William Bassett, of Plymouth

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William Bassett

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Possibly , Bethnal Green, Middlesex, England
Death: Died in Bridgewater, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Bridgewater, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of unknown father of William Bassett of Plymouth and unknown mother of William Bassett of Plymouth
Husband of Elizabeth Bassett and Mary Bassett
Father of William Bassett, of Sandwich; Elizabeth Burgess; Sarah White; Nathaniel Bassett; Nathaniel Bassett and 4 others

Occupation: Blacksmith
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William Bassett

from: http://www.bassettbranches.org/tng/getperson.php?personID=I1&tree=Fortune

NOTE: HIS PARENTS ARE NOT PROVEN

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William Bassett was possibly the son of William Bassett of Bethnal Green, London. A William Bassett was baptized at Stepney, England on 24 Oct 1600. Our William came over on the ship Fortune in 1621; settled fir Plymouth, then in Duxbury, and finally in Bridgewater, of which town he was an original proprietor. He died there in 1667. He was comparatively wealth being a large land holder, only four in Plymouth paying a higher tax in the year 1633. He had a large library. In 1648, he was fined five shillings for neglecting "to mend guns in seasonable times" - an offense of not a very heinous character - but is shows that he was a mechanic as well as a planter. His name is on the earliest list of freeman, made in 1633; he was a volunteer in the company raised in 1637, to assist Massachusetts and Connecticut in the Pequod War; a member of the committee of the town of Duxbury to lay out bounds, and to decide on the fitness of persons applying to become residents and was representative to the Old Colony Court six years. His son William settled in Sandwich; was there in 1651, and is the ancestor of the families of that name in that town, and of some of the families in Barnstable and Dennis. His son, Colonel William Bassett, was Marshall of Plymouth Colony at the time of the union with Massachusetts, and in 1710, one of the judges of the Interior Court, and afterwards Register of Probate. When William Bassett died, he left books by Robinson and Ainsworth, a concordance, commentaries, sermons, and religious histories. There is no evidence to link our William Bassett with the Willi Bassett of Leyden who married (1) Cecelia Leight before 1611. He is listed a widower when he married (2) Margaret Oldham on 13 May 1611 in Leyden, Holland. Our William married (1) Elizabeth, possibly a Tilden, most likely in 1623 after the ship Ann arrived in Plymouth. Elizabeth was the mother of all of his children. Elizabeth died before 1650. He married (2) Mary (Tilden) Lapham, widow of Thomas Lapham and daughter of Nathaniel and Lydia (Huckstepp) Tilden, sometime after 1651.

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Summary article with illustrations here: Deep In The Woods II - Exploring our History and Heritage: 1593: William Bassett l thank you, Jean Hageman

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ESTATE OF WILLIAM BASSETT

INVENTORY OF ESTATE OF WILLIAM BASSETT May the 12 anno. domini 1667

An Inventory taken of the moveable goods of William Basse Bridgewater, deceased.

It a payr billowes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10- It an anvill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-00- It a vice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10- It the tongs hammers beckhorne . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10- It al the rest of Small shopp Tools . . . . . . . . . 4-00- It Answorth on 5 books moses . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-06- It Ursiuns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-10- It more to books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-10- It a comentary on romans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-10- It a concordance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-16- It a commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-12- Wilson on the romans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-10- Mayer on 4 evangelists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-10- Rogers his seven treteses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-08- Haris on the beatituds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-07- wilsons dixsonary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-08- Knights concordance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-08- Mayers exposition of diffcultys of . . . . . . . . . . 0-05- to small books against prelassy . . . . . . . . . . . 0-04- weemses explanation of ceremonial law . . . . . . . . 0-07- dike on deceitfulness of the hart . . . . . . . . . . 0-03- mR Robinsons observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-02- a tretise of precious faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-02- a parcel of small books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-08- a mare and colt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-00- 3 cowes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10- to steers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-00- one Hiefer and a steer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-00- Three yearlings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-05- a sow & seven shots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-05- A rugg and fether bed & bolsters and sheets . . . . . 6-00- mor and other smal fether bed boster & covering . . . 2-05- more another rugg and fether bed and bolster sheets and pillowes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10- to pillowes to blankets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-15- a parcell of flax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-05- cotton yarne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-00- smal parcel yarn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-07- 9 pounds of sheeps wool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-09- corne 18 bushels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14- an oxe hide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-18- to bushels of malt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-08- three baggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-08- on sadle & bridle & sadle cloth & girts . . . . . . . 1-10- a panel.. & girt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-07- a cart rope & halter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-05- a horse harnes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-04- Cow bels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-03- nails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-15- to payr of scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-08- old hogsheeds & tubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-04- ------ 84-11-

