William Estment, Snr, SV/PROG

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William Estment, Snr, SV/PROG

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Woodstock, Dorset, England
Death: Died in Grahamstown, Albany, Eastern Cape, South Africa
Immediate Family:

Husband of Ann Estment; Elizabeth Estment and Mary Mandy Estment
Father of Willam James George Lloyd Estment; Uriah Estment; Mary Ann Glass; Sarah Lloyd; Henry Estment and 8 others

Occupation: Labourer, Sawyer, Farmer, Storekeeper
Managed by: Conrad Ian Naude'
Last Updated:

About William Estment, Snr, SV/PROG

1820 British Settler

William Estment, Labourer, 18 was member of Philipp's Party of 30 people, on the Kennersley Castle.

Party originated from Pembrokeshire, Wales

Departure Bristol, 10 January 1820. Arrival Table Bay, Cape Town - 29 March 1820. Final Port - Algoa Bay, Port Elizabeth 29 April 1820

Area Allocated to the Party : Bush River - Philipps named the location Lampeter, after the Carmarthenshire village of Lampeter Velfrey.

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  • from Haverfordwest in Pembrokeshire
  • From "Wolf Craig" Lampeter
  • first settled at Lampeter north east of Bathurst then moved to Southwell - Port Alfred ( in Doris Stirk's book)
  • Sailed on ship Kennersley Castle 1/10/1820 reached Table Bay 4/29/1820 and Algoa Bay 4/29/1820
  • The ship was quarantined at Table Bay for measles caused Phillip's Party not to settle in Table Bay but at Albany Algoa Bay.

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http://www.1820settlers.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Genealogy&file=getperson&personID=I12406&tree=1

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/SOUTH-AFRICA-EASTERN-CAPE/2004-08/1093794377

William ESMOND was born in Dorsetshire, England, in 1799. Not much is known of his life prior to 1820 when he sailed out to the Cape Colony under Phillip's Party on a ship by the name of Kennersley Castle. They departed from Bristol on 10 January 1820 and were originally arranged to be settled with the other Welsh parties at the Zonder End River, but the ship was quarantined for measles on arrival in Table Bay on 29 March 1820, so the party was not permitted to land. It was the decided that they should be sent on to Algoa Bay and be settled in Albany; It was done, and they arrived on the shores of our fair city on 29 April 1820 - they had been on the sea for over 3 months. (Isn't it strange to think how different it could have been if the ship had not been quarantined for measles, and its occupants had been located at the original destination?)

William must have, at some point in his journey, changed his surname from 'ESMOND' to 'ESTMENT' because all records prior to 1820 indicate that his surname was the former, while his marriage certificates and tombstone bear the latter. His status in 1820 is described as 'labourer', but he became quite a well-to-do figure during his life in the Cape Colony; it is believed that he was quite a wealthy shopkeeper, and at one stage shortly before his death, a director of the Fort Beaufort Bank.

William was, like most of the members of my family, obstinate, grumpy and totally set in his ways; he also displayed The Legendary Estment Ears which my family is so famous for, which I was fortunate to avoid inheriting, and which have often been likened to a wing-nut. When I hear about some of the things which William did, it's not difficult to imagine my father or grandfather doing the selfsame thing. One of these strange anecdotes displays just how obstinate this old man actually was. The story goes that it was around closing time at William's shop in Beaufort Street and William was in the house behind, getting dressed for a special function to which they had been invited, when an Innkeeper entered the shop and asked for a sack of meal for his guests' supper. The son, who was aware that it was closing time, told the Innkeeper that he was afraid that he could not supply him with the meal. At this, the Innkeeper became angry and demanded to see the boy's father, but the son!

refused to fetch him on the grounds that his father was busy getting dressed and that it was, by then, past closing time. Hearing the racket, William entered the shop to find his young son arguing with an adult and demanded to be told what was going on. He was so disgusted by the behaviour of his son, that he rolled up his sleeves, loaded the sack of meal into his wheelbarrow, and pushed it up the street to the Inn himself; making his son walk next to him so that the whole town could see his 'poor old father' pushing the heavy wheelbarrow while his son walked casually beside him, and so that the son would be ashamed of what he had done.

William's message to his son was that the customer always deserves the best - no matter what the time - something which a great many shops these days would do well to remember. -------------------- Ellis Estment wrote that family always believed that William belonged to the family of Sir Henry Esmond who was a womanizer. William was disgusted with this so when he arrrived in South Africa as an 1820 settler at the age of 18 he changed his name to Estment.

Arrived in Port Elizabeth.

William was Anglican and attended the cathedral in Grahamstown, South Africa

view all 18

William Estment, Snr, SV/PROG's Timeline

1803
April 2, 1803
Woodstock, Dorset, England
1822
May 22, 1822
Age 19
Grahamstown, Cape, South Africa
1824
October 31, 1824
Age 21
Lower Albany, Eastern Cape, South Africa
1826
April 1826
Age 22
1828
April 6, 1828
Age 25
Grahamstown, Cape Province, South Africa
1830
January 31, 1830
Age 26
1833
December 6, 1833
Age 30
Grahamstown, Western District, Eastern Cape, South Africa
1834
March 21, 1834
Age 30
Grahamstown, Cape Province, South Africa
1835
June 21, 1835
Age 32
1837
1837
Age 33