William Clayton

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William Clayton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rumbaldswick (within present Chichester), West Sussex, England
Death: Died in Chester County, Province of Pennsylvania
Immediate Family:

Son of William Clayton, Sr. and Joan Clayton
Husband of Prudence Clayton
Father of William Mickel Clayton; Prudence Reynolds (Clayton); Honour Browne (Clayton); Joseph Mickel Clayton; Mary Jane Beals (Clayton) and 3 others
Brother of Joan Claiton; Elizabeth Clayton; Richard Clayton; Thomas Clayton and Mary Clayton

Occupation: Carpenter, Lumber dealer, Acting Govenor (PA)
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About William Clayton

Christening: 9 DEC 1632 Chichester, Sussex, England

From notes taken by Duncan Rea Williams III in his "Cyber Niche": http://www.drwilliams.org/genealogy/3919.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Clayton_(Governor)

William Clayton came to America in 1677 on the ship "Kent", landing in the Delaware River north of Salem West Jersey. He lived in Burlington NJ, then moved to Chichester Twp Chester Co., PA in 1681. He was a judge in PA, then Acting Govenor in PA in 1684 and 1685.

From the History of Chester County, Pennsylvania:

1) 1722 tax list Upper and Lower Chichester 2) was Justice in first session of the court held at Upland 1682 3) member of Governors Council 1683-84 4) Justice of the Peace 1684 5) Justice of Upland court Sept 13 1681 6) Provincial council of Chester Co. PA 1 yr Nov 1682 7) Member of the Supreme Executive Council from Chester Co., PA 1683.

WILLIAM CLAYTON, with his family, arrived in the ship "Kent" from London, in the company with certain Commissioners sent out by the Proprietors of New Jersey to purchase lands from the Indians, etc. In March 1678/9, he purchased the share of Hans Oelson, one of the original grantees of Marcus Hook, and settled at that place.

In religious persuasion he was a Friend (member of the Society of Friends, or a Quaker), and was an active and consistent member.

He was also active in political matters. He was a member of Governor Markham's Council, and also of that of the Proprietary after his arrival, and at the same time served as one of the Justices of the Court of Upland County, and subsequently for that of Chester County, presiding at the first court held in Pennsylvania, under the Proprietary government.(*)

On 8 mo. (November) 24, 1684, he was elected President of the Provincial Council, which, for the time being, was practically the position of Governor of the Colony.

Research Notes:

William Clayton received a patent for 500 acres in Chester Co.,PA. Moved from Chygoes Island, which was renamed Burlington by the Quakers, and is no longer an island.

It has been determined that Willliam Clayton is NOT the son of a London lawyer, or Oxford University dignitary that was previously claimed.

A Will Bond in lieu of a Will was signed by his son, William Clayton, Jr. and is number 119 for the year 1689 in the Register of Wills office of the City and County of Philadelphia, PA.

Exactly when William Clayton became a Quaker is not known, but he was active as a Friend before he emigrated on the ship Kent to New Jersey. Samuel Janney in his "History of the Religious Society of Friends" speaks of a William Clayton going on a missionary trip to Ireland in 1656.

Joseph Besse in his "Collections of Sufferings for Sussex" has this entry: "On the 7th day of the 12th month of this present year 1663 (7 March 1663/1664 Julian, or 17 March 1664 Gregorian), Edward Hamper, Nicholas Rickman, Tristram Martin, William Turner, John Baker, John Snafold, Richard Newman, William Clayton and Henry Wolger for the sake of truth they did profess in meeting together to wait upon the Lord with the rest of the Meeting (Chichester) then assembled, were by one Major Mills with his band of armed men and with guns and swords drawn and in a violent manner took out of the said meeting 20 persons and had them to an inn, where they were kept till midnight and in the meantime the said Major Mills sent for William Gratwick, called a Justice of the Peace in this County of Sussex, and for no other cause were the several persons afore named by him the said Gratwick, committed to goal and the rest he bound over to answer for that offence,, so called, who accordingly appeared at the Assize, but were not called for anything said to them in relation to that matter, but at the following Sessions the aforementioned persons who were committed to goal were fined every many 6 pounds for the said meeting, and because for conscience sake they could not pay their fines aforesaid, they were committed to the House of Correction for 6 months in the town of Arundel (about 10 miles to the east) where they lay until it was expired, but here it is to be noted that John Snasfold aforesaid was fined but 3 pounds, and for not paying it lay there 3 months. "

