William Averill, Sr. (c.1611 - 1652)

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Nicknames: "Avery", "Averell"
Birthplace: Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
Managed by: Lori Lynn Wilke
Last Updated:

About William Averill, Sr.

WILLIAM AND ABIGAIL AVERELL.

iCalled also Averill and Avery) of IPSWICH, MASS., and THEIR DESCENDANTS:

AVERELLS, AVERILLS, AVERYS.

1. William1 Averell, the first of our family in America, settled at Ipswich, Mass., before March, 1637, the date on which he received his first grant of land from that town, and on which his name is first recorded in the Town Proceedings. He appears there as William Avery. It is evident from this and other records that he was born about 1611 or earlier, and that, like many others who came to the shores of New England at that time, he was a simple husbandman, young, and with small means.

Many efforts have been made to discover proof of his ancestry, and an experienced and successful genealogist who has discovered other lost links feels sure he has solved our problem. But as we have not yet recovered the record of the marriage of William Averell (or Averill or Avery) to Abigail—, a very essential evidence in this case,—it seems best to place the carefully collected data by themselves under "English Genealogical Data." Most of this was gathered by Mr. C. A. Hoppin, Jr., and it contains his reasons for believing that we belong to the Averells of Kent, England.

We give here a brief synopsis of his records relating to that family. Mr. Hoppin has concluded after his long experience in England and America in this sort of research, that our William1 Averell was the eldest son of Nicholas and Dorcas Averell of Ash, Kent (very near London); grandson of Robert Averell, buried at Ash, and mentioned in a Chancery case, 1638; and greatgrandson of Thomas Averell of Ridley, Kent, who died September 1556, and was mentioned in a Chancery case 1638 (see p 16 for English Genealogy Data: Averells of Kent, prepared by C. A. Hoppin, Jr.).

The following items are from his statement:

"Nicholas Averell, the father of William1, made a will, 8 September 1631, in which he called himself of Ashe (by Farmingham), Kent, yeoman. He wished to be buried by his father in the churchyard; and he left to his eldest son, William Averell and his heirs, his home in Ashe with the forge, barne, orchard, etc.; and to his son Michael a house and tenement in Little Peckham, alias West Peckham; to his wife, Dorcas Averell, executrix, the rents of said houses until his sons came to the age of 21. He gave also to both his sons £20 apiece when 21; the residue to his wife Dorcas. William's uncle, Geoffrey Averell of Stansted, Kent, yeoman, made a will, Jan. 10, 1631, leaving lands to his brother, Robert Averell, and his heirs; and if Robert had no issue (he d. soon after) they were to go to Wm. Averell, son of Nicholas Averell, deceased. If William Averell left no heirs the lands were to go to his brother Michael. William Averell had left for America at date of this will; the fact may, or may not, have been known to the testator. No matter in either case: for, if Robert held his brother Geoffrey's estate, he was obliged to pass it on to William.

"Another of William's uncles, Robert Averell of HartleyKent, also mentions his nephews Michael and William in his will dated Nov. 15, 1637; proved 30 Nov. 1637, giving them his two houses and lands at Stansted, Kent. This will is proof that both William and his brother Michael were of age in 1637; also that William was of age in 163k if not before."

After finding the above and other records, Mr. C. A. Hoppin, Jr., wrote:

"It is clear how William Averell got means for so adventurous and ambitious a voyage as to America, while he was a young man, and also for an early marriage; and he was close to the stream of emigration which swept down the river past Kent from London." [Letter of May 25, 1905.]

It is probable that William1 Averell was born at "Ash, near Farmingham, Kent" (there is another Ash in Kent), between 1611 and 1613, as he was not of age, September 8, 1631, and had reached his majority November 15, 1637. He must have left home by January, 1631, when eighteen or twenty years of age. His name does not appear in Kent records so far as known after 1637; and our first record of him in America is found in the Proceedings of the Town of Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, volume 1, page 32; "in the year of 1637, the 2d day of March," when under the name of "William Avery," he received a grant of land in that town.

His wife's name was Abigail (surname unknown), and she appears to have been the mother of all his children. It seems probable that their two eldest sons were born before 1637, because they were "presented" before the Court "for defect in watching," 31, 3, 1649. As it is certain that watching could not have been done very intelligently by lads less than fifteen years of age, they must have been born about 1632 and 1634. So it is likely that the marriage of William Averell to Abigail took place in 1631 or 1632, while they were still very young, and if not in Ash or Ipswich, possibly in some other place in England or America.

The precise date of their settlement in Ipswich is not known, and it is not impossible that they came there earlier than the date of record. A tradition in one branch of the family is that he came with the Cogswells to Ipswich in 1635. The name William Averell, Averill or Avery has not yet been found in any passenger lists of emigrants to America; but lists not yet found may come to light and reveal the knowledge we seek.

Ipswich received its present name August 5, 1634. It was taken from common land which had been known as Aggawam before Captain John Smith visited it in 1614. It was occupied by settlers in 1628, but ordered abandoned in 1630; so that the first permanent settlement was that made by John Winthrop, Jr., and his companions in 1632-3, when it was called the Plantation of Aggawam. The following year, 1634, about one hundred settlers came, and in 1635 a much larger number, including the Bradstreets, Dudleys, Cogswells, Saltonstall, Jackson, Kinsman, Perley, Woodmansee, Andrews and others with whom William Averell was associated more or less.

All the records we have of our progenitor William Averell from 1637 to 1653 show that he was a resident of Ipswich, and these are found in the Town Proceedings of Ipswich (16341885), and Essex County Records at Salem (which include land transfers, probate records, court records, and two volumes of Essex County Marriages).

An act was passed September 9, 1639, ordering vital statistics to be kept "of every person in this jurisdiction"; and June 14, 1642 an act was passed supplementary to that of 1639, ordering an annual return by Clerks of the Writs of all such vital statistics in the several towns, "to the recorder of the Court nearest their habitation." As a result of these two acts we find today in Salem in the Essex County Court Records, the two volumes mentioned above; one volume (Ipswich Ct. Series) covering the years from—1654 to—1691, which gives not only county marriages, but Ipswich births and deaths for this period; the other volume containing county marriages from April—, 1681, to March—, 1786, including those of Ipswich.

As "to become a freeman each person was legally required to be a member of some congregational church," a majority of the people in Ipswich at this period were undoubtedly identified with the only church there, the First Congregational Church, which was organized in 1634. Reverend Thomas Parker was its first minister. Reverend Nathaniel Ward was ordained its pastor in 1635, and he was succeeded by Reverend John Rogers, who was ordained in 1638, and who held the position until 1655. Reverend John Norton was associated with him during that period. The records of this earliest church are preserved from 1720 to 1885; but unfortunately for us all those preceding 1720 are lost.

None of the above mentioned records give us any clue to the nationality, place of birth, place or date of marriage, or any former place of residence of our William1 or of his wife, Abigail Averell; nor do they give us the surname of Abigail or the dates and places of birth of their children, of whom seven were living when William1 made his will in 1652, fifteen years after the first mention of him in the town records.

The following items were copied from records mentioned above, and are here united and preserved for the benefit of his descendants.

Although for nine years William1 Averell's name appears on Ipswich town records always under the surname of Avery,

(photo, p 56) Site Of William Averell's Home, Ipswich, Mass.

and always under that name in the Index to the Proceedings of the Town, nevertheless all the references are to the same person, who in the records is called Averye, Avery, Averell and Averill (The name is rarely written in Ipswich with u in the place of v; but in Topsfield the old form of u for v appears frequently and also in Essex County deeds).

Laws for the Proprietors Records, May 14, 1634, states that none but the General Court hath power to ... . dispose of lands, viz. to give and confirm proprieties. After September 6, 1638, though the first planters were allowed 50 acres for each person this benefit was not to be allowed to all others.

