William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey

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William de Warenne

Also Known As: "1st Earl of Warren and Surrey"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bellencombre, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Lewes, Sussex, England
Place of Burial: Priory of Lewes, Lewes, Sussex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Rodulf de Warenne, I and Béatrice de Vascoeuïl
Husband of Isabel de Warenne; Mathilde Goet and Gundred de St. Omer, Countess of Surrey
Father of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl Of Surrey; Richard Reynold de Warenne, II; de de Warren; Editha 'Edith' de Warenne; Anne De Warenne and 4 others
Brother of Ranulf II de Warenne
Half brother of Rodulf II de Warenne; Ada of Mar; NN. de Garenne and Emma of Rudolf de Warenne

Occupation: 1st Earl of Surrey, Earl of Surrey
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey

William I de Warenne, Earl of Surrey

William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, Seigneur de Varennes († 1088), was a Norman nobleman who was created Earl of Surrey under William II 'Rufus'. He was one of the few who was documented to have been with William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. At the Domesday Survey he held extensive lands in thirteen counties including the Rape of Lewes in Sussex (now East Sussex).

Parent: Rudolph de Warenne & Béatrice (Gunnor's niece)

Spouse 1: Gundred, sister of Gerbod "the Fleming"

Children: 1. William 2. Edith 3. (daughter), married Enise de Colungis 4. Rainald 5. Gundred 6. Roger

Spouse 2: a sister of Richard Gouet (Goet), no issue. LINKS http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc254886787 http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#WiliamWarenneSurreydied1088

Castle Acre: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Acre

MEDIEVAL LANDS

RODULF de Warenne, son of --- (-1074 or after). An undated charter records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ", with the consent of "dominum nostrum Willelmum Normannorum ducem…et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii", by undated charter (dated to [1037/55]), signed by "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…"[1105]. "Rodulfus de Warenna" sold "totam portionem suam silvæ montium Blovillæ et Scurræ", with the consent of "uxoris suæ…Emmæ", by undated charter (dated to [1059]), signed by "Willelmi comitis, ipsius Rodulfi, Emmæ uxoris eius, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Leudonis…"[1106]. "Rodulfus de Warenna cum conjuge sua…Emma" sold "Amundi Villæ, Anglicevillæ, Flamenvillæ, Maltevillæ", with the consent of "Willelmi consulis Normanniæ", by undated charter[1107]. "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villæ…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[1108]. "Quidam miles de la Bruere…Alveredus, annuente Adheliza uxore sua" sold "decimas…in Maltevilla et Amunde Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Wido comes et Rodulfus de Warethna cum uxore sua…Emma", by undated charter, signed by "…Goiffredi fratris Alveredi, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Roberti filii eius…"[1109]. "Quidam miles…Willelmus filius Ansgeri de Salceid" sold land "in Amundi Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "domino eius Rodulfo…de Warenna…et uxor eius…Emma", by undated charter[1110]. "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[1111]. He sold land at Matevilla, Flamenvilla, Amundi Villa and Anglicevilla, all in pagi Calentensis, to Sainte-Trinité jointly with his wife and two sons, dated 1074[1112].

m firstly BEATRICE, [niece of GUNNORA, mistress of Richard I Duke of Normandy,] daughter of --- (-after 1053). An undated charter records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ", with the consent of "dominum nostrum Willelmum Normannorum ducem…et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii", by undated charter (dated to [1037/55]), signed by "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…"[1113]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that one of the nieces of Gunnor, mistress of Richard I Comte [de Normandie], married "le père du premier Guillaume de Warenne"[1114].

m secondly (1059 or before) EMMA, daughter of --- (-after 1074). "Rodulfus de Warenna" sold "totam portionem suam silvæ montium Blovillæ et Scurræ", with the consent of "uxoris suæ…Emmæ", by undated charter (dated to [1059]), signed by "Willelmi comitis, ipsius Rodulfi, Emmæ uxoris eius, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Leudonis…"[1115]. "Rodulfus de Warenna cum conjuge sua…Emma" sold "Amundi Villæ, Anglicevillæ, Flamenvillæ, Maltevillæ", with the consent of "Willelmi consulis Normanniæ", by undated charter[1116]. "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villæ…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[1117]. "Quidam miles de la Bruere…Alveredus, annuente Adheliza uxore sua" sold "decimas…in Maltevilla et Amunde Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "Wido comes et Rodulfus de Warethna cum uxore sua…Emma", by undated charter, signed by "…Goiffredi fratris Alveredi, Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Roberti filii eius…"[1118]. "Quidam miles…Willelmus filius Ansgeri de Salceid" sold land "in Amundi Villa" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "domino eius Rodulfo…de Warenna…et uxor eius…Emma", by undated charter[1119]. "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[1120].

Rodulf & his first wife had [four] children:

2. WILLIAM (-Lewes 24 Jun 1088, bur Lewes Priory). "Hugo de Flamenvilla" sold property "quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethana in Amundi Villæ…et in Maltevilla…[et] in Flamenvilla" by undated charter which also records that later "supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor eius…Emma ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus" confirmed the agreement, signed by "…ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Rotberti filii eius, Gisleberti filii eiusdem…"[1124]. "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold land in "quattuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillæ…Flamenvillæ, Amundi Villæ et Anglicevillæ" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, as well as "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi" sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", by charter dated 1074[1125]. Orderic Vitalis records, in recounting a death-bed speech of William I King of England, that "castrum…Mortui Mari" was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius" after it was confiscated from "Rogerium de Mortuomari" who had helped the escape of a French prisoner after defeating troops of Henri King of France in 1054 "apud Mortuum-Mare"[1126]. The chronology of the family shows that the grant to William de Warenne must have occurred several years after the confiscation from Roger de Mortimer. In [1054], he acquired land at Bellencombre, whose castle became the headquarters of the Warenne family in Normandy. He took part in the invasion of England in 1066 and was rewarded with land in 13 counties[1127]. Orderic Vitalis says the king "gave Surrey" William de Warenne in the chronicler's description of post-conquest grants made by King William, without specifying that he was created earl[1128]. He supported King William II against the rebels led by Odo Bishop of Bayeux and Robert Comte de Mortain in early 1088 and was rewarded by being created Earl of Surrey in [late Apr] 1088[1129], although he and his immediate successors usually styled themselves "Earl de Warenne". He was mortally wounded at the siege of Pevensey[1130].

- EARLS of SURREY.

----------------------------------

WILLIAM de Warenne, son of RODULF [Raoul] de Warenne & his first wife Beatrix --- (-Lewes 24 Jun 1088, bur Lewes Priory). "Rodulfus et Willelmus filii eorum [Rodulfo & Emma]" are named in the charter of "Hugo de Flamenvilla" dated 1060, which also names their parents[951]. "Rodulfo et Willelmo filius suis [Rodulfo]" sold land at Matevilla, Flamenvilla, Amundi Villa and Anglicevilla, all in pagus Calentensis, to Sainte-Trinité jointly with their father, dated 1074[952]. This 1074 charter does not specify that the two sons were children of Raoul's wife Emma. He was "consanguineus" of Roger de Mortemer, whose castle was confiscated by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy and awarded to William[953]. In [1054], he acquired land at Bellencombre, whose castle became the headquarters of the Warenne family in Normandy. He took part in the invasion of England in 1066 and was rewarded with land in 13 counties[954]. “…Willielmi de Guarenna…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[955]. Orderic Vitalis says the king "gave Surrey" to William de Warenne in the chronicler's description of post-conquest grants made by King William, without specifying that he was created earl[956]. He supported King William II against the rebels led by Odo Bishop of Bayeux and Robert Comte de Mortain in early 1088 and was rewarded by being created Earl of Surrey in [late Apr] 1088[957], although he and his immediate successors usually styled themselves "Earl de Warenne". He was mortally wounded at the siege of Pevensey[958]. William I King of England donated property in Norfolk to Lewes priory, for the souls of “…Gulielmi de Warenna et uxoris suæ Gundfredæ filiæ meæ” by charter dated to [1080/86], witnessed by "…Michael de Tona…Milonis Crispini…"[959].

m firstly (1070) GUNDRED, sister of GERBOD "the Fleming" Earl of Chester, daughter of --- (-Castle Acre, Norfolk 27 May 1085, bur Lewes Priory). Her marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis who also specifies her relationship with Gerbod[960]. "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes [et] Gundrada uxor mea" founded Lewes Priory as a cell of Cluny by charter dated 1080[961]. This charter also names "domine mee Matildis regine, matris uxoris mee", specifying that the queen gave "mansionem quoque Carlentonam nomine" to Gundred. It is presumably on this basis that some secondary works claim, it appears incorrectly, that Gundred was the daughter of William I King of England. Weir asserts that the charter in question "has been proved spurious"[962], although it is not certain what other elements in the text indicate that this is likely to be the case. Assuming the charter is genuine, it is presumably possible that "matris" was intended in the context to indicate a quasi-maternal relationship, such as foster-mother or godmother. The same relationship is referred to in the charter dated to [1080/86] under which William I King of England donated property in Norfolk to Lewes priory, for the souls of “…Gulielmi de Warenna et uxoris suæ Gundfredæ filiæ meæ”[963]. Gundred died in childbirth.

m secondly ([1085/88]) ---, sister of RICHARD Guet, daughter of ---. Her marriage is confirmed by the Annals of Bermondsey which record the donation in 1098 by “Ricardus Guet frater comitissæ Warennæ” of “manerium de Cowyk” to the monastery[964]. As William de Warenne´s son must have been below marriageable age before his father died, this reference can only apply to a second wife of William de Warenne senior.

Earl William & his first wife had [six] children:

1. WILLIAM de Warenne (-[11 May] 1138, bur Lewes Priory). His parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis[965]. "Willelmo et Reynaldo filiis et heredibus meis" are named in the charter of "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes" dated 1080[966]. He succeeded his father in 1088 as Earl of Surrey, though usually styled Earl de Warenne.

- see below.

2. EDITH (-after 1155). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Edith sœur de Guillaume comte de Warenne" and her husband Hugues [mistake for Géraud?] de Gournay, recording that they left for Jerusalem together, and that after her husband's death en route she married secondly Drogon de Mouchy[967]. m firstly GERARD de Gournay Seigneur de Gournay-en-Bray, son of HUGUES [III] Seigneur de Gournay & his wife Basilia Fleitel (-Palestine after 1104). He and his wife participated in the First Crusade but he died before the capture of Jerusalem[968]. m secondly DREUX [I] Seigneur de Moncy, son of ---.

3. daughter. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m ERNISE de Colungis .

4. RAINALD (before 1080-before 1118). His parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis[969]. "Willelmo et Reynaldo filiis et heredibus meis" are named in the charter of "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes" dated 1080[970]. He inherited his mother's possessions in Flanders. He supported Robert "Courthose" against his brother Henry I King of England, was captured in 1106 but released before the battle of Tinchebrai[971].

5. GUNDRED . The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.

6. [ROGER de Mortemer . Guillaume de Jumièges names "Roger de Mortemer fils du premier Guillaume de Warenne" when recording that he founded the monastery of Saint-Victor on his own domain[972].]

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WIKIPEDIA William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, (died 1088) was one of the Norman nobles who fought at the Battle of Hastings and became great landowners in England.

Life

He was a son of Rodulf II de Warenne and Emma and a grandnephew of duchess Gunnor, wife of duke Richard I of Normandy. The de Warenne surname derives from the hamlet named Varenne located on the river Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy[1] in the region today called Bellencombre.

