William Coxe, I

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William Coxe, I

Nicknames: "coxe/cocke/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Steeple Ashton, Wiltshire, England, (Present UK)
Death: Died in Henrico County, Virginia Colony, (Present USA)
Immediate Family:

Son of John Cox and Alice Cox (Walsheer)
Husband of Elizabeth Hutchins
Father of Elizabeth Porter; Mary Catherine Burton; Thomas Cox, Sr.; John William Cox, III; <private> Cox and 1 other
Brother of Anstice Cox; Grace Street; Elizabeth Cox; Margaret Cox and John Cox, II
Half brother of Michael Cox

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About William Coxe, I

In 1611, four years after Newport's early explorations, Sir Thomas Dale left Jamestown to establish a settlement upriver. Relations with the Indians had steadily deteriorated since 1607, and Dale's company suffered constant attacks. The party finally came to a peninsula on the north side of the river, now Farrar's Island, where Dale established the colony's second settlement, "Henricus," known also as the "city" or "town" of "Henrico." In just four months the town grew to a fortified settlement. Frame houses lined three streets, and the men had built a wooden church, a brick foundation for a permanent church, storehouses, watchtowers, and huts.

Life in the New World was hard, but the English had high hopes that their settlements would add valuable minerals and raw materials to their economy, in addition to providing strategic military outposts. They also saw this land as a new frontier for spreading Christianity.

Virginia's economy was sharply transformed by the introduction in 1612 of new strains of mild tobacco by colonist John Rolfe. Rolfe's tobacco was shipped to England, and Virginia's economy soon began to prosper.

In 1614, peace with the Indians was temporarily established, following Rolfe's marriage to Powhatan's daughter, Pocahontas, who had converted to Christianity and been baptized "Rebecca."

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William Coxe was born in 1598 in England, and was 12 years old when he came to Virginia in 1610. He arrived in the Godspeed on June 10, 1610, in the party of Thomas West, Third Lord De La Warr. He may have been a brother of Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Sir Henry Coxe of Broxburn, Herfordshire, who was married to Robert West, brother of Lord De La Warr. When the muster was taken in February 1624/25, he was listed as William Coxe, age 26, at Elizabeth City, with Thomas Bouldinge. On Sept. 20, 1628, because he qualified as an "ancient planter" - that is, one who had been in the colony before April 1616, the time of departure of Sir Thomas Dale - he was granted a ten-year lease for 100 acres. This land granted to William Coxe, Planter, was located "within the precincts of Elizabeth City...bounded on the south by the maine [James] river." --------------------