The first mention of William Averell is in a grant found in Ipswich Town Records, called The Town Proceedings, page 32; • 2d day of March, 1637: Granted to William Avery, six acres of planting ground on the further side of Muddy River. Also twenty acres of upland and six acres of meadow at Chebacco neare Allin Pearleyes.

(Muddy River is directly north of the Town House, and about one mile from what have always been called both "Avery's" and "Averill's Birches," which are on the way to Rowley. The above mentioned "six acres—on the further side of Muddy River," appears to be the land sold by William Averell, Jr., 1658, to John Woodam, see item p. 65, under "vol. i, p. 598.")

Many people whose names are well known had grants at Chebacco. Among those was a grant of land to Samuel Dudley at Chebacco, which preceded January 13th, 1637; for in a grant to Jonathan Wade at that date at Chebacco, the land is described as "lying on the South-west of Mr. Samuel Dudley's land, and on the South-east of Mr. John Winthrop's, and on the North-west of Chebacco Creek."

The above mentioned "Chebacco" was later called Argilla, although the name has been given since then to a town in Essex County about five miles from Ipswich Town House.

Of the ancient Chebacco referred to in the grant to William Averell of twenty acres of upland and six acres of meadow, we have an interesting account in The Old Argilla Road by T. Frank Waters, 1634:

"The high-way to Cheboky or Juboque is easily identified as the later road to Argilla or Argilla Farm. The majestic hill whose base is skirted by the ancient road is commonly known as Heartbreak Hill. The tidal creek that intersects it is known as Labour in vayne, and the other small river or creek that flows up from Essex River is mentioned as Chebacco Creek and commonly known by that name.

"Chebacco, Cheboko or Jeboke was the best the English tongue could do toward preserving the name by which the Indians had called a pleasant region stretching from the creek to the beach: Heartbreak Hill was divided into tillage lots and granted to settlers.

"Of land grants on the sunny southern side of the hill: East of Wm. Fuller's, Denison had four acres; proceeding down the road (Old Argilla) were Allen Perlie's four acre lot, Robert Kinsman's six acres, Richard Haffield's four acres. Humphry Wyeth's six acres and Alexander Knight's four-acre lot, each fronting on the road and running back up and on the crest.

"Mr. Dudley sold his lot on the hill to Wm. White; he to Thos. Treadwell in 1638: Mr. John Tuttle to Reginald Foster in 1638 (Eight acres)." [See also p. 59.]

The following year William "Avery" had a house lot lying near the great cove, as shown by the following: [P. T. I.] 27th day of July 1638. "Memorand, that Richard Lumpkin hath sould unto John Tuttell the day and year above written, one house and a house lott, with certaine other Landes as hereafter followeth, that is to say, one house lott lying near the great cove of the Town River, having a house lott now in the possession of William Avery, on the South West, Robert Kinsman's house lott on the North West, the Towne River on the South East, and a house lott now in the possession of Samuel Hall on the East, also upon the sayde lott one dwelling house formerly built by Richard Browne now of Newbury, and by him sould unto Mr. Richard Saltonstall, by whom it was sould unto the sayd Richard Lumpkin."

No mention of the assignment or deed to William Averell of the above mentioned house lot "near the great cove of the town river" has yet been found.

26 day of September, 1638: "Memorand, that whereas John Tuttell, hath lately bought of Richard Lumkin one house lott, lying neare the great cove beneath the falles of the Town River, having a house lott now in possession of William Avery on the South West, and a house lott of Robert Kinsman on the North West, as in this book folio 13, more at large appeareth. Also upon the sayd lott one dwelling house, formerly built by Richard Browne, now of Newbury, as in the foresayd folio doeth appear. Now the sayd John Tuttell, hath for divers good considerations him thereunto moveing sould and alienated unto Reynold Foster all the sayd lott together with the sayd dwelling house together with all out housing gardens fenceing together with all other the apurtenances unto the sayd house and lott."

Under the date of January 13, 1639, the seven men decided to allow owners of cattle individually or combined to have commonage under specified conditions for one bull and eight cows free of pay. Forty-three persons are named as owners. 'Avery,' who was one of them, appears sixth on this list, and in a group associated with Jo. Jackson and Hodges:

"13 January 1639: Agreed that each three yeare old Bulls unwrought, shall have allowed 8 cows free of pay, from Keeping and Bulls, and 2 year old Bulls 4 cows apiece free in consideration that the Bulls shall go with the herd till the first day of September.

Mr. Brasye 4 Tho: Clark 1 Jo: Perkins 1 Jo: Webster 1 Mr. Gardner 1 Avery 1 Wm. White 1 Mr. Norton 1 Varnham 1 Mr. Vincent 1 Mr. Wittingham 1 Bacheler 1 Robert Mussy 1 Allen Perley 1 Theop: Sachwell 1 Mr. Boreman 1 Edw. Ketcham 1 Newman 1 Reginald Foster 1 Hodges 1 Ma Whipple 1 Mr. Firman 1 Mr. Wilson 1 Goodman Smith 1 Mr. Wm. Payne 2 Mark Symons 1 John Sachwell 1 Daniel Warner 1 Jo: Wyat 1 Jo: Perkins 1 Jo: Warner 1 Mathew Curwin 1 Mr. Bartholmew 1 Jo Jackson 1 Wm. Fuller Mr. Wade 1 Ro Payne 1 Mr. Baker 1 Mr. Tredwell 1 Rich: Kimble 2 Alex: Knight 1 Mr. Jo. Tuttell 1 Stayce 1

[In the original entry these people were in groups. This copy of names was taken from Schofield's printed copy.]

17th of the 12th mo. 1641, appears: "The names of such as are Comoners in Ipswich viz: that have right to Comonage there: the last day of the last month 1641."

There are one hundred and eleven in this list, "Wil'm Averye" being the one hundred and second; among names following his were those of John Jackson and Matthew Whipple, who were associated with him in other ways.

"Att a meeting of the seven men the first month 1646. Agreed with William Averill, to keep the herd of Goats on the North side of the River, to begin the 10th of this month: and to have for his pains 5s 6d the week, to have 6d a head at their first going out, and the rest at the end of his time, of this pay 3d for every head to be paid in butter or wheat only the last mo. he is to have but 3s 6d a week."

(Signed) William Averill (or Averell?)

[The above item, found on p. 129 of the copy from the original record, was copied by the compiler of this genealogy from the original volume, before the volume was sent to Taunton, Mass., for repairs and for preservation by the T. W. R. Emery process. At that time the important question was whether our William's real name was Avery or not. The difference between Averell and Averill was not especially considered then. The entire item she then thought written and signed by William Averell, as it differed in penmanship and in construction from the entry given below which appeared to have been made by the Town Clerk, and had no signature. Returning to Ipswich another year (June 11, 1907), to verify the spelling of the surname and obtain reassurance about the autograph, and to secure a tracing, and if possible a photograph of the entry, she was unable to find it in the preserved records of the original volume. She therefore believes that that page was not strong enough to bear the process of restoration. See the attested copy of the original records, p. 129, and Schofield's printed copy of Ipswich Proceedings, First Volume, Old Town Records, 1634-74.]

[I. T. P.] 22d 1 mo 46 (From the attested copy of the original records): "Agreed with William Avery to Keepe the heard of goates on the North syde of the River, to begin the 24th of this present month until the first day of the ix mo. and to have for his pay after six shillings (for the Goates on this syde: ( ) Goats on the South syde to be brought to ( ) herd on this syde then he is to have after 8s the week, the tyme is to ( ) untill the first of November ( ) of his pay he is to have 6d the ( ) first going out, the rest at time, 3d the end in ( )."

(There was no signature to the above which was evidently an entry by the Town Clerk.)