Pewter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-00- three pots and pot hooks & skillet . . . . . . . . . . 1-00- Iron mortar pot hangers Smothing Iron tongs and fier shovel and spil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-14- a candlestick & gridiron & fram of skillet . . . . . . 0-09- howes and axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-15- Plow Irons & chaines rop ring & staple . . . . . . . . 1-18- Cart & wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-02- four guns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-05- four forks & tu rakes a spade & tu shovels . . . . . . 0-09- three weges & a wheel and wheelbarrow . . . . . . . . 0-10- a parcell of hemp and tu braks . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-17- a grindstone with his Iron hanging . . . . . . . . . . 0-18- trayes a smal ketle & barrels & tubs . . . . . . . . . 1-16- a Cheese press sives & sifting troughs payls and half bushell & winding blades & hunk . . . . . . . . . 0-17- in mony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-11- powder bullets & horne & hemp hichel . . . . . . . . . 0-12- a cutlesse warming pan & frying pan . . . . . . . . . 1-00- a suite & cloak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-00- more one suite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12- another suite & cloak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10- a troopers coat & doblet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-03- old cloathes and stockens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-05- foure shirts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-00- apeice of stufe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-00- gloves caps and bands & neckcloths . . . . . . . . . . 0-15- pillow beers napkins old linen . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-10- shewes & hats & a carpet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-04- cheasts chaires and table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-00- a parcell of books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-00- to Thwart sawes agers steeles sithes sneads . . . . . 1-00- ropes & baskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-02- some small triviall things happyly forgotten . . . . . 0-05-00

The Inventory made by William Bre John Willis

Mary ye relict of the bove sd William Bassett tooke oath this 25 of May (67) before me Thomas Hinckley Asst.

THE FORTUNE

The actual second boat to Plymouth was the 55 ton Fortune. It arrived at Cape Cod on Nov. 11, 1621 with "35 persons to remaine and live in ye plantation." Under command of Thomas Barton, master, she had left London in July. The pilgrim fathers and mothers were settling in for another long, cold winter. They didn't expect another boat until spring. When the Fortune's tall white mainsail was seen off Cape Cod the nervous colonists thought it was a French raiding party come down from Canada to make mischie Governor William Bradford convened a council of war. Defense chief Miles Standish, "the little chimney easily fired," mustered "every man, yea boy, that could handle a gun" and ordered the 1,500 pound cannon on Fort Hill to thunder out a warning shot. As the Fortune tacked into Plymouth harbor, the settlers were surprised and relieved to see her run up the red cross of England, this being in the days before Scotland's cross of Andrew was added to the Union Jack. Plymouth's sturdy little shallop, a tiny fishing vessell, brought ashore 35 new settlers, all in good health, "which did not a little rejoyce them The welcome mat frayed a bit when it was learned that the penny pinching Merchant Adventurers, the Colony's underwriter in London, had sent the Fortune out with no provisions..."not so much as bisket cake or any victialls," little bedding beyond "some sorry things" in their cabins, and neither "pot nor pan to dresse any meate in." Like those who crossed on the Mayflower, not all on the Fortune had come to the New World seeking religious freedom. Only 12 were listed in Plymouth's company of "saints," Separatist followers of Robert "Trouble Church" Browne, a famous and fiesty dissenter from the Church of England. The "saints" on the second boatload included such names as William Bassett, Jonathan Brewster, William Wright, Thomas Morton, Austin Nicholas and 14 year old Thomas Cushman, who was adopted by Governor Bradford and grew up to become Plymouth's ruling elder. The rest were "strangers" - artisans and craftsmen sent over by the sponsoring adventurers to make the colony viable enough to send fur and timber back to England for profit. Included among them were Stephen Deane, a miller; vintner William Hilton; Robert Hicks, a dealer in hides; armorer William Pitt; carriage maker Thomas Prence, who later became governor; and, "fellmonger" Clement Briggs, also a dealer in skins. There was also a John Adams-a family name that was to leave an indelible mark on the new continent- and William Conner, who might have been Irish and either died or left the colony a few years later. Besides the "lusty yonge men, and many of them wild enough," the Fortune also carried four women, among them Martha "Goodwife" Ford who, the journals report, was "delivered of a sonne the first night she landed, and both are doing very well." The newcomers found a tidy, tiny town rising along "a very swee brooke under a hillside." There were 11 buildings along Leyden Street, seven private dwellings and four common houses for stores, arms and bachelors. Plymouth had made peace with a half dozen neighboring Indian tribes, had celebrated its first harvest and witnessed its first marriage, between Susanna Fuller White, a widow of three months, and Edward Winslow, a widower of less than two months. The colony had also witnessed its first and last duel, between Edward Dotey and Edward Leister. The little corn field on the hill behind the meeting house hid the graves of more than half the 101 passengers who alighted from the Mayflower. After surviving that first bitter winter and a spring epidem scurvy and pneumonia, "when they were but six or seven sound persons" to work the fields and put up the buildings, the Plymouth settlers were shocked to learn that Robert Cushman arrived on the Fortune with an insulting letter from Thomas Weston, speaking for the adventurers. It berated the colonists f keeping the Mayflower too long and sending her back empty. The letter also accused them of "weakness" and squandering their time in "discoursing, arguing and consulting". They swallowed the insults and loaded the Fortune with beaver a otter pelts, bartered with the Indians for cheap trinkets, and stuffed as much hardwood timber, wainscoting and "good clapboard" as they could into the ship's hold. The Fortune set sail on its return trip to England Dec. 13, just over a month after arriving, only to fall into the hands of French pirates, who hijacked the cargo and stripped the ship of everything of value on boar including her sheet anchor. They left the passengers, including Robert Cushman who had left his son behind in Plymouth, with not a "hat to their heads or a shoe to their feet." The new colonists from the Fortune were on hand for the second Thanksgiving feast at Plymouth in 1622. The Thanksgiving celebration, then usually held in October, was repeated almost every year thereafter in the Plymouth Colony and soon became a tradition throughout New England. Thanksgiving moved west in the covered wagon era and became a national holiday in 1863, when a war weary President Abraham Lincoln set aside the last Thursday in November as a time for public thanksgiving.

