William "Donn" Earl of Ulster de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster (c.1312 - 1333) MP

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Nicknames: "William /de Burgh/ Earl of Ulster", "The Brown Earl", "called "Donn" meaning the "Brown Earl""
Place of Burial: Belfast, Ireland
Birthplace: Ulster, Ireland
Death: Died in Murdered at Le Ford, Belfast, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland
Occupation: Murdered in a feud, Earl of Ulster, #rd Earl of Ulster, Earl, 3rd Earl of Ulster
Managed by: Alejandro "Alec" Oxenford
Last Updated:

About William "Donn" Earl of Ulster de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster

William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, called "Donn" meaning the "Brown Earl"[1], (September 17, 1312 – June 6, 1333) was a noble in the Peerage of Ireland

The grandson of 2nd Earl Richard Og de Burgh via his second son, John, William de Burgh was also Lord of Connaught in Ireland, and held the manor of Clare, Suffolk.

He was summoned to parliament from December 10, 1327 to June 15, 1328 by Writs addressed to Willelmo de Burgh.

In November 1332, at Greencastle, County Donegal, near the mouth of Lough Foyle,[2] he had his cousin Sir Walter de Burgh starved to death.[3] The following year, he himself was murdered in a feud at Le Ford (now Belfast) by Sir Richard de Mandeville, Knt., John de Logan, and others. His widow fled to England, where she remarried, was again widowed in 1346, and then became an Augustinian Canoness at Campsey, Suffolk, where she is buried.

The third earl of Ulster married, before November 16, 1327, (by a Papal Dispensation dated May 1, 1327) Maud, daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster (a grandson of Henry III of England) by his spouse Maud, daughter and heiress of Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Knt. They had one child, a daughter Elizabeth.

Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster married Lionel of Antwerp, third son of Edward III of England.[4] Upon the death of William Donn ("donn" is Irish for brownhair) the various factions of the de Burghs, now called Burke, began a civil war for supremacy.

-------------------- WILLIAM (DE BURGH),EARL OF ULSTER, grandson and heir, being son and heir of John DE BURGH and Elizabeth his wife, was born 17 September 1312 and crossed to England with his grandfather, Earl Richard, in 1322 and 1323. Although still a minor, he received Earl Richard's English lands, 3 February, and his Irish lands, 5 February 1326/7, and was summoned to Parliament [ENG] from 10 December 1327 to 15 June 1328, by writs directed Willelmo de Burgh, whereby he is held to have become LORD BURGH. He was knighted in London, 22 May 1328, and was among those who were to go to Berwick for the marriage ceremonies, 12 July following, confirming the Treaty of Northampton. Returning to Ireland in that year with Robert, King of Scots, he was granted the keeping of Carrickfergus Castle, 15 November 1328, and of Athlone Castle, 24 February 1330/1. He attended Parliaments [IRL] at Dublin, 1328 and 1329, and at Kilkenny, 1330. In 1329-30 he was in conflict with Brian Ban O'Brien in Munster and also with the Earl of Desmond. Both Earls were ordered, 19 June 1330, by the King to keep the peace and both were committed by the Justiciar [IRL] to the custody of the Marshal in Limerick later in that year. Earl Richard was ordered to aid and advise the Justiciar, 27 February, and was appointed the King's Deputy in Ireland, 3 March 1330. He was called to England, November 1331, to advise the King as to his intended visit to Ireland; and was among those ordered to postpone trials there till after the King's arrival, 4 August 1332.

