William fitz Osbern, 1st Earl of Hereford (c.1036 - 1071) MP

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Nicknames: "Guillaume fitz Osbern", "William fitz Osbern"
Birthplace: Poitiers, Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Died in Cassel, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Occupation: Regent of England, Earl of Hereford, Comte, d'Hereford, de Hainaut, Sieur, de Breteuil, Grand Maître d'hôtel
Managed by: JF Antoine
Last Updated:

About William fitz Osbern, 1st Earl of Hereford

William FitzOsbern, Earl of Hereford. Son of Osbern de Crépon and Emma d'Ivry Married: Adelisa Richilde (no children)

Children with Adelisa: 1. Guillaume (William) 2. Roger 3. Emma 4. (daughter) Illegitimate child: 5. Raoul

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzOsbern,_1st_Earl_of_Hereford http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Fitz_Osbern

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#OsbernCrepondied1040 http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#GuillaumeFitzOsbernHereforddied1071

   GUILLAUME FitzOsbern (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Cormeilles).  Guillaume de Jumièges names "Guillaume fils d'Osbern, proche parent du duc Guillaume", recording that he built the monasteries at Lire and Corneilles[23].  He is named as brother of Osbern, son of Emma, in his donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1038 or after, made jointly with his mother and brother[24].  "Willelmi filii Osberni" witnessed two charters dated 1035 or after and 1038 or after[25].  "…Guillelmi filii Osberni…" witnessed the charter dated 1054 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of "terram…Sancta Columba…dedit Niellus clericus" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[26].  "…Willelmi filii Osberti, Rotgerii de Monte Golmerii, Richardis vicecomitis Abrinchensis…" witnessed the charter dated [1055/56] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy "in pago…Constantino, villam…Flotomannum" to Saint-Florent de Saumur[27].  "…Guillelmus filius Osberti…Guillelmus filius Guillelmi filiii Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[28].  "Willelmus filius Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[29].  

The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that William I King of England made "le Conte Rogier de Montgomery et Guillaume le filz Osber" his two "Marechaulx d´Engleterre" after the conquest of England[30]. "Willelmi filii Osberni" signed a charter of "Erchenbaldo filio Erchenbaldi vicecomitis" dated 1067 or after[31]. "Willelmus comes filius Osberni dapiferi" made a donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1068[32]. He was rewarded for his part in the conquest of England with estates in the Isle of Wight and county of Hereford, thereby becoming Earl of Hereford.

GUILLAUME FitzOsbern, son of OSBERN de Crépon & his wife Emma d'Ivry (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Corneilles[152]).

Orderic Vitalis calls him nepos of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux[153]. Seigneur de Breteuil. He founded the monasteries of Lyre in [1046] and Corneilles in [1060] "on his own estates"[154]. He is named as brother of Osbern, son of Emma, in his donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1038 or after, made jointly with his mother and brother[155]. "Willelmi filii Osberni" witnessed two charters dated 1035 or after and 1038 or after[156]. "…Guillelmi filii Osberni…" witnessed the charter dated 1054 under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy confirmed the donation of "terram…Sancta Columba…dedit Niellus clericus" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[157]. "…Guillelmus filius Osberti…Guillelmus filius Guillelmi filiii Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[158]. "Willelmus filius Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père[159]. "Willelmi filii Osberni" signed a charter of "Erchenbaldo filio Erchenbaldi vicecomitis" dated 1067 or after[160]. "Willelmus comes filius Osberni dapiferi" made a donation to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1068[161]. He fought at the battle of Hastings. William I King of England rewarded him for his part in the conquest of England with the grant of estates in the Isle of Wight and the county of Hereford, whereby he became Earl of Hereford.

Florence of Worcester records that King William left "fratrumque suum Odonem Baiocensem episcopum et Willelmum filium Osberni quem in Herefordensi provincia comitum" when he went to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][162]. Florence of Worcester records that "Willelmi Herefordensis comitis" seized treasure from monasteries in England 17 Feb [1070][163]. King William I appointed him regent of Normandy in [1071][164]. The Chronicon Lyrensi records that "Willelmus filius Osberni" was killed by "Roberto Frison die Dominica Septuagesimæ" in 1072 and buried "Apud Cormelias"[165]. He was killed supporting the accession of Arnoul III Count of Flanders, whose mother he had married as his second wife, against Robert I "le Frison" Count of Flanders.

Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Osberni Normanniæ dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis" was buried "apud Cormelias"[166].

m firstly ADELISA de Tosny, daughter of ROGER de Tosny & his wife Godechildis --- (-Abbaye de Lire). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Adelise fille de Roger du Ternois" as wife of "Guillaume fils d'Osbern, proche parent du duc Guillaume", recording that her husband buried her in the monastery of Lire which he had built[167]. Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Osberni Normanniæ dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis…Aelizam uxorem suam filiam Rogeri de Toeneio" was buried in the monastery of Lire[168].

m secondly (after Jul 1070) as her third husband, RICHILDE, widow firstly of HERMAN Comte de Hainaut and secondly of BAUDOUIN VI Count of Flanders, daughter of --- (-Messines 15 Mar 1087, bur Abbaye de Hasnon). The question of the parentage of Richilde is discussed fully in the document HAINAUT dealing with her first husband's family. The Annals of Winchester record the marriage in 1070 of “comitissam Flandriæ” and “rex…nepoti suo Willelmo filio Osberni”[169]. Her third marriage is shown in the Complete Peerage which cites Annales Flandriæ stating that Richilde was taken in battle where her new husband FitzOsbern was killed[170].

Earl Guillaume & his first wife had four children:

1. GUILLAUME (-Bec 12 Jan [1103], bur Monastery of Lire[171]). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Guillaume et Roger l'Obstiné" as the two sons of Guillaume FitzOsbern and Adelisa[172]. "…Guillelmus filius Osberti…Guillelmus filius Guillelmi filiii Osberti…" witnessed the charter dated to [1060] under which Guillaume II Duke of Normandy granted "Brenerias" to the abbey of Bayeux[173]. "Willelmus filius eius" subscribed the donation of "Willelmus comes filius Osberni dapiferi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen dated 1068[174]. Son of Guillaume Earl of Hereford according to Orderic Vitalis[175], who also refers to him as nepos of Guillaume Comte d'Evreux[176]. On the death of his father, William I King of England granted him the succession to the estates in Normandy, whereby he became Seigneur de Breteuil et de Pacy[177]. He was captured in an attack on Conques, during the war between Raoul de Tosny and Guillaume Comte d'Evreux triggered by the enmity between their wives, and ransomed for 3,000 livres and the promise to make his cousin Roger de Tosny his heir[178]. An addition to the chronicle of Robert of Torigny records the death "apud Beccum V Id Jan" in 1183 of "Willermo filio Osberni comite Herefordiæ…filiis ipsius…Willemus maior natu" and his burial "in claustro Lirensis cenobii"[179]. The Chronicon Lyrensi records the death "apud Beccum V Id Jan" in 1098 of "Willelmus filius Willelmi filii Osberni" and his burial "in claustro Lirensis Cœnobii" which had been built by his father[180].

m ADELINE de Montfort-sur-Risle, daughter of HUGUES II de Montfort-sur-Risle & his second wife ---. She is named as wife of Guillaume by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and specifies that the couple were childless[181]. Guillaume had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses:

a) EUSTACHE de Pacy (-Pacy [Feb] 1136[182]). Orderic Vitalis records that he was the son of Guillaume "by a concubine", that he challenged the claims of William de Gaël and Renaud de Grancey to his father's estates and established himself as Seigneur de Breteuil et de Pacy, which was recognised by Henry I King of England who gave him his daughter's hand in marriage[183]. He rebelled against Henry I King of England, his father-in-law, in 1119, forfeited Breteuil but was allowed to retain Pacy[184]. m (1103) JULIANE, illegitimate daughter of HENRY I King of England & his mistress [Ansfride] . She is named as the daughter of King Henry I by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that the king arranged her marriage[185]. According to the Complete Peerage[186], it is "not unlikely that she was the daughter of Ansfride" as her presumed full brother Richard interceded with King Henry on her behalf in 1119[187]. After her husband's rebellion in 1119, the king (her father) besieged her in Breteuil castle, from where she "was forced to leap down from the walls…and fell shamefully with bare buttocks into the depths of the moat", and fled to her husband at Pacy[188]. She and her husband were later pardoned. She became a nun at Fontevraud Abbey[189]. Eustache & his wife had four children:

i) GUILLAUME (-1153). He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Pacy. Orderic Vitalis records that he attacked Breteuil[190], which had been given to Raoul de Gaël. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 "sine liberis" of "Willermo de Paccio" and states that the castle of Pacy passed to "Roberto filio Roberti comitis Legecestriæ"[191].

ii) ROGER . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.

iii) daughter . Orderic Vitalis records that she and her sister were given as hostages by their father in exchange for the son of Ralph Harenc. After Eustache blinded the boy, King Henry allowed Ralph to blind the two girls and cut off the tips of their noses[192].

iv) daughter . Orderic Vitalis records that she suffered the same fate as her sister[193].