(The above story from THE SECOND BOAT MAGAZINE, May 1982)

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21666. William Bassett343,344,403,404,423 was born between 1595 and 1600 in Of, Sandwich, Kent, England. He was christened on 24 Oct 1600 in Stepney, London, England. He was buried on 12 May 1667 in Bridgewater, England. He died in 1667 in Bridgewater, Plymouth Colony.205 He was born in England.424 He was a blacksmith in Bridgewater, Plymouth Colony. BASSET, WILLIAM -William Basset, of the Leiden Separatists, arrived in 1621 on the Fortune. In Leiden records, he is shown as a master mason, from Sandwich, Kent. He was a widower of Cicely Bassett, and he was betrothed in Leiden in 1611 to Mary Butler, with William Brewster, Roger Wilson, Anna Fuller, and Rose Lisle as witnesses, but Mary died before the marriage. He was betrothed on 29 July 1611 to Margaret Oldham, with Edward Southworth, Roger Wilson, Elizabeth Neal, and Wybra Pontus as witnesses, and they married 13 August 1611. He married in Leiden a third time to Elizabeth (Dexter, p. 165), and he brought her and their son William to Plymouth. Wife Elizabeth and children William and Elizabeth were in the 1627 division, but the wife died later. Basset married at Plymouth a fourth wife after 5 June 1651 Mary (Tilden) Lapham, for on that date Timothy Hatherly proved the will of Thomas Lapham, deceased. The widow Lapham, being weak, was not able to appear in court (PCR 2:169). Earlier, 22 June 1650, Mary Lapham, widow of Thomas Lapham of Scituate, confirmed the sale of land in Tenterden, Kent, to Thomas Hiland (MD 10:199; PCR 12:194). The will of Timothy Hatherly dated 12 December 1664 (MD 16:158-59), left L5 to the wife of William Basset, "my wifes Daughter, " and thus Mary would have been the daughter of Nathaniel Tilden of Scituate. 

On 8 November 1666 William Basset, who described himself as a blacksmith of Bridgewater, sold four lots to John Sprague of Duxbury, and Basset's wife Mary gave her consent, John Sprague being her husband's son-in-law (Ply. Colony LR 3:66). In his will, dated 3 April 1667, sworn 5 June 1667, William Basset mentioned his unnamed wife (Mary swore to his inventory), his son Joseph, and his son William's son William (MD 16:162); the inventory shows an interesting collection of books. On 2 June 1669 William Basset of Sandwich, oldest son of William Basset sometime of Bridgewater, deceased, confirmed land to his youngest brother, Joseph Basset of Bridgewater (Ply. Colony LR 3:140). William Basset, Sr. also had a daughter Sarah, who married Peregrine White, q.v.; a daughter Ruth, who married John, son of Francis Sprague, q.v. (TAG 41:178); and a daughter Elizabeth, who married Thomas Burgess in 1648 (PCR 8:6) and divorced him in 1661 after he was brought to court for an act of uncleanness with Lydia Gaunt (the first divorce in Plymouth Colony), and the Court allowed Elizabeth to keep small things "that are in William Basset's hands" (PCR 3:221). On 6 June 1683 Goodwife Sprague and her son John agreed about land which formerly belonged to John Sprague's grandfather Basset (PCR 6:109). Ruth (Basset) Sprague married (2) a man whose surname was Thomas (TAG 41:179). William, Sr. also had a son Nathaniel 2 Basset. Robert Ray King, "The Family of Nathan Basset of Chatham," NEHGR 125:7, has to do with Nathan 3 Basset, the son of Nathaniel 2 Basset and his wife Dorcas Joyce, daughter of John. (Note: In correspondence, Robert S. Wakefield questions whether it was the same William Basset in all four marriages, and it is a surprisingly large number of Englishmen sharing a name with someone else that was resident in Leiden-)

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. William Bassett and Elizabeth Tilden were married about 1621 in Bridgewater, England.205

William Bassett was born in Sandwich, Kent, England. He was christened 24 0ct 1600 in Stepney, London, England. He died on 4 Apr 1677 in Bridgewater, Plymouth, MA. He was buried on 12 May 1677 in Bridgewater, Plymouth, MA. He married Elizabeth Tilden.

