William Beardsley (1603 - 1661) MP

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Nicknames: "Arrived in America 1635"
Birthplace: Stratford-On-Avon, Warwickshire, England, (Present UK)
Death: Died in Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)
Occupation: mason, immigrated on ship Planter, 1635, Mason
Managed by: Lauren Johnson
Last Updated:

About William Beardsley

William Beardsely was a mason. He came from England on the ship Planter in 1635 when he was 30 years old. With him were his wife, Mary age 26, daughter Mary 4, and sons John 2, and Joseph ½.

He was a Deputy from Stratford to the Connecticut Legislature for eight terms: Sept. 1645, Sept. 1649, May 1650, Sept. 1651, May 1652, Oct. 1653, Feb. 1657, and May 1658.

His will was dated September 28, 1660. It included: all my daughters that are now married, £10 apiece; sons Samuel and Joseph; wife; overseers, Mr. Blackman, Philip Groves, John Brinsmade, John Birdsey, Joseph Hawley; Daniel; son John; children. The witnesses were Caleb Nichols and John Welles. His estate was inventoried in July of 1661.

Sources:

Jacobus, Donald Lines, History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield (reprinted with corrections), Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1991 (1930); vol. 1, p.45

Mormon family record sheet, including references to History of Stratford, Connecticut and ...Families of Old Fairfield

Above information compiled by: Walter Gilbert: 3941 Perry Hall Road; Perry Hall, Maryland, USA; 21128-9751; 410-256-7560

Notes for William Beardsley

  • Added by gbstitt on 21 Jul 2009
  • Originally submitted by mkilgard to Wheeler-Kilgard and Koenig-Sparrowgrove Family Tree on 17 May 2009

Notes for William Beardsley

  • William Beardsley, our forefather and one of the first settlers and an original proprietor of Stratford, Conn., came to New England in 1635, embarking at London on April 15th of that year with his family in the ship "Planter" with 36 other pilgrims.
  • The Planter had been built a couple of years earlier at Wapping. At 170 tons the Planter was slightly smaller than the Mayflower (180 tons) that had sailed to Plymouth Rock 15 years earlier with 102 pilgrims aboard
  • In the record of the ship's log of the Planter is this listing: "I Mason, Williams Beardsley, years 30, England --Marie (Mary) Beardsley, years 26, England --Marie Beardslie, years 4, England, --John Beardslie, years 2, England --and Joseph Beardsley, six months, England."
  • This the family tradition given by Hinman was that he came from Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire, England, but Orcutt in his History of Stratford and other authorities state that he emigrated with Rev. Adam Blakeman from St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. He went first to Hadley Mass., and was enrolled as a freeman Dec, 7, 1636. In 1638 he was chosen to help found the colony of Connecticut going first to Hartford and in the spring of 1639 became a settler at Stratford. His occupation was stone mason.
  • He shared in the original distribution of land in Stratford. His homelot being on the east side of Elm street near the meeting house. He was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church of Stratford. In old colonial documents he is often referred to as "Goodman Beardsley." In the affairs of the town he was soon recognized as a leader. He is described as a man of worth and substance. In 1645 he was on of two Deputies of the General Court and served in that honorable office for seven years. When preparations were being made in 1648 for waging war with the Dutch, he was chosen "with Mr. Ludlow and Mr. Hull to take care for preparing the soulgers in the two seaside townes." Again in 1651, "Andrew Wade, George Hull and William Beardsley were propounded for assistants to joine with the magistrates for the execution of justice in the townes by the seaside." He also served in 1653 in determining the boundaries between Fairfield and Norwalk.
  • (Sources: Puritan Settlers of Conn. PP 167-168, Orcutt's History of Stratford, PP 1130-1142, Genealogical History of the Beardsley Family in America, by Isaac Haight Beardsley, 1902) Notes for Mary Harvey:In "The Seeds of the Planter" by Geraldine D. Gallagher (Fullerton, CA 1975 PP 1) the author quotes Hatton's list of Emigrants (1600-1700) listing Marie Beardsley's age (in 1635) as being 26 years.