As a young man, William played a prominent role in protecting the Norman realm of the future William the Conqueror's from a major invasion by the King of France in February 1054 at the Battle of Mortemer.[2] After this battle Roger de Mortemer forfeited most of his lands, and the duke gave them to William.[3]

William was one of the nobles who advised duke William when the decision to invade England was being considered. He is said to have fought at Hastings,[4] and afterwards received the Rape of Lewes in Sussex,[1] and subsequently lands in twelve other shires. He built castles at Lewes (Sussex), Reigate (Surrey), Castle Acre (Norfolk) and Conisbrough in Yorkshire.[1] By the time of the Domesday survey he was one of the wealthiest landholders in England with holdings in 12 counties.[5]

He fought against rebels at the Isle of Ely in 1071 where he showed a special desire to hunt down Hereward the Wake who had murdered his brother the year before.[1]

William was loyal to William II,[1] and it was probably in early 1088 that he was created Earl of Surrey.[6] He died shortly afterwards of wounds he received while helping suppress the rebellion of 1088.

Family

He married twice:

   * First, Gundred (Latin: Gundrada), sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester.
   * Second, to a sister of Richard Gouet

Children of William and Gundred

   * William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138)
   * Edith de Warenne who married Gerard de Gournay
   * Reynold de Warenne, who inherited lands from his mother in Flanders and died before 1118

Landholdings in the Domesday Book of William de Warenne

   * Aylmerton, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Acre, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Aldborough, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Anmer, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Bagthorpe, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Banham, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Banningham, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Barmer, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Barnham Broom, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Barsham, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Barwick, County of Norfolk[7]
   * Blo Norton, County of Norfolk[8]
   * Bodney, County of Norfolk[8]
   * Bradenham, County of Norfolk[8]
   * Brampton, County of Norfolk[8]
   * Briston, County of Norfolk[8]
   * Buckenham, County of Norfolk[8]
   * Burnham Thorpe, County of Norfolk[8]
   * Carlton, County of Cambridgeshire[9]
   * Chishill, County of Cambridgeshire[9]
   * Clipstone, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Coltishall, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Colton, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Colveston, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Congham, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Corpusty, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Cranwich, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Creake, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Croxton near Fakenham, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Denvor,County of Norfolk[10]
   * Deopham, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Didlington, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Downham Market, County of Norfolk[10]
   * Elsing, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Filby, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Fincham, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Flitcham, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Foulden, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Fransham, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Fring, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Fulmodeston, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Gayton, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Gimingham, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Great Ryburgh, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Gresham, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Gressenhall, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Grimston, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Griston, County of Norfolk[11]
   * Hackford near Reepham, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Harpley, County of Norfolk[12]

   * Hautbois, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Heacham, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Helhoughton, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Hempton, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Hilborough, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Hilgay, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Hillington, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Hingham, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Hockwold, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Holkham, County of Norfolk[12]
   * Houghton,County of Norfolk[12]
   * Ickburgh, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Illington, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Irmingland, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Itteringham, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Kempstone, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Kerdiston, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Kettlestone, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Kennett, County of Cambridgeshire[14]
   * Knapton, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Larling, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Letton, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Lexham, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Little Barningham, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Little Ellingham, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Little Ryburgh, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Little Snoring, County of Norfolk[13]
   * Mannington, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Marham, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Massingham, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Mattishall, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Methwold, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Morley Saint Botolph, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Mundesley, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Mundford, County of Norfolk[15]
   * North Barningham, County of Norfolk[15]
   * North Barsham, County of Norfolk[15]
   * North Walsham, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Northwold, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Outwell, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Palgrave, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Paston, County of Norfolk[15]
   * Pickenham, County of Norfolk[16]
   * Plumstead, County of Norfolk[16]
   * Rainthorpe(Now Rainthorpe Hall, Flordon), County of Norfolk[16]
   * Repps, County of Norfolk (Southrepps)[16]
   * Repps, County of Norfolk (Northrepps)[16]
   * Rockland, County of Norfolk[16]
   * Rockland St Peter, County of Norfolk[16]

   * Roudham, County of Norfolk[16]
   * Rougham, County of Norfolk[16]
   * Rudham, County of Norfolk (Now East & West Rudham)[16]
   * Salthouse, County of Norfolk[16]
   * Santon, County of Norfolk[16]
   * Scarning, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Sco Ruston, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Shereford, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Shernborne, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Shipdham, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Sidestrand, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Snettisham, County of Norfolk[17]
   * South Acre, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Southburgh, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Stanfield, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Stanhoe, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Stibbard, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Stinton, County of Norfolk (now Stinton Hall, Salle)[17]
   * Sustead, County of Norfolk[17]
   * Syderstone, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Tattersett, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Taverham, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Thompson, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Thorpe Market, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Threxton, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Trumpington, County of Cambridgshire[14]
   * Thurning, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Thuxton, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Tittleshall, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Toftrees, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Trunch, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Tuttington, County of Norfolk[18]
   * Waterden, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Weeting, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Weston Colville, County of Cambridgshite[14]
   * West Wickham, County of Cambridgshire[14]
   * West Wratting, County of Cambridgeshire[14]
   * Welborne, County of Norfolk[19]
   * West Dereham, County of Norfolk[19]
   * West Walton, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Whilton, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Wimsbotsham, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Wisbech, County of Cambridgeshire[14]
   * Witton Nr North Walsham, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Wolterton, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Wood Dalling, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Wood Rising, County of Norfolk[19]
   * Yelverton, County of Norfolk[19]

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Hunt
  2. ^ Douglas, p. 67-69
  3. ^ Hunt, Douglas p. 100
  4. ^ Douglas, p.203
  5. ^ Ellis: Introduction to Domesday, i.213.
  6. ^ probably between the very end of 1087 and March 24, 1088 (Lewis p. 335)
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k The Domesday Book, p. 186
  8. ^ a b c d e f g The Domesday Book, p. 187
  9. ^ a b The Domesday Book, p. 47
 10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m The Domesday Book, p. 188
 11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o The Domesday Book, p. 189
 12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m The Domesday Book, p. 190
 13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o The Domesday Book, p. 191
 14. ^ a b c d e f The Domesday Book, p. 48
 15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o The Domesday Book, p. 192
 16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l The Domesday Book, p. 193
 17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n The Domesday Book, p. 194
 18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l The Domesday Book, p. 195
 19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l The Domesday Book, p. 196

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Guillaume Ier de Warenne

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Ier_de_Warenne

Guillaume de Warenne ou de Varenne (William of Warenne ou of Warren en anglais) († 24 juin 1088), fut l'un des compagnons de Guillaume le Conquérant dans sa conquête de l'Angleterre en 1066. Important baron anglo-normand, il fut l'un des hommes les plus riches de l'Angleterre nouvellement conquise. Il fut fait 1er comte de Surrey par Guillaume II le Roux peu avant sa mort. Il fut aussi le fondateur d'une dynastie qui domina le comté de Surrey jusqu'en 1347.

Début de carrière

Il est le fils de Rodulf1 († peu après 1074), un petit noble normand et d'une mère inconnue, qui pourrait être Béatrice († après 1053), l'une des nombreuses nièces de Gunnor2 (voir plus bas). Son toponyme vient du hameau de Varenne à quelques kilomètres au sud d'Arques-la-Bataille, au bord de la rivière Varenne2.

Jeune homme, Guillaume aide le duc à consolider son pouvoir sur la Normandie, notamment dans les campagnes de 1052 et 1054 qui culminent avec la bataille de Mortemer. À l'issue de celle-ci, le duc dépouille Roger de Mortemer, son chef d'armée pour cette bataille, parent de Guillaume, de toutes ses possessions pour avoir libéré le prisonnier Raoul IV de Vexin, comte de Valois, dont Roger est aussi le vassal. Il se réconcilie plus tard avec le duc qui lui rend toutes ses possessions, sauf les châteaux de Mortemer et Bellencombre qui sont confiés à Guillaume2.

Bellencombre, qui est au bord de la rivière Varenne devient le siège de la famille de Warenne en Normandie. Il est alors haut dans la faveur du duc, et celui-ci le récompense plus encore avec les terres confisquées en 1053 au comte Guillaume d'Arques. Guillaume fait alors partie des principaux barons du duché, et il est consulté par le duc Guillaume le Bâtard (plus tard le Conquérant) à propos de son projet d'invasion de l'Angleterre2.

Conquête de l'Angleterre

Il est l'un des vingt compagnons du Conquérant identifiés avec certitude à la bataille de Hastings2, et est donc probablement un commandant d'une partie de l'armée normande. En 1067, il est l'un des quatre barons en charge de l'Angleterre pendant que le roi est en Normandie2. Lorsque Guillaume le Conquérant est de retour, il lui confie le rape de Lewes (Sussex)2. Les rapes du Sussex sont les divisions du comté et des territoires stratégiques pour la protection de la route vers et depuis la Normandie. Le château de Lewes, probablement construit par Guillaume de Warenne2 permet de surveiller le fleuve côtier Ouse. Il devient le siège familial en Angleterre2. En 1073, suite à un réarrangement des rapes pour en créer un nouveau pour Guillaume (I) de Briouze, il doit rendre quelques dizaines de seigneuries, mais en obtient en Est-Anglie en compensation2.

Entre autres possessions importantes, il reçoit aussi le stratégique honneur de Conisbrough dans le Yorkshire du Sud3. Il acquiert ce territoire probablement durant la campagne de dévastation du nord de l'Angleterre en 1068-10702. Il y construit aussi un château fort. Mais ses principaux domaines sont en Est-Anglie. Il est le principal propriétaire terrien du Norfolk, et possède de nombreuses seigneuries dans le Suffolk, l'Essex et le Cambridgeshire2. Son centre de commandement pour ces domaines est Castle Acre dans le Norfolk2.

Le Domesday Book nous indique qu'en 1086, Guillaume de Warenne est le quatrième plus riche baron d'Angleterre, après Odon de Bayeux et Robert de Mortain, les demi-frères du roi, et le comte Roger II de Montgommery. Les revenus générés annuellement par ses terres en Angleterre sont de 1140 livres sterling annuelles. 548£ lui reviennent directement chaque année, le reste revient à ses vassaux. À cette époque, il détient environ 300 manoirs, mais aucune terre dans le Surrey4.

Il possède des terres dans onze comtés5,6,2, principalement dans le Norfolk et le Yorkshire, comme tenant en chef ou vassal. Ses domaines dans l'est produisent la moitié de ses revenus et ceux du Sussex les deux cinquièmes2. Il est très agressif dans la gestion de ses domaines, et n'hésite pas à s'approprier des domaines voisins des siens2. Dans l'Essex, il s'empare de terres du diocède de Durham et de l'abbaye d'Ely2. Dans le Sussex, il vole des terres appartenant aux nonnes de Wilton2.

En Normandie ses domaines ne sont pas particulièrement importants malgré les dons reçus du duc2. Il a un frère aîné, nommé Raoul ou Rodulf, qui succède à leur père qui est toujours vivant en 10742. Il est toutefois possible qu'il hérite de quelques domaines2.

La révolte des comtes

Article détaillé : Révolte des comtes.