A gunsmith and metal worker (other records list him as "master mason", William arrived on the Ship "Fortune" in 1621, the second ship to bring colonists to Plymouth Colony. The Leyden, Holland record indicates that William Bassett came from Sandwich, England and that he was a master mason. William was Representative, 1640-44 with Governor Bradford and others. Following arrival in 1921, he was one of the "purchasers," first in Plymouth with his wife Elizabeth and son William and daughter Elizabeth, and took part in the division of cattle in 1627. He then resided at Duxbury, and was subsequently among the first settlers of Bridgewater in 1652.

Identified in England as member of "Leiden Separitists"

William - occupation: gunsmith / worker in metals - came over on the ship Fortune in 1621 - settled first in Plymouth, then in Duxbury and finally in Bridgewater, Mass. - of which town he was an original proprietor.


He was a large landowner - with only four in Plymouth paying a higher tax in 1633. He had a large library of books. His name is on the earliest list of freemen in 1633. He was a volunteer for the Pequod War in 1637 and on the committee to lay out the town of Duxbury.

The "First Comers"

     
Under the original agreement with the "merchant adventurers", those who came and worked as partners in the Plymouth venture would all benefit from the 1627 Division of the colony assets. While we tend to give the Mayflower passengers special consideration as "The Pilgrims" (a term they did not use to denote themselves that came into use at the end of the 18th century), the Plymouth colonists classified all those who arrived on the first four ships alike, and referred to them as the "Old Comers" or "First Comers" (which also included a few stragglers such as Phineas Pratt). 

The ship Fortune arrived at Plymouth on November 9, 1621, just a few weeks after the First Thanksgiving. The Anne & Little James, the vessels parted company at sea; the ANNE arrived the latter part of June 1623, and the LITTLE JAMES some week or ten days later. All the vessels bringing new settlers along with many of the wives and children that had been left behind in Leyden when the Mayflower departed in 1620.

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He lived and died in Sandwich, Mass.

Reference for him and his family:

The Identity of Sarah Bassett of Middleborough, Massachusetts and Mansfield, Connecticut.

By Marston Watson

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Prior to his immigration, he was a member of the Leiden Separatist congregation.

one of the forefathers, and one of the twenty-seven heads of families who arrived in the ship 'FORTUNE', and landed in Plymouth Nov 11, 1621.

he settled first in Plymouth, then Duxbury, and finally in Bridgewater of which town he was an original proprietor. he died there in 1667. he was comparatively wealthy, being a large land-holder, only 4 in Plymouth paying a higher tax in 1633. he had a valuable library, from which it is to be inferred that he was an educated man. he had lands allotted to him, his wife, his son, William Bassett Jr., and his daughter, Elizabeth in the division of may 22, 1627. He removed to Duxbury before 1639. he sold land to the Reverand Ralph Partridge in Duxbury in 1637. in 1640 he received a large grant of 100 acres at Beaver Pond. A Deputy from Duxbury from 1640-43-44; constable 1652' name on the earliest list of freeman made in 1633; was a volunteer in the company raised in 1637 to asst Ma and CT in the Pequod War; a member of the committee of the town of Duxbury to lay out bounds. In 1652 he sold lands to his son-in-law, Peregrene White. Rep to the old colony court for 6 years.

Was a Master Mason of Bethnal Green, Middlesex Cty, England.

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This William Bassett lived in Scrooby England( or Sandwich or Stepney) and went to Leyden Holland in 1608. He was with the Pilgrims on the Speedwell which was determined to be unseaworthy and forced to return to Plymouth, England. He came to the Plymouth Colony on the 2nd ship, Fortune (1621.) He settled in Duxbury, was a neighbor to Miles Standish and was an armourer and blacksmith. He died in Bridgewater leaving much land and a large library--some donated to Harvard.

(Ref. State War Papers of New Hampshire, Vol. XIV page 427, Vol. XV, pg 3 and 741. National Numbers 187301 and 203966. Supplemental 63586, DAR)

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We think of William Bassett as a Pilgrim, a blacksmith, and the owner of a many more books than usual for his time and place. But in 1621 he showed that he was also a risk-taker, when he embarked on a long sea voyage to a tiny colony in a strange land with a minimum of preparation. Governor William Bradford of Plymouth Colony describes ship Fortune’s arrival in his history Of Plimoth Plantation:

In Novembr [1621], about yt time twelfe month that themselves came [i.e., Bradford and the Pilgrims on the Mayflower], there came in a small ship to them unexpected or looked for, in which came Mr. Cushman and with him 35 persons to remaine & live in ye plantation; which did not a little rejoice them. And they when they came ashore, and found all well, and saw plenty of vitails [victuals?] in every house, were no less glade. For most of them were lusty yonge men, and many of them wild enough, who little considered whither or aboute what, they wente, till they came into ye harbore at Cap-Codd.
So they were all landed; but ther was not so much as a bisket-cake or any other victialls for them neither had they any beding, but some sory things they had in their cabins, nor pot, nor pan, nor overmany cloaths. The plantation was glad of this addition of strength but could have wished that many of them had been of better condition; but yt could not now be helpte.