"The Generall Town meeting held the 19th of December 1648: "Whereas the Inhabitants of this Town have engaged themselves to pay yearly on the 10th day of December, unto Major Denison soe long as he shall be there leader, the sum of twenty four pounds seaven shillinge, in way of Gratuity to encourage him in his military helpfulness unto them, as by their severall subscriptions under their hande may appeare. And because it is most manifest the sayd summ will not be raysed, unless some

(photo) Meeting House Hill, Ipswich, Mass

better order be taken for the same, especially in respect of the alteration & change of the Inhabitants.

"It is therefore ordered, that henceforth the seaven men, shall yearly in November put the said sum of 24£ 7s Od into a rate, yyortioning (portioning) it upon the inhabitants, having also respect unto the bill of subscription of the Towne from yeare to yeare, to be levyed and colected by the Constables, and payd unto the sayd Major Denison, on the 10th of December yearly, soo long as he shall continue to be leader of this companye. Voted by the Towne at the generall meeting above mentioned."

"A list of the names of those that did subscribe their names to allow unto Major Denison there (or these?) severall somes yearly, while he continued to be our Leader." [This list contains 161 names of which "Willm Averill's" name is the fortieth. Of these one gives £0. 10s. Od., Mr. Robert Payne; four give £0. 8s. Od., John Apleton, Samuel Apleton, Mr. Tuttle, Rich: Shatowell; three give £0. 6s. 0d., Mr. Willm Payne, Willm Bartholomew, Edward Waldern; three give £0. 5s. 0d., Job Bishop, John Chote, John Andrews, Jun.; thirty five give £0. 4s. 0d., including Mr. Saltonstall, Mr. Hubard, Mr. Rogers, Mr. Norton, Jeames Chute, John Whipple Jun., Thos Perkins, John Burnam, Joseph Emerson, Daniell Ringe, Willm Cogswell; thirty seven give £0. 3s. 0d., among these are Mr. Symond, Frances Dane, Jeames Howe, Will Clarke, Thos Knolton, Willm Averill, Renald Foster, Moses Pengrye, Aron Pengrye, John Fuller, John Andrews Ser., Robert Pearpoynte, Thos: Burnhame; Sixty eight give £0. 2s. 0d., among these are John Whipple, Theophilus Wilson, Robt Lord, Humph: Broadstreet, John Woodham, John Jackson, Andrew Hodges, Stephen Jordan, John Denison, Willm Adams Jun., Willm Adams Ser., Thos: Clarke Jun., Joseph Medcalfe, Thos: Lee, John Lee, Edward Browne, John Hassell, John Browne, Dan Hovey, Robert Kinsman Jun., Willm Storye, Thos: Bishop, John Emerson.

As Robert Lord and "Jeames" Howe were among the "seaven men chosen for this year (27 Feb. 1648)," and Theophilus Willson, and Thos: Knolten were chosen Constables at the same time, Willm Averell's generosity toward their military leader must be undoubted. [It speaks well for the community that there were only ten who gave less than the above mentioned sums.]

Extracts from Essex County Deeds, which mention William Avery, Averell, Averill:

[Until 1641 there was no method in recording deeds, which may account for the loss of some records. Essex County deeds are recorded from 1640.]

Vol. i. p. 192. "Feb. 8, 1648;" William Averell was witness to a deed of John Davis.

Vol. i. p. 137. "26th of 4 mo 1648: From Sale of an Estate by Wm. White to Ralph Dix (Description of land of Wm. White), which is "on the north side of the river by the river toward the South, having the land of William Avery, John Woodham and the widow Jackson toward the north east, and the land of Mr. Samuel Symonds toward the south west coming to the meeting house greene toward the nor west, and also another portion on Muddy River bounded by that river in part (and lands of others, among whom is Reginald Foster);

Volume 1. p. 267. "4th day of the 8th mo. 1651: George Palmer of Ipswich sells to Ralph Dix six acres of land on the North side of the river of Ipswich, joining on the N. W. the land of Wm. Chute and South East the land of Wm. Avery;

Volume i. pp. 377 & 433. "Indenture May 20, 1653, between the Appletons and John Woodam; John Woodam and Mary his wife grant to John Appleton and Samuell Appleton all their dwelling house fences and house lot by estimate three acres be it more or less with the comonage belonging to the dwelling house as it now lyeth bounded and fenced to the ledge of rocks next the meeting house green, from the corner of the lane from the meeting house greene, leading to the river, to ye rock wall, turning down to the house where John Wooddam now dwelleth and so from the corner of the lane aforesaid to the house lott of Reonald Foster, and so over to the house lott of the Widdow Averell and thence to the corner of the rock wall aforesaid next the meeting house green in the towne of Ipswich

this land above mentioned given in exchange for

another house and house lot adjoining to the house lott first above mentioned in this present writing toward the north, and

upon the river toward the south house lot of

Symonds to the West, and the Widow Avarell toward the East.

Vol. i. p. 492. "4th day of 11th mo. 1655. John West deeds three and a half acres to William Story. It has the common ground of Ipswich toward the North, the land of Thomas Low toward the East, Robert Kinsmans that was lately, now of s' 1 William Story toward the South, and of William Averill toward the West. [This and the two items following refer to land occupied by William Averell, Sr., which was Wm. jr.'s only by inheritance.]

Volume i. p. 549. "Feb. 17, 1656. John Kimball Att. for Thomas Scott, deeds 15 acres of land in Ipswich to Geo. Farrow. 3 acres of it are bounded by the land of William Prichett toward the East, of William Avery toward the South of John Warner toward the West—the fence north.

Volume i. p. 598. "Oct. 4. 1658. William Avarell, 'carpenter,' for £6 deeds 'one six acre lott' 'lying within Ipswich comon fence near Muddy river toward Rowley' to John Woodam. It is bounded by the land of Thomas Hart toward the East; of Richard Satchwell toward the South, Samuel Younglove toward the West and of .... toward the North."

There is no evidence that William, Jr., purchased any land in Ipswich, or was granted any, either before or after his father's death; and as his Mother died shortly after, he must have come into possession of this property through some unpublished or unrecorded agreement with his brothers and sisters.

It does not appear that William1 Averell was a freeman. In 1631 it was decided that "no man shall be admitted to the freedom of this body politic but such as are members of some of the churches within the limits of the same" (Fiske's Beginnings of New England, p. 109).

In Plymouth "freemen" were at first the signers of the compact, and such persons as might be added by a majority vote.

1656: It was ordered that "such as are admitted to be freemen of the corporation shall be propounded by the Court being such as have been app'd by the freemen of the town where they live."

1658: They were to be propounded by one June Court, and admitted at the next June Court if thought right. (Not until 1674 was it ordered that the names of freemen be kept upon the Town Records.)

1658: "No 'Quaker Ranter' or any such corrupt pson Shal bee admited to bee a freeman of this Corporation."

From Felt's Ipswich: "To become a freeman each person was legally required to be a respectable member of some Congregational Church. Persons were also made freemen by the General Court of the Colony and also by Quarterly Courts of the Counties. None but freemen could hold office or vote for rulers."

There is absolutely no evidence that William' or his family had any church associations during his life time. It has been supposed by some that the family were Quakers, and the facts that the wife of William' Averell was not received into the Topsfield Church until after her husband's death, and that all his large family of children (except his oldest son, William, who had lived in Ipswich) were baptized after his death indicate at least an unusual state of mind toward the Congregational Church. A search of Massachusetts Quaker records has been made, but it did not reveal any Averys or Averells of Ipswich or Topsfield in 1637-91 as belonging to the Society of Friends. Such a record may be found in Ash, Kent, but no proof has yet been found here. Quaker records for Kent do not precede 1646.

