William de Warenne (1118 - 1148) MP

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Nicknames: "Earl Warrenne"
Birthplace: Rue du Vermandois, Cherbourg-Octeville, Basse-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Near Mount Cadmus, near the border between Rum and the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, Turkey
Cause of death: Killed in battle defending King Louis VII of France at the Battle of Mount Cadmus near Laodicea on the Lycus in Turkey
Occupation: 3rd Earl of Surrey
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About William de Warenne

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on English Earls:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#_Toc186716618

WILLIAM de Warenne ([1119]-killed in battle Laodicea 19 Jan 1148).

Guillaume de Jumièges names "Guillaume III" as son of "Guillaume II de Warenne comte de Surrey" & his wife[988]. [His wife was Isabella de Vermandois--PW]

William de Garenne donated property to St Faith, Longueville by charter dated to [1130], witnessed by "Ysabel comitissa uxor comitis et Willelmo et Radulfo filii eorum"[989]. “W comes de Warenna et Isabella comitissa uxor mea necnon filii nostri Willelmus…et Radulfus” donated property to Castle Acre Priory by undated charter[990].

He succeeded his father in 1138 as Earl of Surrey.

An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennæ” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Willielmus comes Warenniæ” for the souls of “Willielmi comitis patris mei…matris meæ Isabellæ et fratrum meorum Radulphi Warenniæ et Reginaldi Warenniæ”[991].

He was killed during the Second Crusade. Robert of Torigny records that "tercii Willermi comitis de Guarenna" accompanied Louis VII King of France to Jerusalem and died there[992].

m as her first husband, ELA de Ponthieu, daughter of GUILLAUME [I] "Talvas" Comte d'Alençon & his wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] (-1174).

Guillaume de Jumièges records that an unnamed daughter of Guillaume Talvas married "Guillaume de Warenne comte de Surrey"[993]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.

She married secondly (1152 or before) as his second wife, Patrick Earl of Salisbury. Her second marriage is confirmed by Robert of Torigny who refers to the wife of "comes Patricius" as "filia Guillermi comitis Pontivi, matre comitisse de Warenna"[994].

Earl William & his wife had one child:

1. Isabelle de Warenne (d. 12 July 1203, buried Chapter House, Lewes)

-----------------------

From the Wikipedia page on William de Warenne:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_3rd_Earl_of_Surrey

William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey (died 1148), was the eldest son of the William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.

He was generally loyal to king Stephen. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln (1141), and was one of the leaders of the army that pursued the empress Matilda in her flight from Winchester, and which captured Robert of Gloucester.

Crusader Knight (1146-48)

He was one of the nobles that, along with Louis VII of France, took crusading vows at Vezelay in 1146, and he accompanied the initial army of the Second Crusade the next year. He was killed by a Turkish attack while the army was marching across Anatolia (modern day Turkey) on their way to the Holy Land.

In December 1147 the French-Norman force reaches the Biblical town of Ephesus on the west coast of Turkey. They were joined by remnants of the German army which had previously taken heavy losses at Dorylaeum. They marched across Southwest Turkey and fought in an unsuccessful battle at Laodicea against the Turks on the border between Byzantine Empire and Seljuks of Rum (3-4 Jan 1148).

On January 8, they battled again in the area of Mount Cadmus, where the Turks ambushed the main train of infantry and non-combatants after the main force moved too far ahead. King Louis and his bodyguard of Templar Knights and Noblemen sallied forth in a classic example of chivalry to protect the poor and valiantly charged the Turks. Most of the knights were killed, including William, and Louis barely escaped with his life.

His army arrived later at the coastal city of Adalia. The battle was recorded by Odo de Deuil, personal chaplain to Louis, in his book De Profectione - pp 68–127.

Family

He was a great-grandson of Henry I of France, and half-brother to Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, and Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford.

William married Adela (or Ela), daughter of William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, who was the son of Robert of Bellême.

They had one child, a daughter, Isabel, who was his heir. She married first William of Blois, second son of king Stephen, and who became earl of Warenne or Surrey.

After he died without children in October 1159, she married Hamelin, half-brother of Henry II, who also became Earl of Warenne or Surrey. He took the de Warenne surname[citation needed], and their descendants carried on the earldom.

Notes

^ Phillips, Jonathan, The Second Crusade: Extending the frontiers of Christendom, (Yale University Press, 2007), 201.

Sources

1. William de Warenne Genealogy Wikia

http://familypedia.wikia.com/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_3rd_Earl_of_Surrey_(1120-1148)

2. The battle is recorded by Odo de Deuil, personal chaplain to Louis, in his book De Profectione - pp 68–127.

3. Warren Family History Project

http://www.maintour.com/family/reid/warren_line.htm

--------------------

From the Wikipedia page on the Battle of Mount Cadmus (where William de Warenne was killed in battle):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Mount_Cadmus

The Battle of Mount Cadmus took place near Laodicea on January 6, 1148, during the Second Crusade.[2] The French crusader army, led by Louis VII of France, was defeated by the Seljuks of Rum.