En 1075 éclate la révolte des comtes Raoul de Gaël, comte d'Est-Anglie, et Roger de Breteuil, 2nd comte d'Hereford. Guillaume et Richard de Bienfaite7, que le roi a établi comme co-justiciers du royaume (Joint Chief Justiciar) pendant son absence, convoquent les rebelles à la cour2. Ceux-ci ne daignant pas obéir aux ordres, ils lèvent l'armée d'Angleterre, aidés des évêques Odon de Bayeux et Geoffroy de Montbray, et livrent aux rebelles un combat sanglant. Orderic Vital relate que les rebelles capturés ont le pied droit tranché afin de pouvoir être reconnus8,2. Les deux justiciers assiègent ensuite le château de Norwich pendant trois mois, mais Raoul de Gaël s'est enfui en bateau2.

Au début des années 1080, Guillaume de Warenne participe aux campagnes normande dans le Maine2.

La rébellion de 1088

Article détaillé : Rébellion de 1088.

Guillaume le Conquérant meurt en 1087, et en 1088 survient une révolte du fait que les barons anglo-normands doivent servir deux seigneurs, les fils aînés du roi, Robert Courteheuse pour leurs territoires en Normandie, et Guillaume II le Roux pour leurs possessions anglaises. Guillaume de Warenne est l'un des rares barons à rester fidèle au roi9, alors que ses adversaires veulent le remplacer par le duc Robert, son frère aîné, plus facilement manipulable. Guillaume est immédiatement récompensé de son soutien au roi, et fait comte de Surrey en avril ou mai 108810. La rébellion est un échec, mais Guillaume meurt d'une blessure lors du siège du château de Pevensey.

Il est inhumé dans le chapitre du prieuré dédié à saint Pancrace qu'il avait fondé à Lewes10 vers 1078. Ce prieuré fut la première cellule clunisienne en Angleterre2. Il avait pris la décision de sa fondation après un pèlerinage à Rome, qu'il avait dû interrompre à Cluny pour cause de guerre en Italie2.

Pour C. Tyerman, Guillaume de Warenne eut une carrière météorique11. Fils cadet d'un noble normand mineur, il devint l'un des hommes les plus riches d'un des plus riches royaumes d'Europe, grâce à une loyauté irréprochable envers ses seigneurs11. Il fut aussi le fondateur d'une dynastie riche et puissante qui domina le comté de Surrey jusqu'en 134711.

Controverses

Sur l'identité de sa mère

L'identité de sa mère est sujette à débat, il existe des chartes de donation le mentionnant comme le fils d'Emma, qui serait la seconde femme de son père. Ce mariage n'aurait eu lieu que vers 1055, ce qui est incompatible avec l'âge de Guillaume à la bataille de Hastings en 1066. Il y a donc probablement confusion entre deux Rodulf, père et fils.

Au début du xiie siècle l'archevêque Anselme de Cantorbéry interdit le mariage de Guillaume (II) de Warenne à une bâtarde d'Henri Ier d'Angleterre, pour cause de consanguinité2. Cela tend à confirmer la mention par Guillaume de Jumièges12 que Guillaume est le fils de Béatrice († après 1053), une nièce de Gunnor et le frère de Roger de Mortemer. Pour C. P. Lewis, l'interprétation la plus plausible est que Béatrice était la mère ou la grand-mère de Guillaume de Warenne2.

Sur les origines de sa femme Gundred

Les historiens s'accordent aujourd'hui pour affirmer qu'elle était la sœur de Gherbod le Flamand, l'officieux comte de Chester, confirmant ainsi la filiation donnée par Orderic Vital13. Il a existé néanmoins un vif débat autour de son ascendance, certains historiens et généalogistes14 la considérant comme une fille légitime de Guillaume le Conquérant et de Mathilde de Flandre, ou comme une fille de Mathilde par un précédent mariage inconnu.

La charte de fondation du prieuré de Lewes, contient la phrase latine suivante attribuée à Guillaume de Warenne : « pro salute dominae meae Matildis Reginae matrix uxoris meae. » (pour […] la reine Mathilde, mère de ma femme). Par conséquent, il a été fait l'hypothèse que Gundred et son frère Gherbod seraient les enfants de Mathilde, ce qui expliquerait pourquoi Gherbod, un Flamand, se verrait confier le très stratégique comté de Chester suite à la conquête. Ces historiens affirment que le parentage donné par Orderic Vital est suspicieux. En effet, dans la même phrase, il affirme que le roi Guillaume donne le comté de Surrey à Guillaume de Warenne juste après la conquête, ce qui est bien évidemment faux. Toutefois, Allison Weir, dans son ouvrage15 Généalogie complète des familles royales britanniques, affirme que la charte de fondation du prieuré est un faux. Autre indice, le Domesday Book mentionne un Frederick comme beau-frère de Guillaume. Ce Frederick étant un flamand, donc frère de Gundred, il est peu probable que la reine ait eu trois enfants d'un mariage sans qu'il n'en reste une trace.

La richesse des Warenne

En mars 2000, le Sunday Times publia une enquête sur les plus riches personnalités de Grande-Bretagne du millénaire qui allait s'achever. Leurs calculs16 montra qu'en valeur actuelle, Guillaume de Warenne était le plus riche particulier de tout le iie millénaire britannique avec une valeur estimée de ses biens à 57,6 milliards de livres sterling actuelles17.

Le calcul est certes spécieux – d'ailleurs les dix premiers du classement vécurent au Moyen Âge, mais démontre que les possessions de Guillaume de Warenne étaient gigantesques.

En 2007, dans un livre intitulé The Richest of the Rich (Les plus riches des riches), Philip Beresford et William D. Rubinstein désignent Alain le Roux comme le particulier le plus riche d'Angleterre de tous les temps. En utilisant le même type de calcul que pour l'étude de 1999, sa fortune est estimée à 74 milliards de livres sterling18.

Mariage et descendance

Vers 1070, il épouse Gundred, sœur de Gerbod le Flamand, officieux comte de Chester. Elle moeurt en couches2 le 27 mai 1085 à Castle Acre, Norfolk. Ils eurent :

  • Guillaume (II) (avant 1071 – 1138), 2e comte de Surrey, hérite des possessions de son père ;
  • Édith, épouse Géraud (ou Hugues ?) de Gournay († 1099), seigneur de Gournay-en-Bray. Ils participent à la première croisade, et son mari meurt avant la prise de Jérusalem. Elle épouse ensuite Drogon de Mouchy (ou Dreux de Monceaux) ;
  • Raynald (avant 1080 – avant 1118), hérite des possessions flamandes de sa mère. Il supporte Robert Courteheuse contre Henri Ier et est capturé juste avant la bataille de Tinchebray, puis relâché ;
  • une fille non nommée, épouse Ernise de Colungis ;
  • Gundred.

En secondes noces, il épouse une sœur de Richard Gouet, un noble du Perche2.

Voir aussi

Compagnons de Guillaume le Conquérant Révolte des comtes Rébellion de 1088 Comte de Surrey

Références

  • ↑ ou Raoul, Ranulf, Randolf Ralph etc.
  • ↑ a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z, aa, ab, ac, ad et ae C. P. Lewis, « Warenne, William (I) de, first earl of Surrey (d. 1088) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • ↑ Voir l'histoire de Conisbrough sur conisbroughcastle.org.uk [archive].
  • ↑ C. Warren Hollister, The Greater Domesday Tenants-in-Chief, Domesday Studies, Éd. J.C. Holt (Woodbridge), 1987, p. 219-248.
  • ↑ Voir le site domesdaybook.co.uk en lien externe.
  • ↑ Sussex, Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, Yorkshire, Oxfordshire, Shropshire, Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire, Lincolnshire, Huntingdonshire.
  • ↑ Richard de Bienfaite, descendant des comtes de Brionne, primogéniteur de la famille de Clare.
  • ↑ Histoire de la Normandie, vol. II, livre IV, p. 253.
  • ↑ Histoire de la Normandie, vol. III, livre VIII, p. 234
  • ↑ a et b Histoire de la Normandie, vol. III, livre VIII, p. 277
  • ↑ a, b et c Christopher Tyerman, « William Warenne », Who's Who in Early Medieval England, 1066-1272, Éd. Shepheard-Walwyn, 1996, p. 36-37.
  • ↑ Guillaume de Jumièges, Gesta Normannorum ducum, liv. VIII, chap. XXXVII, p. 303-304.
  • ↑ Histoire de la Normandie, vol. III, livre VII, p. 214
  • ↑ Sir George Floyd Duckett, Observations on the parentage of Gundreda, the daughter of William, duke of Normandy, Sussex Archaeological Society, 1878
  • ↑ Allison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy, Éd. Pimlico, 2e édtition, 2002 (ISBN 0712642862)
  • ↑ Chaque candidat fut évalué suivant sa contribution au produit national net du pays quand il mourut, ou quand sa fortune était à son point culminant. Ce pourcentage fut ensuite multiplié par le produit intérieur net de 1999.
  • ↑ BBC News | UK | Warlord tops richest ever list [archive]
  • ↑ Jaya Narain, « 1066 invader was Britain's wealthiest man in history », dans le Daily Mail, 8 octobre 2007. [(en) Texte de l'article dans le Daily Mail [archive] (page consultée le 28 janvier 2008)]
  • Sources[modifier]
  • C. P. Lewis, « Warenne, William (I) de, first earl of Surrey (d. 1088) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • Christopher Tyerman, « William Warenne », dans Who's Who in Early Medieval England, 1066-1272, Éd. Shepheard-Walwyn, 1996, p. 36-37. (ISBN 0856831328).
  • Orderic Vital, Histoire de la Normandie, éd. Guizot, 1826. En ligne sur bnf.fr
  • Comtes de Surrey
  • George Floyd Duckett, Observations on the parentage of Gundreda, the daughter of William, duke of Normandy, Sussex Archaeological Society, 1878. En ligne sur Oldbooksoncd.com
  • Guillaume de Warenne dans le Domesday Book
  • Détail des possessions de Guillaume de Warenne en Angleterre d'après le Domesday Book

