William De La Ferte Mascy, Viscount Bellame (1035 - 1087) MP

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Nicknames: "Guillame", "Compte de la Ferte-Mace"
Birthplace: Macé, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Bucklow, Cheshire, England
Managed by: Danielle Rae Ward
Last Updated:

About William De La Ferte Mascy, Viscount Bellame

William de La Ferté Macé (c. 1034-aft 1085)

Born: La Ferté Macé, Normandy(Fort Mace)now in Alençon,Orne,France
Living: 1085 Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England (in the Domesday book)
Married: Miss de Conteville and/or Muriel de Conteville. Daughter of Harluin/Harlevin/Harlowen de Conteville and Harlette/Arlette de Falaise - the father-in-law and mother of William the Conqueror.
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Children:
Mathieu de La Ferté Macé - Fought at the battle of Hastings under the William the Conqueror - died abt 1075 somewhere in Normandy fighting under the Conqueror.
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Hugue de Macey - Fought at the battle of Hastings under the William the Conqueror - about 1100 in Essex England.
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Margaret De La Ferté Macé - married Ranulphus De Praers
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Guillaume(William)I de La Ferté Macé - Baron of Ferté Macé
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Hamon I De Mascy - 1st Baron of Massey and Lord of Description: Ascelie (Ashley Hall); Bogedone (Bowden) Church and Mill; Bramale (Bramhall); Doneham (Dunham Massey) Town; Hale, Hawk's Eyrie; Potitone (Puddington) Farm House and two Halls - supposed squire to one of his brothers at Hastings.

William de La Ferté Macé was the only French noble family holding land within Normandy (A Norse-occupied territory of France, of which William the Conqueror was Duke). The Barons of Massey were fair and well respected in England, but their ancestors in France were a brutal family respected more for their violent disposition than their titles.

Pedigree for William de La Ferté Macé (c. 1034-aft 1085), of which I can provide further info on request:

Parents: William I (II) Talvas and Hildeburge D'Alençon, d/o Raoul III de Beaumont
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Grandparents: William I Talvace De Bellême and Mathilde De Ganelon (I haven't researched her yet)
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G-Grandparents: Yves I De Creil De Belesme and Gordeschilda "Godchilde" De Ponthieu, d/o Hilduin III de Ponthieu
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GG-(possible) Grandparents: Yves De Criel and Giele de Ponthieu.

I hope this helps. Most of these folks have multiple variants for their name depending on whether they were recorded by an English, Norman or French Monk. Their names also changed based on titled lands: It was common to adopt the name of the manor or land you controlled as a 'surname'.

Email me at ah64acrew(at)hotmail.com if you have questions, comments, or wish source references.

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Viscount William de la Ferté-Macé,1 2 3 4 son of William I Talvas, Lord of Bellême and Alençon and Hildegarde de Beaumont, was born in 1034 in Massey, <Cheshire, > England and died <1066> at age 32. Other names for William were William Lord of La Ferté-Macé, William Count de la Ferté-Macé, Viscount William de la Ferté Macé, William Ferte Massey, and William de la Ferté-Macé.

Birth Notes: May have been born in Normandy.

Death Notes: May have died at the Battle of Hastings.

Research Notes: Fought in Battle of Hastings with wife's half brother, William the conqueror, his brothers-in-law, and his sons. Some sources list his sons as Hamon de Massey I, Robert de Massey and William de la Ferte Massey. Others list two legitimate sons, Baron Mathieu de la Ferte Mace and Hugue de Macey, plus Hamon as an illegitimate son."

--------- From a Post by Scott Denison 28 July 2008 in the Massey Family Genealogy Forum (Genealogy.com): William de La Ferté Macé was the only French noble family holding land within Normandy (A Norse-occupied territory of France, of which William the Conqueror was Duke). The Barons of Massey were fair and well respected in England, but their ancestors in France were a brutal family respected more for their violent disposition than their titles.

William married Miss < > de Conteville, [stepmother of Hamon],5 daughter of Herluin de Conteville, Viscount of Conteville, Count of Crespon and Harlette de Falaise, in 1058 in Normandy, France. < was born from about 1037 to 1041 in Conteville, Normandy, France. Other names for < were Miss (Muriel?) de Conteville Burgh and Muriel de Montaigne.