The following items relating to ancient Ipswich and to the contemporaries of William1, may be of interest. They are from Ancient Records of the Town of Ipswich 1634-1654, and Willcomb's Hand book of Ipswich History.

m

1629: "Settlers were to be given 50 acres of land." "At a Court holden at New Towne August 5th 1634; It is ordered that Aggawam shalbe called Ipswich."

"Att a gen'all Court, holden att Newe Towne March 4th 1634: It is ordered, that John Winthrop, John Humfry & John Endicott Esq. or any two of them shall have power to devide ye Lands att Ipswich, within 4 myles of the Town, to yXticular ysons as in equity they shall thinke meete" (y stands for p in many cases).

1634: "Itt is concluded amongst us that any man havinge a house lott granted unto him, shall have any trees felled upon the same, paying a valuable consideration for the fallinge of them." (This was enacted at a period which we think of as being rich in a primeval forest that covered all the land to the very sea-shore.)

The same year November, 1634: "A mill and a Ware were allowed uppon the Towne River about the falles of it to Mr. John Spencer and Mr. Nicholas Easton, uppon this condician, that they shall pte with an equal share of theire Fish to all the Inhabitants of this Town if they bee demanded att five shill a thousand more or less according to the comon price of the Countrye" (see below). Then follows the first recorded list of grants of which we have knowledge:—"grants of 1634, in the mo. of November to Mr. John Spencer, 20 acres; Mr. Nicholas Easton 20 acres; John Wintrop Esq. 6 acres; and again 300 acres; Mr. William Clerke 60 acres; Mr. Robert Coles 200 acres; John Perkins the Elder, 'fouretye' acres; Mr. John Dillingham, 6 acres. Later to John Newman, William Sergiant and William Franklin 12 acres more or less to be equally divided between them, land which Mr. John Spencer had resigned unto the Towne again.

"To John Perkins Junr with Thomas Hardy and Francis Jordan 6 acres in equal share, Thomas Howlett 4-% acres. Thomas Howlett again 6 acres shared with John Maninge. John Gadge 4 acres John Gage with Thomas Clerke six acres shared. Also six acres to John Gadge, in equal shares with Thomas Clerke and others. To Mathias Currin 2 acres. To John Maning 6 acres, with Thomas Howlett, John Gage & others." "Mr. William Clerke was Clerke of the Towne."

Dec. 29th, 1634. "Mr. John Spencer & Mr. Nicholas Easton freelye resygne all that interest they have in a former Towne grant to build a Mill and a Ware upon the Town River" (under specified conditions).

1634. Tobacco is forbidden to be used publicly. 1635. Dwelling houses to be built within one half mile of the meeting house. 1636. Newbury was settled by persons from Ipswich. 1637. Only 37 plows owned by the people of all Mass. 1638. Seven selectmen were appointed. 1641. Deeds ordered to be recorded in one book. 1642. The town voted to establish a free school. 1643. Indian beans are used in voting. 1645. Topsfield was set off from Ipswich. 1647. The second meeting house was built. The Reverend Nathaniel Ward publishes "The simple Cobbler of Agawam." 1649. Smoking forbidden when on the streets. 1651. The town established a Latin School. 1652. The second prison in the colony is built at Ipswich. 1659. Town bell rung at 9 p. m. each day.

The first mention of Chebacco is the grant Dec. 29, 1634, to Richard Kent, "of fouer acres of Land near the River Chebacco and ytt is consented unto, he may build another ware uppon the same River and enjoy the profits of the same."

The second mention is of the same date: "given and granted unto Mr. Nicholas Easton, a great hill of Land, lyeinge towards a Cricke coming out

of the River Chebacco If 300 acres of Land bee not found

on that side of the River, ytt is to bee layed out uppon the other side of the River, to make upp 300 acres."

The third mention is of the same date: "Given and granted unto Mr. John Spencer, three hundred acres of Land, lyeinge next unto the Land of Mr. Easton, towards the River Chebacco." On June 28, 1638, more than a year after the grant to William "Avery," Musconominot, Sagamore of Agawam, sells to Mr. John Winthrop for "Twenty Younds, all the Rights, yroperty, and Cleame I have or ought to have unto all the Lands lying and being in the Bay of Agawan, als (alias) Ipswich being soe Called now by the English, as well as all such Lands Wh I formerly reserved unto my own use at Chebacco, as alsoe all other Lands belonging unto me in those parts Mr. Dummers farme excepted only." He also relinquishes at the same time "all of the Right and interest" which he has "in the Havens, Rivers, Creeks and Hands, huntings and fishings, with all the Woods, Swamps, Timber," etc., and secures him "against the title and cleame of all other Indians and Nations whatsoever." The Witnesses to this deed were Jno. Jollife, Thomas Coytomore, James Downinge, Robert Hardinge.

We quote by permission from Sketch of John Winthrop the Younger by Thomas Franklin Waters.

"(2) Winthrop undoubtedly owned two considerable outlying estates, each of about three hundred acres,—respectively known as Argilla and Castle Hill farms,—the former about two miles from the town, near Labour in Vain Creek, the latter, much more distant, near Ipswich Beach. Both were ultimately sold by him to his brother-in-law, Samuel Symonds, and there is not a particle of evidence that he had previously lived on either. On the contrary, his deeds to Symonds mention no dwelling-houses, and at the time of the Argilla purchase Symonds wrote Winthrop at length about a house he intended to build.

"(3.) A third estate of Winthrop's,—smaller, but nearer the original settlement,—consisted of six acres of land lyinge near the River on the South side thereof. This is one of the earliest grants for tillage or houselots mentioned in existing Town Records, but it was not made until 1634. In 1686 the widow of Rev. John Rogers, President of Harvard College, owned and occupied an estate on the West side of the open Green now known as the South Green, or School-house Green, and in the same year she claimed part of the land 'outside a line drawn from Mr. Saltonstall's fence' and some land 'at the end of the new orchard before the land of William Avory, all this upon the satisfaction of a grant to Mr. Winthrop of six acres of land in 1634.' The town voted her £10 and provided 'that the said land laid down shall be common and be not impropriated by any particular future grant to any person or persons.' It is evident that Winthrop's grant bordered on, if it did not comprise, the South Green, and it apparently included not merely the fine open meadow long part of the Heard estate, but the property at present bounded by Poplar, County, and School Streets. This would have made a very sightly location for his dwelling, but there is not a line of record, not even a floating tradition, that he ever built there." (See Mr. Waters very complete and interesting History of Ipswich with excellent diagrams of the property of the earlier settlers, including the town lot of William1 Averell. Mr. Waters very kindly granted the use of the plates for those diagrams to the compiler of this genealogy. [See pp. 48 and 49]).

In 1694 the heirs of William* Averell sold the old homestead in Ipswich, three acres of land, to Francis Crompton; and it was described as "bounded South East and South West mostly upon ye land ye homestead of Mr. John Rogers minister," the one referred to in the above article [see p. 88].

These records are of value because they give us the names of William Averell's neighbors; Allin Pearley, Robert Kinsman, Richard Hatfield, Samuel Dudley, John Tuttle, Reginald Foster, Richard Lumpkin, Samuel Hall, Richard Browne (?), Mr. Richard Saltonstall, Wm. White, John Woodham, John Jackson, and Widow Jackson, Samuel Symonds, Ralph Dix, Wm. Chute, John and Samuel Appleton, Wm Prichett and Richard Satchwell. If their residences were not on the properties mentioned, their lands at least adjoined.

If our inferences about the birth of William1 Averell are correct, he must have died when about forty years of age. His wife survived him and attested to the truth of the inventory of his estate, March 29, 1653.

The will of William Averell of Ipswich was drawn the "3rd of the 4th mo. 1652" (June 3.); and as it was proved March 29, 1653, he must have died between those two dates. His wife and widow Abigail Averell died before 27; 1:55, at which date an inventory of her estate was presented by her son William Averell, to the Court held at Ipswich.