Background

The ill-disciplined Crusaders, especially in the German Crusade, had caused a number of incidents with the passage of the crusading army through the Balkans. The Byzantine emperor, Manuel I Comnenus, feared that the troops of the crusaders would strengthen the Principality of Antioch, which he wanted to restore to his sovereignty, and also would weaken the Byzantine-German alliance against Roger II of Sicily. While Conrad II and Louis VII refused to pay homage to the Byzantine emperor in the fall of 1147, they retained the Byzantine troops. Consequently, Roger II seized Corfu and Cephalonia, and plundered Corinth and Thebes.

The French and Germans decided to take separate routes. Conrad's army was defeated at the Battle of Dorylaeum October 25, 1147.

The remnants of the army of Conrad were able to join the army of the king of France. Both armies followed the path left by the first Crusaders advance to Philadelphia in Lydia. In this city, the Germans were still exposed to attack and decided to return to Constantinople.

Conrad III reconciled with Manuel and with his Germans captured Acre with Byzantine ships. The troops of Louis VII followed the coast and then took the road to the East. The Seljuks waited on the banks of the river Meander, but the Franks forced the passage and marched to Laodicea, which they reached on January 6, the day of the Epiphany. They then marched to the mountains that separate the Phrygia of the Pisidia.

The Battle

The vanguard, led by Geoffrey de Rancon, was recklessly placed too far ahead of the army. King Louis, with the main column, ignored that fact, and proceeded onward.

The French soldiers walked with confidence, convinced that their comrades occupied the heights in front of them. However, the Seljuks had the advantage when the French ranks broke and rushed upon them swords in hand. The French retreated to a narrow gorge, bordered on one side with precipices and crags on the other. Horses, men, and baggage were forced into the abyss. King Louis VII was able to escape the fray, leaned against a tree and stood alone against multiple attackers.[3]

At night, the king took advantage of the darkness to join the vanguard of his army, which previously was believed dead.[4] After the battle, the army of the king of France, which had suffered heavy losses, barely reached Attaleia on January 20.

Notes

^ Phillips, Jonathan, The Second Crusade: Extending the frontiers of Christendom, (Yale University Press, 2007), 201.

^ Nicolle, David and Christa Hook, The Second Crusade 1148: Disaster Outside Damascus, (Osprey Publishing, 2009), 62.

^ Phillips, p. 201.

^ Runciman, Steven (1952). A History of the Crusades: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100–1187 (Vol. 2). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 272. ISBN 0-5213-4771-8.

From the Wikipedia page on Louis VII regarding the Battle of Mount Cadmus:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_VII_of_France

The historian Odo of Deuil reported:

During the fighting the King Louis lost his small and famous royal guard, but he remained in good heart and nimbly and courageously scaled the side of the mountain by gripping the tree roots … The enemy climbed after him, hoping to capture him, and the enemy in the distance continued to fire arrows at him. But God willed that his cuirass should protect him from the arrows, and to prevent himself from being captured he defended the crag with his bloody sword, cutting off many heads and hands.

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From The Second Crusade 1148: Disaster Outside Damascus by David Nicolle and Christa Hook:

http://books.google.cl/books?id=6MLrRG1yEP0C&pg=PA37&lpg=PA37&dq=Laodicea+1148&source=bl&ots=XoDZSw860P&sig=FhVTSnk-Y-cZrOpc3C5U56eqbF0&hl=es&ei=uxKUTPTmKYH78AbVmqmXDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=Laodicea%201148&f=false

Notes from The Second Crusade:

1. Konrad III of Germany reaches Constantinople (10 September 1147)

2. Louis VII of France reaches Constantinople (4-5 October 1147)

3. Amadeus II of Savoy joins Louis in Constantinople

4. Konrad III leads the German crusader army to Nicomedia, then divides his forces, intending to take the stronger part across Saljuq central Anatolia while the baggage train, pilgrims, and a defending force under Bishop Otto of Freising take a more westerly route.

5. Konrad III's force is forced to turn back several day's march beyond Dorylaeum (25 October 1147), then retreats under Turkish harassment to Nicaea.

6. Bishop Otto's force follows the coastal road then turns inland, probably up the Gediz River via Philadelphia to Laodicea.

7. Bishop Otto's force is ambushed, probably just outside Laodicea; the survivors continue to Adalia (Antalya) from where they sail to the Holy Land.

