a Saxon knight who helped in the invasion, certainly not Irish. The noble families of Ireland are packed with outsiders who helped in the invasion, that is why the Irish rebelled against them for centuries. They aren't irish in origin. The noble families of Ireland were largely English and other outsiders. Yet, people today assume that irish noble families have all Irish origin. No, they do not. Again, that is why the Irish rebelled against these Irish noble houses-- they were not Irish in origin in many cases. Furthermore, the Gheradini did indeed exist in Florence before it was a republic. The Gheradini lost power when it was made into a republic. The Victorians were vehemently prejudiced against all things Irish but loved all things Florentine. Thus they sneered that a Gheradini lineage could not be in Ireland. They said Gheradino was not a Cosimo, because that was the term used during the republican era. However, before Florence was a republic, of course they had local noblemen: effectively dukes, counts, barons, whatever language you wish to use, such as the Gheradini who were local pre-republican noblemen of Florence. The Geradini represent the pre-republican era before the word "Cosimo" was adopted. However the Gheradini were effectively the equivalent role as the Florentines "Cosimos" before the Medici adopted the term Cosimo for the ruler of Florence. A general term might be "Lord" however, that is an English word, even if correct in the role. The correct term is "Seignior of Florence."

The Gherardini were one of the seigniorial families that fell when the Republic of Florence was founded circa A.D. 1250.211. The Gheradini family is recorded in many Irish pedigrees as their ancestor from three brothers who participated in the invasion of Ireland, including the families of Fitzmaurice (from Maurizio), Fitzgerald (from Gheraldini) and other families such as Gerard, Gerald, Keating, Rogers, White, Carew, Redmund, and Lords of Kerry, etc who descended from the three brothers.

The denial of this pedigree was a Victorian anti-Irish prejudice on the part of the English, who saw the Irish as barbaric Celts at that time, and would reflexively scoff at a noble Florentine origin of Irish families. The English scoffed at all things Irish in that era.

PROBABLY INCORRECT: Unfortunately, Other's descent from the Gherardini was claimed a fantasy, debunked by a Victorian writer. In one version of the story, he was a son of Otho di Gherardini of the Florentine family.

"The story given above is traced to an Irish priest, 'called Maurice, who was of the family of the Gherardini settled in that island,' and who, passing through Florence in 1413, claimed the local Gherardini as his ancient kinsmen."

http://www.geraldini.com/new/fitzgerald_uk_1.asp

The Gherardinis

The Mona Lisa painting by Leonard da Vinci was born of the Gherardini family of Florence. Her husband, a silk merchant, was of the Giocondo family. Hence, the painting is often called "La Gioncanda" indicated Mona Lisa's married name.

The Gheradini family had estates in various parts of the Florentine territory. In Florence, their principal residence was near the Ponte Vecchio bridge. Their tower still exists, being part of the Palazzo Bartolomei.

The first date we have in the family history is 910 A.D. when one Raniero (Rainier?) was living. The Italian historian Gammurini, says "the Gherardi were among the most ancient and wealthy families of Tuscany in 900 A.D."

The family flourished until the year 1125. Then, during a political upheaval, the patrician families were driven into exile. The Gherardini lost their patrician rank and became mere citizens. Later they were restored to honors, became wealthy again, and served the Republic of Florence both in the senate and on the battlefield. Three were Consuls of the Republic; others died as leaders of the Republican armies in the many civil wars. Confiscations and losses during the civil wars impoverished the Gherardini, and they also suffered much by the destruction of their property in the great fire of Florence in 1303. From the 14th century onwards they seem to have played a smaller part in the history of Florence.

At different times, between 1000 and 1400, individuals of the family emigrated, passing into France, England, Wales, Ireland, Cracow and the Canary Islands. Those who stayed in Florence became extinct, as did those in France and Cracow. However, there are correspondence records showing that the Gherardini of Florence and the Irish "Geraldines" did not lose touch with each other. There are records of visits back and forth until the late 1500's.

--------------------------

-------------------- Walter Fitz Otho,who at the time of the general survey, appears by Domesday Book to have enjoyed the same lordship which his father held. The name of Walter's wife is in doubt, as is likewise the seniority of his three sons. (Genesis of the White Family, 1920, Emma Siggins White, page 7). Walter Fitz-Otho or Fitz-Other at the general surveys of the kingdom in 1078, was castellan of Windsor, and was appointed by William the conqueror warden of the forests in Berkshire.

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Walter fitz Otho de Windsor's Timeline

1037
1037
Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
1060
1060
Age 23
Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, , Wales
1065
1065
Age 28
Windsor, Antrim, , Ireland
1066
1066
Age 29
Castle Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales
1066
Age 29
Berkshire
1068
1068
Age 31
Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
1069
1069
Age 32
1075
1075
Age 38
Horsford, St. Faith's, Norfolk, England
1078
1078
Age 41
1085
1085
Age 48