We give on the opposite page a copy of the photograph of William1 Averell's will, and copies of the will and inventories mentioned above follow.

The will appears in Essex County Probate Records among Old Ipswich Records, Volume xv. p. 122; also in the Court copies of early records in volume ii. p. 54.

INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM AVERELL:

This is a true invetarie of o' goods.

I hous: Lott & house 10-00-00 It" 10 acres of upland gro"n & 6 As o' meddo: 10-00-00

II 2 Kine & 2 two-yer: old i6 - 00 - 00 P 2 shoats 01-00-00 I' 1 Iron pott, 1 brass pott 1 frying pa"

P 4 pewtr platt" 1 flag" 1 Ir° ketle 1 brass ketl 1 Copp 1 brass

pan & some othr smal things 02 - 17 - 00

P 2 chests 1 fethr bed: 1 othr bed: 2 payre o' sheets 2 bolst"

3 pillow" 2 blanketts 1 CoXlid 1 bedstead & othr smal linnen 05 - 10 - 00

P 2 Coats, & wearing appel 03 - 00 - 00

PI warming pa' 00-03-00

I' A tub 2 pails a few books 00 - 10 - 00

A Corslett 01-00-00

what shee oweth 12 - 00 - 00

Reginold fostr Andrew Hodg'

The court held at Ipswich the 29th of march 1653 recd this Inventory p me

THE WILL OF WILLIAM AVERELL:

I william Averill of Ipswich being weake in bodye but of pfect memorye doe make this my last will and testament first I doe bequeath my body to the earth to be deasently buryed in the Burying place of Ipswich my sperit into the hands of my Saviour the Lord Jesus Christ And for my outward estate being but small I doe give vnto my children each of them being seven* in numbar the some of five shillings a peece & the rest of my estate my debts being discharged I give vnto Abygal my wife whom I make sole Execotrix of this my last will in wittnes heerof I have heervnto sett my hand and seale the 3th of the 4th mo: 1652

  • The word seven (which is not perfectly plain) was written in place of the word six which is crossed out.

prvd in court held at Ipswich the 29th of march 1653 by the oath of Andrew Hodges & Renold ffoster p me Robert Lord cleric

Court copies of the above Inventory and Will were certified to in the Office of the Clerk of the Courts for Essex County, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, September 24, 1897, by James P. Hale, Assistant Clerk.

The signature of William Averell to his will was very carefully examined by this Clerk and others, and they decided without question that it was spelled as here printed: Averell. (See The Essex Ant., February, 1901, Volume v, No. 2.)

A photograph of this will was sent to England to Mr. C. A. Hoppin, Jr., and submitted to experts in the reading of writing of that period, there being some disagreement in America over the spelling of the surname. The English experts pronounced the signature to be without doubt, Averell.

Mr. Hoppin wrote that the will proved invaluable and that the signature was certainly Averell (1904).

Nevertheless, the compiler of this genealogy believes that the first generations were not very particular about the spelling, for we find that an even greater number of variations were in use by many families in America that bore other surnames.

Andrew hodges Renold ffoster

Will

Averell

(photo, p 70: the will)

INVENTORY OF GOODS OF ABIGAIL AVERELL. (Essex County—Probate Records.) (Case No. 1025)

this is a true Inventory of the goods of Abigail Auerell widdow and Executoresk of William Auerell: now deceased:

(photocopy)

the perticulers aboue written ware Aprized by us whose names are under written

Andrew hodges Reienold ffoster

a frame raysed & something done to it to be cousd (?) whether it be the estate of the widdows or otherwise William Auerill took his oath in court held at Ipswich the 27 (1) 55

to this Inuentorye to be a true Inuentory.to his best knowledge. Essex SS. Probate Office. June 14, 1907. A true copy.

Attest: J. T. Mahoney. Register.

If Abigail Averell left a will, no record of it has been found; nor have we found any record or reference to the distribution of her property. The inventory of her estate gives the house lot and house at in increased valuation, as is probably the case in the six acres of "meddow." It also includes the six acre lot at Muddy River, probably the original grant which for some reason was not specified under that name in the inventory of her husband's estate. It is possible that during the two years between William Averell's death and her own, she effected an exchange of some or all of the twenty acres of upland at Chebacco, for the "pequett" lott of seven acres, which may have been part of the lot of William "Prichett" (who lived near them), if "Pequett" and "Prichett" refer to the same person.

That Abigail Averell was held in loving remembrance, as well as her husband, is indicated by the fact that one of her sons and five of her grandsons named one of their daughters Abigail.

The children of William and Abigail Averell whose names are known to us and appear in Ipswich town or court records, are the four given in the list below. The three whose names are unknown, of the "seven" mentioned in their father's will, may have been daughters, or some may have been younger sons. In any case, as Everill, Everell and Everall were variants of the name Averell or Averill as found in documents relating to this family, it seems wise to give elsewhere all that we know of James Everill or Everell of Boston, and Abiell Everill or Everell of Boston (they were not Everetts) ; and also, because of association with Ipswich, some items about Thomas Avery of Salem, for which see under A. B. C. in "Memoranda" below.

The children of William and Abigail Averell were "seven" (order not ascertained):

2. i. William5, b. '—, 16—; m. — 1661, Hannah Jackson. 3. ii. Thomas*, b. —, 16—; m. — 1657, Frances Collins. 4. iii. Sarah", b. —, 16—; m. — 1663, John Wildes. 5. iv. John7, b. —, 16—; his name appears in old Ipswich Records

(among Essex Co. Ct. R.), vols. 1-4, p. 159, as John Avery, dep. 1654; and in the same volume, p. 212, as John Averell, 1656, charged with striking Thomas Twigs in the meeting house in the time of public ordinances on the Sabbath. This was after his father's death, and he was not the only youth in Ipswich guilty of such insubordination. See the similar entry about Edward Cogswell and Thomas Bragg. [merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

MEMORANDA.

(A) James Everell (Everill) was a pioneer in the shoe business of Massachusetts, being a leather and shoe merchant in Boston, Mass., in 1650, 1651, 1653, 1654, 1665, 1686; he was Freeman, 3 Sept. 1634; and several times selectman. He was admitted with his wife Elizabeth into

the Old Church, July 20, 1634. He m. (1) Elizabeth ;m. (2)

Mary (see name of executrix of his estate 1682, "Mary Everell").

In Suffolk Registry, Boston, Mass., James appears as Grantee: 1650 (2 mo) 17; James Everell, from Town of Boston; Bendall's dock, with flats belonging thereto [Vol. 1, p. 115.].

1651—March 20: James Everell from Tinge [Vol. 1, p. 189]; a Boston Wharf.

1653 July 21: James Everell from Thomas Dudley [Vol. 1, p. 104.]

1654, Nov. 1: Simon Lynde [" 1." 143.]

Nov. 9: " " " "" [" 2." 92.]

John Shaw [" 2." 104.]

Richard Bellingham

et ux. [" 2." 238.]

1665 :James" "Simon Bradstreet [" 1." 221.]

1686, July 10:'et al Indenture [ " 14." 3.]

1701, June30:(?)" " "Joseph How [ " 20." 291.]

County Suffolk—P. R., Boston, Mass.: For 1683—James Everell: Will; Dec. 11, 1682 (Case No. 1268, Vol. 6, p. 400, Will; Vol. 6, p. 400, Provd; Vol. 9, p. 113 Inv.). He gives the sum of £5 to "Decons" of Old Church in Boston.

Bequest to grandson James Manning .... to my wives granddaughter Elizabeth Adkins 40/s; and unto all my own grandchildren one with another 40/s apiece & to John Ham £3. (James's two daughters Hannah Manning and Elizabeth Grant to share what remains of the estate after the decease of his wife).

Witnesses: (Signed) James Everell.