--------------------------------------

  1. ID: I8810
  2. Name: William DE WARENNE Earl of Warenne Y
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: ABT 1055 in Bellencombe, Seine-Inferieure, France
  5. Death: 24 JUN 1088 in Lewes, Sussex, England
  6. Burial: Chapter House, Lewes, Sussex, England
  7. Occupation: I Earl of Surrey; Seigneur de Varennes, near Dieppe.
  8. Religion: Sources: Reilly, Deborah Lynn. E-mail from LynnBull@aol.com
  9. Note:
   Note: From: Hyacinth@frost.snowhill.com (Jae Fleming)
   Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
   Subject: Companions of William the C reposted
   Date: 20 Feb 1999 02:20:41 -0800
   At 08:53 AM 2/19/99 -0500, Bill Martin wrote:
   >Dear Todd A. Farmerie,
   >
   >I have a couple of questions for you, prompted by your recentposts...
   >Who are the two dozen people known by name who fought withWilliam the
   >Conqueror at Hastings? Please list source(s) too.
   Bill,
   I saved this portion of an earlier post to the list, which Ibelieve from
   from Mr. Farmerie:
   The list was published in CP. It has also been posted here(several
   times, I suspect), including the following from Mr. Reitwiesner:
   >> The Falaise Roll is not an accurate list. The list ofpersons actually
   >> known to have been at the Battle of Hastings on the side ofWilliam the
   >> Conqueror is printed in the second edition of Cokayne's*Complete Peerage*,
   >> vol XII, Part I, Appendix pp. 47-48, as part of Appendix L.Numbers 1-12
   >> are recorded by William of Poitiers, number 13 is portrayedin a battle
   >> scene in the Bayeux Tapestry, and 14 and 15 are named byOrderic. 16-19
   >> were in William's army and almost certainly at the battle (16named by
   >> William of Poitiers, 17-19 portrayed in the Bayeux Tapestry),but there is
   >> no direct statement that they actually were at the Battle ofHastings.
   >> Number 20 is stated by Orderic to have taken part in fightsin the English
   >> war before William became King.
   >>
   >> 1. Robert de Beaumont, afterwards Count of Meulan and Earlof Leicester
   >> 2. Eustace, Count of Boulogne
   >> 3. William, afterwards 3rd Count of Evreux
   >> 4. Geoffrey of Mortagne, afterwards Count of Perche
   >> 5. William FitzOsbern, afterwards Earl of Hereford
   >> 6. Aimery, vicomte of Thouars
   >> 7. Hugh de Montfort, seigneur of Montfort-sur-Risle
   >> 8. Walter Giffard, seigneur of Longueville
   >> 9. Ralph de Toeni, seigneur of Conches
   >> 10. Hugh de Grandmesnil, seigneur of Grandmesnil
   >> 11. William de Warenne, afterwards Earl of Surrey
   >> 12. William Malet, seigneur of Graville
   >> 13. Eudes, Bishop of Bayeux, afterwards Earl of Kent
   >> 14. Turstin FitzRou
   >> 15. Engenulf de Laigle, seigneur of Laigle
   >> 16. Geoffrey de Mowbray, Bishop of Coutances
   >> 17. Robert, Count of Mortain, afterwards Earl of Cornwall
   >> 18. Wadard
   >> 19. Vital
   >> 20. Goubert d'Auffay, seigneur of Auffay
   >>
   >> For further information, see the source I cited above, andthe sources
   >> cited there.
  1. ENGL: Y
  2. NORM: Y
  3. WMCQ: Y
  4. Change Date: 28 FEB 1999

Father: Rodulph II DE WARENNE Mother: Emma b: ABT 1020 in Normandy, France

Father: Ralph (or Rodulf) DE WARENNE b: ABT 0988 in Normandy, France

Marriage 1 Gundred "the Fleming" DE FLANDRES b: ABT 1063 in Normandy, France

   * Married: BEF 1077

Children

  1. Has Children William II DE WARENNE (WARREN) Earl of Surrey b: 1071 in Sussex, England
  2. Has Children Edith DE WARREN b: ABT 1084 in Sussex, England

-------------------- Warenne, William de From Varenne, near Bellencombre, Seine-Inf. Fought with William I at Hastings. Lord of the Sussex rape of Lewes, with castle there; created Earl of Surrey, 1088; died same year from an arrow. Holdings in 13 counties all over the country. In modern money his holdings would be worth a £57 billion, a record in Britain during the last millennium.

He appears to have been the son of Rodulf or Ralph, called "filius episcopi", by his second wife, Emma, Rodulf himself being the son of Hugh (d. 1020), bishop of Coutances, by a sister of Gunnor, wife of Richard I (d. 996), duke of the Normans (G. Waters, Gundrada de Warenne, p. II; Archæological Journal, iii. 7; Cont. of Will. Jumièges, viii.37, makes his mother a niece of Gunnor). His name was derived from his fortress situated on the left bank of the Varenne, and called after that river, though later called Bellencombre (Seine-lnférieure), where there are some ruins of a castle of the eleventh century. He was a knight at the battle of Mortemer in 1054; and when, after the battle, Roger de Mortemer, his kinsman (he is incorrectly called his brother, ib.; Stapleton says that he was uncle), offended Duke William, the duke gave the castle of Mortemer to William Warenne (Orderic, p. 658).

He was one of the lords consulted by the duke with reference to his complaints against Harold (d. 1066) [q.v.], and was present at the battle of Hastings (Will. of Poitiers, p. 135). When the Conqueror returned to Normandy in March 1067 he appointed William, with other lords, to assist the two vice-roys in England. Grants of land were given him by the king; in Sussex he held Lewes, where he erected a castle, and about a sixth part of the county. He is said to have built another castle at Reigate in Surrey, and a third at Castle Acre in Norfolk. In 1069 he received Conisborough in the West Riding, with its appendages, and he became wealthy, for in 1086 he held lands in twelve counties (Ellis, Introduction to Domesday, i.213; Watson). He fought against the rebels in the Isle of Ely in 1071, and is represented as having a special grudge against Hereward, who is said to have slain his brother Frederic (Liber de Hyda, p. 295; Gesta Herewardi, pp. 46, 54, 61; Liber Eliensus, c.105; Frederic occurs as a landholder in Cambridgeshire and Norfolk, see Domesday, ff. 196, ii, 465b, 170b, 172b, but was dead in 1086). During the absence of the king in 1075 Warenne was joint chief justiciar with Richard de Clare (d. 1090? ) [q.v.], and took a leading part in suppressing the rebellion of the Earls of Hereford and Norfolk. In 1077 he and his wife Gundrada [q.v.] founded the priory of St. Pancras at Lewes, the first house of the Cluniac order that was founded in England; and in that year Lanzo was sent over by the mother-house of Cluni as the first prior (for the first and genuine charter of foundation see Sir G. Duckett, Charters and Records of Cluni, i. 44-5). In a spurious charter of foundation recited in 1417 (ib. pp. 47-53; Monasticon, v.12), which should not entirely be disregarded, William is made to say that he and his wife had been advised by Lanfranc [q.v.] to found a religious house, and that they determined on their foundation in consequence of a visit that they made to Cluni when they were intending to go on a pilgrimage to Rome, but were prevented by the war between the pope and the emperor, and when they were admitted into the brotherhood of the house. William made large grants to his priory (Manuscript Register of Lewes), it received a charter from the Conqueror, and held a high place among the 'daughters of Cluni' (Duckett, u.s.). In January 1085 William and other lords were engaged in the siege of Ste.-Susanne in Maine, which was held against the Normans by the viscount Hubert de Beaumont; they had no success, and were most of them wounded (Orderic, p. 649).

William of Warenne remained faithful to William Rufus in the rebellion of 1088, and the position of his castle at Lewes rendered his loyalty especially useful to the king (ib. p. 667; Freeman, William Rufus, i. 59). Probably in that year Rufus gave him the earldom of Surrey; Orderic (p. 680) represents the grants as made at an assembly that the king held at Winchester in 1090, probably at Easter (see Freeman, u.s.), and adds that the earl died shortly afterwards. He also (p. 522) speaks of a grant of 'Surrey' as made to him by the Conqueror, and William's name occurs in the testes of two charters of the Conqueror to Battle Abbey as 'comes de Warr' (see Monasticon, iii. 244-5); but these testes are certainly spurious, indeed the charters themselves are not above suspicion. Nor does Orderic's notice of the grant of 'Surrey' necessarily imply a grant of the earldom; taken with his account of the grant by Rufus, it seems rather to exclude such a grant. Freeman indeed considers that William must have received a grant of the earldom from the Conqueror, and accordingly gives him the title of earl before l087 (see Norman Conquest, iv. 471n., 584, 659); but considering the number of times that his name occurs in genuine records of the Conqueror's time without the title of earl, as specially in 'Domesday,' there is no valid reason for Freeman's supposition. (The question is well discussed by Mr. Round in the Complete Peerage, vii. 322, art. 'Surrey.' The assertion of some genealogists that William held a Norman earldom of Warenne is contrary to an invariable Norman usage. On the custom of describing English earls by their Christian names followed by their title, and in some cases with a distinctive suffix, as 'Willelmus comes Warenna,' where Warenne is used as a surname to distinguish Earl William from other earls of the same name, see Round, Geoffrey de Mandeville, p. 145.)

It is said that the earl was wounded in the leg by an arrow at the siege of Pevensey, and was carried to Lewes, where he died, after leaving his estates in England to his elder, and in Flanders to his younger, son (Liber de Hyda, p. 299; the authority, though late, may be accepted, see William Rufus, i.76n.; the estates in Flanders must have come to the earl by his marriage). The earl's death may then be dated 24 June 1088, for Pevensey was surrendered probably in May in that year (the day is given in the Manuscript Register of Lewes Priory, f. 105, and the date is also noted in Annales de Lewes ap. Sussex Archæological Collections, ii. 24; Dugdale, followed by Doyle, gives 24 June 1089). He was buried in the chapter-house of Lewes, with an epitaph given by Orderic (p. 680). He is described as remarkably valiant (Benoit de Ste. More, i. 189).

He married (1) Gundrada, first daughter of the king William and Matilda, and by her had two sons, William de Warenne (d. 1138) [q. v.] and Rainald or Reginald, who fought on the side of Duke Robert in 1090, was taken prisoner at Dive in 1106, and pardoned by Henry I (Orderic, pp. 690, 819, 821), and a daughter Edith [see under Gundrada], whose daughter Gundred married Nigel de Albini, and was mother of Roger de Mowbray I (d. 1188? ) [q.v.] After the death of Gundrada in 1085, William married (2) a sister of Richard Goet, or Gouet, of Perche Gouet (Eure et Loire) (0. Waters, u.s., p. 20; Bermondsey Annals, iii. 420).

Besides the priory of Lewes, he founded the priory of Castle Acre as a dependency of Lewes (Monasticon, v. 49), and is said to have been a benefactor of St. Mary's at York (ib. iii. 546, 550). He is accused of having unjustly held lands belonging to the abbey of Ely, and it is related that on the night of his death the abbot heard his soul crying for mercy, and that shortly afterwards his widow sent a hundred shillings to the church, which the monks refused to receive as the money of one who was damned (Liber Eliensis, c. 119). The story is no doubt connected with a long dispute between his descendants and the monastery. His remains were discovered at Lewes in 1845, and were reinterred at Southover in that borough (Sussex Archæological Collections, ii. II, xl. 170; Archæologia, xxxi. 439).

As listed in the Doomsday Book, his grants include:

- Bedfordshire: Dean, Easton, Keysoe, Swineshead.

- Buckinghamshire: Broughton (nr Aylesbury).

- Cambridgeshire: Carlton, Chishill, Trumpington, Weston Colville, West Wickham, West Wratting, Wisbech.

- Essex: Belstead Hall, Canfield, Chardwell (formerly Ainsworth), Dunmow, Easton, Fordham, Halstead, Hannington, Housham, Hunt's Hall (Formerly Pooley), Kenningtons, Paglesham, Peyton, Plumberow, Quick(s)bury, Roding, Steeple Bumpstead, Tildury, Wedens.

- Huntingdonshire: Catworth, Little Catworth, Tilbrooke.

- Lincolnshire: Carlton Scroop, Long, Bennington.