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William & Mary come to America

  • Added by gbstitt on 21 Jul 2009
  • Originally submitted by paigechurchman to geyelin-churchman on 29 Oct 2008

William, Mary and their children (Mary, John & Joseph) were members of the church of the reverend Adam Blackman. They immigrated to America as congregation of this church on a ship called "Planter," which arrived in Boston about June 1, 1635, after leaving Saint Albans Hertfordshire England in April. The congregation stayed in Hadley, Mass. for about three years and then moved to Hartford, Connecticut and then to what is now Stratford. Here, they found a small clearing on the Pootatuck River where they settled. Around them was forest, thick with trees, animals and Indians. They persevered, others joined them and they became the founders of Stratford. William Beardsley served eight terms as the Stratford deputy to the CT legislature. He took the oath of allegiance in Massachusetts Bay Colony 7 December 1636 and was admitted a freeman in 1637.

William was a mason by trade. He served eight terms as deputy from Stratford to the Connecticut Legislature for eight terms.

For more on the Beardsleys, see: http://www.cousinconnect.com/d/a/170030

For more on Adam Blackman, see: http://www.genealogycentral.net/index_files/Page322.html

Additional information about this story Description The founding of Stratford, Connecticut Date 1639 Location Connecticut

Stratford mason : Added by gbstitt on 21 Jul 2009 Originally submitted by jimarny to Richter on 27 Mar 2009

When the necessary manual labor was done, William Beardsley could use his mason's skills on chimneys and foundations, Richard Harvey the tailor could turn to making clothes, and linen weaver William Wilcoxson could operate his loom and teach others his skills.

Additional information about this story Description Page 19 from "In Pursuit of Paradise" by Lewis Knapp Date 1640's

A History of the Old Town of Stratford and the City of Bridgeport, Connecticut Added by gbstitt on 21 Jul 2009 Originally submitted by Ethlynn to Mallory Family Tree on 19 Feb 2009

William Beardsley a mason by trade, came from England in 1635, in the ship Planter, when he was 30 years of age, and his wife. Mary,* ( The name was not Maria, Marie, «s spelled in the ship list, being the French-English for Mary) 26, his daughter Mary, 4, son John, 2, and Joseph, 6 months. Tradition in all the branches of the family says he was a native of Stratford, on the river Avon, in England, and that he gave the name Stratford to the plantation höre in Connecticut, and when one of his descendants settled in western New York lie named the place Avon, in honor of the old river. William Beardsley emigrated with Rev. Adam Blakeman from St. Albans, England ; remained at Hadley, Mass., probably, until 1638, coming thence to Hartford, and the next spring to Stratford, as one of the first settlers here. He was elected deputy to the General Court seven years. His will was dated Sept. 28, 1660, and proved July 6, 1661. The inventor)' of his estate was taken Feb. 13, tC6o-i, amounting to ¿333-15-8.

He died aged only 56 years, and had several young children besides the following, mentioned in his will : John, Joseph, Samuel and Daniel. Only three daughters' names have been ascertained ; two were married after his decease, and yet he says in his will : "All my daughters that are now married, I give Ten pounds a peece." Therefore there must have been more than one then married, but of these only Mary's name is known. Judge Savage says among the children not named were William and Thomas, but of this William no evidence is found.

The Family of William Beardsley, One of the First Settlers of Stratford Connecticut Added by gbstitt on 21 Jul 2009 Originally submitted by dpleroux to LeRoux Family Tree on 29 Mar 2009

Beardsley Genealogy: The Family of William Beardsley, One of the first settlers of Stratford, Connecticut by Nellie Beardsley Holt


Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England is a city of about 30,000 inhabitants at the present time. The main street slopes to the public square located on top of a high hill, overlooking the counties of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. The parish church, St. Mary’s (Church of England) faces the square. For how many centuries men have worshipped in this hallowed spot, no one can tell. Ilkeston was a well established village, long before the Conquest, and it is very probable that there was an Anglo-Saxon Church on the hilltop before the present Norman foundation. St. Mary’s church was started in the 12th century, and was not completed until the 20th. Its stones tell the story of eight hundred years of service. The marriage, baptism and burial registers go back to 1588. The first parish register consists of 38 leaves, and contains entries from 1588 to 1634. The entries are written in Latin, the ink is very faded, and the Old English script is difficult to read. In this register are the following entries:


Marriage.William Beardsley and Marie Harvie, Jan. 26, 1631. Baptism.John, son of William Beardsley, November 2, 1633.