Richard Collocot John Wisnall. Senr

Feb. 6. 1682, Mary Everell. Execut1 testified that the inventory rendered was true.

[Thomas Dudley and Simon Bradstreet were known to, if not by, William Averell.] James Everell died 1682/3 at Boston. Children:

(By first wife)

i. Ann (hannah)", b. prob. in Eng.; m. (1) William Blanchard; m. (2) George Manning.

ii. EzEKIEL', bap. May 15, 1636; not mentioned by name in father's

will; prob. dec'd.

iii. Coreniah (cornelia?)-', bap. Nov. 4, 1638; not mentioned in

father's will; prob. dec'd.

iv. Elizabeth', bap. Oct. 3, 1641; m. James Grant of Kittery, Me.,

mentioned in will, Dec., 1682. (This place—Kittery—was near York where Thomas2 (No. 3), the son of Wm.1 Averell settled.)

(B) Abiel Everell (or Averell), b. , 16—, lived at Boston,

Mass., where he m. July 6, 1655, Elizabeth Phillips, daughter of Lieut. William Phillips of Watertown, Mass., and Saco, Me. His parentage and his relationships are not known. He may belong to this family, or to that of James Everell. As the Averells and Averills were also called Everell, it appears well to enter Abiel here as possibly one of the sons of William1. He died soon after his marriage. His widow married (2) April 1, 1660, John Alden, Jr. (son of John Alden the pilgrim and Priscilla Mullins, his wife), born 1623.

Suffolk Probate Records, Volume iv, page 9, give the "Inventory of

ye goods of Abiel Everell dec appraised by John Sunderland

and John Sandford, being chosen thereunto and called to appraise them by Mr. John Aldin and Elizabeth his wife, she being formerly ye wife and after ye widow of Abiell Everell aforesaid. This 15th 12mo. 1660."

The inventory mentions his dwelling house and many good articles, a cradle, etc., etc.

John Alden swore to the truth of the inventory Feb. 22, 1660. The only child of Abiell and Elizabeth (Phillips) Everell was: Child (born at Boston):

i. James', born April 4, 1656.

(The fact that he bears this name suggests relationship with James Everell (see above). It is hoped that further search of foreign records may solve the problem of the parentage of James and Abiel Everell who were the first of that name in Boston, as well as that of William1 Averell.)

(C) Thomas Avery of Salem, Mass., progenitor of the Portsmouth Avery stock, was a blacksmith. He appeared in Salem records the year that our ancestor William1 Averell appeared in those of Ipswich—1637.

Reverend John Fisk of Salem in his Annals of that year, records a pledge of membership in his society by "Tho. Avery" 1637.

In Essex Court Records, Vols. 1-4, p. 196, Tomes Aueri of Salem is mentioned as wit. in a case; and in Vol. .., p. 205, is found the will of (Mrs.) Rebecca Bacon, widow of William Bacon of Salem, made the 9th mo. 1655, in which she appoints Brothers Joseph Boys (Boyse, Boice, etc.), Thomas Avery & Nath1 Felton, as Overseers; her son Isaac is made sole executor, assisted by Robert Buffum (as Isaac is under age); and Cousins

(nieces and nephews?) Ann Potter and Rich(ar)d Cheelcraft; Sister Buffum, Sister Coys, Sister Sugthwike (Southwick, wife of Lawrence) Sisters Avery and Horniss (Harnets), and Brother Robert Buffum are mentioned; also Sister Judith in Old England and cousin John and George Bedell. (The wife of Thomas Avery was Susanna.)

In her husband's will, 9th mo. 1653, which was declared in the presence of George Emery and Elizabeth Boyce, their son Isaac was called a minor, and in case of his death Rebecca, the mother, was to have his share. Mention is made in this will of Ann Potter. Overseers are Joseph Boyse and Lawrence Southwick.

Litigation in connection with the inheritance of the above mentioned Ann Potter shows that Ann's father was at one time Mayor of Coventry, England, and that the family or some of them were in Ireland during disturbances there. And Thomas Avery of Salem is mentioned as if related to Ann's family (see Essex Co. Ct. R.).

Also in Old Ipswich Records found among Essex County Records; Vol. 16, p. 44, the Widow Woodmansee's Thirds are mentioned in an extensive legal controversy, and the name of Thomas Avery of Salem appears in the case. It is to be observed that "Mr. Woodmansee," husband of the "Widow" mentioned above, settled at Ipswich in 1635, the year of the Cogswells' arrival, and that there is a tradition that our William' Averell came the same year.

Mr. Water's article on Meeting House Green mentions the following Salem Quakers imprisoned at Ipswich under the edict of October 19, 1658: Samuel Shattocke, Lawrence Southwick, Cassandra Southwicke his wife, Nicho Phelps, Joshua Buffum and Josiah Southwicke. The Southwickes and Joshua Buffum were associated with Thomas Avery in Salem; and it is possible that William Averell and his family were also Quakers.

1. The Thomas Howlett Grist Mill, Topsfield, Built For Him, 1738-9.

2. William1 Averell's Land, The Hedge Between The Site Of His House

And The Site Of His Barn; Topsfield.

3. From "paul Averill's Bridge," Middleton.

4. The Francis Peabody House (See Errata).

Source: The Averell-Averill-Avery family: A record of the descendants of William and Abigail Averell of Ipswich, Mass. ... (Google eBook)

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODkxAAAAMAAJ&output=text&source=gbs_navlinks_s -------------------- Name Origin: Scots/Norman Decendants names appear as Everil, Averill, Averil, Avirel, Averel, Eviril, Averal http://www.averillproject.com/documents/william_of_ipswich_first3generations.pdf

Sources:

The Averell-Averill-Avery family : a record of the descendants of William and Abigail Averell of Ipswich, Mass. (1914) https://archive.org/details/averellaverillav02aver

The Averill Project: http://www.averillproject.com/

William Averill/Avery Sr.: http://www.averillproject.com/documents/william_of_ipswich_first3generations.pdf

WILLIAM OF IPSWICH1 AVERELL1-2 was born in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England. He died between 03 Apr 1652-29 Mar 1653 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts3. He married Abigail Hynton on 26 Nov 1618 in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England2. She was born on 05 Oct 1595 in Bicester, Oxfordshire, England4. She died before Mar 1655 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts5.

Interesting note about William Averill, Sr.: From Felt’s Ipswich: “To become a freeman each person was legally required to be a respectable member of some Congregational Church. Persons were also made freemen by the General Court of the Colony and also by Quarterly Courts of the Counties. None but freemen could hold office or vote for rulers.” There is absolutely no evidence that William or his family had any church associations during his life time. It has been supposed by some that the family were Quakers, and the facts that the wife of William Averell was not received into the Topsfield Church until after her husband’s death, and that all his large family of children (except his oldest son, William, who had lived in Ipswich) were baptized after his death indicate at least an unusual state of mind toward the Congregational Church. A search of Massachusetts Quaker records has been made, but it did not reveal any Averys or Averells of Ipswich or Topsfield in 1637-91 as belonging to the Society of Friends.