Research Notes: The "Miss de Conteville" in several sources may have been Muriel de Conteville.

Per Wikipedia (Herluin de Conteville) one of Muriel's sisters could have been married to William, lord of La Ferte -Mace instead of Muriel. If Muriel, aka Muriel de Montaigne, Muriel de Conteville. More ancestry on Muriel may be available.


Children from this marriage were:

+ 2 M i. Hamon de Massey, 1st Baron de Dunham 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 was born before 1056 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died in 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step)

+ 3 M ii. Baron Mathieu de la Ferté Macé 13 was born after 1058 and died about 1075 in Normandy, France.

+ 4 M iii. William de la Ferté-Macé, Baron of La Ferté-Macé 14 was born about 1059. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step)

+ 5 M iv. Sir Hugue de Macey 14 died about 1100 in <Normandy, (France)>.

+ 6 F v. Margaret de la Ferté-Macé .14


_________________________________

DE MASSCEY/MASSEY ANCESTORS OF SIR WILLIAM DE BAGGELEGH

1034 -1278
My premise is that 'de mascey' and 'de baggelegh' are homonymic names (denoting the surname or used to signal that the person controls/owns that area,
Ie de la ferte mace/de mascey/de baggelegh
Meaning of Ferte Mace becomes the anglicized Mascey/Massey, Sir William De Baggelegh son-in-law of Hamon de Masscey VI
1. Viscount William de la Ferté-Macé,1 2 3 4 son of William I Talvas, Lord of Bellême and Alençon and Hildegarde de Beaumont, was born in 1034 in Massey, <Cheshire, > England and died <1066> at age 32. Other names for William were William Lord of La Ferté-Macé, William Count de la Ferté-Macé, Viscount William de la Ferté Macé, William Ferte Massey, and William de la Ferté-Macé. 
Birth Notes: May have been born in Normandy.
Death Notes: May have died at the Battle of Hastings.
Research Notes: Fought in Battle of Hastings with wife's half brother, William the conqueror, his brothers-in-law, and his sons. Some sources list his sons as Hamon de Massey I, Robert de Massey and William de la Ferte Massey. Others list two legitimate sons, Baron Mathieu de la Ferte Mace and Hugue de Macey, plus Hamon as an illegitimate son." 
William de La Ferté Macé was the only French noble family holding land within Normandy (A Norse-occupied territory of France, of which William the Conqueror was Duke). The Barons of Massey were fair and well respected in England, but their ancestors in France were a brutal family respected more for their violent disposition than their titles.
William married Miss < > de Conteville, [stepmother of Hamon],5 daughter of Herluin de Conteville, Viscount of Conteville, Count of Crespon and Harlette de Falaise, in 1058 in Normandy, France. < was born from about 1037 to 1041 in Conteville, Normandy, France. Other names for < were Miss (Muriel?) de Conteville Burgh and Muriel de Montaigne.
Research Notes: The "Miss de Conteville" in several sources may have been Muriel de Conteville.
Per Wikipedia (Herluin de Conteville) one of Muriel's sisters could have been married to William, lord of La Ferte -Mace instead of Muriel. If Muriel, aka Muriel de Montaigne, Muriel de Conteville. More ancestry on Muriel may be available.
Children from this marriage were:
+ 2 M i. Hamon de Massey, 1st Baron de Dunham 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 was born before 1056 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died in 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step) 
+ 3 M ii. Baron Mathieu de la Ferté Macé 13 was born after 1058 and died about 1075 in Normandy, France. 
+ 4 M iii. William de la Ferté-Macé, Baron of La Ferté-Macé 14 was born about 1059. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step) 
+ 5 M iv. Sir Hugue de Macey 14 died about 1100 in <Normandy, (France)>. 
+ 6 F v. Margaret de la Ferté-Macé .14 

http://books.google.com/books?id=zSJnMdalm1cC&pg=PA423&lpg=PA423&dq=William+De+La+Ferte+Mace&source=bl&ots=rCVsFqk_VZ&sig=X-wfWCGyAyC0Uk_GSipQJQVI9JQ&hl=en&sa=X&ei=WmfsUYX-NYj68QSH3ICwBw&ved=0CG0Q6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=William%20De%20La%20Ferte%20Mace&f=false