- Norfolk: Acre, Aldborough, Anmer, Aylmerton, Bagthorpe, Banham, Bannington, Barmer, Barnham, Broom, Barsham, Barwick, Blo Norton, Bodney, Bradenham, Brampton, Irmingland, Itteringham, Kempstone, Kerdiston, Kettlestone, Knapton, Great Ryburgh, Gresham, Gressenhall, Grimston, Griston, Hackford, Harpley, Hauthois, Heacham, Helhoughton, Hempton, Hilborough, Hilgay, Hillington, Hingham, Hocwold Holkham, Houghton, Hunworth, Ickburgh, lllington, Irmingland, Itteringham, Kempstone, Kerdiston, Kettlestone, Knapton, Larling, Letton, Lexham, Little Barningham, Little Ellingham, Little Ruburgh, Little Snoring, Mannington, Massingham, Mattishall, Melthwold, Morley St Botolph, Mundesley, Mundford, North Barningham, North Barsham, North Walsham, Northwold, Outwell, Plagrave, Pickenham, Plumstead (Nr Holt), Repps (Northreppst + Southrepps), Rockland, Rockland St Peter, Poudham, Rudham, Salthouse, Santon, Scarning, Sco Ruston, Shereford, Shernborne, Shipdham, Sidestrand, Snettisham, South Acre, Southburgh, Stanfield, Stanhoe, Stibbard, Stinton, Sustead, Syderstone, Tattersett, Taverham, Thompson, Thorpe Market, Threxton, Thurning, Thuxton, Tittleshall, Toftrees, Trunchx, Tuttington, Waterden, Weeting, Welborne ,West Dereham, West Walton, Wick, Wicklewood, Wickmere, Wilton, Wimsbotsham, Witton, Wolterton, Wood Dalling, Wood Rising, Yelverton.

- Oxfordshire: Caversfield, Gatehampton, Mapledreham.

- Suffolk: Barnham, Boulge, Bredfield, Burgh (near Woodbridge), Buxhall, Covehithe (formerly North Hales), Creeting, Dedach, Depden, Elveden, Gedding, Henstead, Herring swell, Middleton, Thorington (near Dunwich), Withersfield, Wrentham.

- Surrey: Tout le territoire du Surrey lui a appartenu lorsque il a été fait Comte de Surrey.

- Sussex: Ashcombe, Balmer, Barcombe, Bevendean, Brighton, Clayton, East Chiltington, Falmer, Fulking, Hamsey, Hangleton, Hurstpierpoint, Iford, Keymer, Lewes, Mayfield, Moulstone, Newtimber, Ovingdean, Pangdean, Patcham, Perching, Plumpton, Portslade, Poynings, Rodmell, Rotting dean, Saddlescombe, Streat, Upper Beeding, Warningore, Westmerston, Wicham, Winterbourne, Wootton.

- Yorkshire, West Riding: Aughton, Barnbrough, Bilham, Braithwell, Bramley (in Leeds), Bramley (near Rotherham), Clifton, Conisbrough, Cusworth, Dinnington, Edenthorpe, Fishlake, Greasbrough, Harthill, Hatfield, Hoyland, Nether, Kirk Sandall, Kiveton, Ravenfield, Stainforth, Thorne, Tudworth, Whiston, Wilsic. -------------------- He was a son of Rodulf II de Warenne and Emma and a grandnephew of duchess Gunnor, wife of duke Richard I of Normandy. The de Warenne surname derives from the hamlet named Varenne located on the river Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy[1] in the region today called Bellencombre.

Family

He married twice:

   * First, Gundred (Latin: Gundrada), sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester.
   * Second, to a sister of Richard Gouet

Children of William and Gundred

   * William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138)
   * Edith de Warenne who married Gerard de Gournay
   * Reynold de Warenne, who inherited lands from his mother in Flanders and died before 1118

Landholdings in the Domesday Book of William de Warenne -------------------- William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, (died 1088) was one of the Norman nobles who fought at the Battle of Hastings and became great landowners in England.

Life He was a son of Rodulf II de Warenne and Emma and a grandnephew of duchess Gunnor, wife of duke Richard I of Normandy. The de Warenne surname derives from the hamlet named Varenne located on the river Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy in the region today called Bellencombre.

for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- William DE WARENNE

   * Father: Ralph DE WARENNE
   * Mother: Emma in BELLECOMBE
   * Birth: 1050, Bellecombe, France
   * Death: 24 Jun 1088, Lewes, Sussex, England
   * Burial: Gundrada Chapel, Lewes, England
   * Partnership with: Gundrada of NORMANDY
         o Child: Edith DE WARENNE Birth: 1075, Surrey, England
         o Child: William II DE WARENNE Birth: 1078, Surrey, England
         o Child: Reginald DE WARENNE Birth: 1085

Ancestors of William DE WARENNE

                           /-Hugh 'Bishop of Countance' DE MORTIMER
                 /-Rudolf DE WARENNE
                 |         -Gunnora DE CREPON
       /-Ralph DE WARENNE
       |         |         /-Tesselin DE ROUEN
       |         -Beatrice DE VASCOEUIL

William DE WARENNE

       -Emma in BELLECOMBE

Descendants of William DE WARENNE

1 William DE WARENNE

 =Gundrada of NORMANDY
     2 Edith DE WARENNE
       =Gerard DE GOURNAY
           3 Gundred DE GOURNAY
             =Nigel DE AUBIGNY
       =Dreux II DE MOUCHY
           3 Dreux III DE MOUCHY
             =Edith DE VARENNES
     2 William II DE WARENNE
       =Isabel DE VERMANDOIS
           3 Reginald DE WARENNE
             =Alice DE WORMEGAY
           3 Gundreda DE WARENNE
             =Roger Earl of NEWBURGH
           3 William III DE WARENNE
             =Adela DE TALVAS  Marriage: 1136, England
           3 Adalaide DE WARENNE
             =Henry Earl of HUNTINGDON  Marriage: 1139
             =William DE LANCASTER  Marriage: 1153, England
           3 Ralph DE WARENNE
     2 Reginald DE WARENNE

Source:

1. email: JoeAllison@fastmail.fm -------------------- [Marion Fileon De GILCHRIST.FTW]

William Warenne was one of those followers of William of Normandy who made their fortunes by the conquest of England. The younger son of Rudulf of Varenne in Normandy, he distinguished himself in ducal service as a very young man in the early 1050s. After the ducal victory at Mortemer (1054) he received estates in upper Normandy, but it was only after the English invasion that he attained the front rank. He fought at Hastings and was rewarded with lands which by 1086 extended into thirteen counties, most notably strategically important estates in Sussex centered round Lewes. By the end of William I's reign he was one of the dozen largest individual landowners in England. He repaid his debt with vigorous loyalty in both England and France. In 1075 he played a leading role in suppressing the revolt of the earls of Hereford and Norfolk. After the Conqueror's death, Warenne supported William Rufus in 1087-88 against Robert Curthose and Odo of Bayeux. Rufus encouraged his service by creating him earl of Surrey in 1088. The same year Warenne was seriously wounded by an arrow in his leg at the siege of Pevensey and died at his foundation of Lewes Priory on 24 June 1088.

Warenne's career was more than meteoric. A younger son of an obscure minor Norman nobleman, he had risen through conspicuous loyalty to his lord to become not only one of the richest men in one of the richest kingdoms of Europe but also the founder of a dynasty which, powerful, wealthy and influential, survived as earl of Surrey until 1347. Warenne's foundation at Lewes (1078/80) was the first Cluniac house in England, another sign of the Conquest's effect on establishing institutional as well as personal links across the Channel. Warenne's success depended on the traditional chivalric virtues of loyalty, bravery and prowess in arms. His life illustrates the stupendous prizes and the personal dangers on offer to those who joined the conquest of England. It was appropriate that Warenne's direct descendent, John De Warenne, Earl of Surrey (1231-1304), when challenged in 1278 by royal commissioners to produce title to his land, produced an old rusty sword declaring, 'Here, my Lord, is my warrant (warrantus: a pun which no doubt appealed to the somewhat intractable sense of honour of the time). My ancestors came with William the Bastard and won their lands with the sword, and by the sword I will hold them against all comers.' Earl John won his case. William of Warenne would have approved. [Who's Who in Early Medieval England, Christopher Tyerman, Shepheard-Walwyn, Ltd., London, 1996]

William de Warrenne, Earl of Warrenne, in Normandy, a near kinsman of William the Conqueror, came into England with that prince and, having distinguished himself at the battle of Hastings, obtained an immense portion of the public spoliation. He had large grants of land in several counties, amongst which were the Barony of Lewes, in Sussex, and the manors of Carletune and Benington, in Lincolnshire. So extensive indeed were those grants that his possessions resembled more the dominions of a sovereign prince than the estates of a subject. He enjoyed, too, in the highest degree, the confidence of the king, and was appointed joint justice-general with Richard de Benefactis for administering justice throughout the whole realm. While in that office, some great disturbers of the public peace having refused to appear before him and his colleague in obedience to citation, the Earl took up arms and defeated the rebels in a battle at Fagadune, when he is said, for the purpose of striking terror, to have cut off the right foot of each of his prisoners. Of those rebels, Ralph Wahir or Guarder, Earl of Norfolk, and Roger, Earl of Hereford, were the ringleaders. His lordship was likewise highly esteemed by King William Rufus, and was created by that monarch Earl of Surrey. He m. Gundred, dau. of the Conqueror*, and had issue, William, Reginald, Gundred-Edith, and another dau. who m. Ernise de Colungis.

This potent noble built the castle of Holt and founded the priory at Lewes, in Sussex. He resided principally at the castle of Lewes, and had besides Castle-Acre, in Norfolk, and noble castles at Coningsburg and Sandal. He d. 24 June, 1088, and Dugdale gives to following curious account of his parting hour. "It is reported that this Earl William did violently detain certain lands from the monks of Ely, for which, being often admonished by the abbot, and not making restitution, died miserably. And, though his death happened very far off the isle of Ely, the same night he died, the abbot lying quietly in his bed and meditating on heavenly things, heard the soul of this earl, in its carriage away by the devil, cry out loudly and with a known and distinct voice, Lord have mercy on me; Lord have mercy on me. And, moreover, that the next day after, the abbot acquainted all the monks in chapter therewith. And likewise, that about four days after, there came a messenger to them from the wife of this earl with 100 shillings for the good of his soul, who told them that he died the very hour that the abbot had heard the outcry. But that neither the abbot nor any of the monks would receive it, not thinking it safe for them to take the money of a damned person. If this part of the story as to the abbot's hearing the noise be no truer than the last, viz., that his lady sent them 100 shillings, I shall deem it to be a mere fiction, in regard the lady was certainly dead about three years before." The earl was s. by his elder son, William de Warenne. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 568, Warren, Earls of Surrey]

  • At one time, it was thought that Gundred was the daughter of William the Conqueror. This has since been disproved. For details, see "Early Yorkshire Charters" by C. T. Clay, or "Études sur Quelques Points de l'Historie de Guillaume le Conquérant" by H. Prentout. [Brian Tompsett, Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, University of Hull, Hull, UK, "Electronic," royal01389]

The 1st Earl of Surrey, William was one of the leaders at the battle of Mortemer. After the battle of Arques, in February 1054, William the Conqueror's force was large enough for it to be divided into two contingents operating to the west and east of the Seine. The duke himself, with men from middle Normandy, faced the invaders who were advancing under the French king, Henri I, through the Evrecin. On the other side of the river, Robert, count of Eu, with Hugh de Gournay, Walter Giffard, Roger de Mortimer, and the young William de Warenne, came out from their own lands to withstand the eastern incursion of the French force under count Odo and count Rainald, which seems to have been unprepared for this levy from eastern Normandy. Having entered the duchy by way of Neufchatel-en-Bray, the French army advanced to the neighborhood of Mortemer, and there gave itself up to unrestrained rape and pillage. Widely scattered and demoralized, it thus offered itself as an easy target. The slaughter was considerable. The battle was of decisive importance. The Norman victory was complete, and the King of France withdrew. The battle of Mortemer was a major crisis in Norman history, and never again was duke William to be faced by so formidable a threat to his power.