8. Louis VII and Amadeus II march to Nicaea where they hear of Konrad's defeat; they send a military escort for the Germans and agree to rendezvous with Konrad at Lopardium.

9. The combined forces of Louis and Konrad march via Esseron (mid-November 1147), Pergamon, and Smyrna to Ephesus, where they celebrate Christmas; the crusader camp is attacked by Turkish raiders outside Ephesus.

10. Part of the French crusader army takes the direct route to Philadelphia, which they reach safely, probably then awaiting the main army at Laodicea.

11. A large Saljuq and Danishmandid army assembles west of Konya; Emperor Manuel warns the crusader leaders.

12. Louis VII, Amadeus II, and the French crusader army leaves Ephesus (28 December 1147), ascend the Meander Valley, defeat a Turkish ambush (1 January 1148), and reach Loadicea (3 January 1148), but are refused entry by the Byzantine governor.

13. The French crusader army is attacked while crossing the flank of Mount Cadmus (Honaz Dagi) via the Kazik Beli Pass (Ben notes: actually a plateau with small valleys cut into the side, south of Mount Cadmus - 37°38'15.64"N, 29°12'56.99"E), suffering major losses (c. 8 January 1148).

14. The French crusader army is again ambushed, probably while crossing the headwaters of the Dalaman River (Ben notes: not very far further east, following the E87 Antalya-Denizli yolu or highway).

15. The French crusader army reaches Adalia (present Antalya), but is refused entry (20 January 1148).

--------------------

From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on William III de Warenne:

http://thepeerage.com/p10252.htm#i102512

William III de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey1

M, #102512, b. circa 1119, d. 19 January 1147/48

Last Edited=17 Nov 2009

William III de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey was born circa 1119. He was the son of William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.2,3

He married Ela Talvas, daughter of William Talvas, Comte de Ponthieu.4

He died on 19 January 1147/48.4

William III de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Surrey [E., 1088] circa 11 May 1138.3

Child of William III de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Ela Talvas

1. Isabella de Warenne+ b. c 1136, d. 13 Jul 1199

Citations

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 53. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 496. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 495.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 497.

--------------------

Ancient Lineage of Magna Carta Baron: William de Warenne

http://www.spaldinggenealogy.com/ancient_lineaege_of_magna_carta_.htm

Death Date: 1/19/1148 or 3/31/1148

-----

Apparently, a personal GEDCom file [160010.GED]

(Complete with date that the LDS Church "baptized" him)

ID: I25001

Name: William III Warenne 3rd Earl Of Surrey

Surname: Warenne

Given Name: William III

Suffix: 3rd Earl Of Surrey

Prefix: Earl

Sex: M

Birth: 1118 in England - 3rd Earl Of Surrey - Son Of William 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Death: 1148 in Crusade 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Burial: [Earl Of Surrey]

Residence: [EARL OF SURREY]

Event: Occupation Earl Of Warren And Surrey

Note:

3RD EARL OF ESSEX AND SURREY; ES III:699; NCP XII/1:491-496.

A crusader who died in the Holy Land.

The Complete Peerage vol.XIIpI,p.496-7.

1 2 15 16 17 18 19 3 7 8 20 21 22 23 24 9 13 14

  1. Change Date: 14 May 2008 at 07:02:17

Father: William II Warren

b: ABT. 1081 in 2nd Earl Surrey, Sussex, England

Mother: Isabel (Elizabeth) de Vermandois

b: 1085 in Valois, Bretagne, France c: 1131 in Burgundy - Dtr Of Hugh Magnus

Marriage 1 Adelia Talvas (Talvace) Marchioness

b: ABT 1110 in Alencon, Normandy, France c: in And Alencon, France

  • Married: WFT Est 1098-1146 in Sussex, England 1 3 4 5 7 9 10 11 13 14
  • Sealing Spouse: 27 Nov 1936 in SLAKE
  • Event: Seal 27 Nov 1936 3 9

Children

1. Has No Children Gundreda De Warenne

b: 1130 in Somersetshire, England

2. Has Children Isabel Warren

b: 1137 in Warren, Surrey, England c: in England - Only Dtr And Heir Earl Of Surrey

3. Has Children Maud Warren

b: 1138 in Sussex, France

Sources:

1. Title: #733

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Mar 26, 1997

2. Title: #677

Text: Date of Import: Apr 20, 2001

3. Title: #671

Text: Date of Import: Dec 26, 2000

4. Title: #678

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Jul 5, 2000

5. Title: #679

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Dec 15, 2000

6. Title: #688

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Apr 24, 2001

7. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: World Family Tree Vol. 3, Ed. 1

Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc.

Publication: Release date: February 9, 1996

Note: Customer pedigree.