A recent letter from Frank Beardsley, Solicitor, Ilkeston, tells of his interest in Beardsley lore, and portions of it reads, as follows: “The Beardsley family, by tradition, were in Ilkeston before William the Conqueror’s time, 1066. Unfortunately, I do not think there are any written records of those early times, for the simple reason practically everything belonged to the Lord of the Manor, and it was difficult in England to even move to the next parish, because if you did, you had to satisfy the new Parish Authorities that you would not eventually have to be assisted financially out of their parish funds, because in law each parish was responsible for their poor and in the majority of parishes, the people were as a rule, only just able to exist as they were mostly ordinary workers for the Lord of the Manor. This applied practically until 1750 or so when machine age started. In this parish, and indeed most others, there was little or no property belonging to the inhabitants, they were simply small hard working tenants. This explains why, until about the end f the 18th Century, there are very few deeds and documentsrelating to property. However, in Ilkeston, there was a small portion which was freehold and could be disposed of by the owner. I have a deed in my possession, dated 1690, where John Beardsley sells to William Beardsley half a house for L30 which was apparent part of a farm house at the top of the town and both the Beardsley’s farmed the land attached there to as Yeomen Farmers. I have identified this place which is probably the birthplace of the Beardsley Family some two or three hundred years previously. Unfortunately the site of the farmhouse is almost covered by very old cottages and the Corporation’s Water Reservoir. The before mentioned people, would no doubt be relatives of the William Beardsley who went to America in 1635. I also have in my possession an old gargoyle which came from the parish church built in Norman times and which has apparently been used as a font for baptism or holy water: also a few pieces of silver and chairs which your William Beardsley may have seen. I am not aware of any Ilkeston Beardsley having a coat of arms. Most of them would have a ring or brass seal, with a device or initials engraved on it, for use when required. That Stratford was originally named “Cupheay” is extremely interesting because of a hamlet known as “Cotmanhay” which in the old days was about a half mile from Ilkeston, but is now incorporated in the town of Ilkeston, was in the old Derbyshire dialect, to my persona knowledge, “pronounced” as “Cupheay” This leads me to the thought that perhaps William Beardsley named Stratford after the birthplace or residence of his wife, as Harvey is a very old Ilkeston name.

     FIRST GENERATION1. William , was born in England, 1605; died at Stratford, Connecticut, 1661; married at Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England, 26 Jan. 1631, Mary Harvey.  One of his descendants writes:William Beardsley, the progenitor of all our family here in America, was a mason, by trade.  I think of him as an artisan whose strength and skill contributed to the comfort and protection of his fellow-settlers, and also as a builder.  Yes, and a builder in the larger sense, builder in the ideals and principles which enter into the construction of the State and nation.  He brought his family to America, on the ship “Planter”, a vessel which carried one hundred and twenty-one passengers. these emigrants landed at Massachusetts.  In Hotness  “List of Person’s who went from Great Britain to the American Plantation,” we find the followings: 2 degree April in 1635.“These under written names are to be transported to New England imbarqued in the Planter Nic Trarice bound thither the parties have brought Certificate. from Minister St St (Sic)) Albans in Hertfordshire c Attestacon from Justice of Peace according to the Lords order.”Among the thirty-eight passengers listed from St. Albans, were the following:

Wm.Beardsley 30 A Mason Marie Beadsley 26 Marie Beadslie 4 John Beadslie 2 Joseph Beadslie 6 mo.