At some time in or after 1054, duke William gave William the castle of Mortemer, which had been forfeited by his kinsman, Roger de Mortimer, after the battle of Mortemer. William also acquired lands at Bellencombre, the castle of which became the caput of the Warenne barony in Normandy. In 1066, he was one of the Norman barons summoned by duke William to a council on hearing that Harold had been crowned king after the death of Edward the Confessor. He took part in the invasion of England and was present at the battle of Hastings. He was rewarded with lands in 13 counties. In 1067, he was one of the Norman nobles whom the Conqueror left in England to support his vice-regents, William FitzOsbern and the bishop of Bayeux. In 1075, he was one of the two chief justiciars who were in charge of England when the earls of Hereford and Norflok rebelled, and who summoned them to the King's court, and on their refusal crushed the rebellion. To secure his loyalty, William was created earl of Surrey shortly after Easter, April 16, 1088. About 1078-1082, he founded Lewes Priory in Sussex as a cell of Cluny Abbey. He was mortally wounded at the siege of Pevensey before the end of May 1088, and died at Lewes in June.

A possible alternative parentage for William is given in the account of Ralph Mortimer I in the Dictionary of National Biography : "...Roger (de Mortimer, Ralph's father)...was accordingly deprived of his castle of Mortemer, which was transferred to his nephew, William de Warren, son of his brother Ralph, and afterwards first Earl of Surrey. However, it has recently been suggested that William de Warenne was son of Ralph (Ranulf), husband of Emma, and that Ralph, along with Roger de Mortimer, were in turn sons of another Ralph, the husband of Beatrice (with Beatrice the descendant of Gunnora's clan). At least as explained in the argument, the dual (actually triple, counting William's brother) Ralphs seem to better fit the available data. The discussion of the connection of Beatrice to Gunnora's family is confused and confusing in this source, which at one point shows Beatrice's supposed brother as the husband of Gunnora's niece (which would negate a supposed descent), while later showing the father's wife as the niece.

William de Warren I, Earl of Warenne, came from Normandy, a near kinsman of William the Conqueror. He received large grants of land in recognition of the distinguished part he took at the battle of Hastings. He had large grants of land in several counties among which were the barony of Lewes, in Sussex, and the manors of Carletune and Benington, in Lincolnshire. So extensive indeed were those grants that his possessions resembled more the dominions of a sovereign prince than the estates of a subject. He enjoyed, too, in the highest degree, the confidence of the king, and was appointed joint Justice-General, with Richard de Benefactis, for administering justice throughout the whole realm. While in that office, some great disturbers of the public peace having refused to appear before him and his colleague, in obedience to citation, the Earl took up arms, and defeated the rebels in a battle at Fagadune, when he is said, for the purpose of striking terror, to have cut off the right foot of each of his prisoners. Of these rebels, Ralph Wahir or Gauder, Earl of Norfolk, and Roger, Earl of Hereford, were the ringleaders. He was likewise highly esteemed by King William Rufus, and was created by that monarch the first Earl of Surrey. He married Gundred.

This potent noble built the castle of Holt, and founded the priory of Lewes, in Sussex. He resided principally at the castle of Lewes, and had besides Castle-Acres, in Norfolk, and noble castles at Coningsburg and Sandal. He died on June 24, 1088, and Dugdale gives the following curious account of his parting hour. "It is reported that this Earl William did violently detain certain lands from the monks of Ely; for which, being often admonished by the abbot, and not making restitution, he died miserably. And, although his death happened very far off the Isle of Ely, the same night he died, the abbot lying quietly in his bed, and meditating on heavenly things, heard the soul of this Earl, in its carriage away by the devil, cry out loudly, and with a known and distinct voice, Lord have mercy on me: Lord have mercy on me. And, moreover, that the next day after, the abbot acquainted all the monks in chapter therewith. And likewise that about four days after, there came a messenger to them from the wife of this Earl, with 100 shillings for the good of his soul, who told him that he died the very hour that the abbot had heard the outcry. But that neither the abbot nor any of the monks would receive it; not thinking it safe for them to take the money of a damned person." "If this part of the story," adds Dugdale, "as to the abbot's hearing the noise, be no truer than the last, that is that this lady sent 100 shillings, I shall deem it to be a mere fiction, in regard the lady was certainly dead about three years before." The Earl was succeeded by his son, William.

EARLDOM OF SURREY (I) - WILLIAM DE WARENNE was 1st son of Rodulf II by Emma. At some time in or after 1054 Duke William gave him the castle of Mortemer, which had been forfeited by his kinsman, Roger de Mortimer, after the Battle of Mortemer in February of that year. Probably at the same time he acquired lands at Bellencombre, the castle of which became the caput of the Warenne barony in Normandy. In 1066 he was one of the Norman barons summoned by the Duke to a Council on hearing that Harold had been crowned King after the death of the Confessor. He took part in the invasion of England and was present at the Battle of Hastings. He was rewarded with lands in 13 counties (j), including most of the rape of Lewes in Sussex, the manor of Conisborough, co. York, and Castle Acre and a number of holdings in Norfolk. In 1067 he was one of the Norman nobles whom the Conqueror left in England to support his vice-regents, William FitzOsbern and the Bishop of Bayeux. In 1075 he was one of the two chief justiciars who were in charge of England when the Earls of Hereford and Norfolk rebelled and who summoned them to the King's court, and on their refusal crushed the rebellion (b). About 1083-85 he was fighting for the King in Maine (c). In the spring of 1088 he supported William II against the rebels led by the Bishop of Bayeux and the Count of Mortain, and to secure his loyalty he was created, shortly after Easter (16 April) 1088, EARL OF SURREY (e), his immediate successors being styled more usually EARLS DE WARENNE. He was mortally wounded at the siege of Pevensey before the end of May. He founded Lewes priory as a cell of Cluny abbey, about 1078-82. He married, 1stly, Gundred, sister of Gerbod the Fleming, EARL OF CHESTER, possibly daughter of Gerbod, hereditary advocate of the Abbey of St. Bertin at St. Omer. She died in child-birth, 27 May 1085, at Castle Acre, Norfolk, and was buried the chapter-house at Lewes. He married, 2ndly, [----], sister of Richard GUET (living 1098). He died 24 June 1088, apparently from the effect of his wound at Pevensey, at Lewes, and was buried there beside his wife. [Complete Peerage XII/1:493-5, XIV:604 (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(j) Bedford, Bucks, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Lincoln, Oxford, York, Berks, Essex, Hants, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Sussex.

(b) William was one of those who occupied Norwich castle after its surrender.

(c) He was one of the leaders of an unsuccessful attack on the castle of Ste Suzanne in Jan, year uncertain.

(e) The creation has been ascribed to the Conqueror, but certainly in error. This was the only earldom created before the reign of Stephen of which the holder did not take his title from the county in which lay his chief territorial strength. However, it is likely that with the Earldom he was given lands at Reigate in Surrey.

[From "The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families"]

For this identification see Mr. Loyd's paper 'The Origin of the Family of Warenne' in Yorkshire Arch. Journal, vol. xxxi, pp. 97-113. The hamlet of Varenne lies on the river Varenne c. 2 miles S of Arques and c. 13 miles N of Bellencombre. The latter place, arr. Dieppe, cant. Bellencombre, where there was a castle, became the caput of the Warenne honour in Normandy. -------------------- William was one of the nobles who advised duke William when the decision to invade England was being considered. He fought at Hastings, and afterwards received the Rape of Lewes in Sussex, and subsequently lands in twelve other shires. In addition to the cluster around Lewes, there were clusters around the castles he built at Castle Acre in Norfolk and Conisbrough in Yorkshire. By the time of the Domesday survey he was one of the wealthiest landholders in England. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, (died 1088) was one of the Norman nobles who fought at the Battle of Hastings and became great landowners in England.

Life He was a son of Rodulf II de Warenne and Emma and a grandnephew of duchess Gunnor, wife of duke Richard I of Normandy. The de Warenne surname derives from the hamlet named Varenne located on the river Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy[1] in the region today called Bellencombre.

As a young man, William played a prominent role in protecting the Norman realm of the future William the Conqueror's from a major invasion by the King of France in February 1054 at the Battle of Mortemer.[2] After this battle Roger de Mortemer forfeited most of his lands, and the duke gave them to William.[3]

William was one of the nobles who advised duke William when the decision to invade England was being considered. He is said to have fought at Hastings,[4] and afterwards received the Rape of Lewes in Sussex,[1] and subsequently lands in twelve other shires. He built castles at Lewes (Sussex), Reigate (Surrey), Castle Acre (Norfolk) and Conisbrough in Yorkshire.[1] By the time of the Domesday survey he was one of the wealthiest landholders in England with holdings in 12 counties.[5]

He fought against rebels at the Isle of Ely in 1071 where he showed a special desire to hunt down Hereward the Wake who had murdered his brother the year before.[1]

William was loyal to William II,[1] and it was probably in early 1088 that he was created Earl of Surrey.[6] He died shortly afterwards of wounds he received while helping suppress the rebellion of 1088.

Family He married twice:

First, Gundred (Latin: Gundrada), sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester. Second, to a sister of Richard Gouet

Children of William and Gundred William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138) Edith de Warenne who married Gerard de Gournay Reynold de Warenne, who inherited lands from his mother in Flanders and died before 1118

Landholdings in the Domesday Book of William de Warenne:

Aylmerton, County of Norfolk[7] Acre, County of Norfolk[7] Aldborough, County of Norfolk[7] Anmer, County of Norfolk[7] Bagthorpe, County of Norfolk[7] Banham, County of Norfolk[7] Banningham, County of Norfolk[7] Barmer, County of Norfolk[7] Barnham Broom, County of Norfolk[7] Barsham, County of Norfolk[7] Barwick, County of Norfolk[7] Blo' Norton, County of Norfolk[8] Bodney, County of Norfolk[8] Bradenham, County of Norfolk[8] Brampton, County of Norfolk[8] Briston, County of Norfolk[8] Buckenham, County of Norfolk[8] Burnham Thorpe, County of Norfolk[8] Carlton, County of Cambridgeshire[9] Chishill, County of Cambridgeshire[9] Clipstone, County of Norfolk[10] Coltishall, County of Norfolk[10] Colton, County of Norfolk[10] Colveston, County of Norfolk[10] Congham, County of Norfolk[10] Corpusty, County of Norfolk[10] Cranwich, County of Norfolk[10] Creake, County of Norfolk[10] Croxton near Fakenham, County of Norfolk[10] Denver, County of Norfolk[10] Deopham, County of Norfolk[10] Didlington, County of Norfolk[10] Downham Market, County of Norfolk[10] Elsing, County of Norfolk[11] Filby, County of Norfolk[11] Fincham, County of Norfolk[11] Flitcham, County of Norfolk[11] Foulden, County of Norfolk[11] Fransham, County of Norfolk[11] Fring, County of Norfolk[11] Fulmodeston, County of Norfolk[11] Gayton, County of Norfolk[11] Gimingham, County of Norfolk[11] Great Ryburgh, County of Norfolk[11] Gresham, County of Norfolk[11] Gressenhall, County of Norfolk[11] Grimston, County of Norfolk[11] Griston, County of Norfolk[11] Hackford near Reepham, County of Norfolk[12] Harpley, County of Norfolk[12]

Hautbois, County of Norfolk[12] 