This was no mere inconvenience. Half of the first 100 colonists had died the previous winter. The ship left in early December, and Bradford and his assistant

disposed these late comers into several families as they best could, took an exact account of all their provisions in store and proportioned the same to the number of persons, and found that it would not hold out above six months at half allowance, and hardly that; and they could not well give less this winter time till fish came in again. So they were presently put to half allowance, one as well as another, which began to be hard, but they bore it patiently under hope of supply.

William survived the winter. By 1623 he was married and by 1627 he and his wife Elizabeth had two children. Nobody knows who she was or exactly when they married; they might even have come over together on the Fortune.

They settled down and made good. Eleven years after he arrived, only four people in Plymouth paid more taxes than he did. He served on an inquest jury and hired an indentured servant for six years. (But I’ve never seen him called “Mr.” in the records. Although he rubbed elbows with Plymouth Colony’s elite he was never one of them.)

In 1630 the much more numerous, and somewhat less radical, Puritans settled not far to the north. (Unlike the Pilgrims, the Puritans considered themselves part of the Church of England, and took care not to seem too radical or separatist, for fear that the English authorities would crush them.) This large neighboring population created a market for corn and cattle, and in 1637 William was among the men who moved to a new settlement in Duxbury (”Ducksburrow”), about 5 miles across the bay from Plymouth, in order to make the most of the opportunity. Prominent settlers included John Alden, Myles Standish, Jonathan Brewster, and Thomas Prence.

The move made commercial sense but it split the colony. The Pilgrim Fathers had wanted to maintain a compact settlement in which the settlers could worship together, keep an eye on one another’s good behavior, and efficiently defend themselves against any Indian attack. Bradford lamented,

Those that had lived so long together in Christian and comfortable fellowship must now part and suffer man  divisions. First, those tha  lived on
                                                                                          

Sprawl won out in 1637 as it has almost ever since. William himself granted some land to Ralph Partridge, the new minister in Duxbury. In May 1638, the colony’s legislature ordered that

the lands on Duxborrow side shall not be disposed to any but to such new commers as Mr. Collyer, Mr. Partrich, Jonathan Brewster, & Willm Basset shall approve to be fitt for their societie.

William served in the colonial legislature — known in those days as the General Court — several times in the 1640s as one of Duxbury’s representatives along with Standish and Alden. He served several years as Duxbury’s constable, a responsible and sometimes onerous position. As blacksmith, he was responsible for mending guns, and in the spring of 1649 was fined five shillings for not getting them mended “in seasonable time.”

Even in his fifties he wasn’t done pioneering. In 1655 he left Duxbury to become one of the first settlers of Bridgewater, the first inland Plymouth Colony settlement. At some point after 1634 his wife Elizabeth died and he eventually married second the widow Mary Tilden Lapham.

Over time he accumulated one of the largest libraries in the colony. After his death his books were valued at almost 10 pounds, a significant fraction of his estate. In his estate inventory they’re listed as follows:

Ainsworth on the 5 bookes of Moses, ursinus, a Comentary on the Romans, a Concordance, a Comentary, Wilson on the Romans, Mayer on the Evangelests, Rogers his 7 treateses, harris on the beatitude, Wilsons Dixonary, Knights Concordance, Madyors exposition on, 2 smale bookes against prelacye, Weams his explanation of the Cerimoniall law, Dike on Deceitfulnes of the hart, Mr. Robinsons observations, a treatise of precious faith.

We may wonder whether William’s children ever reminded him of his younger adventurous self. In March 1649 his daughter Sarah and her husband Peregrine White were in court charged with “fornication before marriage,” as were daughter Ruth and husband John Sprague six years later. Son Nathaniel was fined 20 shillings in 1653 for “disturbing divine service” in Duxbury. And in 1661 daughter Elizabeth asked for and received a divorce from her husband Thomas Burgess after he had been sentenced to two severe whippings for committing an unspecified “act of uncleanness” with one Lydia Gaunt. This was the first divorce granted in Plymouth. (Burgess and Gaunt took off for Rhode Island.)

Death caught William unawares; he wrote no will but Plymouth court testimony records the deathbed scene. On April 3, 1667, he found himself so weak and sick that he told Mary: “Wife, I must leave thee but I shall leave thee with the Lord; if God had lengthened out my life it might have been that thou mightest have been more comfortably provided for.”

His friends asked him about his estate, “whether his mind was as formerly; That hee would give his moveable goods with his Chattles to his wife.” He “answared yea it was his mind; and that shee should have the house and ground till shee Died; if she Married not; and then hee would give it to his son Williams son; and his tools to his son Joseph.”