It was not until December 7, 1636, that William Beardsley took the oath of office in Massachusetts and was made a freeman. As yet, we have been unable to definitely determine where he and his family lived from 1636 till 1639, during which time traveled over the route from Massachusetts to Hartford, and Wethersfield, Connecticut, with other colonists. The first we hear of him, after he was made a freeman, was in the Pequonnock Plantation (now known as Stratford, Connecticut), where he was one of the first settlers in the year, 1639. The General Court of Connecticut, in 1638, enacted that each town in the Colony should appoint a recorder and keep an accurate record of land transactions and other affairs and keep an accurate record of prior to 1650, have been found about this plantation. It has been thought that they were destroyed by fire. The earliest definite record containing the names of those who were owners of land is the list of the owners of fence about the first “Common Field,” which was as early as 1650. William Beardsley was the second largest owner, his length of fence measured 24 rods, 6 feet. That the plantation was settled in 1639 is evident from records kept by the General Court, dated, October 10, 1639, at which time the plantation was called Pequonnock, by the court. In June 1640, it was called Cupheay, and in April 1643 it was first called Stratford. There is no definite record as to the number of persons in the first group of settlers. A small creek setting back from the river, since known as Mac’s Harbor , is where this band of pioneers are suppsed to have landed, in the location known as “Sandy Hollow.” Their “home lots” were of one or two acres in extent, grouped closely together as a means of protection. William Beardsley’s home lot was but a short distance from the harbor. His next door neighbor was William Wilcockson who had also been a passenger on the ship Planter. Next to him was John Peake, who had also come from Derbyshire. Among the other first settlers was Richard Harvie and family, who had come on the same ship, and probably were relatives of William’s wife Mary; then there was Rev. Adam Blakeman, Joseph Hawley, Robert Lane, Henry Tomlinson, early settlers, and natives of Derbyshire; appartlently many of these early settlers were relatives and former friends. William Beardsley took an active part in the affairs of the settlement. Judging from the Colonial records he was considered a man of worth, influence, and substance. He was Deputy to the General Court at Hartford for eight sessions between 1645 and 1659. In the colonial records of Connecticut, 1649, we find where a “committee was chosen by the Court for the ordering of setting forth of these souldgers and Mr. Ludlow was desired to take care for preparing the souldgers with provisions and all other necessaryes for the designe in two (sea Side) Towns; and Mr. Hull and William Beardsley are chosen to assist therein,” the towns were Fairfield and Stratford. In 1651, “Andrew Ward, George Hull, and William Beardsley were propounded for Assistants to join with the magistrates for the execution of justice in the Towns by the sea side.” In October 1659, “Mr, Blackman, Goodman Beardsley and Joseph Judson were chosen as a committee to help in the settlement of a dispute over property.” He was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church of Stratford. The first meting-house in Stratford was located at Sandy-Hollow on the bank of Mac’s creek, and around this place of worship was the first graveyard. In 1677-78, a new burial place was laid out. No record of interments in the first graveyard, have been found, but the date of William Beardsley’s death would lead of to think that he was buried there; also his wife Mary, although we have no date of her death. The latest record found of her is in the list of inhabitants of Stratford, in the year 1668. In the year, 1939, the 300th anniversary of the settlement of Stratford, Connecticut, the descendants of William and Mary Beardsley, place a memorial for these ancestors; a bronze plaque, which reads as follows:To honor the memory of William and Mary Beardsleyand the other first settlers ofStratfordwho landed near this spotin the year, 1639. Erected by the Beardsley Family Association. This plaque is on a boulder, placed in Sandy Hollow, near the spot where the first settlers landed. The boulder came from a Beardsley homestead, located near enough to Sandy-Hollow, to make one visualise that undoubtedly the children of William and Mary Beardsley, played upon this rock. William and Mary Beardsley were undoubtedly, practical, thrifty people, coming to America in search of a new home, in what they hoped would be a land of opportunity. They were the parents of nine children whose descendants have honourably played their part in building up this nation. William died in Stratford, 1661, and in studying the inventory of his estate, one realises more, the frugality of these ancestors. they could have had very few wordily possessions when they arrived at Stratford, and twenty years later, when he died, his estate inventoried over “e”327 a tidy sum in those early days.

            

Copied from Fairfield Probate Records in the Connecticut State Library at Hartford, Connecticut:


“I William Beardsley of Stratford, being sic and weak in body, but not in mind, do leave this as my last will and testament. All my daughters that are now married I give ten pounds a peace. my son Samuel I give that red cow which I have now lent him. I also reserve four acres of best land at Piquanock for my wife to improve of Joseph fall in to help her if she please. The rest is Samuel’s. I also give him one of ye new white blankets. If Joseph, my sone, please to be an assistant to my wife for the carrying on of her byanes whilst she lives; or marryes and leaves the sea, I give him ye half of my accommodations in Stratford; if not I give him twenty pounds of my share of ye barke to be his part. I desire my loving wife, that if she should pleases to add to the shares of my daughters, that she would add to them all alike. The rest of my estate is however, to be disposed of unto my wife and children at the discretion of Mr. Blackeman, Philip Groves, John Brinsmoyd, John Burdsey, and Joseph Hawley and also the oare, government an disposal of my children. It is my will that Daniel, after the decease of my wife, that he have the other halfe of ye lots. I give to my son John, tenn Shillings. Sept.28,1660. I, William Beardsley in the Presence of _____. This is a true copy of ye will of William Beardsley.Inventory of William Beardsley’s estate, July 6, 1661, by Samuel Sherman, John Hard, Henry Waklin, E 327-15a-8d. (portions of it were as follows:) pounds-shillings-pence Indian corn, 6 bushels 00-15-00 Cloth, 17 yards 02-10-00 1bed and covering 03-00-00 Flax and yarn 03-00-00 Barrels, baskets, bags, broom 01-06-00 Bed and bedstand 07-00-00 Cloth, 30 yards 02-10-00 Woolen blankets 07-10-00 3 bed ticks 02-00-00 1 bed and covering 05-00-00 Brass kettle 12-00-00 Powder 01-10-00 2 guns, 4 pistols 03-00-00 1 sword and belt 00-08-03 His apparel 06-10-00 Trading cloth 27-00-00 Carpeting 01-00-00 1 firkin of butter 01-06-00 Sheets, pillows, and napkins 09-00-00 39 bushels of wheat 07-16-00 29 “ “ 03-15-00 Hay 10-00-00 Salt with barrel 00-12-00 Oxen with yoke 02-00-00 1 pair of boots 00-05-00 6 horses and mares 50-00-00 house, barn and rest of accommodations 71-00-00 Meadows and uplands, ect ink is faded