Heacham, County of Norfolk[12] Helhoughton, County of Norfolk[12] Hempton, County of Norfolk[12] Hilborough, County of Norfolk[12] Hilgay, County of Norfolk[12] Hillington, County of Norfolk[12] Hingham, County of Norfolk[12] Hockwold, County of Norfolk[12] Holkham, County of Norfolk[12] Houghton,County of Norfolk[12] Ickburgh, County of Norfolk[13] Illington, County of Norfolk[13] Irmingland, County of Norfolk[13] Itteringham, County of Norfolk[13] Kempstone, County of Norfolk[13] Kerdiston, County of Norfolk[13] Kettlestone, County of Norfolk[13] Kennett, County of Cambridgeshire[14] Knapton, County of Norfolk[13] Larling, County of Norfolk[13] Letton, County of Norfolk[13] Lexham, County of Norfolk[13] Little Barningham, County of Norfolk[13] Little Ellingham, County of Norfolk[13] Little Ryburgh, County of Norfolk[13] Little Snoring, County of Norfolk[13] Mannington, County of Norfolk[15] Marham, County of Norfolk[15] Massingham, County of Norfolk[15] Mattishall, County of Norfolk[15] Methwold, County of Norfolk[15] Morley Saint Botolph, County of Norfolk[15] Mundesley, County of Norfolk[15] Mundford, County of Norfolk[15] North Barningham, County of Norfolk[15] North Barsham, County of Norfolk[15] North Walsham, County of Norfolk[15] Northwold, County of Norfolk[15] Outwell, County of Norfolk[15] Palgrave, County of Norfolk[15] Paston, County of Norfolk[15] Pickenham, County of Norfolk[16] Plumstead, County of Norfolk[16] Rainthorpe (now Rainthorpe Hall, Flordon), County of Norfolk[16] Repps, County of Norfolk (Southrepps)[16] Repps, County of Norfolk (Northrepps)[16] Rockland, County of Norfolk[16] Rockland St Peter, County of Norfolk[16]

Roudham, County of Norfolk[16] 

Rougham, County of Norfolk[16] Rudham, County of Norfolk (Now East & West Rudham)[16] Salthouse, County of Norfolk[16] Santon, County of Norfolk[16] Scarning, County of Norfolk[17] Sco Ruston, County of Norfolk[17] Shereford, County of Norfolk[17] Shernborne, County of Norfolk[17] Shipdham, County of Norfolk[17] Sidestrand, County of Norfolk[17] Snettisham, County of Norfolk[17] South Acre, County of Norfolk[17] Southburgh, County of Norfolk[17] Stanfield, County of Norfolk[17] Stanhoe, County of Norfolk[17] Stibbard, County of Norfolk[17] Stinton, County of Norfolk (now Stinton Hall, Salle)[17] Sustead, County of Norfolk[17] Syderstone, County of Norfolk[18] Tattersett, County of Norfolk[18] Taverham, County of Norfolk[18] Thompson, County of Norfolk[18] Thorpe Market, County of Norfolk[18] Threxton, County of Norfolk[18] Trumpington, County of Cambridgeshire[14] Thurning, County of Norfolk[18] Thuxton, County of Norfolk[18] Tittleshall, County of Norfolk[18] Toftrees, County of Norfolk[18] Trunch, County of Norfolk[18] Tuttington, County of Norfolk[18] Waterden, County of Norfolk[19] Weeting, County of Norfolk[19] Weston Colville, County of Cambridgeshire[14] West Wickham, County of Cambridgeshire[14] West Wratting, County of Cambridgeshire[14] Welborne, County of Norfolk[19] West Dereham, County of Norfolk[19] West Walton, County of Norfolk[19] Whilton, County of Norfolk[19] Wimsbotsham, County of Norfolk[19] Wisbech, County of Cambridgeshire[14] Witton Nr North Walsham, County of Norfolk[19] Wolterton, County of Norfolk[19] Wood Dalling, County of Norfolk[19] Wood Rising, County of Norfolk[19] Yelverton, County of Norfolk[19]


-------------------- At the time of his death, it has been estimated that his wealth was equivalent to £73.9 billion in today's money

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, (died 1088) was one of the Norman nobles who fought at the Battle of Hastings and became great landowners in England.

The de Warenne surname derives from the hamlet named Varenne located on the river Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy[1] in the region today called Bellencombre.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, (died 1088) was one of the Norman nobles who fought at the Battle of Hastings and became great landowners in England.

He was a son of Rodulf II de Warenne and Emma and a grandnephew of duchess Gunnor, wife of duke Richard I of Normandy. The de Warenne surname derives from the hamlet named Varenne located on the river Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy in the region today called Bellencombre.

As a young man, William played a prominent role in protecting the Norman realm of the future William the Conqueror's from a major invasion by the King of France in February 1054 at the Battle of Mortemer. After this battle Roger de Mortemer forfeited most of his lands, and the duke gave them to William.

William was one of the nobles who advised duke William when the decision to invade England was being considered. He is said to have fought at Hastings, and afterwards received the Rape of Lewes in Sussex, and subsequently lands in twelve other shires. He built castles at Lewes (Sussex), Reigate (Surrey), Castle Acre (Norfolk) and Conisbrough in Yorkshire. By the time of the Domesday survey he was one of the wealthiest landholders in England with holdings in 12 counties.

He fought against rebels at the Isle of Ely in 1071 where he showed a special desire to hunt down Hereward the Wake who had murdered his brother the year before.

William was loyal to William II, and it was probably in early 1088 that he was created Earl of Surrey. He died shortly afterwards of wounds he received while helping suppress the rebellion of 1088. At the time of his death, it has been estimated that his wealth was equivalent to £73.9 billion in today's money.

He married twice:

First, Gundred (Latin: Gundrada), sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester. Second, to a sister of Richard Gouet

Children of William and Gundred William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138) Edith de Warenne who married Gerard de Gournay Reynold de Warenne, who inherited lands from his mother in Flanders and died before 1118 -------------------- http://thepeerage.com/p448.htm#i4477 William I de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey1 M, #4477, d. 24 June 1088

Last Edited=7 Dec 2005

    William I de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey was the son of Rudolph de Warenne and Beatrice (?). He married Gundreda (?).1 He died on 24 June 1088.
    William I de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey was created 1st Earl of Surrey [England] circa 16 April 1088.1

Child of William I de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and Gundreda (?) William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey+2 d. c 11 May 1138

Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 494. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 496. -------------------- Other Event(s)

Note 1:     
 Earl of Surrey     
Note 2:     
 Seigneur de Verennes, near Dieppe, France     
Note 3:     
 Lord of Reigate, Lews, Coningsburgh     
Note 4:     
 Lord of Bellencombre, in Normandy     
Note 5:   Sep 1066  
 Commander in the Norman Army     
AKA (Facts Page):     
 Earl of Surrey and Warenne    

-------------------- William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, (died 1088) was one of the Norman aristocrats who fought at the Battle of Hastings and became great landowners in England. He was a son of Rodulf II de Warenne and Emma and a grandnephew of duchess Gunnor, wife of duke Richard I of Normandy. The de Warenne surname derives from the castle of that name on the River Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy[1] in the region today called Bellencombre. As a young man, William played a prominent role in protecting the Norman realm of the future William the Conqueror's from a major invasion by the King of France in February 1054 at the Battle of Mortemer[2]. After this battle Roger de Mortemer forfeited most of his lands, and the duke gave them to William[3]. William was one of the nobles who advised duke William when the decision to invade England was being considered. He fought at Hastings[4], and afterwards received the Rape of Lewes in Sussex[5], and subsequently lands in twelve other shires. He built castles at Lewes (Sussex), Reigate (Surrey), Castle Acre (Norfolk) and Conisbrough in Yorkshire [6]. By the time of the Domesday survey he was one of the wealthiest landholders in England with holdings in 12 counties[7]. He fought against rebels at the Isle of Ely in 1071 where he showed a special desire to hunt down Hereward the Wake who had murdered his brother the year before[8]. William was loyal to William II[9], and it was probably in early 1088 that he was created Earl of Surrey[10]. He died shortly afterwards of wounds he received while helping suppress the rebellion of 1088. At the time of his death, it has been estimated that his wealth was equivalent to £73.9 billion in today's money.

Family

He married twice: First, Gundred (Latin: Gundrada), sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester. Second, to a sister of Richard Gouet [edit]Children of William and Gundred

William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138) Edith de Warenne who married Gerard de Gournay Reynold de Warenne, who inherited lands from his mother in Flanders and died before 1118 [edit]Notes

^ Hunt ^ Douglas, p. 67-69 ^ Hunt, Douglas p. 100 ^ Douglas, p.203 ^ Hunt ^ Hunt ^ Ellis: Introduction to Domesday, i.213. ^ Hunt ^ Hunt ^ probably between the very end of 1087 and March 24, 1088 (Lewis p. 335)

References

Douglas, David C. (1964). William the Conqueror. ISBN 0300078846. C. P. Lewis, "The Earldom of Surrey and the Date of Domesday Book", Historical Research 63 (1990) Notes on the family of Gerbod, Earl of Chester, and of Gundred, wife of William de Warenne, Earl of Surrey William Warenne, reprinted from the 1917 Dictionary of National Biography Hunt, William (1899). "William Warenne, first Earl of Surrey". Dictionary of National Biography 59. 372-373. Warren Family History Project Ancestrial File References The Origin of the Family of Warenne by L.C. Loyd - Yorkshire Archealogical Society Journal vol. xxxi (1933) pp 97-113

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne%2C_1st_Earl_of_Surrey

http://www.conisbroughcastle.org.uk/History/dewarennescastles.htm -------------------- William I de Warenne (in French: Guillaume de Varennes), 1st Earl of Surrey, was one of the Norman nobles who fought at the Battle of Hastings and became great landowners in England.

The de Warenne surname derives from the hamlet named Varenne located on the river Varenne, which flows through the territory William acquired in Upper Normandy in the region today called Bellencombre.

As a young man, William played a prominent role in protecting the Norman realm of the future William the Conqueror's from a major invasion by the King of France in February 1054 at the Battle of Mortemer. After this battle, Roger de Mortemer forfeited most of his lands, and the Duke gave them to William.

William was one of the nobles who advised Duke William when the decision to invade England was being considered. He is said to have fought at Hastings, and afterward he received the Rape of Lewes in Sussex, and subsequently lands in twelve other shires. He built castles at Lewes (Sussex), Reigate (Surrey), Castle Acre (Norfolk) and Conisbrough in Yorkshire. By the time of the Domesday survey he was one of the wealthiest landholders in England with holdings in 12 counties.

He fought against rebels at the Isle of Ely in 1071 where he showed a special desire to hunt down Hereward the Wake, who had murdered his brother the year before.

William was loyal to King William II, and it was probably in early 1088 that he was created Earl of Surrey. He died shortly afterwards of wounds he received while helping suppress the rebellion of 1088. At the time of his death, it has been estimated that his wealth was equivalent to £73.9 billion in today's money.

He married twice: First, Gundred (in Latin: Gundrada), sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester and mother of our ancestors William and Edith; second, to a sister of Richard Gouet.

William was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through his son William and through his daughter Edith, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey for more information. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey

Sources:

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- 1st Earl of Surrey

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_1st_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- Title: Book: Royalty For Commoners

     Author: Roderick W. Stuart
     Publication: Revised Second Editon, @1988, by Genealogical Publishing Company.
     Note: ABBR Book: Royalty For Commoners
     Page: Page 70
Seigneur De Varennes, Near Dieppe; Earl Of Surrey.