What about his books, someone asked, “which hee formerly took care about”? “Answared hee Could not now Doe it.”

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21666. William Bassett343,344,403,404,423 was born between 1595 and 1600 in Of, Sandwich, Kent, England. He was christened on 24 Oct 1600 in Stepney, London, England. He was buried on 12 May 1667 in Bridgewater, England. He died in 1667 in Bridgewater, Plymouth Colony.205 He was born in England.424 He was a blacksmith in Bridgewater, Plymouth Colony. BASSET, WILLIAM -William Basset, of the Leiden Separatists, arrived in 1621 on the Fortune. In Leiden records, he is shown as a master mason, from Sandwich, Kent. He was a widower of Cicely Bassett, and he was betrothed in Leiden in 1611 to Mary Butler, with William Brewster, Roger Wilson, Anna Fuller, and Rose Lisle as witnesses, but Mary died before the marriage. He was betrothed on 29 July 1611 to Margaret Oldham, with Edward Southworth, Roger Wilson, Elizabeth Neal, and Wybra Pontus as witnesses, and they married 13 August 1611. He married in Leiden a third time to Elizabeth (Dexter, p. 165), and he brought her and their son William to Plymouth. Wife Elizabeth and children William and Elizabeth were in the 1627 division, but the wife died later. Basset married at Plymouth a fourth wife after 5 June 1651 Mary (Tilden) Lapham, for on that date Timothy Hatherly proved the will of Thomas Lapham, deceased. The widow Lapham, being weak, was not able to appear in court (PCR 2:169). Earlier, 22 June 1650, Mary Lapham, widow of Thomas Lapham of Scituate, confirmed the sale of land in Tenterden, Kent, to Thomas Hiland (MD 10:199; PCR 12:194). The will of Timothy Hatherly dated 12 December 1664 (MD 16:158-59), left L5 to the wife of William Basset, "my wifes Daughter, " and thus Mary would have been the daughter of Nathaniel Tilden of Scituate. 

On 8 November 1666 William Basset, who described himself as a blacksmith of Bridgewater, sold four lots to John Sprague of Duxbury, and Basset's wife Mary gave her consent, John Sprague being her husband's son-in-law (Ply. Colony LR 3:66). In his will, dated 3 April 1667, sworn 5 June 1667, William Basset mentioned his unnamed wife (Mary swore to his inventory), his son Joseph, and his son William's son William (MD 16:162); the inventory shows an interesting collection of books. On 2 June 1669 William Basset of Sandwich, oldest son of William Basset sometime of Bridgewater, deceased, confirmed land to his youngest brother, Joseph Basset of Bridgewater (Ply. Colony LR 3:140). William Basset, Sr. also had a daughter Sarah, who married Peregrine White, q.v.; a daughter Ruth, who married John, son of Francis Sprague, q.v. (TAG 41:178); and a daughter Elizabeth, who married Thomas Burgess in 1648 (PCR 8:6) and divorced him in 1661 after he was brought to court for an act of uncleanness with Lydia Gaunt (the first divorce in Plymouth Colony), and the Court allowed Elizabeth to keep small things "that are in William Basset's hands" (PCR 3:221). On 6 June 1683 Goodwife Sprague and her son John agreed about land which formerly belonged to John Sprague's grandfather Basset (PCR 6:109). Ruth (Basset) Sprague married (2) a man whose surname was Thomas (TAG 41:179). William, Sr. also had a son Nathaniel 2 Basset. Robert Ray King, "The Family of Nathan Basset of Chatham," NEHGR 125:7, has to do with Nathan 3 Basset, the son of Nathaniel 2 Basset and his wife Dorcas Joyce, daughter of John. (Note: In correspondence, Robert S. Wakefield questions whether it was the same William Basset in all four marriages, and it is a surprisingly large number of Englishmen sharing a name with someone else that was resident in Leiden-)

From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996. William Bassett and Elizabeth Tilden were married about 1621 in Bridgewater, England.205

William Bassett was born in Sandwich, Kent, England. He was christened 24 0ct 1600 in Stepney, London, England. He died on 4 Apr 1677 in Bridgewater, Plymouth, MA. He was buried on 12 May 1677 in Bridgewater, Plymouth, MA. He married Elizabeth Tilden.

A gunsmith and metal worker (other records list him as "master mason", William arrived on the Ship "Fortune" in 1621, the second ship to bring colonists to Plymouth Colony. The Leyden, Holland record indicates that William Bassett came from Sandwich, England and that he was a master mason. William was Representative, 1640-44 with Governor Bradford and others. Following arrival in 1921, he was one of the "purchasers," first in Plymouth with his wife Elizabeth and son William and daughter Elizabeth, and took part in the division of cattle in 1627. He then resided at Duxbury, and was subsequently among the first settlers of Bridgewater in 1652.

Identified in England as member of "Leiden Separitists"

William - occupation: gunsmith / worker in metals - came over on the ship Fortune in 1621 - settled first in Plymouth, then in Duxbury and finally in Bridgewater, Mass. - of which town he was an original proprietor.