b) ISABEL . She was the daughter of Guillaume according to Orderic Vitalis[194]. She must have been illegitimate as the same chronicler states in a later passage that her father's marriage was childless[195]. The charter recording the donation of "femina Hildeburgis…" to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise names "Elisabeth" as wife of her son "Ascelinus…Goellus" and their sons "Robertus et Willelmus"[196]. m ASCELIN Goel, son of ROBERT d'Ivry & his wife Hildeburgis de Château-Gaillard. He seized the castle of Ivry-la-Bataille (Eure) from Guillaume de Breteuil and surrendered it to Robert Duke of Normandy. The resulting war with Guillaume ended with the latter's capture and agreement to Ascelin's marriage to his daughter[197].

2. ROGER de Breteuil (-after 1087). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Guillaume et Roger l'Obstiné" as the two sons of Guillaume FitzOsbern and Adelisa[198]. On the death of his father, William I King of England granted Roger the succession to the estates in England, whereby he became Earl of Hereford. He conspired with his brother-in-law Raoul de Gaël Earl of Norfolk at Exning, Cambridgeshire in 1075, at the marriage of his sister, and rebelled against King William I during the latter's absence in Normandy. They raised an army but were prevented from crossing the River Severn by the Bishop of Worcester and the Abbot of Evesham. On the king's return to England, Earl Roger was imprisoned and his estates forfeited. He remained captive for the rest of his life[199]. Florence of Worcester records that "Herefordensis comes Rogerus filius Willelmi…East-Anglorum comiti Radulfo" conspired against King William in [1074][200]. Florence of Worcester records that "comites Morkarum et Rogerum, Siwardum cognomento Barn, et Wlnothum regis Haroldi germanum" were released by King William on his deathbed in 1087[201]. m ---. The name of Roger's wife is not known. Roger & his wife had two children:

a) RENAUD (-after [1130]). He is named as the son of Roger by Orderic Vitalis, who says that he and his brother became "some of the best soldiers in the service of King Henry I and are still awaiting his pardon"[202]. Nephew of Guillaume de Breteuil, on whose death he claimed Breteuil[203]. He held the Ballon fief in Wiltshire by [1130] de iure uxoris[204]. A charter of Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire including the donation by “Reginaldi filii comitis et Emelinæ uxoris eius…hæredum suorum Eatonam”, by undated charter[205]. The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordiæ et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[206]. m EMMELINE, daughter of HAMELIN de Ballon Lord of Abergavenny & his wife Agnes --- . A charter of Richard I King of England confirmed donations to Godstow nunnery, Oxfordshire including the donation by “Reginaldi filii comitis et Emelinæ uxoris eius…hæredum suorum Eatonam”, by undated charter[207]. The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordiæ et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[208]. Her parentage is confirmed by the return of knight´s fees made by William son of Reginald under Herefordshire in 1166 which names “Hamelinus de Balun avus suus”[209]. Renaud & his wife had five children:

i) WILLIAM de Ballon (-[1168/75]). The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordiæ et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[210]. William son of Reginald made his return of knight´s fees under Herefordshire in 1166 which names “Hamelinus de Balun avus suus”[211]. He claimed the Lordship of Abergavenny in 1166, in right of his mother.

ii) RAINALD de Ballon (-1203). The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordiæ et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[212]. The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldum de Baelun Reginaldi filii comitis filium, et Emelinæ de Baelun” confirmed his father´s donation of property “Eatonam” to Godstow, naming “Hamelinus de Baelun avus meus”, subscribed by “Hamelino de Baelun”[213]. He succeeded his brother in [1168/75][214]. "Reginald de Baelun son of Reginald, son of the earl, and Emeline de Baelun" confirmed the donation of the manor of Eaton to Godstow abbey, made by "their father and mother", by charter dated to [1170/80][215]. It is supposed that "their" is a mistake for "his", and that "Emeline" was the mother of Rainald de Ballon not his otherwise unrecorded sister of this name, although this is not beyond all doubt.

iii) HAMELIN de Ballon . The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordiæ et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[216].

iv) AGNES . The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordiæ et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[217].

v) JULIANA . The cartulary of Godstow includes an undated charter under which “Reginaldus filius Rogeri comitis Herefordiæ et Emelina uxor sua” and “filios et filias meas Wilelmum…Reginaldum et Hamelinum necnon Agnetem et Julianam” donated property “Eatonam” to Godstow[218].

b) ROGER (-after [1125/26][219]). He is named as the son of Roger by Orderic Vitalis, who says that he and his brother became "some of the best soldiers in the service of King Henry I and are still awaiting his pardon"[220].

