William LeVavasour (de Burg) (1131 - 1191)

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About William LeVavasour (de Burg)

William de Burgh (1157 – 1206). He died in 1206 at Athassell Abbey, Golden, County Tipperary, Munster, Ireland.

Contents [hide] 1 Biography 1.1 Residence 1.2 Early life Early career 1.3 Alliance with Connacht 1.4 Death 1.5 Family 2 See also 3 Sources


[edit] Biography [edit] Residence The 'de Burgh' family owned the majority of a small village, Walton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire [1] and did so for hundreds of years through many generations.

[edit] Early life Early career William's ancestry is unknown but he was apparently a kinsman of Hubert de Burgh. He arrived in Ireland in 1175 among retinue of King Henry II of England. Henry apparently appointed him Governor of Limerick. With in a few years he was granted the manors of Kilsheeland and Ardpatrick, and in time, the castle of Tibraghty in County Kilkenny.

In 1179, King Henry II of England granted vast estates of land in Leinster, Munster, and Connaught to William who became the first Lord of Connaught, but never really held the land of Connaught until 1204.[1]

Sometime in the 1190s, William allied with the King of Thomond, either Donal Mor mac Turlough O’Brien, King of Thomond (died 1194) or his son Murtogh, and may have married Donal's daughter. This alliance probably took place during the reign of Murtough, as up to the time of his death Donal had being at war with the Normans. At any rate no more wars are recorded between the two sides for the rest of the decade.

[edit] Alliance with Connacht In 1200, "Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair went into Munster, to the son of Mac Carthy and William Burke to solicit their aid." This marked the start of de Burgh's interest in the province. Though King of Connacht Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair (reigned 1190–1224) faced much opposition, mainly from within his own family and wished to engage Burke's aid to help secure his position. The following year William and Ua Conchobair led an army from Limerick to Tuam and finally to Boyle. Ua Conchobair's rival, Cathal Carragh Ua Conchobair marched at the head of his army to give them battle but was killed in a combined Burke/Ua Conchobair onslaught after a week of skirmishing between the two sides.

William and Ua Conchobair then travelled to Iar Connacht and stayed at Cong for Easter. Here, William and the sons of Rory O'Flaherty conspired to kill Ua Conchobair but the plot was foiled, apparently by holy oaths they were made to swear by the local Coarb family. However, when de Burgh demanded payment for himself and his retinue, battle finally broke out with over seven hundred of de Burgh's followers said to have being killed. William, however, managed to return to Limerick.

The following year in 1202, William returned and took vengeance, on his army that was destroyed a year early. He took the title “Lord of Connaught” in 1203.

[edit] Death The Annals of the Four Masters recorded his passing in 1206:

"William Burke plundered Connaught, as well churches as territories; but God and the saints took vengeance on him for that; for he died of a singular disease, too shameful to be described."

[edit] Family The identity of William's wife is uncertain. A late medieval genealogy records his marriage to Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien[2], and the descent of Clanricarde from their son Richard. A book of genealogies recorded in the 15th century by Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, one of the Four Masters (published in Annalecta Hibernica 18), indicates that the mother of Richard Mor de Burgh, William's son and successor, was the "daughter of the Saxon [English] king", an illegitimate daughter of Henry II of England or perhaps Richard I of England. Such a connection would explain the use of the term consanguineus [kinsman] by Edward I of England to describe Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster. However, the filiation of William's children remains conjectural, and it is not even clear whether Richard de Burgh, ancestor of Clanricarde, is even a separate person from Richard Mor de Burgh.

Son, perhaps by a natural daughter of a King of England:

Richard Mor de Burgh, Lord of Connaught (Abt. 1194–Bet. 17 Feb 1242-1243) Sons, by the daughter of Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien:

Hubert, Bishop of Limerick (1196–1251) William, Sheriff of Connaught (1198-1247) [edit] See also Burke Baronets of Glinsk Burke Civil War 1333-38 Clanricarde Earl of Ulster [edit] Sources Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Line 177B-8. 1.^ Walton 2.^ Empey, C. A (2004). "Burgh, William de (d. 1206)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/4000. Retrieved 2006-11-04. http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100005C/index.html "Burke: People and Places", Eamonn Bourke, Dublin, 1995. William de Burgh de Burgh Dynasty Born: 1157 Died: 1206 Preceded by New Creation Lords of Connaught 1203–1206 Succeeded by Richard I Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Burgh" Categories: 1157 births | 1206 deaths | Anglo-Normans in Ireland | Anglo-Normans | People from Norfolk -------------------- William de Burgh (1157 – 1206) (but may be the same as William FitzAldelm de Burgh). He died in 1206 at Athassell Abbey, Golden, County Tipperary, Munster, Ireland.