William de Warenne, Count, Earl of Surrey 1st Acceded: 16 APR 1088 Interred: Chapter House, Lewes, Sussex Notes: Ancestry shown differs from that shown by Cokayne in "The Complete Peerage", and follows "Aspects of Robert of Torigny's genealogies revisted"; "Nottingham Medieval Studies,xxxvii,1993,pp.21-27; as cited by A.B.Wilson and S.Baldwin

---

  1. Note:
   WILLIAM DE WARENNE was 1st son of Rodulf II by Emma. At some time in or after 1054 Duke William gave him the castle of Mortemer, which had been forfeited by his kinsman, Roger de Mortimer, after the Battle of Mortemer in February of that year. Probably at the same time he acquired lands at Bellencombre, the castle of which became the caput of the Warenne barony in Normandy. In 1066 he was one of the Norman barons summoned by the Duke to a Council on hearing that Harold had been crowned King after the death of the Confessor. He took part in the invasion of England and was present at the Battle of Hastings. He was rewarded with lands in 13 counties (j), including most of the rape of Lewes in Sussex, the manor of Conisborough, co. York, and Castle Acre and a number of holdings in Norfolk. In 1067 he was one of the Norman nobles whom the Conqueror left in England to support his vice-regents, William FitzOsbern and the Bishop of Bayeux. In 1075 he was one of the two chief justiciars who were in charge of England when the Earls of Hereford and Norfolk rebelled and who summoned them to the King's court, and on their refusal crushed the rebellion (b). About 1083-85 he was fighting for the King in Maine (c). In the spring of 1088 he supported William II against the rebels led by the Bishop of Bayeux and the Count of Mortain, and to secure his loyalty he was created, shortly after Easter (16 April) 1088, EARL OF SURREY (e), his immediate successors being styled more usually EARLS DE WARENNE. He was mortally wounded at the siege of Pevensey before the end of May. He founded Lewes priory as a cell of Cluny abbey, about 1078-82. He married, 1stly, Gundred, sister of Gerbod the Fleming, EARL OF CHESTER, possibly daughter of Gerbod, hereditary advocate of the Abbey of St. Bertin at St. Omer. She died in child-birth, 27 May 1085, at Castle Acre, Norfolk, and was buried the chapter-house at Lewes. He married, 2ndly, [----], sister of Richard GUET (living 1098). He died 24 June 1088, apparently from the effect of his wound at Pevensey, at Lewes, and was buried there beside his wife. [Complete Peerage XII/1:493-5, XIV:604 (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]
  1. Note:
  2. Note: (j) Bedford, Bucks, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Lincoln, Oxford, York, Berks, Essex, Hants, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Sussex.
  3. Note:
  4. Note: (b) William was one of those who occupied Norwich castle after its surrender.
  5. Note:
  6. Note: (c) He was one of the leaders of an unsuccessful attack on the castle of Ste Suzanne in Jan, year uncertain.
  7. Note:
   (e) The creation has been ascribed to the Conqueror, but certainly in error. This was the only earldom created before the reign of Stephen of which the holder did not take his title from the county in which lay his chief territorial strength. However, it is likely that with the Earldom he was given lands at Reigate in Surrey.
  1. Note:
  2. Note: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
  3. Note:
  4. Note: [From "The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families"]
  5. Note:
   For this identification see Mr. Loyd's paper 'The Origin of the Family of Warenne' in Yorkshire Arch. Journal, vol. xxxi, pp. 97-113. The hamlet of Varenne lies on the river Varenne c. 2 miles S of Arques and c. 13 miles N of Bellencombre. The latter place, arr. Dieppe, cant. Bellencombre, where there was a castle, became the caput of the Warenne honour in Normandy.
  1. Note:
  2. Note: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
  3. Note:
   William Warenne was one of those followers of William of Normandy who made their fortunes by the conquest of England. The younger son of Rudulf of Varenne in Normandy, he distinguished himself in ducal service as a very young man in the early 1050s. After the ducal victory at Mortemer (1054) he received estates in upper Normandy, but it was only after the English invasion that he attained the front rank. He fought at Hastings and was rewarded with lands which by 1086 extended into thirteen counties, most notably strategically important estates in Sussex centered round Lewes. By the end of William I's reign he was one of the dozen largest individual landowners in England. He repaid his debt with vigorous loyalty in both England and France. In 1075 he played a leading role in suppressing the revolt of the earls of Hereford and Norfolk. After the Conqueror's death, Warenne supported William Rufus in 1087-88 against Robert Curthose and Odo of Bayeux. Rufus encouraged his service by creating him earl of Surrey in 1088. The same year Warenne was seriously wounded by an arrow in his leg at the siege of Pevensey and died at his foundation of Lewes Priory on 24 June 1088.
  1. Note:
   Warenne's career was more than meteoric. A younger son of an obscure minor Norman nobleman, he had risen through conspicuous loyalty to his lord to become not only one of the richest men in one of the richest kingdoms of Europe but also the founder of a dynasty which, powerful, wealthy and influential, survived as earl of Surrey until 1347. Warenne's foundation at Lewes (1078/80) was the first Cluniac house in England, another sign of the Conquest's effect on establishing institutional as well as personal links across the Channel. Warenne's success depended on the traditional chivalric virtues of loyalty, bravery and prowess in arms. His life illustrates the stupendous prizes and the personal dangers on offer to those who joined the conquest of England. It was appropriate that Warenne's direct descendent, John De Warenne, Earl of Surrey (1231-1304), when challenged in 1278 by royal commissioners to produce title to his land, produced an old rusty sword declaring, 'Here, my Lord, is my warrant (warrantus: a pun which no doubt appealed to the somewhat intractable sense of honour of the time). My ancestors came with William the Bastard and won their lands with the sword, and by the sword I will hold them against all comers.' Earl John won his case. William of Warenne would have approved. [Who's Who in Early Medieval England, Christopher Tyerman, Shepheard-Walwyn, Ltd., London, 1996]
  1. Note:
  2. Note: ----------
  3. Note:
   William de Warrenne, Earl of Warrenne, in Normandy, a near kinsman of William the Conqueror, came into England with that prince and, having distinguished himself at the battle of Hastings, obtained an immense portion of the public spoliation. He had large grants of land in several counties, amongst which were the Barony of Lewes, in Sussex, and the manors of Carletune and Benington, in Lincolnshire. So extensive indeed were those grants that his possessions resembled more the dominions of a sovereign prince than the estates of a subject. He enjoyed, too, in the highest degree, the confidence of the king, and was appointed joint justice-general with Richard de Benefactis for administering justice throughout the whole realm. While in that office, some great disturbers of the public peace having refused to appear before him and his colleague in obedience to citation, the Earl took up arms and defeated the rebels in a battle at Fagadune, when he is said, for the purpose of striking terror, to have cut off the right foot of each of his prisoners. Of those rebels, Ralph Wahir or Guarder, Earl of Norfolk, and Roger, Earl of Hereford, were the ringleaders. His lordship was likewise highly esteemed by King William Rufus, and was created by that monarch Earl of Surrey. He m. Gundred, dau. of the Conqueror*, and had issue, William, Reginald, Gundred-Edith, and another dau. who m. Ernise de Colungis.
  1. Note:
   This potent noble built the castle of Holt and founded the priory at Lewes, in Sussex. He resided principally at the castle of Lewes, and had besides Castle-Acre, in Norfolk, and noble castles at Coningsburg and Sandal. He d. 24 June, 1088, and Dugdale gives to following curious account of his parting hour. "It is reported that this Earl William did violently detain certain lands from the monks of Ely, for which, being often admonished by the abbot, and not making restitution, died miserably. And, though his death happened very far off the isle of Ely, the same night he died, the abbot lying quietly in his bed and meditating on heavenly things, heard the soul of this earl, in its carriage away by the devil, cry out loudly and with a known and distinct voice, Lord have mercy on me; Lord have mercy on me. And, moreover, that the next day after, the abbot acquainted all the monks in chapter therewith. And likewise, that about four days after, there came a messenger to them from the wife of this earl with 100 shillings for the good of his soul, who told them that he died the very hour that the abbot had heard the outcry. But that neither the abbot nor any of the monks would receive it, not thinking it safe for them to take the money of a damned person. If this part of the story as to the abbot's hearing the noise be no truer than the last, viz., that his lady sent them 100 shillings, I shall deem it to be a mere fiction, in regard the lady was certainly dead about three years before." The earl was s. by his elder son, William de Warenne. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 568, Warren, Earls of Surrey]
  1. Note:
   * At one time, it was thought that Gundred was the daughter of William the Conqueror. This has since been disproved. For details, see "Early Yorkshire Charters" by C. T. Clay, or "Études sur Quelques Points de l'Historie de Guillaume le Conquérant" by H. Prentout. [Brian Tompsett, Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, University of Hull, Hull, UK, "Electronic," royal01389]
  1. Note:
  2. Note: Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
  3. Note: Page: 158-1
  4. Note:
  5. Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
  6. Note: Page: XII/1:493-495
  7. Note:
  8. Note: Title: The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families, by Lewis C Loyd, 1999
  9. Note: Page: 111

__________ Vol II File 26: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James

Warren Line (Earls of Warren and Surrey) Ref: Burke, pp. 568-569.

The following account is from Crispin and Macary in "Falaise Rolls":

William de Warren is first mentioned in history in connection with the battle of Mortemer in 1054 by Oderic Vital, and again as having attended the council at Lillebonne, where it was determined to invade England. He later was one of the powerful seigniors who attended Duke William to the Conquest, and Wace records "De Garenes i vint Willeme," but nothing of importance is chronicled concerning him at Hastings. In 1067 he was one of the nobles entrusted with the government of England during the king's absence in Normandy under the jurisdiction of Bishop Odo and William Fitz Osberne. In 1074 he was associated with Richard de Bienfaite in the suppression of the rebellion of the Earls of Hereford and Norfolk and as joint-Justice-General with him for administering justice throughout the whole realm. His reward was princely, since he held the great baronies of Castle Acre in Norfolk, Lewes in Sussex, where he usually resided, and Coningsburg in Yorkshire, with twenty-eight towns and hamlets in its soke. In all he possessed 300 manors and was created the first Earl of Surrey by King William Rufus. The reason for this enormous reward was probably because he married Gundreda, who is believed to have been the daughter of Queen Matilda (and William the Conqueror?); she died in 1085. This theory is supported by a charter of William de Warren to Lewes priory, in which he states that his donations, among others, were for Queen Matilda, the mother of his wife. It is conjectured that Grundreda and Gherbold the Fleming, created Earl of Chester, her brother, were the children of Queen Matilda by a former marriage, probably clandestine, and therefore not reported by the historians of the day. William de Warren I. was succeeded by his son, William de Warren II., Earl of Warren and Surrey, who married Elizabeth, daughter of the great Earl of Vermandois, the widowed countess of Meulent, by whom he had, among other children, William de Warren III., the last earl of his line, who succeeded him and died i

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William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey's Timeline

1036
1036
Bellencombre, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
1071
1071
Age 35
Lewes, Sussex, England
1076
1076
Age 40
1082
1082
Age 46
Sussex, England
1084
1084
Age 48
1085
1085
Age 49
Gournay, Normandy, France
1085
Age 49
Of,,Sussex,England
1088
April 16, 1088
- present
Age 52
Earl of Surrey
June 24, 1088
Age 52
Lewes, Sussex, England
June 24, 1088
Age 52
Priory of Lewes, Lewes, Sussex, England