 

I have found no other records pertaining to the settlement of his estate.

-------------------- See "Genealogical history of the Beardsley-lee family in America" http://www.archive.org/details/genealogicalhist00bear

-------------------- William Beardsley came to New England in 1635 aboard the "Planter." Coming over with his was his wife, age 26, daughter Mary, age 4, son John, age 2 and son Joseph, age six months. They were all enrossed at London on 2 April 1635 as passengers for New England. He was made a freeman Dec 7, 1636, elected deputy for Stratford, 1645 and in 1649 he was appointed to secure provisions for soldiers in war against the Dutch in New York. In 1659 the town of Stratford recorded "certain lands given, bought & granted to Wil[lia]m Beardsly by the town": one acre & half granted by the town & three acres & half bought that was Goodman Knowls lying all in one parcel"; "one acre in the Old Field"; four acres upon the neck"; "six acres and a half...lying on the neck"; "eleven acres & three quarters of upland & meadow lying together in the New Field"; "twenty & one acres of meadow & upland lying together in the field called Mr. Waklin's Neck"; and "four acres & a half of meadow." In his will proved 6 July 1661 "William Beardsly of Stratford" bequeathed to "all my daughters that are now married I give ten pounds apiece"; to "my son Samuel that red cow which I have now lent him, I only reserve four acres of that land at Pequanocke for my wife to improve if Joseph fall in to help her if she please, the rest is Samuel's, I also give him one of the new white blankets"; to "Joseph my son," should he choose to be "an assistant to my wife" while she lives or until she remarries, "& leaves the sea," half "my accommodations in Stratford" and if not, "I give twenty pounds of my share of the bark to add to his part"; if "my loving wife" pleases to add to the portions of "my daughters" she to add to them equally; residue to wife and children "at the discretion of Mr. Blackman, Philip Groves, John Brimsmayd, John Burdsie and Joseph Hawly," overseers; "Daniell after the decease of my wife that he have her half of the lots"; to "my son John" 10s. -------------------- Birth record also listed as: 9 Mar 1602/03 in Stratford-on-Avon,Warwickshire, England.

They landed in Massachusetts probably about June 1, 1635 and it is believed that he settled first at Watertown, Mass. Shortlyafterward he removed to Stratford, Conn., where he died in 1661at about fifty-six years of age. This emigrant brought with him from England his wife Mary and his three children, Mary, John and Joseph. The children born in this country are believed to have been Samuel, Sarah, Hannah, and Daniel, and there may have been others as well.

He was a deputy from Stratford, CT to the Connecticut legislature between 1645 and 1658. The name of Beardsley is said to have been derived from the residence of its first bearers in the parish of Bardsley, near Manchester, Lancashire, England. It is found on the ancient records in various forms of which Beardsley is that most generally accepted in America today

In 1638 he removed to Hartford, Connecticut, and in the following spring to Stratford, of which he was one of the first settlers.He was deputy to the General Court seven years. He was a mason by trade. His will was dated September 28, 1660. and proved July 6, 1661. His inventory, dated February 13, 1660-01, amounted to three hundred and thirty-three pounds fifteen shillings eightpence.

He died at the age of fifty-six years, leaving several young children.

Beardsley: English: possibly a variant of Bardsley, or alternatively a habitational name from an unidentified place (possibly in Nottinghamshire, where the surname is particularly common). Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press,ISBN 0-19-508137-4

Poet Emily Dickinson, First Lady Bess Truman, publisher Frank Nelson Doubleday, P.T. Barnum and Tom Thumb (Charles Stratton)are descendants.