Contents [hide] 1 Biography 1.1 Residence 1.2 Early life Early career 1.3 Alliance with Connacht 1.4 Death 1.5 Family 2 See also 3 Sources


[edit] Biography

[edit] Residence The 'de Burgh' family owned the majority of a small village, Walton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire [1] and did so for hundreds of years through many generations.

[edit] Early life Early career William's ancestry is unknown but he was apparently a kinsman of Hubert de Burgh. He arrived in Ireland in 1175 among retinue of King Henry II of England. Henry apparently appointed him Governor of Limerick. With in a few years he was granted the manors of Kilsheeland and Ardpatrick, and in time, the castle of Tibraghty in County Kilkenny.

In 1179, King Henry II of England granted vast estates of land in Leinster, Munster, and Connaught to William who became the first Lord of Connaught, but never really held the land of Connaught until 1204.[1]

Sometime in the 1190s, William allied with the King of Thomond, either Donal Mor mac Turlough O’Brien, King of Thomond (died 1194) or his son Murtogh, and may have married Donal's daughter. This alliance probably took place during the reign of Murtough, as up to the time of his death Donal had being at war with the Normans. At any rate no more wars are recorded between the two sides for the rest of the decade.

[edit] Alliance with Connacht In 1200, "Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair went into Munster, to the son of Mac Carthy and William Burke to solicit their aid." This marked the start of de Burgh's interest in the province. Though King of Connacht Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair (reigned 1190–1224) faced much opposition, mainly from within his own family and wished to engage Burke's aid to help secure his position. The following year William and Ua Conchobair led an army from Limerick to Tuam and finally to Boyle. Ua Conchobair's rival, Cathal Carragh Ua Conchobair marched at the head of his army to give them battle but was killed in a combined Burke/Ua Conchobair onslaught after a week of skirmishing between the two sides.

William and Ua Conchobair then travelled to Iar Connacht and stayed at Cong for Easter. Here, William and the sons of Rory O'Flaherty conspired to kill Ua Conchobair but the plot was foiled, apparently by holy oaths they were made to swear by the local Coarb family. However, when de Burgh demanded payment for himself and his retinue, battle finally broke out with over seven hundred of de Burgh's followers said to have being killed. William, however, managed to return to Limerick.

The following year in 1202, William returned and took vengeance, on his army that was destroyed a year early. He took the title “Lord of Connaught” in 1203.

[edit] Death The Annals of the Four Masters recorded his passing in 1206:

"William Burke plundered Connaught, as well churches as territories; but God and the saints took vengeance on him for that; for he died of a singular disease, too shameful to be described."

[edit] Family The identity of William's wife is uncertain. A late medieval genealogy records his marriage to Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien[2], and the descent of Clanricarde from their son Richard. A book of genealogies recorded in the 15th century by Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, one of the Four Masters (published in Annalecta Hibernica 18), indicates that the mother of Richard Mor de Burgh, William's son and successor, was the "daughter of the Saxon [English] king", an illegitimate daughter of Henry II of England or perhaps Richard I of England. Such a connection would explain the use of the term consanguineus [kinsman] by Edward I of England to describe Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster. However, the filiation of William's children remains conjectural, and it is not even clear whether Richard de Burgh, ancestor of Clanricarde, is even a separate person from Richard Mor de Burgh.

Son, perhaps by a natural daughter of a King of England:

Richard Mor de Burgh, Lord of Connaught (Abt. 1194–Bet. 17 Feb 1242-1243) Sons, by the daughter of Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien:

Hubert, Bishop of Limerick (1196–1251) William, Sheriff of Connaught (1198-1247)

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Originator of the Burke Surname

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The progenator of the Burkes in Ireland, William de Burgh was the brother of Hubert de Burgh, Justiciary of England, the second most powerful man in the Kingdom next to the King. Hubert was a powerful magnate who helped draft the Magna Carta - Runnymede 1215. The de Burghs had arrived in England from France along with William the Conqueror during the succesful Norman Invasion of England in 1066. William arrived in Ireland from England sometime around 1185, after he had been given large tracts of land by King John. It wasn't long after his arrival that he took the office of Governor of Limerick and was given the manors of Ardpatrick and Kilsheelan.