Source Media Type: Family Archive CD

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Mar 26, 1997

8. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: 13143.GED

Note: Source Media Type: Other

Text: Date of Import: Apr 20, 2001

9. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: v11t4329.FTW

Note: Source Media Type: Other

Text: Date of Import: Dec 26, 2000

10. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: Ball.FTW

Note: Source Media Type: Other

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Jul 5, 2000

11. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: 401017.ftw

Note: Source Media Type: Other

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Dec 15, 2000

12. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: 160010.GED

Note: Source Media Type: Other

Page: Tree #0723

Text: Date of Import: Apr 24, 2001

13. Title: #731

Page: Tree #3385

Text: Date of Import: Dec 26, 2000

14. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: World Family Tree Vol. 2, Ed. 1

Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc.

Publication: Release date: November 29, 1995

Note: Customer pedigree.

Source Media Type: Family Archive CD

Page: Tree #3385

Text: Date of Import: Dec 26, 2000

15. Title: #681

16. Title: #678

Text: Date of Import: Jul 5, 2000

17. Title: #669

18. Title: #679

Text: Date of Import: Dec 15, 2000

19. Title: #680

20. Title: Ancestral File (R)

Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Publication: Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998

21. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: Ball.FTW

Note: Source Media Type: Other

Text: Date of Import: Jul 5, 2000

22. Title: Ancestral File (TM)

Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Publication: June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JAN 1998

23. Repository:

Name: Not Given

Title: 401017.ftw

Note: Source Media Type: Other

Text: Date of Import: Dec 15, 2000

24. Title: Ancestral File (TM)

Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Publication: July 1996 (c), data as of 2 January 1996

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_3rd_Earl_of_Surrey

3rd Earl of Surrey.

--------------------

William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey, was also known as William III de Varennes. (Warenne or Varennes was an alternative name for Surrey.)

William was generally loyal to the usurper King Stephen. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln (1141), and was one of the leaders of the army that pursued the Empress Matilda in her flight from Winchester, and which captured Robert of Gloucester.

William was one of the nobles that, along with our ancestor King Louis VII of France, took crusading vows at Vezelay in 1146, and he accompanied the initial army of the Second Crusade the next year. He was killed by a Turkish attack while the army was marching across Anatolia (modern day Turkey) on their way to the Holy Land.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_3rd_Earl_of_Surrey for considerably more information.

--------------------

William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey (d. 1148), was the eldest son of the William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.

He was generally loyal to king Stephen. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln (1141), and was one of the leaders of the army that pursued the empress Matilda in her flight from Winchester, and which captured Robert of Gloucester.

--------------------

According to Wikipedia

He was the eldest son of the William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.

He was generally loyal to king Stephen. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln (1141), and was one of the leaders of the army that pursued the empress Matilda in her flight from Winchester, and which captured Robert of Gloucester.

He was one of the nobles that, along with Louis VII of France, took crusading vows at Vezelay in 1146, and he accompanied the initial army of the Second Crusade the next year. He was killed by a Turkish attack while the army was marching across Anatolia (modern day Turkey) on their way to the Holy Land.

In Dec 1147 the French-Norman force reaches the Biblical town of Ephesus on the west coast of Turkey. They are joined by remnants of the German army which had previously taken heavy losses at Dorylaeum. Marching across Southwest Turkey and fight in an unsuccessful battle at Laodicea against the Turks on the border between Byzantine Empire and Seljuks of Rum (3-4 Jan 1148). On 8-Jan they battle again in the area of Mount Cadmus, where Turks ambush the main train of infantry and non-combatants because the main force is too far forwards. King Louis and his bodyguard of Templar Knights and Noblemen sallied forth in a classic example of chivalry to protect the poor and valiantly charged the Turks. Most of the knights were killed, including William, and Louis barely escaped with his life. His army arrives later at the coastal city of Adalia. The battle is recorded by Odo de Deuil, personal chaplain to Louis, in his book De Profectione - pp 68–127.

He was a great-grandson of Henry I of France, and half-brother to Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, and Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford.

William married Adela (or Ela), daughter of William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, who was the son of Robert of Bellême.

They had one child, a daughter, Isabel, who was his heir. She married first William of Blois, second son of king Stephen, and who became earl of Warenne or Surrey. After he died without children in October 1159, she married Hamelin, half-brother of Henry II, who also became Earl of Warenne or Surrey. He took the de Warenne surname, and their descendants carried on the earldom.

-------------------- William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey (d. 1148), was the eldest son of the William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.