He married (Papal dispensation 1 May 1327) Maud, daughter of Henry, EARL OF LANCASTER AND LEICESTER (grandson of HENRY III) by his 1st wife, Maud, daughter and heir of Sir Patrick DE CHAWORTH, of Kidwelly, co. Carmarthen, and Kempsford, co. Gloucester. He was murdered, 6 June 1333, aged 20, at Le Ford (now Belfast), on his way to Carrickfergus, by John de Logan and some of the Mandevilles. His widow fled immediately with her daughter Elizabeth to England, where she married, before 8 August 1343, Sir Ralph DE UFFORD, Justiciar of Ireland (1344-46), who d. 9 April 1346 at Kilmainham (Ireland) and was buried at Campsey Priory, Suffolk. Maud, who became an Augustinian canoness at Campsey in 1347, had licence from the Pope to transfer to the Order of St. Clare, 11 April 1364, and was living at Bruisyard Abbey in the same co., 21 February 1368/9. She died 5 May 1377 and was buried with her 2nd husband at Campsey. [Complete Peerage XII/2:178-9, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] WILLIAM DE BURGH, 4th Earl of Ulster, b. 17 Sep. 1312, murdered 6 June 1333, ae. 20 at LeFord, Belfast; m. (Papal disp. 1 May 1327), Maud, dau. HENRY, Earl of Lancster by 1st wife MAUD, dau. of Sir Patrick de Chaworth of Kidwelly. She m. (2) by 8 Aug. 1343, Sir Ralph de Ufford, Justiciar of Ireland, d. 9. Apr. 1346. She d. 5. May 1377. (CP, op. cit. (XII(2):178-179). [Ref: Weis AR7 94A:33]

BURGH, WILLIAM, de, sixth Lord of Connaught and third Earl of Ulster (1312-1332), was the son of John de Burgh, by his wife Elizabeth, sister of Gilbert de Clare, the last earl of Gloucester. Born on 13 Sept. 1312, he was fourteen when he succeeded to the title and estates of his grandfather, Richard de Burgh [q.v.] (_Fifteenth Cent. Chron._) His uncle Edmund and his cousin Walter, son of William de Burgh, were appointed his guardians, with the custody of his Irish lands (_Irish Rolls_, 33b, 34b). Edward III dubbed him knight on Whit Sunday 1328, and at the same time gave him possession of his estates. In the same year he was present at Northampton when the truce between England and Scotland was confirmed. From Northampton he went to Berwick for the betrothal of his cousins, David Bruce and the English princess Joan; after which Robert Bruce crossed over to Carrickfergus in company with the young earl, but returned to Scotland almost immediately. About Lady day 1329 he was present at the great Dublin parliament when it was decreed that each baron should punish his own servants if they broke the peace. In honour of this law he gave a great feast in Dublin Castle. In 1330 the old feud between the De Burghs and the Geraldines broke out again, and Roger Utlawe, the justiciar, committed both Lord Maurice Fitzthomas and the Earl of Ulster to the custody of the marshal at Limerick. They cannot have been confined long, as De Burgh was in England in 1331; while in October of the same year Lord Maurice Fitzthomas was once more a prisoner in Dublin Castle, whence he was not released till 1333. (_Fifteenth Cent. Chron._; _Book of Howth_). His release is probably to be connected with the murder of the Earl of Ulster, who was slain by Robert de Mandeville, between Newtown and Carickfergus, on 6 June 1333. Like his father and his other ancestors for many generations, De Burgh was constantly at war with the native Irish. He came to Ireland in 1328, and in the same year led an expedition against Brian O'Brian. True to the policy of his race, the Earl of Ulster supported the claims of the descendants of Cathal Crodbherg, and thus was brought into conflict with his cousin, Walter de Burgh, who, bent on securing the throne of Connaught for himself, was constantly attacking Turlough. On the death of this king (1330) the earl seems to have been at open war with Sir Walter, whom he took prisoner, and starved to death in Greencastle in Galway (1332). Two years previously he had led a second expedition against Brian O'Brian, for the purpose of expelling him from the district of Thurles, near Cashel (_Loch Cé_; _Fifteenth Cent. Chron._) At the time of his death De Burgh was still a minor (_Irish Rolls_, 38 b), and, according to a later account, in his twentieth year (_Fifteenth Cent. Chron._) His wife was the daugher of Henry Plantagenet, third earl of Lancaster (Lodge; _Book of Howth_, 327). By her he left a daughter and heir, Elizabeth, who was entrusted to the custody of her great-uncle, Edmund de Burgh (_Irish Rolls_, 40). This lady married Lionel, third son of Edward III, who thus, by right of his wife, became nominal lord of the immense Irish estates of the De Burghs (_Fifteenth Cent. Chron._) De Burgh's widow married Ralph Ufford, justiciar of Ireland (d. 1346), whom she survived (_ib._) [For authorities see Burgh, Richard de* and Walter de.**] T. A. A.*** [Ref: DNB, Editors, Leslie Stephen & Sidney Lee, MacMillan Co, London & Smith, Elder & Co., NY,1908, vol ii, p. 331]