In 1200 A.D. William was granted the castle of Tibraghty in Co. Kilkenny.

William married a daughter of Donal Mor O'Brien, King of Thormond which greatly increased his power in the area and in 1200 he set his sights on Connaught.

After many battles and campaigns sometimes on the side of the O'Connors - Kings of Connaught and sometimes against them, He eventually joined forces with Cathal Crov Dearg and in a skirmish near Boyle, Co Roscommon his main rival for the province, Cathal Caragh was slain.

After this skirmish both William and Cathal Crov Deargh went to the Monastery at Cong where they spent Easter.

During their stay at Cong, William billeted his soldiers with various clans around the province but a false rumour was spread that William was dead; at this news, all 900 of William's soldiers were put to the sword by their hosts.

William returned to Limerick to form a new army and the following year he marched into Connaught with the sole purpose of avenging the deaths of his murdered soldiers.

On the banks of the Shannon at Meelick, he built a castle and from there, laid waste the province, plundering the monasteries of Clonfert, Knockmoy, Mayo, Clonmacnoise and Cong, burning, killing and pillaging as they went.

His former ally Cathal Grog Dearg complained bitterly to King John and William was recalled to England where he surrended his castles to the King. The complaint was taken seriously by the King and a commision was set up to investigate, but the matter was abandoned, due no doubt to the influence of Williams brother, Hubert.

William was eventually given all his castles and land back except for Connaught, which was to remain the King's territory.

William returned to Ireland in 1204, and when he died in 1205/6 he was buried in Athassel Abbey which he had founded 5 years earlier.

William had a son, Robert de Burgh who with his army eventually over-ran Connaught and parcelled up the lands between themselves finally ending the power of the O'Connors and starting the spread of one of Irelands largest families.

-------------------- William de Burgh (1157 – 1206). He died in 1206 at Athassell Abbey, Golden, County Tipperary, Munster, Ireland.

Residence:

The 'de Burgh' family owned the majority of a small village, Walton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire [1] and did so for hundreds of years through many generations.

Early life Early career:

William's ancestry is unknown but he was apparently a kinsman of Hubert de Burgh. He arrived in Ireland in 1175 among retinue of King Henry II of England. Henry apparently appointed him Governor of Limerick. With in a few years he was granted the manors of Kilsheeland and Ardpatrick, and in time, the castle of Tibraghty in County Kilkenny.

In 1179, King Henry II of England granted vast estates of land in Leinster, Munster, and Connaught to William who became the first Lord of Connaught, but never really held the land of Connaught until 1204.[1]

Sometime in the 1190s, William allied with the King of Thomond, either Donal Mor mac Turlough O’Brien, King of Thomond (died 1194) or his son Murtogh, and may have married Donal's daughter. This alliance probably took place during the reign of Murtough, as up to the time of his death Donal had being at war with the Normans. At any rate no more wars are recorded between the two sides for the rest of the decade.

Alliance with Connacht:

In 1200, "Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair went into Munster, to the son of Mac Carthy and William Burke to solicit their aid." This marked the start of de Burgh's interest in the province. Though King of Connacht Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair (reigned 1190–1224) faced much opposition, mainly from within his own family and wished to engage Burke's aid to help secure his position. The following year William and Ua Conchobair led an army from Limerick to Tuam and finally to Boyle. Ua Conchobair's rival, Cathal Carragh Ua Conchobair marched at the head of his army to give them battle but was killed in a combined Burke/Ua Conchobair onslaught after a week of skirmishing between the two sides.

William and Ua Conchobair then travelled to Iar Connacht and stayed at Cong for Easter. Here, William and the sons of Rory O'Flaherty conspired to kill Ua Conchobair but the plot was foiled, apparently by holy oaths they were made to swear by the local Coarb family. However, when de Burgh demanded payment for himself and his retinue, battle finally broke out with over seven hundred of de Burgh's followers said to have being killed. William, however, managed to return to Limerick.

The following year in 1202, William returned and took vengeance, on his army that was destroyed a year early. He took the title “Lord of Connaught” in 1203.

Death:

The Annals of the Four Masters recorded his passing in 1206:

"William Burke plundered Connaught, as well churches as territories; but God and the saints took vengeance on him for that; for he died of a singular disease, too shameful to be described."