He was generally loyal to king Stephen. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln (1141), and was one of the leaders of the army that pursued the empress Matilda in her flight from Winchester, and which captured Robert of Gloucester. -------------------- Last Name/Maiden Name: "de Warenne" or Pantagenet

--------------------

William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166–1240), otherwise known as William Plantagenet[citation needed], was the son of Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

De Warenne was present at the coronation of King John of England on May 27, 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208-1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March, 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, he was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200-1208, and during 1213-1226 he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

Family

He married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), eldest daughter and later co-heiress of William Marshal, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, thus becoming by marriage the Earl of Salisbury, on October 13, 1225. They had a son and a daughter. The son John (1231-1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228 - 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

--------------------

From the Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_6th_Earl_of_Surrey

William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

For other persons of the same name, see William de Warenne.

William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166–1240), otherwise known as William Plantagenet, was the son of Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

De Warenne was present at the coronation of King John of England on May 27, 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208-1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March, 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, he was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200-1208, and during 1213-1226 he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

Family

He married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), eldest daughter and later co-heiress of William Marshal, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, thus becoming by marriage the Earl of Salisbury, on October 13, 1225. They had a son and a daughter. The son John (1231-1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228 - 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

--------------------

From Wikipedia:

William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166–1240), otherwise known as William Plantagenet, was the son of Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

De Warenne was present at the coronation of King John of England on 27 May 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208-1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, he was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200-1208, and during 1213-1226 he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

He married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), eldest daughter and later co-heiress of William Marshal, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, thus becoming by marriage the Earl of Salisbury, on 13 October 1225. They had a son and a daughter. The son John (1231-1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228 - 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

--------------------

Sources:

1. Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, (Genealogical Publishing Co. 5th ed. 1999), line 151-1.

2. Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, line 151-1.

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William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For other persons of the same name, see William de Warenne.

William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166–1240), otherwise known as William Plantagenet, was the son of Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

De Warenne was present at the coronation of King John of England on May 27, 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208-1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March, 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, he was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200-1208, and during 1213-1226 he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

Family

He married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), eldest daughter and later co-heiress of William Marshal, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, thus becoming by marriage the Earl of Salisbury, on October 13, 1225. They had a son and a daughter. The son John (1231-1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228 - 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

Source

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 69-28, 76-28, 83-27.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_6th_Earl_of_Surrey

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William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166–1240), otherwise known as William Plantagenet, was the son of Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

De Warenne was present at the coronation of King John of England on May 27, 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208-1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March, 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, he was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200-1208, and during 1213-1226 he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

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William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, otherwise known as William Plantagenet (and also as Guillaume IV de Varennes), was granted the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire, by his father, Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet).

William was present at the coronation of King John of England on May 27, 1199.

In 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony, but when Normandy was lost to the French in 1204, he lost his Norman holdings, including Gascony. King John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208 and 1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne. He was listed as one of those who advised King John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the King's cause looked hopeless.

In March 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III. He was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200 and 1208, and during 1213-1226, he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_6th_Earl_of_Surrey for more information.

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Lost Norman holdings in 1204 when Normandy lost to French

King John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford

Lieutenant of Gascony - 1202

Lord Warden of Cinque Ports 1204-6 and 1214

Warden of Welch marches 1208-13

Loyal to King John during dispute with barons

Advised John to accede to Magna Carta

Supported King Henry III

Sheriff of Wiltshire 1200-8 and 1213-26

2 children -------------------- William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166–1240), otherwise known as William Plantagenet, was the son of Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

De Warenne was present at the coronation of King John of England on 27 May 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208-1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, he was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200-1208, and during 1213-1226 he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. [edit] Family

He married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), eldest daughter and later co-heiress of William Marshal, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, thus becoming by marriage the Earl of Salisbury, on 13 October 1225. They had a son and a daughter. The son John (1231-1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228 - 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel. -------------------- William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey (d. 1148), was the eldest son of the William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.

He was generally loyal to king Stephen. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln (1141), and was one of the leaders of the army that pursued the empress Matilda in her flight from Winchester, and which captured Robert of Gloucester.

He was one of the nobles that, along with Louis VII of France, took crusading vows at Vezelay in 1146, and he accompanied the initial army of the Second Crusade the next year. He was killed by a Turkish attack while the army was marching across Anatolia (modern day Turkey) on their way to the Holy Land.

Family

He was a great-grandson of Henry I of France, and half-brother to Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, and Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford.

William married Adela (or Ela), daughter of William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, who was the son of Robert of Bellême.

They had one child, a daughter, Isabel, who was his heir. She married first William of Blois, second son of king Stephen, and who became earl of Warenne or Surrey. After he died without children in October 1159, she married Hamelin, half-brother of Henry II, who also became Earl of Warenne or Surrey. He took the de Warenne surname, and their descendants carried on the earldom.

-------------------- William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey (died 1148) was the eldest son of the William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.

He was generally loyal to king Stephen. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln (1141), and was one of the leaders of the army that pursued the empress Matilda in her flight from Winchester, and which captured Robert of Gloucester.