And the same "Collection for Lancashire" has this entry for 1665: "As William Clayton was preaching in a Meeting at Padisham, the Priest of that Parish, attended by a Constable with a Warrant, came into the Meeting, pulled William out on the street,, tore his coat. The Constable then carried him before the Justices, who tendered him the Oath of Allegiance, and upon his refusal to take it, committed him to prison till the next sessions, when the Justices fined him 5 pounds for being at an unlawful Assembly, and committed him to the House of Corrections for 3 months. The Officers, for pretended fees and charges of carrying him thither, took his coat off his back. The keeper put him into a dungeon for 5 days and nights, till some moderate people of the town procured him the common liberty of the house for the rest of the time."

Two Quakers, Edward Byllinge and John Fenwick were partners in a proprietorship for West Jersey purchased for Lord Berkeley. Because of financial difficulties, Byllinge signed over his share to William Penn and two other creditors who in turn sold proprietary lots to two companies of Friends, one from Yorkshire and one from London.

Commissioners were appointed to "purchase from the Indians" or "to extinguish the Indian title" to the land and they shipped on the Kent. William Clayton was among those who came with these Commissioners. There were 17 family heads listed on the Kent which started loading in March 4, 1677, and finally sailed in the early summer. They passed the royal barge in the Thames and were given a blessing by King Charles II who was undoubtedly glad to see them go.

After a stop in New York, the Kent sailed up the Delaware late in August and finally settled in "Chygoe's Island." This became Burlington, NJ. There were some scattered buildings from the Swedish settlement there, but during the first winter many of the settlers had to be sheltered in sheds, tents and stables.

"The Concessions and Agreements of the Proprietors, Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Providence of West Jersey in America" had been drawn and signed before the trip was undertaken. This document of civil and religious liberty was the Friends first experiment in legislation. It created an executive and a legislative power, provided that a Governor be chosen by an Assembly which in turn was elected by the people, and became the basis for the common law of the province. This colony predated Pennsylvania by five years.

The fact that William Penn referred to William Clayton as "cousin" as well as "friend" has not been explained.

Time Line: William Clayton was born 1 year prior to the first town government in the colonies being organized in Dorchester, Massachusetts

THE KENT

The Kent carried colonists to West New Jersey with Gregory Marlow as master and loaded in London for New Jersey 19 March to 31 March, 1677. There followed loadings for other ports, but she sailed before May.

The Kent sailed first to New York, arriving either the 4th, 12th or 16th August. Then after a short stay, the Kent sailed across the bay to Perth Amboy, after which she headed south to the Delaware, landing first at the mouth of Raccoon Creek where she is said to have disembarked some 230 passengers of a total of 270. She then moved on to Chygoes Island, now Burlington.

Other histories state that she landed at Raccoon Creek after an early June halt at New Castle, then to Burlington on 23 June. However, the arrival time in New York is known from the minutes of the New York government, with which the Commissioners (aboard the Kent) met during their stay there.

The Yorkshire purchasers settled the 1st tenth, from Assinpink to Rancocas. The London purchasers settled the 2nd tenth, from Rancocas to Timber Creek.

From Jonna Turnbull's Ancestors: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:614076&id=I525

ID: I525 Name: William CLAYTON [1] Sex: M [2] [3] Birth: 8 DEC 1632 in Boxgrove Parish, Sussex, England [3] Death: 1 AUG 1689 in Chester Co,Pennsylvania [4] Ancestral File #: 594P-QV

Note: (1) William CLAYTON was baptized 9 Dec 1632 Boxgrove, Sussex, England.

He married 7 Nov 1653 St. Pancras Parish, Chichester, Sussex, England, to Prudence LANCKFORD, the daughter of William LANCKFORD of Broughton Parish, Hampshire, England.

Early adherents to the teachings of George Fox, William and Prudence became members of the Society of Friends.

On 7th day 12th month 1663 William was committed to jail in Sussex and fined 6 pounds for meeting with other Quakers. Having refused to pay his fines, William was jailed for six months in the House of Correction in the town of Arundel.