  • [Lodge's Peerage of Ireland, i., which must, however, be used with caution; Irish Close and Patent Rolls; Escheat Rolls, i. ii.; Parliamentary Writs, i. ii.; Calendar of Patent Rolls from John to Edward IV; Fine Rolls (ed. Roberts), i. ii.; Calendar of Documents relating to Ireland (ed. Sweetman), ii. iii. iv.; Calendarium Genealogicum, i. ii.; Report on the Dignity of a Peer, ii.; Annals of Loch Cé (ed. Henessey); Trokelowe (ed. Riley), Annales Londin. et Paulin. ap Crhonicles of Ed. I and II (ed. Stubbs); Documents relating to Scotland (ed. Palgrave), i.; Gilbert's Viceroys of Ireland; Exchequer Rolls of Scotland (ed. Stuart and Burnett), i.; Hist. Documents of Scotland (ed. Stevenson), i. ii. The Chartularies of St. Mary's, Dublin (ed. Gilbert), ii., contain copies of two manuscripts (Add. MS. 4792 and Bodley MS. Laud 526), which are assigned from their handwriting to the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries respectively. The Book of Howth and Bodley MS. Laud 613 contain many transcripts of documents relating to early Irish history.]
    • [Lodge's Peerage of Ireland (ed. Archdall) and Dugdale's Baronage are full of uncritical assertions, and all their statements require to be checked by constant reference to contemporary documents. Calendar of Irish Documents (ed. Sweetman), vols. i. II.; Calendar of Patent Rolls (Record Office); Fine Rolls (ed. Roberts); Calendarium Genealogieum, i. ii.; Annals of Loch Cé (ed. Hennessey, Rolls Series); Matthew Paris (ed. Luard); Matthew of Westminster (ed. 1601); Gilbert's Viceroys of Ireland and Chartularies of St. Mary's, Dublin (Rolls Series). The Book of Howth (ed. Brewer and Butler) and Bodley MS. Laud 613 contain a large collection of copies of documents relating to the history of Irelqnd in the thirteenth century.]
      • T. A. Archer, author of the article.

-------------------- 3d Earl of Ulster Had his cousin, Sir Walter de Burgh, starved to death Murdered by some of his tenants After his death, factions of family fought war for supremacy -------------------- William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, called "Donn" meaning the "Brown Earl"[1], (September 17, 1312 – June 6, 1333) was a noble in the Peerage of Ireland The grandson of 2nd Earl Richard Og de Burgh via his second son, John, William de Burgh was also Lord of Connaught in Ireland, and held the manor of Clare, Suffolk. He was summoned to parliament from December 10, 1327 to June 15, 1328 by Writs addressed to Willelmo de Burgh. In November 1332, at Greencastle,County Donegal, near the mouth of Lough Foyle,[2] he had his cousin Sir Walter de Burgh starved to death.[3] The following year, he himself was murdered in a feud at Le Ford (now Belfast) by Sir Richard de Mandeville, Knt., John de Logan, and others. His widow fled to England, where she remarried, was again widowed in 1346, and then became an Augustinian Canoness at Campsey, Suffolk, where she is buried. The third earl of Ulster married, before November 16, 1327, (by a Papal Dispensation dated May 1, 1327) Maud, daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster (a grandson of Henry III of England) by his spouse Maud, daughter and heiress of Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Knt. They had one child, a daughter Elizabeth. Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster married Lionel of Antwerp, third son of Edward III of England.[4] Upon the death of William Donn ("donn" is Irish for brownhair) the various factions of the de Burghs, now called Burke, began a civil war for supremacy. [edit]References

Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md., 2005, p.153. ISBN 0-8063-1759-0 ^ The Statute of Kilkenny ^ The History of Ulster ^ * Chronicle of Britain ISBN 1-872031-35-8 ^ Curtis, Edmund [1950] (2004). A History of Ireland, 6th ed., Routledge, 91–92. ISBN 0-415-27949-6.

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William "Donn" Earl of Ulster de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster's Timeline

1312
September 13, 1312
Ulster, Ireland
September 17, 1312
1327
May 1, 1327
Age 14
Papal Dispensation
1332
July 6, 1332
Age 19
Carrickfergus, Ulster, Ireland
1333
June 6, 1333
Age 20
Murdered at Le Ford, Belfast, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland
1340
1340
Age 20
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