Notes for William of Ipswich Averell: Decendants names appear as Everil, Averill, Averil, Avirel, Averel, Eviril, Averal The notes refer to this William Avery as William (Sr), who was also called Avery. According to the notes, William and Abigail Averell settled at Ipswich, Essex Co, MA before March, 1637. Also their last son was born in 1632 in England. Averill Book Notes Ipswich received its present name August 5, 1634. It was taken from common land which had been known as Aggawam before Captain John Smith visited it in 1614. It was occupied by settlers in 1628, but ordered abandoned in 1630; so that the first permanent settlement was made by John Winthrop, Jr. and his companions in 1632-1633, when it was called Plantation of Aggawam. The following year, 1634, about one hundred settlers came, and in 1635 a much larger number, including Bradstreets, Dudleys, Cogswells, Saltonstall, Jackson, Kinsman, Perley, Woodmansee, Andrews and others with whom William Averell was associated more or less. All the records we have of our progenitor from 1637 to 1653 show that he was a resident of Ipswich and these are found in the Town Proceedings of Ipswich (1634-1885), and Essex County Records at Salem (which include land transfers, probate records, court records, and two volumes of Essex County Marriages). An act was passed September 9, 1639, ordering vital statistics to be kept “of every person in this jurisdiction”; and June 11, 1642 an act was passed supplementary to that of 1639, ordering an annual return by Clerks of the Writs of all such vital statistics in the several towns, “to the recorder of the Court nearest their habitation.” As a result of these two acts we find today in Salem in the Essex County Court Records, the two volumes mentioned above; one volume (Ipswich Ct. Series) covering the years from 1654 to 1691, which gives not only county marriages, but Ipswich births and deaths for this period; the other volumes containing county marriages from April, 1681, to March, 1786, including those of Ipswich. As “to become a freeman each person was legally required to be a member of some congregational church,: a majority of the people of Ipswich at this period were undoubtedly identified with the only church there, the First Congregational Church, which was organized in 1634. Reverend Thomas Parker was its first minister. Reverend Nathaniel Ward was ordained its pastor in 1635, and he was succeeded by Reverend John Rogers, who was ordained in 1638, and who held the position until 1655. Reverend John Norton was associated with him during that period. The records of this earliest church are preserved from 1720 to 1885; but unfortunately for us all those preceding 1720 are lost. The following items were copied from records mentioned above, and are here united and preserved for the benefit of his descendants. Although for nine years William Averell’s name appears on Ipswich town records always under the surname of Avery, and always under that name in the Index of the Proceedings of the Town, nevertheless all the references are to the same person, who in the records is called, Averye, Avery, Averell, and Averill (The name is rarely written in Ipswich with u for v appears frequently and also the in the Essex County deeds). Laws for the Proprietors Records, May 14, 1634, states that none but the General Court hath power to…dispose of lands, viz, to give and confirm proprieties, After September 6, 1638, though the first planters were allowed 50 acres for each person this benefit was not to be allowed to all others. The first mention of William Averell is in the grant found in Ipswich Town Records, called The Town Proceedings, page 32; 2d day of March, 1637; Granted to William Avery, six acres of planting ground on the further side of Muddy River, Also twenty acres of upland and six acres of meadow at Chebacco neare Allin Pearleyes. “12 January 1639: Agreed that each three years old Bulls unwrought, shall have allowed 8 cows free of pay, from Keeping and Bulls, and 2 year old Bulls 4 cows apiece free in consideration that the Bulls shall go with the herd till the first day of September. Mr. Brasye 4 Tho: Clark 1 Jo: Perkins 1 Jo: Walker 1 mr. Gardner 1 Avery 1 Wm. White 1 Mr. Norton 1 Varnham 1 Mr. Vincent 1 Mr. Wittingham 1 Bacheler 1 Rovert Mussy 1 Allen Perley 1 Theop: Sachwell 1 Mr. Boreman 1 Edw. Ketcham 1 Newman 1 Reginald Foster 1 Hodges 1 Ma Whipple 1 Mr. Firman 1 Mr. Wilson 1 Goodman Smith 1 Mr. Wm. Payne 2 Mark Symons 1 John Sachwell 1 Daniel Warner 1 Jo: Wyat 1 Jo: Perkins 1 Jo: Warner 1 Mathew Curwin 1 Mr. Bartholmew 1 Jo Jackson 1 Wm. Fuller 1 Mr. Wade 1 Ro Payne 1 Mr. Baker 1 Mr. Tredwell1 Rich: Kimble 2 Alex, Knight 1 Mr. Jo. Tuttle 1 Stayee 1 [In the original entry these people were in groups. This copy of names was taken from Schofield’s printed copy.] 17th of the 12th mo. 1641, appears: “The names of such as are Commoners in Ipswich viz: that have right to Comonage there: the last day of the last month 1641.” There are one hundred and eleven in this list. “Wil’m Averye” being the one hundred and second; among names following his were those of John Jackson and Matthew Whipple, who were associated with him in other ways. “At a meeting of the seven men the first month 1646. Agreed with William Averill, to keep the herd of Goats on the North side of the River, to begin the 10th of this month: and to have for his paines 5s 6d the week, to have 6d a head at their first going out, and the rest at the end of his time, of this pay 3d for every head to be paid in butter or wheat only the last mo. He is to have bur 3s 6d a week.” (Signed) William Averill (The above item, found on p. 129 of the copy from the original record, was copied by Clara Avery from the original volume, before the was sent to Taunton, MA, for repairs and for preservation by the TWR Emery process. At that time the important question was whether our William’s real name was Avery or not. The difference between Averell and Averill was not especially considered then. The entire item she then thought written and signed by William Averell, as it differed in penmanship and in construction from the entry given below which appeared to have been made by the Town Clerk, and had no signature. Returning to Ipswich another year (June 1907), to verify the spelling of the surname and obtain reassurance about the autograph and to secure a tracing, and if possible a photograph of the entry, she was unable to find it in the preserved records of the original volume. She therefore believes that the page was not strong enough to bear the process of restoration. See the attested body of the original records, p. 129, and Schofield’s printed copy of Ipswich Proceedings, First Volume, Old Town Records, 1634-74.) [ITP] 22d 1 mo 46 (From attested copy of the original records): “Agreed with William Avery to Keepe the heard of goates on the North side of the River, to begin the 24th of this present month until the first day of the ix mo. And to have for his pay after six shillings (for the Goates on this side: () Goats on the South side then he is to have after 8s the week, the tyme is to () until the first of November () of his pay he is to have 6d the () first going out, the rest at time, 3d the end in ().” (There was no signature to the above which was evidently an entry by the Town Clerk.) “The Generell Town meeting held the 19th of December 1648: “Whereas the Inhabitants of this Town have engaged themselves to pay yearly on the 10th day of December, unto Major Denison soe long as he shall be there leader, the sum of twenty pounds seaven shilling, in way of Gratuity to encourage him in his military helpfulness unto them, as by their several subscriptions under their hands may appeare. And because it is moset manifest the sayd sum will not be raysed, unless some better order be takeh for the same, especially in respect of the alteration & change of the Inhabitants. “It is therefore ordered, that henceforth, the seaven men, shall yearly in Nonember put the said sume of 24 £ 7s 0d into a rate, yyortioning (portioning) it upon the inhabitants, having also respect unto the bill of subscription of the Towne from yeare to yeare, to be levied and collected by the Constables, and payd unto the sayd Major Denison, on the 10th of December yearly, soo long as he shall continue to be leader of this companye. Voted by the Towne at the generall meeting above mentioned.” “A list of names of those that did subscribe their names to allow unto Major Denison there (or these?) severall somes yearly, while he continued to be our Leader.” [This list contains 161 names of wich “Willm Averill’s name is the fortieth. Of these one gives £0. 10s. 0d., Mr. Robert Payne; four give £0. 8s. 0d., John Apleton, Samuel Apleton, Mr. Tuttle, Rich: Shatowell; three give £0. 6d. 0d., Mr. Willm Payne, Willm Bartholomew, Edward Waldern; three give £0. 5s. 0d., Job Bishop, John Chote, John Andrews, Jun.; thirty five give £0. 4s. 0d., including Mr. Saltonstall, Mr. Hubard, Mr. Rogers, Mr. Norton, Jeames Chute, John Whipple Jun., Thos Perkins, John Burnam, Joseph Emerson, Daniell Ringe, Willm Cogswell; thirty seven give 20s00340.03s. 0d., among these are Mr. Symond, Frances Dane, Jeames Howe, Will Clarke, Thos Knolton, Willm Averill, REnald Foster, Moses Pengrye, Aron Pengrye, John Fuiller, John Adnrews Ser., Robert Pearpoynte, Thos: Burnhame; Sisty eight give £0. 2s. 0d., among these are John Whipple, Theophilus Wilson, Robt Lord, Humph: Boradtreet, John Woodham, John Jackson, Andrew Hodges, Stephen Jordan, John Denison, Willm Adams Jun., Willm Adams Ser., Thos: Clarke Jun., Joseph Medcalfe, Thos: Lee, John Lee, Edward Browne, John Hassell, John browne, Dan Hovey, Robert Kinsman Jru., Willm Storye, Thos: Bishop, John Emerson. As Robert Lord and “Jeames” Howe were among the “seaven men chosen for this year (27 Feb. 1648),” and Theophilus Wilson, and Thos: Knolten were chosen Constables at the same tiem, Willm Averell’s generosity toward their military leader must be undoubted. [It speaks well for the community that there were only ten who gave less than the above mentioned sums.] Extracts from Essex County Deeds, which mention William Avery, Averell, Averill: [Until 1641 there were no method in recording deeds, which may account for the loss of some records. Essex County deeds are recorded from 1640.] Vol. i. p. 192. “Feb. 8, 1648;” William Averell was witness to a deed of John Davis. Vol. i. p. 137. “26th of 4 mo 1648: From Sale of an Estate by Wm. White to Ralph Dix (Description of land of Wm. White), which is “ on the north side of the rive by the river toward the south, having the land of William Avery, John Woodham and the widow Jackson toward the north east, and the land of Mr. Samuel Symonds toward the south west coming to the meeting house greene toward the nor west, and also another portion on Muddy River bounded by that river in pat (and lands of others, among whom is Reginald Foster); Volume 1. p. 267. “4th day of the 8th mo. 1651: George Palmer of Ipswich sells to Ralph Dix six acres of land on the North side of the river of Ipswich, joining on the N.W. the land of Wm. Chute and South East the land of Wm. Avery; Volume 1. pp. 377 & 433. “Indenture May 20, 1653, between the Appletons and John Woodam; John Woodam and May his wife grant to John Appleton and Samuel Appleton all their dwelling house fences and house lot by estimate three acres be it more or less with the commonage belonging to the dwelling house as it now lyeth bounded and fenced to the ledge of rocks next the meeting house green, from the corner of the lane from the meeting house greene, leading to the river, to ye rock wall, turning down to the house where John Wooddam now dwelleth and so from the corner of the land aforesaid to the house lott of Reonald Foster, and so over to the house lott of the Widow Averell and thence to the corner of the rock wall aforesaid next the meeting house green in the towne of Ipswich…this land above menetioned given in exchange for another house and house lot adjoining to the house lott first above mentioned in this present writing toward the north, and upon the river toward the south…house lot of Symonds to the West, and the Widow Avarell toward the East. Vol. i. p. 492. “4th day of 11th mo. 1655. John West deeds three and a half acres to William Story. It has the common ground of Ipswich toward the North, the land of Thomas Low toward theEast, Robert Kinsmans that was lately, now of sd William Story toward the South, and of William Averill toward the Weast. [This and the two items following refer to land occupied by William Averell, Sr., which was Wm. Jr.’s only by inheritance.] Volume i. p. 549. “Feb. 17, 1656. John Kimball Att. For Thomas Scott, deeds 15 acres of land in Ipswich to Geo. Farrow. 3 acres of it are bounded by land of William Prichett toward the East, of William Avery toward the South of John Warner toward the West - the fence north.