   "Ship Passenger Lists The South 1538-1825" by Carl Boyer
   Names of inhabitants in Virginia, 1624-1625
   William Coxe ship Godspeed date 1610
   William immigrated on 10 Jun 1610 to On the Godspeed in the party of Thomas West
   ("Early Virginia Ancestors of our Cox Family and Their Colonial Cousins," compiled by Mrs. David O. Reichlein, submitted by Mrs. Opal Cox Avant): "The first Cox in our family appears to have been William Cox, Planter, who came to Virginia before 1628, and could have been the same William Cox, age 26, who came over in the Godspeed. A land grant of 150 to William Cox, Oct. 29, 1637 in Henrico County, about 2 miles above Harrow Attocks, was granted for transportation of three persons, one of which was Richard Byrd. William Cox appears to have purchased additional land adjoining this patent and owned land on both sides of the James River: Coxendale on one side, and Dutch Gap on the other side. William Cox acquired by lease 100 acres of land in Elizabeth City on Sept. 20, 1624.
   William Coxe and Elizabeth were probably married about 1633 and had at least four children, two daughters and two sons:
   Thomas and
   John [I].
   Thomas was mentioned in records of May 6, 1665, when it is noted that he had previously sold land at "Warrick" to Mr. John Knowles. This was part of the land on "Fallen Creek" belonging to the orphans of William Coxe. The son John [I] probably married Robert Craddock's daughter and was the only one of William's children known to have left issue.
   John Cox [I] was born about 1635 and died in Henrico in 1676;
   he had a son Richard Coxe who died about 1735 in Virginia. Richard married Mary Trent, the daughter of Henry Trent and Elizabeth Sherman, and the granddaughter of Henry Sherman and his wife Cisley, who was the widow of Isaac Hutchins. Mary Trent and Richard Coxe had a daughter Elizabeth Cox, born February 25, 1713. About 1731 their daughter Elizabeth married Strangeman Hutchins, son of Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins
   Hopkins of Virginia and Related Families, by Walter Lee Hopkins, J.W. Fergusson & Sons Printers, Richmond, Virginia, 1931, pages 114-117:
   Cox Family of Virginia: In the list of "Adventurers," as they were styled in the Charters of the Virginia Companies, 1609 and 1620, the name is spelled Cock, Cocks, Cox, Coxe (Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 3, page 282).
   William Coxe, aged 26, came over in the Godspeed in 1610. It is most likely that this is the same William Cox whom Governor West granted 100 acres of land in Elizabeth County [City?], Virginia, Sept. 28, 1628 (Land Book I, page 89, Richmond, Virginia); also to whom Gov. John West, under date of Nov. 29, 1636, granted "one hundred and fifty acres of land, situate and being in the County of Henrico, about three miles and a half above Harrowattocks, west and by north upon main river, westerly upon the great Swamp, easterly into the woods, southerly towards Harrowattocks," for the transportation of three heads into the Colony, viz: Thomas Braxton, Richard Bird, and Richard Hewes (Land Book I, page 403). Also to whom Gov. John Harvey, under date Oct. 29, 1637, granted "one hundred fifty acres of land situate, lying and being in the County of Henrico, about three miles and a half above Harrowattocks," for the transportation of three persons into the Colony at his own expense; names of persons not found (Land Book I, page 492). (See Cox notes by Mrs. E.F. O'Gorman, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 38, pages 157-159.)
   Posted to the Henrico County, Virginia Deed Forum by Regena Cogar, rlcogar@bellsouth.net, 22 September 2000:VA Patents 1, p. 403Library of Virginia Digital Collection:Land Office Patents and Grants
   William Cox150Exmd__________To all to whome these presents shall come I Capt John West Esqr Governor &c. send &c. Now Know yee that I the said Capt John West Esqr doe with the consent of the Councell of State accordingly give and grant unto William Cox one hundred and fiftie acres of Land scituate lying and being in the County of Henrico about twoe miles & a halfe above Harroe Attocks West and by North upon the maine river Westerly upon the great swamp Easterly into the woods and Southerly towards [Harrow?] Attocks The said one hundred and fiftie acres of Land being due unto him the said William Cox by and for the transportacon of three persons into this Colony whose names are in the Records menconed under this pattent To have and to hold &c. dated the 29th November 1636 ut in aliis__________Thomas [Bra_ston?]Richard BirdRichard [He__es?]
   Note: Transcriber's comments are in brackets [ ]. For clarity, some contractions have been spelled out. Image format copyrighted by the Library of Virginia.