Crusader Knight (1146–48)

He was one of the nobles that, along with Louis VII of France, took crusading vows at Vezelay in 1146, and he accompanied the initial army of the Second Crusade the next year. He was killed at the battle of Mount Cadmus while the crusader army was marching across Anatolia(modern day Turkey) on their way to the Holy Land.[1]

In Dec 1147 the French-Norman force reaches the Biblical town of Ephesus on the west coast of Turkey. They are joined by remnants of the German army which had previously taken heavy losses at Dorylaeum. Marching across Southwest Turkey and fight in an unsuccessful battle at Laodicea against the Turks on the border between Byzantine Empire and Seljuks of Rum (3-4 Jan 1148). On 8-Jan they battle again in the area of Mount Cadmus, where Turks ambush the main train of infantry and non-combatants because the main force is too far forwards. King Louis and his bodyguard of Templar Knights and Noblemen sallied forth in a classic example of chivalry to protect the poor and valiantly charged the Turks. Most of the knights were killed, including William, and Louis barely escaped with his life. His army arrives later at the coastal city of Adalia. The battle is recorded by Odo de Deuil, personal chaplain to Louis, in his book De Profectione - pp 68–127.

Familly

He was a great-grandson of Henry I of France, and half-brother to Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, and Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford.

William married Adela (or Ela), daughter of William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, who was the son of Robert of Bellême.

They had one child, a daughter, Isabel, who was his heir. She married first William of Blois, second son of king Stephen, and who became earl of Warenne or Surrey. After he died without children in October 1159, she married Hamelin, half-brother of Henry II, who also became Earl of Warenne or Surrey. He took the de Warenne surname[citation needed], and their descendants carried on the earldom. --------------------

William III fought at the battle of Lisieux and Lincoln and took the Cross with his cousin, Louis VII of France. William was killed by the Turke while on the Crusades. -------------------- EARLDOM OF SURREY (III) WILLIAM (DE WARENNE) III, EARL OF SURREY, 1st son and heir, was born probably in 1119. In June 1137 he was one of the nobles who deserted Stephen's army in Normandy. The King pursued them to Pontaudemer, where he held William de Warenne junior and other youths and did his best to pacify them; but did not dare to make them fight. He was with his half-brother Waleran, Count of Meulan, at Rouen on 18 Dec. 113 8, and at Oxford in 1139 or early in 1140. On 2 February 1140/1 he was in Stephen's army at the battle of Lincoln, and with Waleran fled before the enemy's opening charge. However, the brothers soon rallied to the Queen and were with her in London about June 1141. After the King's release on 1 November he witnessed royal charters at Canterbury at Christmas 1141 and at Ipswich early in 1142. On Palm Sunday, 24 March 1145/6, he took the cross, and in June 1147 he set off on crusade. He was a benefactor to the priories of Lewes, Castle Acre, Nosteil and Thetford, the Templars and St. Mary's Abbey, York. He married Ela or Ala, daughter of William TALVAS, COUNT OF PONTHIEU (son of Robert DE BELLÊME, 3rd EARL OF SHREWSBURY), by Ela, widow of Bertrand, COUNT OF TOULOUSE, and daughter of Eudes BOREL, DUKE OF BURGUNDY. He died s.p.m. 19 January 1147/8, being slain when the reargmacrd of the French King's army was cut to pieces in the defiles of Laodicea (i). His widow married, probably in or before 1152, Patrick (DE SALISBURY), 1st EARL OF WILTSHIRE or SALISBURY (died 1168). She is said to have died 4 October 1174. [Complete Peerage XII/1:496-7]

(i) He left an only daughter and heir Isabel. He was probably the first to assume the checkered shield of gold and azure, differenced by the change of colour from the checkered shield borne by his half-brother Waleran, Count of Meulan. ............................................

William de Warrenne (Earl of Warrenne), 3rd Earl of Surrey, zealously espoused the cause of King Stephen and had a chief command in the army of that monarch in the battle fought at Lincoln between him and the adherents of the Empress Maud. His lordship m. Adela, dau. of William Talvace, son of Robert de Belesmé, Earl of Shrewsbury, and had by her (who m. 2ndly, Patrick de Evreux, Earl of Salisbury) had an only dau. and heir, Isabel. In 1147, the Earl of Warrenne and Surrey assumed the cross and accompanoied Lewis, King of France, to the Holy Land against the Saracens. From this unfortunate enterprise the earl never returned, but whether he fell in battle or died in captivity has not been ascertained. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 569, Warren, Earls of Surrey] ................................................