Source:William the Conquerer The Norman Impact on England Author: David Charles Douglas University of California Press, 1964

More on Odo's descendants: http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.medieval/2010-12/msg00073.html

And interesting note from this source regards Hugh 'Lupus', vicomte de Avranches and Earl of Chester (d. 27 July, 1101) who granted Hamon Mascy I his lands and his relationshiop to Odo. http://www.geni.com/people/William-De-La-Ferte-Mascy/6000000018790715350

From Friends of Baguley Hall on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/friends.baguley.hall?ref=stream DE MASSCEY/MASSEY ANCESTORS OF SIR WILLIAM DE BAGGELEGH

1034 -1278
My premise is that 'de mascey' and 'de baggelegh' are homonymic names (denoting the surname or used to signal that the person controls/owns that area,
Ie de la ferte mace/de mascey/de baggelegh
Meaning of Ferte Mace becomes the anglicized Mascey/Massey, Sir William De Baggelegh son-in-law of Hamon de Masscey VI

1. Viscount William de la Ferté-Macé,1 2 3 4 son of William I Talvas, Lord of Bellême and Alençon and Hildegarde de Beaumont, was born in 1034 in Massey, <Cheshire, > England and died <1066> at age 32. Other names for William were William Lord of La Ferté-Macé, William Count de la Ferté-Macé, Viscount William de la Ferté Macé, William Ferte Massey, and William de la Ferté-Macé.