3. EMMA . Guillaume de Jumièges records that the unnamed daughter of Guillaume FitzOsbern and Adelisa married "comte Raoul né Breton" and that they both went to Jerusalem in the time of Pope Urban[221]. Florence of Worcester records that her brother "Herefordensis comes Rogerus filius Willelmi" arranged her marriage to "East-Anglorum comiti Radulfo" against the wishes of King William in [1074][222]. The Annals of Winchester record the marriage in 1075 of “Radulfo Wadele comiti” and “comitis Willelmi Osberni filii filiam”[223]. m (Exning, Cambridgeshire 1075[224]) RALPH de Gaël Earl of Norfolk, son of RALPH "the Staller" Seigneur de Gaël & his wife --- (before 1040-on crusade after 1096).

4. daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges records that Guillaume FitzOsbern had two daughters[225].

Guillaume had one [Illegitimate] child [by an unknown mistress]:

5. RAOUL . Guillaume de Jumièges names Raoul as son of Guillaume FitzOsbern, recording that he became a monk at Corneilles as a child[226]. From the context of the passage, it would appear that Adelisa, wife of Guillaume FitzOsbern, was not the mother of Raoul as he is not included in the list of the couple's children in another passage. -------------------- William FitzOsbern (c. 1020 – 22 February 1071), Lord of Breteuil, in Normandy, was a relative and close counsellor of William the Conqueror.

1st Norman Earl of Hereford William FitzOsbern became one of the great magnates of early Norman England. He was created Earl of Hereford before 22 February 1067, one of the first peerage titles in the English peerage.

Early life He was the son of Osbern the Steward, a nephew of Duchess Gunnor, the wife of Duke Richard I of Normandy. Osbern became the steward of his cousin Duke Robert I of Normandy, and when Robert left the Duchy to his young son William, Osbern was one of Duke William's guardians. Osbern was killed defending the person of Duke William against an assassination attempt, sometime around 1040.

Osbern had married Emma, a daughter of Count Rodolf of Ivry, who was a half-brother of Duke Richard I of Normandy. Through her he inherited a large property in central Normandy, including the honours of Pacy and Breteuil.

William fitzOsbern was probably raised at the court of his cousin and namesake Duke William, and like his father, became one of the ducal stewards. He was one of the earliest and most vigorous advocates of the invasion of England, and tradition holds that he convinced the doubters amongst the Norman barons of the feasibility of the invasion.

FitzOsbern's younger brother Osbern was one of Edward the Confessor's chaplains, and possessed the rich church of Bosham in Sussex, and was well-placed to pass along intelligence on the situation in England. He later became Bishop of Exeter.

In England after 1066 As Duke William took control of England (becoming William I of England), fitzOsbern was given charge of the Isle of Wight, and then before 22 February 1067 he was made Earl of Hereford as well as Gloucester, Worcester and Oxfordshire.

Challenge and reward In any case, that part of England was not yet under Norman control; the understanding must have been that fitzOsbern was to take charge of their conquest when he was able. Also for the central part of 1067 the King returned to Normandy, leaving fitzOsbern, along with Odo of Bayeux, in charge of England.

Subduing Southwest England The King was back in England in 1068, and fitzOsbern accompanied him in the subdual of southwest England. He attended the King's Whitsun court in May, and then himself paid a visit to Normandy, where he fell ill for some months.

In charge at York In February or March 1069 fitzOsbern was given charge of the new castle at York, but he returned south in time to attend the King's Easter court in April.

Subduing the West Midlands Anglo-Saxon resistance in the West Midlands was subdued later in 1069, and it is likely fitzOsbern played a major part in this, though the details are not certain.

Invasion of Gwent During this time fitzOsbern and his followers pushed on into Wales, beginning the conquest of the Welsh Gwent.

Castle builder As part of the assertion of Norman control over England (and Wales), fitzOsbern was one of the major Norman castle builders. Early castles attributed to him include Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight and then in South Wales Chepstow (Striguil), Wigmore, Clifford Castle and Monmouth Castle, as well as creating or improving the fortifications of the towns of Hereford and Shrewsbury.

Distraction and death in Flanders In 1070 trouble arose in Flanders, where King William's brother-in-law Baldwin VI of Flanders had died, leaving his county and his young sons in the hands of his widow Richilde, Countess of Mons and Hainaut. Her control of Flanders was challenged by the brother of her late husband, Robert the Frisian. Looking for help, she offered herself in marriage to fitzOsbern. He could not resist the chance to become also Count of the rich Principality in the German Empire, close to Normandy. He hurried there with his army, but nevertheless was defeated by the Count of Flanders: fitzOsbern lost his life in the Battle of Cassel on 22 February 1071.