William de Warenne, third Earl of Surrey (d. 1148), was the eldest son of William de Warenne, second earl of Surrey (d 1138) and half-brother of Robert de Beaumont (1104-1168), earl of Leicester, Waleran de Beaumont, count of Meulan, and Hugh, earl of Bedford. He was with Stephen's army at Lisieux in June 1137; he took a prominent part in the disturbance that broke out between the king's Norman and Flemish followers. He succeeded his father as Earl of Surrey in 1138. Together with Robert de Beaumont he was present at the battle of Lincoln in 1141, and fled early in the fight. During the king's imprisonment he remained faithful to the Queen and when the empress Matilda and her forces retreated from Winchester he pursued them, in company with William of Ypres and his Femings, and assisted in the capture of Ealr Robert of Gloucester at Stockbridge hear Andover. He was with the king at his Christmas court at Canterbury, and when he was in the eastern counties early in 1142. A notice of a bribe paid to him and three others of the king's captains by Geoffrey, abbot of St Albans, where they were minded to burn the town, has suggested that he assisted in the capture of Geoffrey de Mandeville in Sept 1143.

The earl took the cross with Louis VII and a crowd of other nobles at Vezelai on Easterday, 31 Mar 1146, and accompanied the crusading army which set out in Jun 1147. In the march from Laodicea in Jan 1148 he was helping to gmacrd the rear of the army when he was cut off by the Turks and either killed on the spot or, according to the belief of some in England, died after a very short captivity. His death is dated in the register of Lewes priory 13 Jan.

He married Ela or Adela, daughter of William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, son of Robert de Belleme, who married for her second husband, Patrick, earl of Salisbury, and died in 1174. By her he had one daughter Isabel, his heir, who married, (1) before 1153, William, second son of King Stephen, who became in consequence Earl of Surrey, and was sometimes designated as 'William de Warenne;' and after his death, without children, in Oct 1159, (2) Hamelin, natural son of Geoffrey, count of Anjou. She died in 1199, and was buried in the chapter-house of Lewes priory.

Earl William gave a charter to Lewes priory conveying seisin of his grant by offering hair with Henry of Blois, bishop of Winchester, cut from his and his brother Ralph's heads before the altar, and before going on the crusade founded the priory of Thetford, Norfolk, for canons regular of the Holy Sepulchre. [Dictionary of National Biography, XX:832] -------------------- William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey (1119–1148), was the eldest son of the William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois. He fought during the Anarchy generally remaining loyal to king Stephen.[2] He was a crusader on the Second Crusade.

Contents Life 2 Crusader Knight (1146–48) 3 Family 4 Ancestry 5 References 6 Sources

Life Still in his minority in 1137 he was serving with Stephen, King of England in Normandy being one of those young nobles who initially fled the battle.[4] Stephen pursued them, held them and did his best to pacify them but did not make them fight. At his father's death in 1138, William became the third Earl of Surrey.[1] At Easter 1138 he accompanied his half-brother Waleran de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Worcester on an embassy to Paris ratifying a treaty between the English and French kings.[5] On February 2nd, 1141, he and his half-brother Waleran were again with King Stephen at the battle of Lincoln but fled at the initial charge of the enemy forces.[4] They both joined Queen Matilda but on King Stephen's release they were once again among his followers, William witnessing a royal charter at Canterbury in late 1141.[4]

Crusader Knight (1146–48)

He was one of the nobles that, along with his second cousin, Louis VII of France, took crusading vows at Vezelay in 1146, and he accompanied the initial army of the Second Crusade the next year.[5] He was killed at the Battle of Mount Cadmus while the crusader army was marching across Anatolia (modern day Turkey) on their way to the Holy Land.[6] In December 1147 the French-Norman force reached Ephesus. They were joined by remnants of the army of the Holy Roman Empire, which had previously taken heavy losses at Dorylaeum. They marched across southwest Turkey and fought an unsuccessful battle at Laodicea on the border between Byzantine Empire and Seljuks of Rum (3–4 January 1148). On 8 January they battled again in the area of Mount Cadmus, where Turks ambushed the infantry and non-combatants only, because they had become separated from the rest of the army. King Louis and his bodyguard of Knights Templar and noblemen recklessly charged the Turks. Most of the knights were killed, including William, and Louis barely escaped with his life. His army arrived later at the coastal city of Adalia. The battle is recorded by Odo of Deuil, personal chaplain to Louis, in his book De Profectione on pages 68 through 127.