Birth Notes: May have been born in Normandy.
'''Death Notes: May have died at the Battle of Hastings.
Research Notes: Fought in Battle of Hastings with wife's half brother, William the conqueror, his brothers-in-law, and his sons. Some sources list his sons as Hamon de Massey I, Robert de Massey and William de la Ferte Massey. Others list two legitimate sons, Baron Mathieu de la Ferte Mace and Hugue de Macey, plus Hamon as an illegitimate son."'''''' 
William de La Ferté Macé was the only French noble family holding land within Normandy (A Norse-occupied territory of France, of which William the Conqueror was Duke). The Barons of Massey were fair and well respected in England, but their ancestors in France were a brutal family respected more for their violent disposition than their titles.
William married Miss < > de Conteville, [stepmother of Hamon],5 daughter of Herluin de Conteville, Viscount of Conteville, Count of Crespon and Harlette de Falaise, in 1058 in Normandy, France. < was born from about 1037 to 1041 in Conteville, Normandy, France. Other names for < were Miss (Muriel?) de Conteville Burgh and Muriel de Montaigne.
Research Notes: The "Miss de Conteville" in several sources may have been Muriel de Conteville.
Per Wikipedia (Herluin de Conteville) one of Muriel's sisters could have been married to William, lord of La Ferte -Mace instead of Muriel. If Muriel, aka Muriel de Montaigne, Muriel de Conteville. More ancestry on Muriel may be available.
Children from this marriage were:
+ 2 M i. Hamon de Massey, 1st Baron de Dunham 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 was born before 1056 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died in 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step) 
+ 3 M ii. Baron Mathieu de la Ferté Macé 13 was born after 1058 and died about 1075 in Normandy, France. 
+ 4 M iii. William de la Ferté-Macé, Baron of La Ferté-Macé 14 was born about 1059. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step) 
+ 5 M iv. Sir Hugue de Macey 14 died about 1100 in <Normandy, (France)>. 
+ 6 F v. Margaret de la Ferté-Macé .14 
Second Generation 
2. Hamon de Massey, 1st Baron de Dunham 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 (William (Viscount)1) was born before 1056 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died in 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England. Other names for Hamon were Haimo de Masci, Hamo de Mascy Baron de Dunham, Hamon I De Mascy 1st Baron of Massey, and Hammon I Massey Baron of Dunham Massey. 
Research Notes: Illegitmate son of William de la Ferte-Macé per most sources. 
The first Hamon de Massey was the owner of the manors of Agden , Baguley , Bowdon , Dunham , Hale and Little Bollington after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, taking over from the Saxon thegn Aelfward according to the Domesday Book .[1]
The name of Hamon de Massey was passed on to his descendants for several generations. There are several different ways of spelling the name, including "de Masci", "de Mace", "de Macei", "de Mascy", "de Massy" and "de Massey
The Chester to York Roman road passes between the settlements of Dunham Massey and Bowdon and today forms the boundary between the two places. The name Dunham is derived from the Anglo-Saxon dun, meaning hill. The Massey element of the name is a result of its ownership by the Massey Barons. The manor of Dunham is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as having belonged to the Saxon thegn Aelfward before the Norman Conquest and to Hamo de Masci after. De Masci was an influential baron, who also had control over the manors of Baguley , Bowdon , Hale , Partington , and Timperley . The addition of "Massey" to the name Dunham reflects the manor's importance within the barony; Dunham was the seat of the Masseys. The importance of Dunham is further emphasised by the presence of two of de Massey's castles: Dunham Castle and Watch Hill Castle on the border with Bowdon; a third, Ullerwood Castle , was near Hale. The Masseys remained barons of Dunham and its environs until the 14th century, when the line became extinct.
Bramall Hall 
Bramall Hall is a Tudor manor house in Bramhall , within the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport , Greater Manchester, England. It is a timber-framed building, the oldest parts of which date from the 14th century, with later additions from the 16th and 19th centuries. The house, which functions as a museum, and its 70 acres (28 ha) of landscaped parkland with lakes, woodland, and gardens are open to the public.
Dating back to Anglo-Saxon England , the manor of Bramall was first described in the Domesday Book in 1086, when it was held by the Masseys. From the late 14th century it was owned by the Davenports who built the present house, and remained lords of the manor for about 500 years before selling the estate of nearly 2,000 acres in 1877 to the Manchester Freeholders' Company, a property company formed expressly for the purpose of exploiting the estate's potential for residential building development. The Hall and a residual park of over 50 acres was sold on by the Freeholders (though not the lordship of the manor) to the Nevill family of successful industrialists. In 1925 it was purchased by John Henry Davies , and then, in 1935, acquired by the local government authority for the area - Hazel Grove and Bramhall Urban District Council. Bramall Hall is owned now, following local government reorganisation in 1974, by Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council (SMBC), which describes it as "the most prestigious and historically significant building in the Conservation Area".
The name "Bramall" means "nook of land where broom grows" and is derived from the Old English noun br meaning broom , a type of shrub common in the area, and the Old English noun halh, which has several meanings - including nook, secret place and valley - that could refer to Bramall.[2] The manor of Bramall dates from the Anglo-Saxon period , when it was held as two separate estates owned by the Anglo-Saxon freemen Brun and Hacun.[3] The manor was devastated during William the Conqueror 's Harrying of the North .[4] After William subdued the north-west of England, the land was divided among his followers and Bramall was given to Hamon de Massey in around 1070.[3]
The earliest reference to Bramhall was recorded in the Domesday Book as "Bramale" at which time the manor was part of the Hamestan Hundred in Cheshire. With Cheadle and Norbury , Bramall was one of three places described in the Domesday Book that today lie within the modern-day Metropolitan Borough of Stockport .[1] Whereas its value was 32 shillings before 1066, it was worth only 5 shillings by 1086.
In the first part of the 12th century, the manor passed from the second Baron of Dunham Massey to Matthew de Bromale. According to Dean, Matthew's father is said to have founded the de Bromale family, naming himself after the manor, and he may have been related to or a follower of the de Masseys. He may have also held the manor at some point. The de Bromales held the manor until 1370 when Alice de Bromale married John de Davenport , and the family name was changed.-

Genealogy.com (Snell) says he was an illegitimate son (per Wyatt Massey 11/20/1999). Fought at Battle of Hastings and/or served as Mathieu's squire. Mathieu was later killed in battle in Normandy. Hamon was the first to live at Dunham Massey and was known as the Baron de Dunham. He founded the Massey family.