Family:

The identity of William's wife is uncertain. A late medieval genealogy records his marriage to Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien[2], and the descent of Clanricarde from their son Richard. A book of genealogies recorded in the 15th century by Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, one of the Four Masters (published in Annalecta Hibernica 18), indicates that the mother of Richard Mor de Burgh, William's son and successor, was the "daughter of the Saxon [English] king", an illegitimate daughter of Henry II of England or perhaps Richard I of England. Such a connection would explain the use of the term consanguineus [kinsman] by Edward I of England to describe Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster. However, the filiation of William's children remains conjectural, and it is not even clear whether Richard de Burgh, ancestor of Clanricarde, is even a separate person from Richard Mor de Burgh.

Son, perhaps by a natural daughter of a King of England:

Richard Mor de Burgh, Lord of Connaught (Abt. 1194–Bet. 17 Feb 1242-1243)

Sons, by the daughter of Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien:

Hubert, Bishop of Limerick (1196–1251)

William, Sheriff of Connaught (1198-1247) -------------------- The Annals of the Four Masters recorded his passing in 1206:

"William Burke plundered Connaught, as well churches as territories; but God and the saints took vengeance on him for that; for he died of a singular disease, too shameful to be described."

[edit] Residence

The 'de Burgh' family owned the majority of a small village, Walton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire [1] and did so for hundreds of years through many generations.

[edit] Early life Early career

William's ancestry is unknown but he was apparently a kinsman of Hubert de Burgh. He arrived in Ireland in 1175 among retinue of King Henry II of England. Henry apparently appointed him Governor of Limerick. With in a few years he was granted the manors of Kilsheeland and Ardpatrick, and in time, the castle of Tibraghty in County Kilkenny.

In 1179, King Henry II of England granted vast estates of land in Leinster, Munster, and Connaught to William who became the first Lord of Connaught, but never really held the land of Connaught until 1204.[1]

Sometime in the 1190s, William allied with the King of Thomond, either Donal Mor mac Turlough O’Brien, King of Thomond (died 1194) or his son Murtogh, and may have married Donal's daughter. This alliance probably took place during the reign of Murtough, as up to the time of his death Donal had being at war with the Normans. At any rate no more wars are recorded between the two sides for the rest of the decade.

[edit] Alliance with Connacht

In 1200, "Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair went into Munster, to the son of Mac Carthy and William Burke to solicit their aid." This marked the start of de Burgh's interest in the province. Though King of Connacht Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair (reigned 1190–1224) faced much opposition, mainly from within his own family and wished to engage Burke's aid to help secure his position. The following year William and Ua Conchobair led an army from Limerick to Tuam and finally to Boyle. Ua Conchobair's rival, Cathal Carragh Ua Conchobair marched at the head of his army to give them battle but was killed in a combined Burke/Ua Conchobair onslaught after a week of skirmishing between the two sides.

William and Ua Conchobair then travelled to Iar Connacht and stayed at Cong for Easter. Here, William and the sons of Rory O'Flaherty conspired to kill Ua Conchobair but the plot was foiled, apparently by holy oaths they were made to swear by the local Coarb family. However, when de Burgh demanded payment for himself and his retinue, battle finally broke out with over seven hundred of de Burgh's followers said to have being killed. William, however, managed to return to Limerick.

The following year in 1202, William returned and took vengeance, on his army that was destroyed a year early. He took the title “Lord of Connaught” in 1203.

[edit] Death

The Annals of the Four Masters recorded his passing in 1206:

"William Burke plundered Connaught, as well churches as territories; but God and the saints took vengeance on him for that; for he died of a singular disease, too shameful to be described."

[edit] Family

The identity of William's wife is uncertain. A late medieval genealogy records his marriage to Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien[2], and the descent of Clanricarde from their son Richard. A book of genealogies recorded in the 15th century by Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, one of the Four Masters (published in Annalecta Hibernica 18), indicates that the mother of Richard Mor de Burgh, William's son and successor, was the "daughter of the Saxon [English] king", an illegitimate daughter of Henry II of England or perhaps Richard I of England. Such a connection would explain the use of the term consanguineus [kinsman] by Edward I of England to describe Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster. However, the filiation of William's children remains conjectural, and it is not even clear whether Richard de Burgh, ancestor of Clanricarde, is even a separate person from Richard Mor de Burgh.

Son, perhaps by a natural daughter of a King of England:

Richard Mor de Burgh, Lord of Connaught (Abt. 1194–Bet. 17 Feb 1242-1243)

Sons, by the daughter of Donal Mor mac Turlough O'Brien:

Hubert, Bishop of Limerick (1196–1251)

William, Sheriff of Connaught (1198-1247)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Burgh