He was a large landowner - with only four in Plymouth paying a higher tax in 1633. He had a large library of books. His name is on the earliest list of freemen in 1633. He was a volunteer for the Pequod War in 1637 and on the committee to lay out the town of Duxbury.

The "First Comers"

     
Under the original agreement with the "merchant adventurers", those who came and worked as partners in the Plymouth venture would all benefit from the 1627 Division of the colony assets. While we tend to give the Mayflower passengers special consideration as "The Pilgrims" (a term they did not use to denote themselves that came into use at the end of the 18th century), the Plymouth colonists classified all those who arrived on the first four ships alike, and referred to them as the "Old Comers" or "First Comers" (which also included a few stragglers such as Phineas Pratt). 

The ship Fortune arrived at Plymouth on November 9, 1621, just a few weeks after the First Thanksgiving. The Anne & Little James, the vessels parted company at sea; the ANNE arrived the latter part of June 1623, and the LITTLE JAMES some week or ten days later. All the vessels bringing new settlers along with many of the wives and children that had been left behind in Leyden when the Mayflower departed in 1620.

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William Bassett I - was born on 21 Oct 1600 in Bethnal Green, England and died in 1667 in Bridgewater, Mass. . He was the son of Walter Bassett and Cecelia Lecht.

William married Elizabeth (Mary) Tilden in 1622. Elizabeth was born about 1603 in Tenterden, Kent, England. She was the daughter of Nathaniel Tilden and Lydia "Lucy" Huckstep. She died about 1667 .

Elizabeth - came to New England on the "Fortune" in 1621.

William - occupation: gunsmith / worker in metals - came over on the ship Fortune in 1621 - settled first in Plymouth, then in Duxbury and finally in Bridgewater, Mass. - of which town he was an original proprietor.


He was a large landowner - with only four in Plymouth paying a higher tax in 1633. He had a large library of books. His name is on the earliest list of freemen in 1633. He was a volunteer for the Pequod War in 1637 and on the committee to lay out the town of Duxbury

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arrived on the Abigail in 1635

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1621, November 19- Arrived via the "Fortune", the second ship to land at Plymouth, MA.

1632/3, March 25- He was taxed 1 pound, 7 shillings at Plymouth, MA. This was the fifth highest tax rate at Plymouth, MA at the time.

1639- Moved to Duxbury, MA before this year.

1652, June 3- Listed as a constable of "Duxburrow" (Duxbury), MA.

He later settled at Bridgewater, MA where he died between April 3 and 5, 1667. He was an early deputy of the Colony. -------------------- William - occupation: gunsmith / worker in metals - came over on the ship Fortune in 1621 - settled first in Plymouth, then in Duxbury and finally in Bridgewater, Mass. - of which town he was an original proprietor.


He was a large landowner - with only four in Plymouth paying a higher tax in 1633. He had a large library of books. His name is on the earliest list of freemen in 1633. He was a volunteer for the Pequod War in 1637 and on the committee to lay out the town of Duxbury. --------------------