William Clayton and his family came to America in 1677 but the exact date of their arrival is uncertain. There was a William Clayton who arrived in 1677 in New Jersey on the ship "Kent" reportedly from London in the company of certain commissioners sent by the proprietors of New Jersey to purchase land from the Indians. This may have been another William Clayton who has been mistaken for our William Clayton by Hepburn and others over the years.

On 6th day 8th month 1678, William Clayton Sr., William Clayton Jr. and Prudence Clayton were witnesses to the first marriage recorded at Burlington Monthly Meeting, Society of Friends, West Jersey.

In March 1679 William Clayton purchased the share of Hans Oelson, one of the original grantees of Marcus Hook and settled at that place.

Their daughter Honour Clayton married 6th month 1679 at "Markers Hook" under the care of Burlington Monthly Meeting. The family moved within the next decade to Chester Co., PA where William's estate was administered 1st day 8th month 1689.

Change Date: 23 JAN 2000

Father: William CLAYTON Sr b: 1590 in Chichester, Sussex, England

Mother: Joan SMITH b: 1610 in England

Marriage 1 Prudence LANCKFORD b: 1638 in London, England Married: 7 NOV 1653 in Pancras Parish, Chicester, Sussex, England

Children 1. William CLAYTON b: 11 MAR 1656 in Lewes, Chichester, Sussex, England

2. Prudence CLAYTON b: 20 AUG 1657 in Lewes, Chichester, Sussex, England

3. Joseph CLAYTON b: 11 DEC 1659 in Lewes, Chichester, Sussex, England

4. Elizabeth CLAYTON b: 1660 in England

5. Honour CLAYTON b: 16 JAN 1661/62 in Rumboldswke, Sussex, England

6. Mary CLAYTON b: 29 JUN 1665 in Rumboldswke, Sussex, England

7. Elizabeth CLAYTON b: 29 JUN 1665 in Rumboldswke, Sussex, England

8. Hannah CLAYTON b: 12 OCT 1667 in Rumboldswke, Sussex, England

Sources:

1. Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Title: Ancestral File (TM) Publication: July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996

2. Title: Pennsylvania Quaker Meeting Records Author: William W Hinshaw Publication: Shelby Publishing and Printing 1990

3. Title: Chichester,Sussex, England records Text: From Cheska Wheatley's web page [Q:3]

4. Type: Web Site Title: Ancestry.com Author: Mailing lists and searches

And from Bill Putman's Clayton Family History: www.billputman.com/Clayton.pdf

WILLIAM CLAYTON

This is the William Clayton that was the progenitor of the American line of Claytons. He is referred to in most places as William of Chichester.

In most genealogies he is shown as being born in 1625. My feeling is that since his father was not married until 1631, that William was probably born in 1632.

The only good record is that he was baptized on December 9, 1632 and that record is in the Parish of Boxgrove. He was born nearby at his parent's home in Rumbaldswick, Sussex.

On November 7, 1653, he married Prudence Lanckford in St. Pancras Parish, Chichester, Sussex, England. This event is recorded in the Parish Register as, "William son of William Clayton of this parish and Prudence Lanckford of Peter the Less (Parish), daughter of William Lanckford of Groughton, Hampshire..."

Prudence was born in Surry in the early 1630s. She was a daughter of William Lanckford originally from Broughton Parish, Hampshire. There were a number of early genealogies that all stated Prudence's last name was Mickles. Louis Jones, on one of his many trips to England, determined she was a Lanckford. However, she may have been married first to a man named Mickles who died shortly thereafter.

William was a carpenter by trade and had joined the recently established Quaker religion. He was selected with others to act a Commissioner for William Penn to go to America, to West Jersey near Pennsylvania to clear any Indian titles to land that Penn had acquired near what is today Burlington, New Jersey just north of the colony of John Fenwick in Salem County, New Jersey.

William Clayton sailed for America on the ship Kent which left London in March of 1677 and arrived in New York in August of that year. His family was not listed on the register of the Kent, so they probably joined him later once he had established both the area and a home. During the next four years some 1,400 new arrivals came to Burlington and most of these were Quakers.