   William, who died about 1656, also had 250 acres of land across the river at the mouth of Falling Creek obtained in partnership with Isaac Hutchins on the 1st of September 1642. These lands belonged on December 14, 1656, to "the orphans" (then meaning heirs, not minor children) of William Coxe. On that date Peter Lee acquired 126 acres called "Worricke" bounded on the southwest by a small run, at a place called London Bridge, which divided his land from land belonging to the orphans of William Coxe, bounded on the southeast by the main river and on the northeast by Isaac Hutchins.Isaac Hutchins also obtained his 378-acre grant of land in "Worricks" on the 14th of December 1656. It was lying next to land of Peter Lee, southeast on the main river and northeast to a place called "Porringers Spring." Isaac was probably the son of Robert Hutchins, the mariner, and brother to Elizabeth Coxe, wife of William Coxe. Isaac had other lands on the south side of the river near "Worricks," for on the 1st of September 1642, he bought 250 acres in partnership with William Coxe at the mouth of Falling Creek.
   Isaac Hutchins probably came to Virginia about 1633 prior to the 16th of June 1637 when Captain Thomas Osborne was given credit for Isaac's headrights. Isaac married Cicely "Sisly" and had one child, a son Robert, who was mentioned in Isaac's will of February 23, 1656. In April 1714 the Henrico court concluded that Robert, son of Isaac, died under age and without issue, and thus the lands of Isaac reverted to his wife Cicely. She had married Henry Sherman after the death of Isaac. Her granddaughter, Mary Trent, married Richard Coxe, the grandson of William Coxe. Mary Trent and Richard Cox had a daughter Elizabeth Cox, born February 25, 1713, who about 1731 married Strangeman Hutchins, son of Nicholas Hutchins and Mary Watkins of Henrico County.
   From Margaret L. Smith, 3209 Reba Drive, Houston, Texas, 77019, May 1998:
   First Generation
   William Coxe was born in 1598 in England, and was 12 years old when he came to Virginia in 1610. He arrived in the Godspeed on June 10, 1610, in the party of Thomas West, Third Lord D e La Warr. He may have been a brother of Elizabeth Coxe, daughter of Sir Henry Coxe of Broxb urn, Herfordshire, who was married to Robert West, brother of Lord De La Warr. When the must er was taken in February 1624/25, he was listed as William Coxe, age 26, at Elizabeth City, w ith Thomas Bouldinge. On Sept. 20, 1628, because he qualified as an "ancient planter" - tha t is, one who had been in the colony before April 1616, the time of departure of Sir Thomas D ale - he was granted a ten-year lease for 100 acres. This land granted to William Coxe, Plan ter, was located "within the precincts of Elizabeth City...bounded on the south by the main e [James] river."
   On Nov. 29, 1636, William Coxe received a patent for 150 acres in Henrico County, for the tra nsportation of three persons into the colony. This tract was also located on the James River , further west, and was about 2 miles northwest of "Harroe Attocks" (Arrowhattocks). On Oct . 29, 1637, he received a patent for 150 more acres in the same location, for three more head rights.
   William Coxe and his wife, Elizabeth, made at least one return trip to England, and in 1637 w ere claimed by Mathew Edloe as headrights. Mathew Edloe, his mother Alice Edloe, and siste r Hannah Boyes were all neighbors of William Coxe, owning property adjoining his in Henrico C ounty. Sometime before Dec. 14, 1656, William Coxe and his wife had both died, for on that d ate, Peter Lee patented 126 acres in Henrico County adjoining the land belonging to the "orph ans of William Coxe," and lying on the main (James) river and northeast of the land of Isaa c Hutchins. (There is an unreferenced family chart which shows that William Coxe's wife wa s Elizabeth Hutchins, and it also names their four children.)
   The children of William and Elizabeth Coxe: 1. Thomas - inherited as "son and heir" a right to 250 acres sold on Sept. 1, 1642, by Matt hew Gough to William Cox and Isaac Hutchins, and assigned this interest to John Knowles on Au g. 1, 1668.  2. John [I] - married twice and had six children. He died in 1696. 3. Elizabeth - married Robert Porter. 4. Mary - married John Burton.  After the first generation, the name was spelled "Cox."
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William Coxe, I's Timeline

1598
1598
Steeple Ashton, Wiltshire, England, (Present UK)
1610
June 10, 1610
Age 12
Jamestown, Virginia onboard the Godspeed
1620
1620
Age 22
Henrico Co. Va.
1622
1622
Age 24
Henrico,Virginia,USA
1625
1625
Age 27
VA, USA
1626
August 27, 1626
Age 28
Herefordshire, England, (Present UK)
1639
1639
Age 41
Henrico County, Virginia Colony, (Present USA)
1652
1652
Age 54
Henrico, VA, USA
1656
December 14, 1656
Age 58
Henrico County, Virginia Colony, (Present USA)