FitzOsbern married first Adeliza de Tosny, daughter of Roger I of Tosny. One assumes that he also married Richilde shortly before the Battle of Cassel.

He was succeeded in Normandy by his eldest son, William of Breteuil--who had the unfortunate experience of being held captive and tortured by his daughter's unwelcome suitor, Ascelin Gouel de Perceval 'Lupus', Sire de Yvery, until he finally granted daughter Isabella de Breteuil's hand in marriage to him, and in England and Wales by his younger son, Roger de Breteuil. His daughter Emma married Ralph de Gael, 1st Earl of Norfolk.

He lived in Carisbrooke Castle. ------------------- General information about the Earls of Hereford, who are not all related: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Hereford

-------------------- Norman companion with William the Conqueror. Interred: Abbey of Cormeilles. 1st Earl of Hereford. Acceded 1067. -------------------- William fitz Osbern, 1st Earl of Hereford was the son of Osbern (?) and Emma d'Ivry. He died on 20 February 1070/71 at Flanders, Belgium, killed in action.

Child of William fitz Osbern, 1st Earl of Hereford

   * Emma (?)

http://www.thepeerage.com/p382.htm#i3819 -------------------- William was also called William de Crepon.

William FitzOsbern, seigner de Bréteuil, Earl of Hereford, married Adelise de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny I and Godeheut (?).

William fought with William the Conqueror on 14 October 1066 at the Battle of Hastings, England. He was granted the Lordship of the Isle of Wight by the Conqueror, his kinsman.

William was regent, with Odo of Bayeux, in 1067.

William was created Earl of Hereford by his "distant relation" (1st cousin, 2x removed) William the Conqueror in 1067

William married Richilde de Mons, comtesse de Hainaut.

William died on 20 February 1070/71 in Flanders; he had joined Philip of France with 10 knights only and went off to Flanders, where he was killed.

His large estates in the west and on the Isle of Wight were broken up when his son, Roger, rebelled in 1088.

See "My Lines" ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p348.htm#i7116 ) from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- William Fitz Osbern, a Companion of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, Earl of Hereford.

The castle was founded by Earl William Fitz Osbern in the period between his being made earl of Hereford soon after Christmas 1066 and his death at the battle of Cassel in Flanders on 22 February 1071. In that time it is likely that his

engineers found the natural knoll lying alongside the steep drop to the River Wye near a ford. This gave the site its later name, the cliff by the ford or Clifford. Fitz Osbern's men scarped and ditched the knoll they found into what is today a

motte with a secondary platform to the West. The land of Clifford was at that time waste, but under the earls of Hereford and their successors this waste was brought to blossom with castle, borough and church. After Earl William's death, his

son, Earl

  1. Note: Alice [de Toeni] married William fitz Osbern, 1st Earl of Hereford, of the creation made shortly after the Conquest. [Burke's Peerage]
  2. Note: -----------------------------
  3. Note: William Fitz Osbern, a Companion of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, Earl of Hereford. [Ancestral Roots]
  4. Note: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
  5. Note: Page: 1378, 2680
  6. Note: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
  7. Note: Page: 53-25, 163-23
  8. Note: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
  9. Note: Page: 100 Text: 1071

-------------------- Seigneur of Breteuil in Normandy, he played a leading part in the events leading up to, as well as during, the battle of Hastings, for which he was rewarded with vast estates in England, including the county of Hereford by which he became Earl of Hereford. During the Conqueror's absence in 1067, he was in command of the army, and the following year was with the King in Normandy. In 1068/69, he was governor of York. He divided Herefordshire into casteleries, and attracted many knights to his service. In 1070 or early 1071, he was sent to Normandy to assist Queen Maud in the administration of the Duchy, and there became involved in the troubles in Flanders. In Feb of 1070/71, after joining Philip of France and marching into Flanders, he was killed.

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William Fitzosbern, 1st Earl of Hereford's Timeline

1036
1036
Poitiers, Poitou-Charentes, France
1037
1037
Age 1
Of, , Normandy, France
1050
1050
Age 14
Of, Breteuil, Normandy, France
1051
1051
Age 15
Flanders,Nord,,France
1054
1054
Age 18
Breteuil, Normandy, France or Herefordshire, England
1055
1055
Age 19
Castle Ivry, Normandy, France
1056
1056
Age 20
Of, , Herefordshire, England
1059
1059
Age 23
Of, Herefordshire, England
1060
1060
Age 24
Bréteuil, Eure, Normandy, France
1062
1062
Age 26
Of, Breteuil, Normandy, France