Among the earliest records of the name in England were those of Robert de Berdesleghe of Somersetshire in the latter half of the thirteenth century, those of Roger de Berdesleghe of about the same time, those of Robert de Bardesle of Oxfordshire in 1273, those of William de Bardesley of a slightly later period, those of William de Bardsley of Ashton-under-lyne in 1422, those of John Bardsley of Cheshireabout the middle of the sixteenth century, those of WilliamB ardsley of Ashton before 1600, and numerous others. The direct line of descent of the B(e)ardsleys or Bardseys of Lancashire is said to have ended in the early seventeenth century with one Nicholas Bardsey, who left only female issue, but the family was continued in other branches. One of the best known of these younger branches of the family was that of one William Bardsleyor B(e)ardsley of Lancashire about the middle of the sixteenth century, who removed to London and left issue there by his wife, a Miss Stanley, of William, who married Eliza Lever and was the father by her of a son named Thomas, who had issue by his wife Ann Moore of William, Abraham, Edward, Elizabeth, and Martha.

It is not definitely known from which of the branches of the family in England the early emigrants of the name to America were descended, but it is believed that all of the Beardsleys were of common ancestry at a remote period.

The first of the name in America was William Beardsley (who also used several other formsof the name) born in England in 1605. On April 2, 1635, he sailed on the ship "Planter" for America. There were 37emigrants in all on the ship and the records of the Beardsleys is as follows:A mason William Beardsley years 30 Marie 26 Marie (our line) 4 John 2 Joseph 6 months

The descendants of the various branches of the family in America have spread to all parts of the UnitedStates and have aided greatly both in the founding and in the development of the nation. Among those of the Beardsleys whofought in the War of the Revolution were Hospital Surgeon's-Mate Gersham of New York, Surgeon Ebenezer of Connecticut, Captain Nehemiah of Connecticut, Captain Phineas of Connecticut, and others.

The coat-of-arms of the ancient Bard(e)sley family of Lancashire, from which the American Beardsleys are believe to trace their descent is generally described as follows:Arms - "Argent, two bars gulses, on a canton of the secondmaunch of the first."(Arms taken from Burke's "General Armory", 1884)(The above is a digest of data compiled by the Media ResearchBureau.)**************************************************************************************************************New England Families Genealogical and Memorial: Volume IV Author: William Richard CutterThis is Volume IV of a four-volume set. It has records of achievements of people from England, who have set upcommonwealths in New England. About 6000 names included in thisrecord. Bibliographic Information: Cutter, William Richard. New EnglandFamilies Genealogical and Memorial: Volume IV. 1913. Reprint,Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1996.

Page 1726 William Beardsley, the immigrant ancestor, was born in England in 1605. He came to this country in 1635 in the ship "Planter"with his wife Mary, aged twenty-six. children Mary, aged four,John, aged two, and Joseph, aged six months. According to the family tradition, he was a native of Stratford-on-Avon, the home of Shakespeare, and it is believed that he gave the name of Stratford to the settlement in which he made his home, now Stratford, Connecticut.

One of his descendants who settled in western New York named the town in which he located Avon in honor of the Beardsley who came with Rev. Adam Blakeman from St.Albans, England, and settled first at Hadley, Massachusetts.

In 1638 he removed to Hartford, Connecticut, and in the following spring to Stratford, of which he was one of the first settlers.He was deputy to the General Court seven years. He was a mason by trade. His will was dated September 28, 1660. and proved July 6, 1661. His inventory, dated February 13, 1660-01, amounted to three hundred and thirty-three pounds fifteen shillings eightpence. He died at the age of fifty-six years, leaving several young children. Sources:Repository: Name: Mid-Continent Public Library; Genealogy and Local History Department Independence, Missouri 64050 Title: The History of Ancient Wethersfield Connecticut Author: Henry R. Stiles, A.M., M.D.Publication: Grafton Press; New York; 1987Abbrev: The History of Ancient Wethersfield Connecticut Call Number: 974.62 Ad19Page: V. 2, p. 780 Text: William Beardsley.

-------------------- William Beardsley (1605-1661) was one of the first settlers of Stratford, Connecticut (abt. 1635).

He was born 1605 in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire; in 1631 he married Mary Harvie in St. Mary's church, as written in "Beardsley Genealogy - The Family of William Beardsley - One of the first settlers and founder of Stratford, Connecticut" (Nellie Beardsley Holt, 1951). In 1633, their first son John was baptized there.