Family

He was a great-grandson of Henry I of France, and half-brother to Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, and Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford.[7]

William married Adela (or Ela), daughter of William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, by Helie (Ella) daughter of Odo I, Duke of Burgundy.[8] They had one child, a daughter, Isabel, who was his heir.[9] She married first William of Blois, second son of king Stephen, and who became earl of Warenne or Surrey. After he died without children in October 1159, she married Hamelin, half-brother of Henry II, who also became Earl of Warenne or Surrey.[10] He took the de Warenne surname, and their descendants carried on the earldom.[11]

-------------------- William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey (1119–1148), was the eldest son of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.[1][2] He fought during the Anarchy generally remaining loyal to king Stephen.[2] He was a crusader on the Second Crusade.[3

Life

Still in his minority in 1137 he was serving with Stephen, King of England in Normandy being one of those young nobles who initially fled the battle.[4] Stephen pursued them, held them and did his best to pacify them but did not make them fight. At his father's death in 1138, William became the third Earl of Surrey.[1] At Easter 1138 he accompanied his half-brother Waleran de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Worcester on an embassy to Paris ratifying a treaty between the English and French kings.[5] On February 2nd, 1141, he and his half-brother Waleran were again with King Stephen at the battle of Lincoln but fled at the initial charge of the enemy forces.[4] They both joined Queen Matilda but on King Stephen's release they were once again among his followers, William witnessing a royal charter at Canterbury in late 1141.[4]

Crusader Knight (1146–48)[edit source]

He was one of the nobles that, along with his second cousin, Louis VII of France, took crusading vows at Vezelay in 1146, and he accompanied the initial army of the Second Crusade the next year.[5] He was killed at the Battle of Mount Cadmus while the crusader army was marching across Anatolia (modern day Turkey) on their way to the Holy Land.[6] In December 1147 the French-Norman force reached Ephesus. They were joined by remnants of the army of the Holy Roman Empire, which had previously taken heavy losses at Dorylaeum. They marched across southwest Turkey and fought an unsuccessful battle at Laodicea on the border between Byzantine Empire and Seljuks of Rum (3-4 January 1148). On 8 January they battled again in the area of Mount Cadmus, where Turks ambushed the infantry and non-combatants only, because they had become separated from the rest of the army. King Louis and his bodyguard of Knights Templar and noblemen recklessly charged the Turks. Most of the knights were killed, including William, and Louis barely escaped with his life. His army arrived later at the coastal city of Adalia. The battle is recorded by Odo of Deuil, personal chaplain to Louis, in his book De Profectione on pages 68 through 127.

Family

He was a great-grandson of Henry I of France, and half-brother to Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, and Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford.[7]

William married Adela (or Ela), daughter of William Talvas, count of Ponthieu, by Helie (Ella) daughter of Odo I, Duke of Burgundy.[8] They had one child, a daughter, Isabel, who was his heir.[9] She married first William of Blois, second son of king Stephen, and who became earl of Warenne or Surrey. After he died without children in October 1159, she married Hamelin, half-brother of Henry II, who also became Earl of Warenne or Surrey.[10] He took the de Warenne surname, and their descendants carried on the earldom.[11]

Ancestry ]Ancestors of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey










 













 
















 






 













 
























 



















 






 










 






 













 






 










 






 
















 






 










 






 













References[edit source]

1.^ a b G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 496 2.^ a b Elisabeth van Houts, 'The Warenne View of the Past 1066-1203', Anglo-Norman Studies XXVI, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Boydell Press, Woodbridge. 2004), p. 105 (William III was born within a year of Robert de Beaumont's death in 1118) 3.^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 4, Das Feudale Frankreich und Sien Einfluss auf des Mittelalters (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1989), Tafel 699 4.^ a b c G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 497 5.^ a b Paul Dalton, Graeme J. White, King Stephen's reign (1135-1154)(Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 2008), p. 8 6.^ Phillips, Jonathan, The Second Crusade: Extending the frontiers of Christendom, (Yale University Press, 2007), p. 201. 7.^ K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166, Volume I Domesday Book (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1999), p. 371 8.^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, vol. xi (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1949), p. 377 9.^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 497 note (i) 10.^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 497-500 11.^ P. Anselme de Sainte-Marie, Histoire de la maison royale de France et des grands officiers de la Couronne, Vol. 6 (Estienne Loyson, 1674), p. 20

Notes[edit source] William de Warenne Genealogy Wikia The battle is recorded by Odo de Deuil, personal chaplain to Louis, in his book De Profectione - pp 68–127. Warren Family History Project

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William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey's Timeline

1118
June 1118
Cherbourg-Octeville, Basse-Normandie, France
1129
1129
Age 10
England
1137
1137
Age 18
Surrey, England
1138
May 11, 1138
- January 8, 1148
Age 19
Surrey, United Kingdom
1138
Age 19
1141
1141
Age 22
1146
1146
Age 27
1146
- 1148
Age 27
1147
June 1147
- January 8, 1148
Age 29
1148
January 19, 1148
Age 29
Near Mount Cadmus, near the border between Rum and the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, Turkey