More: http://www.averillproject.com/documents/william_of_ipswich_first3generations.pdf

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William Averill Sr.'s Timeline

1611
1611
Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England, United Kingdom

1. William1 Averell, the first of our family in America, settled at Ipswich, Mass., before March, 1637, the date on which he received his first grant of land from that town, and on which his name is first recorded in the Town Proceedings. He appears there as William Avery. It is evident from this and other records that he was born about 1611 or earlier, and that, like many others who came to the shores of New England at that time, he was a simple husbandman, young, and with small means.

The Averell-Averill-Avery family:
A record of the descendants of William and Abigail Averell of Ipswich, Mass. ... (Google eBook)

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODkxAAAAMAAJ&output=text&s...

1618
November 26, 1618
Age 7
England

His wife's name was Abigail (surname unknown), and she appears to have been the mother of all his children. It seems probable that their two eldest sons were born before 1637, because they were "presented" before the Court "for defect in watching," 31, 3, 1649. As it is certain that watching could not have been done very intelligently by lads less than fifteen years of age, they must have been born about 1632 and 1634. So it is likely that the marriage of William Averell to Abigail took place in 1631 or 1632, while they were still very young, and if not in Ash or Ipswich, possibly in some other place in England or America.

The Averell-Averill-Avery family:
A record of the descendants of William and Abigail Averell of Ipswich, Mass. ... (Google eBook)

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODkxAAAAMAAJ&output=text&s...

1619
October 17, 1619
Age 8
Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, Eng
1621
October 14, 1621
Age 10
Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, Eng
1623
September 28, 1623
Age 12
Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, Eng
1625
June 26, 1625
Age 14
Chipping Norton, Oxford, England

2. William2 Averell, called also Averill and Avery (William'), b. probably in England, about 1632, at a place and date still unknown, lived with his parents at Ipswich, Mass.

The Averell-Averill-Avery family:
A record of the descendants of William and Abigail Averell of Ipswich, Mass. ... (Google eBook), pages 79-97

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODkxAAAAMAAJ&source=gbs_navlin...

1627
1627
Age 16
Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England
1630
January 7, 1630
Age 19
Chipping Horten, Oxfordshire, England
1630
- January 1631
Age 19

He must have left home by January, 1631, when eighteen or twenty years of age.

The Averell-Averill-Avery family:
A record of the descendants of William and Abigail Averell of Ipswich, Mass. ... (Google eBook)

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODkxAAAAMAAJ&output=text&s...

1630
- 1637
Age 19
Ipswich, MA, USA

...He must have left home by January, 1631, when eighteen or twenty years of age. His name does not appear in Kent records so far as known after 1637; and our first record of him in America is found in the Proceedings of the Town of Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, volume 1, page 32; "in the year of 1637, the 2d day of March," when under the name of "William Avery," he received a grant of land in that town...

...The precise date of their settlement in Ipswich is not known, and it is not impossible that they came there earlier than the date of record. A tradition in one branch of the family is that he came with the Cogswells to Ipswich in 1635. The name William Averell, Averill or Avery has not yet been found in any passenger lists of emigrants to America; but lists not yet found may come to light and reveal the knowledge we seek.

Ipswich received its present name August 5, 1634. It was taken from common land which had been known as Aggawam before Captain John Smith visited it in 1614. It was occupied by settlers in 1628, but ordered abandoned in 1630; so that the first permanent settlement was that made by John Winthrop, Jr., and his companions in 1632-3, when it was called the Plantation of Aggawam. The following year, 1634, about one hundred settlers came, and in 1635 a much larger number, including the Bradstreets, Dudleys, Cogswells, Saltonstall, Jackson, Kinsman, Perley, Woodmansee, Andrews and others with whom William Averell was associated more or less.

All the records we have of our progenitor William Averell from 1637 to 1653 show that he was a resident of Ipswich, and these are found in the Town Proceedings of Ipswich (16341885), and Essex County Records at Salem (which include land transfers, probate records, court records, and two volumes of Essex County Marriages).

The Averell-Averill-Avery family:
A record of the descendants of William and Abigail Averell of Ipswich, Mass. ... (Google eBook)

http://books.google.com/books?id=ODkxAAAAMAAJ&output=text&s...