Has death date as 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England.
Herman W. Snell ("Descendants of William De Belleme") quotes from History of Cheshire, by Sir Peter Leycester
"Hamo de Mascy is thought to have been the illegitimate, or "natural" son of William de La Ferte, viscount of the powerful Belleme (Bellamy) family of Normandy. The seat of his holdings was the town of La Ferte Mace (fur-tee ma-cee) located in the present day Orne district. William's oldest son (legitimate) was Baron Mathieu de La Ferte Mace. His youngest (legitimate) was Hugue de Macey. All three sons were present at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, and as a result were given land grants in England. At Hastings, Mathieu's rank was Baron, Hugue's rank was knight, and Hamo served as Mathieu's squire. Mathieu would not live to enjoy his English possessions, as shortly after Hastings he was killed in battle in Shropshire. Hamo received his grants in Chesire and founded the Mascy (Massey) family. The seat of his holdings was the village of Dunham and his family lived at Dunham Massey Hall. His title was Baron de Dunham, and his descendants would continue to live at Dunham Massey Hall until 1458 when it came into the possession of the Booth family by marriage to a Massey heiress. In 1085 the Masseys held nine lordships in Chesire. 
Dunham Massey Hall, at the time the Masseys lived in it, was a three winged manor (in the shape of a squared off U) surrounded by a moat. The extensive grounds outside the moat contained a deer park, orchards, a river, and fishing ponds. Later owners made many changes and it bears little resemblance to the old Massey homestead. It now belongs to the British National Trust and is open to the public. It is located four miles spouthwest of Altrincham, which is a suburb of Manchester. " 
Sites obtained by Hamon l, in addition the the house in Chester and land in Wirrall peninsula, were Ullerton or Owlarton. It is located approx. two miles south-southeast from the town of Knutsford. Going northwest to the Mersey River, Northeast to Bramhall or Bromhale, which is those days would have been two miles s/w from Stockport, Thence below Stockport to the Mersey River. 
With these two lines denoting the s/e/ and s/w/ boundary and the Mersey River being the northern boundary of an area having a triangular shape. At about the midway point of the northern boundary on the Mersey River would be the river crossing to the City of Manchester original location in Lancaster, which lies to the north of Chester. 
This probably marks the area with the greatest holdings of the Barons de Mascy in Cheshire. With these lands Hamon de Mascy had lesser Lords who held portions thereof for him or under his 'right'. Examples would be Adae de Carrington and Alano de Tatton. Both constituted Estates granted to Hamon. 
In 1092 King William Rufus was a guest at the Court of Hugh Lupus in Chester. at least two of his Barons attended the King, Hamon de Mascy and William Venables. They along with their entourage of adherents and servants of Hamon's, accompanied the King on a hunting expedition in the Wirrall Peninsula. This probably took place on lands which had been set aside as a hunting preserve of the King and treated as his possession, which had not been the subject of a grant, not even to Earl Hugh Lupus. No doubt it was a consequence of some occurrence on this hunting expedition that a new estate was given to Hamon I, in fee of Hugh Lupus. 
Pontington, the area which is called today the village of Puddington,was granted by the King him self, so that there after the 
de Mascy Cheshire Barons held it in fee of the King rather than in fee of the Earl. For that reason Pontington was in later years especially prized.One can only speculate why King William Rufus made this generous grant. However, as soon as the hunting party returned to Hugh Lupus' Castle at Chester, Hamon sought out a scrivener, possibly a Monk whoes duties were appropriate to the purpose of recording as follows: 
"I, William, King of England do give onto Mascy all my right, interest and title to the hop and hopland(valley land) from me and mine with bow and arrow, when I shoot upon yerrow(the place), and in witness to the sooth(action or statement) I seal with my wang tooth." 
Inscribed as witness was William Venables "fratre suo". In the consideration given to the first Hamon de Mascy it should be remembered that he was a part of the court and governing body of nobles in Cheshire at a time when it was a county Palatinate under Earl Hugh Lupus. What this means is, that it's rule was like that under a country under martial law. At least Earl Hugh Lupus was not hampered by either King William the Conqueror or King William Rufus and he reigned in Cheshire as King. The Barons and their Lords were almost constantly put to defend against the Welsh on Cheshire's western border and to maintain control over the Saxons who made up the bulk of the population. 
Hamon Massey, the first Baron of Dunham-Massy, held the towns of Dunham,Bowden, Hale, Ashley and half of Owlerton in Bucklow Hundred, under Hugh Lupus, Earl of Cheshire in the reign of William the Conqueror. All of which one Edward held formerly, as appears by Domesday Book.So it appears this Edward was dispossessed of his right herein and these lands given to Hamon by Hugh Lupus. Hamon also had land in Maxfield Hundred,Bromhale and Puddington in Wirrall Hundred and other places, at the same time. 
[FN:From the History of Cheshire, by Sir Peter Leycester:
After the conquest the Saxons were ejected and their lands were granted to Normans. BRAMALE (Bramhall) was granted to HAIMO (Hamo, Hamon) DE MASCI (Mascy, Massey &c) as part of the barony of Dunham Massey, the the Macclesfield Hundred. It is linked historically with Brunhala = Bromhale = Broomhall near Wrenbury and Nantwich, through the family of Hamo de Masci, the first baron.
Noted events in his life were:

• Received: Bramall (Bromale), Abt 1070, Bramhall, Cheshire, England. From Wikipedia - Bramall Hall:

The manor was devastated during William the Conqueror 's Harrying of the North .[4] After William subdued the north-west of England, the land was divided among his followers and Bramall was given to Hamon de Massey in around 1070.[3]
The earliest reference to Bramhall was recorded in the Domesday Book as "Bramale" at which time the manor was part of the Hamestan Hundred in Cheshire. With Cheadle and Norbury , Bramall was one of three places described in the Domesday Book that today lie within the modern-day Metropolitan Borough of Stockport .[1] Whereas its value was 32 shillings before 1066, it was worth only 5 shillings by 1086.[5]
In the first part of the 12th century, the manor passed from the second Baron of Dunham Massey to Matthew de Bromale. According to Dean, Matthew's father is said to have founded the de Bromale family, naming himself after the manor, and he may have been related to or a follower of the de Masseys. He may have also held the manor at some point. The de Bromales held the manor until 1370 when Alice de Bromale married John de Davenport , and the family name was changed.[4]
Hamon married Margaret Sacie, daughter of Le Sire De Sacie, about 1099 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. Margaret was born about 1077 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England.
Children from this marriage were:
+ 7 M i. Robert de Mascy 16 was born after 1098 and died after 1124. 
+ 8 M ii. Hamon II Massey 17 was born about 1100 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England and died about 1140 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 40. 
3. Baron Mathieu de la Ferté Macé 13 (William (Viscount)1) was born after 1058 and died about 1075 in Normandy, France. 
Death Notes: Died in Battle
Research Notes: Legit son 1 of 2
Fought in battle of Hastings, plus Hamon (illegitimate) possibly as his squire. Mathieu killed in battle in Normandy.
4. William de la Ferté-Macé, Baron of La Ferté-Macé 14 (William (Viscount)1) was born about 1059. Another name for William was Guillaume de la Ferté-Macé Baron of Ferté Macé. 
5. Sir Hugue de Macey 14 (William (Viscount)1) died about 1100 in <Normandy, (France)>. 
Research Notes: Legitimate son 2 of 2
Fought in Battle of Hastings. After Mathieu was killed in battle in Normandy, Hugue became the heir and head of the household. He founded the Marcy family.
6. Margaret de la Ferté-Macé 14 (William (Viscount)1). 
Margaret married Ranulphus de Praers.12 
Third Generation 
7. Robert de Mascy 16 (Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born after 1098 and died after 1124.
Research Notes: From A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, Part II, p. 986 "MASSEY."
SIR WILLIAM MASSEY, Knt., 16 HENRY III, son of WILLIAM MASSEY, of Tatton, grandson of ROBERT MASSEY, of Sale, and great-grandson of ROBERT MASSEY, living anno 1124, who was son of HAMON MASSEY, 1st Baron of Dunham Massey, temp. WILLIAM the Conqueror, m. Margaret, dau. and co-heir of Humphrey Rosthorne, of Rosthorne, and was father of
8. Hamon II Massey 17 (Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1100 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England and died about 1140 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 40. 
Research Notes: From A History of Altrincham and Bowdon, p. 9:
"The second Hamon had issue Hamon, a son and heir, and Robert Massey, from whom sprang the Masseys of Sale. This is probably the Hamon Massey who is noticed in one of the ancient chronicles as having held the Castle of Dunham against Henry II. in 1173, during the rebellion of which Hugh Earl of Chester was principal leader. He gave the lands of Bramhall, or Bromale, to Matthew de Bromale by charter..."
Hamon married Eleanor Beaumont about 1124 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. Eleanor was born about 1100 in Cheshire, England.
Research Notes: FamilySearch? Rootsweb? AFN: 18GS-7K2