In 1635, Beardsley and his wife and three children boarded the ship "Planter" with 116 other passengers and sailed to Massachusetts. In December 1636, Beardsley took the oath of office in Massachusetts and was made a freeman.

In 1639, Beardsley and his wife left Boston to became one of the first settler families in the Pequonnock Plantation, which later became known as Stratford, Connecticut. Beardsley was active in the affairs of the settlement and served as Deputy to the General Court at Hartford from 1645 to 1659, as well as being one of the founders of the First Congregational Church of Stratford.

After arriving in America, from 1636-1646 Beardsley and his wife had six additional children.

Beardsley died in Stratford, Connecticut in 1661.

Source: Wikipedia -------------------- Probably from St. Alban's, Hertfordshire, England; he brought documents from the minister and justice of the peace there to London, where he sailed in the ship "Planter" (Capt. Travice) on April 2, 1635, landing in Massachusetts in the summer of 1635. Hatton's List of Immigrants to American 1600-1700 records "a Mason, William Beardsley, years 30, Marie Beardsley, years 26, Marie Beardslie, years 4, John Beardslie, years 2, Joseph Beardslie years 6 mo."

Much more is found in Isaac Haight Beardsley's Geneological History of the Beardslee -ley Family in America (Denver, 1902), pp. 17-20. -------------------- Arrived on The Planter in the Massachusetts Bay, 1635: http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/planter1635.shtml

http://www.winthropsociety.com/ships/planter.htm -------------------- William lived Leicestershire, England. Married Mary Harvey (Harvias, Harvee, etc) January 26, 1631/2, St. Mary's Church, Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England. Mary was baptised June 5, 1605 St. Mary's Certificate to come to colonies from St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. Sailed from Port of London England aboard the "Planter" April 2, 1635.Arrived in Boston, Massachusettes June 1, 1635. He was admitted Freeman of Massachusettes, December 6, 1636.Probably lived at Hartford and Wethersfield, Connecticut, before he helped found what is now Stratford, Connecticut. He was Deputy of the General Court 1645 to 1659 for eight sessions, Hartford, Connecticut. William's will dated September 28, 1660 and probated July 6, 1661, Stratford, Connecticut. He was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church at Stratford. This first meeting house was located at Sandy Hollow, since known as Mac's Harbor, and around this place of worship was located the first graveyard. It is likely William Beardsley and his wife are buried there in unmarked graves. In 1939, the 300th anniversary of the settlement of Statford, the descendants of William and Mary Beardsley placed a plaque on a boulder taken from the Beardsley homestead at Sandy Hollow; formerly William's Land.

-------------------- The Family of William Beardsley, One of the First Settlers of Stratford, CT by Nellie Beardsley Holt refers to a letter from "Frank Beardsley, Solicitor, Ilkeston, who relates: The Beardsley family, by tradition, were in Ilkeston before William the Conqueror's conquest in 1066."

William became a freeman on December 7, 1636 when he took the oath of Office in Massachusetts.

William took an active part in the affairs of the Pequannock Plantation settlement. Judging by the colonial records, he was considered a mand of "worth, influence and substance." He was Deputy to the General Court at Hartford for 8 sessions between 1645-1659. In the colonial records of Connecticut for 1649, an entry appears "a Committee was chosen by the Court for the ordering of setting forth of these soldiers and Mr. Ludlow was desired to take care for preparing the soldiers with provisions and all other necessarys for the designs in 2 (sea side) towns; and Mr. Hull and WIlliam Beardsley are chosen to assist therein." The towns referred to were Fairfield and Stratford.

He was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church in Stratford. The first meeting house was located at Sandy Hollow and this is also the site of the first graveyard. The burial place was laid out between 1677-1678. No records of interments have been found, but by the date of William's death, we can assume he was buried there as was probably his wife, Mary.

His estate was inventoried at over £327 sterling. The following text of his will was copied from the Fairfield, CT Probate Records in the CT State Library in Hartford, CT :

"I, William Beardsley of Stratford, being sick and weak in body, but not in mind, do leave this as my last will and testament. All my daughters that are now married I give £10 apeace. My sonne Samuel I give that red cow which I have now lent him. I also reserve four acres of best land at Piquanock for my wife to improve if Joseph fall in to help here if she please. The rest is Samuel's. I also give him one of ye new white blanketts.