The Clayton family probably arrived in the period around 1689 to 1680.

In 1681, William Clayton moved his family to Chester County, just across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania onto 500 acres of land he had patented.

On September 13, 1681 he presided over the first court held in Chester County. He was one of the first two judges for the City of Philadelphia. He was a member of William Penn's council in 1683 and 1684. He was acting Governor of Pennsylvania from 1684 to 1685.

William Clayton died in 1689. His Will Bond was number 119 and is filed in the office for wills in Philadelphia. There was no actual will, and the bond was written by his widow Prudence. She gives power of executor to her son William, the eldest.

I do not know when Prudence Clayton died, but it was after 1690 and in Chester County.

The following is what I know about the eight children of William and Prudence Clayton. All were born in Sussex, England. The five that survived and came to America were all members of the Quaker faith.

1. WILLIAM CLAYTON the eldest child was born on May 11, 1655. On April 5, 1683 in Chester County, he married Elizabeth Bezer daughter of John and Susannah Bezer. He died in Chester County on April 22, 1727. Their children were William, Elizabeth, Rachel, Edward, Richard, Abel, Thomas and Ambrose.

2. PRUDENCE CLAYTON was born October 20, 1657. She married Henry Reynolds in Sussex England. Henry was a son of William and Margaret Reynolds. She came to America with her family and died in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1728.

3. JOSEPH CLAYTON was born February 12, 1659.

4. ELIZABETH CLAYTON was born in 1660 and died in infancy.

5. HONOR CLAYTON was born January 18, 1662 in Sussex. She came to America and married James Brown on June 9, 1679 in East Nolling Township of Chester County, Pennsylvania. She remained in Chester County and died there sometime around 1715. The Browns were members of the Nottingham Monthly Meeting. It was this marriage between Honor Clayton and James Brown that descended to my family's PIGGOTT line.

6. MARY CLAYTON was one twin born June 20, 1665 in Chichester, Sussex. She married John Beals in Chester County in 1682.

7. ELIZABETH CLAYTON was the other twin and she died in infancy.

8. HANNAH CLAYTON was born January 2, 1667/8 in Sussex. No records remain so she also may have died in infancy.


Ben notes: The following will referred to his son William and the eldest grandchildren William Clayton and Prudence Clayton. From Duncan Rea Williams III's "Cyber Niche": http://www.drwilliams.org/genealogy/3919.htm

1. WILL OF WILLIAM CLAYTON, of the parish of St. Pancras, Chichester, Sussex, England, 1 Feb 1658/9.

Consistory Court Will Register 1653-1668 in Chichester Miscellaneous Wills 1653-1668, vol. 218, Ref. ST61/218 at the West Sussex Record Office, Chichester, Sussex. Copied and transcribed by Marilyn London Winton, 1984.

"WILLIAM CLAYTON. In the name of God I Will Clayton of the Parish of Pancras without the East Gate, of Chichester in the County of Sussex, Timberman, being sick & weak in body yet of perfect memory Lord to be thanked, do make & ordain this my last will & Testament in form following.

First I give and bequeath my soul into the hand of Almighty God and my body to the earth.

....Item: I give unto my son Will Clayton the sum of 12 pence to be paid within on whole year after my decease.

....Item: I give unto my grandchildren William Clayton [and] Prudence Clayton the children of my son Will Clayton the sum of 20 shillings apiece to be paid unto them after they shall accomplish the age of 21 years.

....Item: I give unto my son Richard Clayton the sum of 20 shillings to be paid him when he shall accomplish the age of 21 years.

....Item: I give unto my son Thomas Clayton the sum of 20 shillings to be paid him when he shall accomplish the age of 21 years.

....Also I give and appoint 5 pounds for the placing of my son Thomas above said between this and the first day of May next ensuing the date hereof unto Thomas Coby.

....Item: I give also unto my daughter Elizabeth Clayton the sum of 40 shillings to be paid her within one whole year of my decease.

....Item: I give unto my daughter Mary Clayton the sum of 5 pounds to be paid her when she shall attain to the age of 20 and 1 years.