Links

-------------------- WILLIAM1 BASSETT came from England in 1621. The earl i e s t B assett record in England is of Thurstine de Basse t t , wh o ca me from Normandy in 1066, as Grand Falcone r o f Wi llia m th e Conqueror. His name is in the Domesda y Boo k an d in t he Ba ttle Abbey Roll. Thurstine built Be aupr e Castl e, nea r Cowbr idge in Glamorgan, Wales, soo n afte r the bat tle o f Hastings . His son Lord Ralph Bass ett wa s Chief Jus tice o f England , under Henry I (1068-1 135). T he Bassett s of Engl and are pr obably descended fr om thi s family bu t we have n o records th at show any lin e. The following translation from the records of the c i t y o f L eyden, Holland, where the Pilgrims were then li vi ng , ma y po ssibly refer to William who came in the For tun e , but m ore p robably to his father. "On the 19th o f Marc h , 1611, w ere af fianced William Bassett, drayma n (or jou rn eyman maso n) fro m Sandwich in England, the w idower o f Cec ilia Light , accomp anied by Roger Wilson an d Willia m Brews ter, his fr iends, an d Margaret Butler. " The brid e died be fore the thi rd calling , and was inte rred Apr. 9 , 1611. "O n the 26th o f July, 1611 , were aff ianced, an d on the 13t h Aug. were ma rried Willia m Basse tt, English man, widowe r of Cecilia Ligh t, accompanie d b y Roger Wils on and Edwar d Southworth, hi s friends, an d M argaret Oldh am, young mai d from England." William Bassett was one of thirty-five who came in 1 6 2 1 , i n the Fortune, landing in November. He remaine d i n Pl ym out h until 1638, then went to Duxbury where fo r se vera l ye ar s he and Capt. Miles Standish were altern atel y depu tie s o f the town to General Court. As he wa s rate d one o f th e hig hest on the tax list he must hav e bee n a man o f prope rty. In 1645 the town of Duxbury was granted a plantatio n , t o t h e west, four miles in each direction from a giv e n cen ter . T his was divided between fifty-four, who we r e calle d ori gina l proprietors; among them were John Al de n, Mile s Stand ish , William Bradford, William Bassett , Wi lliam Co llier, C onst ant Southworth and Christophe r Wadsw orth--al l but th e firs t two being Bassett ancest ors. The y paid Ma ssasoit , the fri endly chief of the nei ghborin g Indians, f or thi s land, seve n coats--a yard an d a hal f in each coat --nin e hatchets, eig ht hoes, twent y knives , four moose sk ins an d ten and a hal f yards o f cotton cl oth. Each settle r ha d a grant of a hous e lo t of six acre s. This was incor porat ed as Bridgewate r i n 1656. The nearest corn mill was at Taunton and they often w a l k e d there carrying their grists on their backs. He became a large land holder and had the largest lib r a r y o wned by any of the Pilgrims. He was a blacksmit h a n d "a rmor er." He was a volunteer in the war against the Pequots i n 1 6 3 7 ; a member of Capt. Myles Standish's Military Com pan y , 16 43. He married, probably in England, Elizabeth (???), w h o w a s t he mother of his children. When a division of t h e cat tl e o f the colony was made in 1627, the sixth lo t , consis tin g o f "the lesser of the black cowes came a t f irst in t he A nn , the bigest of the two steers, and t wo s hee goats " cam e t o a company of thirteen persons am ong w hom were W illia m an d Elizabeth Bassett and Willya m Basse tt, Jr., an d Elyz abet h Bassett, Jr., showing the re wer e two childre n at tha t tim e. His wife died before 1650, and he married, after 165 1 , M a r y (Tilden) Lapham, who was baptized in Tenterden , E ng. , 1 61 0, daughter of Nathaniel Tilden, and widow o f Th oma s Lap ham --who died 1648. He had no children by h is se con d wife . H e died in Bridgewater in 1667, betwee n Apr . 3--t he dat e o f his will--and May 12--the date o f inven tory. H is wido w, M ary, signed a receipt Sept. 16 67, whic h is th e lates t recor d we have of her. In the i nventor y of his p ropert y appear , "a pair of bellowes, a n Anvill , a vice, t ongs an d hammer s and coal shovels , a feathe r bed and bols ter an d sheets, o ne other sma l feather bed , 2 pillows , 2 blanket s, 4 guns , 1 buggy, " and several b ooks, amon g them being " Wilson's D ixonar y," two concorda nces, and m any commentarie s on book s o f the Bible. Late r a highwa y was laid out t o run by "o l d Goodm. Bassett's ." "The la st will and Testa ment o f Willi am Bassett Sen . (as dictate d by him on his de at h bed) exhib ited to th e court, holdin g at Plymouth th e 1 st day of June , Anno D om. 1667, on th e oath of Willi am Bre tt and John Car ey . The third of th e second mont h Anno Dom . 1667, the la s t will and Testamen t of Willia m Bassett, Se n. being ver y we ak and sick, an d having sp oken to his wife , and said , 'Wife , I must leav e thee, b ut I shall leave th ee wit h the Lord . If God ha d lengthe ned out my life it mig ht h ave been tha t thou mig htest h ave been more comfortabl y p rovided for.' B ut it be ing d emanded of him by one who w a s acquainted wit h his mi n d about the disposition of hi s e state, whether hi s mi n d was as formerly: That he woul d giv e his movable goo d s w ith his chattels to his wife , answere d, yes, it wa s hi s m ind: and that she should ha ve his hous e and grou nds ti l l she died: If she married n ot, and the n he woul d give i t t o his son William, and hi s tools to hi s so n Joseph: an d i t being demanded about h is books whic h h e formerly too k car e about, answered h e could not no w d o it. To satisf y as so on as we may. Pr esent then wi th hi m we have set ou r hands a s witnesses t o the abov e writin g so far as we kn ow.

-------------------- Added by Elwin Nickerson II my Great Grandfather Arrived on the" Fortune" at Plymouth in 1621 -------------------- Added by Elwin Nickerson II, My Great Grandfather Arrived at Plymouth, Masachusetts in 1621 in the "Fortune"

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William Bassett, of Plymouth's Timeline

1599
1599
Bethnal Green, Middlesex, England
1600
October 24, 1600
Age 1
London, Middlesex, London
October 24, 1600
Age 1
Stepney, London, England
1604
May 30, 1604
Age 5
England
May 30, 1604
Age 5
England
1621
November 10, 1621
Age 22
Aboard 'Fortune' arrived Plymouth Massachusetts USA
November 10, 1621
Age 22
Aboard 'Fortune' arrived Plymouth Massachusetts USA
1621
Age 22
Leiden, South Holland, The Netherlands
1621
Age 22
Plymouth, MA
1621
Age 22
Plymouth, MA