If Joseph, my sone, please to be an assistant to my wife for the carrying on of her bysnes (business?) whilst she lives; or marryes and leaves the sea, I give him ye half of my accomodations in Stratford; if not I give him £20 of my share of ye barke to be his part. I desire my loving wife, that if she should please to add to the shares of my daughters, that she would add to them all alike.

The rest of my estate is however, to be disposed of unto my wife and children at the discretion of Mr. Blakeman, Philip Groves, John Brinsmoyd, John Burdsey and Joseph Hawley and also the care, government and disposal of my children. It is my will that Daniell, after the decease of my wife, that he have the other halfe of ye lots. I give to my son John, ten Shillings."

The will is dated 9/28/1660. The inventory of his estate taken 7/6/1661 by Samuel Sherman, John Hurd and Henry Waklin, included 6 bushels of Indian corn, 17 yds of cloth, 1 bed and covering, flax and yarn, barrels, baskets, bags and brooms, a bed and bedstead, 30 yds of cloth, woolen blankets, 3 bed ticks, 1 bed and covering, brass kettle, powder, 2 guns, 4 pistols, 1 sword and belt, his apparel, trading cloth, carpeting, 1 firkin of butter, sheets, pillows, napkins, 68 bushels of wheat, hay, salt with barrel, oxen with yoke, 1 pair of boots, 6 horses and mares, house, barn and rest of accomodations, meadows and uplands.

Birth: Mar. 9, 1603, England Death: Jul. 6, 1661 Fairfield County Connecticut, USA

William Beardsley and his wife Mary Harvey were natives of England and were married there. They were members of the church of the Reverend Adam Blackman. Together with his 4 children they emigrated to New England in 1635, aboard the good ship Planter. Dec. 7, 1636, he took oath of office and was made a 'freeman'. The family resided briefly in Massachusetts Bay Colony, before removing to the Pequonock Plantation of Connecticut. They became the founders of Stratford, Connecticut in 1639. William is thought to have originally come from Stratford-on-Avon in England and may have been responsible for naming the town Stratford, Connecticut. 1645-1659; he was deputy to the General Court at Hartford for eight terms from 1645 to 1658. Throughout his life he was active in judicial matters in the colony.


Family links:

Spouse:
 Mary Harvey Beardsley (1605 - 1661)*

Children:
 Mary Beardsley Wells (1631 - ____)*
 John Beardsley (1633 - ____)*
 Joseph Beardsley (1634 - 1712)*
 Samuel Beardsley (1636 - 1706)*
 Ruth Beardsley Smith (1636 - ____)*
 Rebecca Beardsley Curtis Beebe (1642 - ____)*
 Hannah Beardsley Dickinson (1642 - 1678)*
 Daniel Beardslee (1644 - 1730)*
  • Calculated relationship
 

Burial: Union Cemetery Stratford Fairfield County Connecticut, USA


Maintained by: Robert Fickies Originally Created by: girlofcelje (inactive) Record added: Jul 03, 2003 Find A Grave Memorial# 7649681 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=beardsley&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=8&GScnty=304&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GSsr=321&GRid=7649681&df=all& -------------------- This is an excerpt from William Beardsley's will, dated 1661 with the exact spelling as it appears in the will: "I, William Beardsley, of Stratford being sick and weak, but well in mind, do leave this my last Will and Testament. All my daughters that are now married, I give Ten pounds a peace. My sonne, Samuell, I give that red cow which I have now lent him. I only reserve four akers of that land at Piquanock for my wife to improve, if Joseph fall in to help her, if she please; the rest is Samuel's. I also give him one of ye new white blankets. If Joseph, my sone, please to be an assistant to my wife, for the carrying on of her bysnes whilst she lives, or marrieus and leaves the sea, I give eto him ye halfe of my acomodations in Stratford; if not, i give him twenty pounds of my share of ye bark, to add to his part. I desire my loving wife, that if shes please to ad to ye portion of any of my daughters, that she would add to yem all alike. I give to my son John ten shillings."

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William Beardsley's Timeline

1603
March 9, 1603
Stratford-On-Avon, Warwickshire, England, (Present UK)
1620
1620
Age 16
England
1630
January 30, 1630
Age 26
Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England
June 26, 1630
Age 27
England, (Present UK)
1633
November 2, 1633
Age 30
Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England, British Isles
1635
November 16, 1635
Age 32
Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England
1635
Age 31
Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States of America
1635
Age 31
St Albans, Hertfordshire, England
1638
September 1, 1638
Age 35
Stratford, Fairfield, Connecticut, United States
1638
Age 34
Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America