....All the rest of my goods I give unto my loving wife Elizabeth Clayton after my debts and funeral expenses be discharged for her well being and for the bringing up of my youngest daughter Mary Clayton, and do ordain and make her my Executor of this my last will and testament. But my will & meaning is that for as much as my wife may be uncapable to manage my estate to the best use and for the payment of debts in the due order, and for as much as my loving friend John Peche [Peachey] of Pagham doth stand bound with me for much of my only debts, I do ordain and appoint my friend John Peche [Peachey] and do give him full power and authority (not withstanding my Executor above said) to prove this my last will & meaning and to take an inventory of all my goods and to sell the same until such time my debts & funeral expenses be discharged, and then to resign up the Executorship into the hands of my loving wife, and to my meaning above said he being paid all such charges as he shall be at in this business.

....And I do ordain & appoint & my will & meaning is & I do desire my 2 friends & do give them powers to call the above named John Peche [Peachey] unto an account & unto such accounts as are needful & as often as they shall think fit, namely William Steele, miller, & living without the east gate of Chichester, & John Avery, shoemaker in Chichester, & I do desire them that they do see this my last will be performed to the true intent & meaning hereof, & I do give my 2 friends Will Steele & John Avery 2 shillings apiece for their care & pains & to have their expenses borne from time to time when they shall be employed about my business.

....In witness hereunto I have set to my hand & seal this first day of February, [the year] of the lord 165 & 8. William Clayton

In witness, us, ....Thomas Hopkins ....John Rogers -------------------- One of the 1st Commissioners sent by Penn to buy Indian rights

The second ship KENT, with Gregory Marlow, Master arrived 16 August 1677 and landed at Raccoon Creek with two hundred thirty passengers. Most of the passengers were called Quakers and among those named was William Clayton. Some of the passengers selected a site for a town, now called Burlington, laid out by Richard Nobe, surveyor. They first called the town New-Beverly, then Bridlington, but soon changed to Burlington. William's name is signed to the first recorded marriage certificate in Burlington for the marriage of Thomas Leeds and Margaret Collier 8-6-1678. -------------------- " William CLAYTON was baptized 9 Dec 1632 Boxgrove, Sussex, England. He married 7 Nov 1653 St. Pancras Parish, Chichester, Sussex, England to Prudence LANCKFORD, the daughter of William LANCKFORD of Broughton Parish, Hampshire, England. An early adherent to the teachings of George Fox, William and Prudence became members of the Society of Friends. On 7th day 12th month 1663 William was committed to jail in Sussex and fined 6 pounds for meeting with other Quakers. Having refused to pay his fines, William was jailed for six months in the House of Correction in the town of Arundel.

William Clayton and his family came to America in 1677 but the exact date of their arrival is uncertain. There was a William Clayton who arrived in 1677 in New Jersey on the ship "Kent" reportedly from London in the company of certain commissioners sent by the proprietors of New Jersey to purchase land from the Indians. This may have been another William Clayton who has been mistaken for our William Clayton by Hepburn and others over the years.

On 6th day 8th month 1678, William Clayton Sr., William Clayton Jr. and Prudence Clayton were witnesses to the first marriage recorded at Burlington Monthly Meeting, Society of Friends, West Jersey. In March 1679 William Clayton purchased the share of Hans Oelson, one of the original grantees of Marcus Hook and settled at that place. Their daughter Honour Clayton married 6th month 1679 at "Markers Hook" under the care of Burlington Monthly Meeting. The family moved within the next decade to Chester Co., PA where William's estate was administered 1st day 8th month 1689. "

-------------------- Was acting Governor of PA, under William Penn, 1684-1685

view all 19

William Clayton's Timeline

1632
December 9, 1632
Boxgrove Parish (within present Chichester), West Sussex, England
December 9, 1632
Chichester, Sussex, England
December 9, 1632
Chichester, Sussex, England, United Kingdom
December 9, 1632
Chichester, Sussex, England
December 9, 1632
Chichester, Sussex, Eng
December 9, 1632
Chichester, Sussex, England
December 9, 1632
Box Grove, Rumbaldswick Parish, Sussex, England
1632
Rumbaldswick (within present Chichester), West Sussex, England
1653
November 7, 1653
Age 21
Chichester, Surrey, England, (Present UK)
1655
March 11, 1655
Age 23
Lewes, Chichester, Sussex, England