Children from this marriage were:
+ 10 M i. John Massey was born about 1127 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. 
+ 11 M ii. Hamon III Massey 19 20 was born about 1129 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died about 1216 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 87. 
+ 12 M iii. Robert Massey was born about 1130 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. 
Fourth Generation 
9. Robert Massey, of Sale (Robert de7, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1). 
Research Notes: Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland by Sir Bernard Burke, Part II (London, 1863), p. 986 "MASSEY"
Robert married someone. 
His child was:
+ 13 M i. William Massey, of Tatton . 
10. John Massey (Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1127 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. 
Research Notes: From History of Altrincham and Bowdon, p. 10:
"[The third Hamon] is said to have given to his brother John Massey all the land of Moreton."
11. Hamon III Massey 19 20 (Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1129 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died about 1216 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 87. Another name for Hamon was Hamo de Masci [III]. 
Death Notes: Per History of Altrincham and Bowdon, p. 10, "He died about the end of the reign of King John, or the beginning of that of Henry III., and his wife Agatha survived him."
BRAMHALL (Maccles.or Masceys field) The third baron of Dunham (in Henry II = 1154-89) confirmed to Mathew de Bromale: "the manors of Bramall, Duckenfield and 11 parts of Baggiley which had been previoulsy held by his father, whose name is not mentioned but who was probably youunger son of near kinsman of Hamo deMasci, the Norman Grantee". (Ormerod p 823). Then, in 6 Edwd I (=1272-1307) "Richard de Bromhall obtained release (ie. exemption) for himself and his tenants in Bromhall, Duckenfield and 11 parts of Baguley (sic) from Hamon de Massey, for being impleaded in the courts of Dunham.
Hamon married Agatha de Theray.22 
The child from this marriage was:
+ 14 M i. Hamon IV Massey 23 was born about 1176 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died after 1250 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. 
12. Robert Massey (Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1130 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. 
Fifth Generation 
13. William Massey, of Tatton (Robert, of Sale9, Robert de7, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1). 
Research Notes: Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland by Sir Bernard Burke, Part II (London, 1863), p. 986 "MASSEY."
William married someone. 
His child was:
+ 15 M i. Sir William Massey .16 
14. Hamon IV Massey 23 (Hamon III11, Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1176 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died after 1250 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. 
Research Notes: From History of Altrincham and Bowdon, pp. 11-12:
"Hamon, the fourth baron, was, like his father, liberaly disposed towards the Church, and gave to the Priory of Birkenhead, which was founded by his father, the advowson and donation of the church of Bowdon, as also half an acre of land in Dunham..."
Hamon married someone. 
His children were:
+ 16 M i. Hamon V Massey 25 26 was born about 1212 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died after 1278. 
+ 17 M ii. William Massey .26 
+ 18 F iii. Margery Massey .26 


      
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William De La Ferte Mascy, Viscount Bellame's Timeline

1035
1035
Macé, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
1052
1052
Age 17
1056
1056
Age 21
Dunham Massey, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom
1058
1058
Age 23
1059
1059
Age 24
1075
1075
Age 40
1087
September 9, 1087
Age 52
Bucklow, Cheshire, England
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