William "Long Legs," 3rd Lord of Douglas

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William "Long Legs" "Longleg" of Douglas (Douglas), Long Legs

Also Known As: "Longleg", "Longlegs", "Long legs", "William Long /Legs/"Long/ Legs"", "12536"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Douglas Castle,Douglas,Lanarkshire,Scotland
Death: Died in Douglas Castle,Douglas,Lanarkshire,Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Archibald Douglas, 2nd Lord of Douglas; Archibald de Douglas; Margaret de Crawford and Margaret Douglas
Husband of Marjory Douglas; Martha (of Carrick) Bruce; Martha Carrick and Constance Battail Douglas
Father of Sir William "le Hardi" Douglas, 5th Lord of Douglas; Willelma Douglas; Hugh of Douglas; Sir William Douglas and Hugh I Lord of Douglas
Brother of Sir Andrew Douglas, Lord Hermiston de Duglas

Occupation: Scot-Norman nobleman
Managed by: Hannelore Caulk Scheu
Last Updated:

About William "Long Legs," 3rd Lord of Douglas

Sir William of Douglas was born in 1240. He was the son of Archibald of Douglas. He died in 1274.

Children of Sir William of Douglas

  • Sir William 'Le Hardi' of Douglas d. 1298
  • Hugh of Douglas1 b. b 1274, d. 1289

Citations

1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 432. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

http://thepeerage.com/p10950.htm#i109494

William, Lord of Douglas (c. 1220 – c. 1274) known as 'Longleg' was a Scoto-Norman nobleman.

The years of the minority of King Alexander III (1249–1262) featured an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by the nationalistic Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith, the other by pro-English Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotia. The former dominated the early years of Alexander's reign. In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso led to Menteith and his party losing to Durward's party. Later both parties called a Meeting of the great Magnates of the Realm to establish a regency until Alexander came of age. William Lord of Douglas was one of the magnates called to witness. Douglas was a partisan of Durward's party. This can be explained by the fact that although most of his territories lay in Douglasdale, through his wife, Constance, he had obtained the rich Manor of Fawdon in Northumberland and it would do well to keep English Royal favour.

David Hume of Godscroft, the arch-panegyricist of the House of Douglas, states that Longleg married Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and had by her two sons and a daughter, the daughter inheriting the Earldom of Carrick. Marjorie went on to marry Robert the Bruce, father to King Robert I of Scotland, this however does not make any sense historically.

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas, died c. 1274, and is said to have married Marjory de Abernethy, daughter of Orm de Abernethy leaving two sons:

Hugh I, Lord of Douglas, d. c. 1274

William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas (1240-1298)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Longleg,_Lord_of_Douglas

--------------------

William, Lord of Douglas (c. 1220 – c. 1274) known as 'Longleg' was a Scoto-Norman nobleman.

The years of the minority of King Alexander III (1249–1262) featured an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by the nationalistic Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith, the other by pro-English Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotia. The former dominated the early years of Alexander's reign. In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso led to Menteith and his party losing to Durward's party. Later both parties called a Meeting of the great Magnates of the Realm to establish a regency until Alexander came of age. William Lord of Douglas was one of the magnates called to witness. Douglas was a partisan of Durward's party. This can be explained by the fact that although most of his territories lay in Douglasdale, through his wife, Constance, he had obtained the rich Manor of Fawdon in Northumberland and it would do well to keep English Royal favour.

David Hume of Godscroft, the arch-panegyricist of the House of Douglas, states that Longleg married Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and had by her two sons and a daughter, the daughter inheriting the Earldom of Carrick. Marjorie went on to marry Robert the Bruce, father to King Robert I of Scotland, this however does not make any sense historically.

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas, died c. 1274, and is said to have married Marjory de Abernethy, daughter of Orm de Abernethy leaving two sons:

Hugh I, Lord of Douglas, d. c. 1274

William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas (1240-1298)

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Longleg,_Lord_of_Douglas

--------------------

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article does not cite any references or sources.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2009)

William, Lord of Douglas (c. 1220 – c. 1274) known as 'Longleg' was a Scoto-Norman nobleman.

The years of the minority of King Alexander III (1249–1262) featured an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by the nationalistic Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith, the other by pro-English Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotia. The former dominated the early years of Alexander's reign. In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso led to Menteith and his party losing to Durward's party. Later both parties called a Meeting of the great Magnates of the Realm to establish a regency until Alexander came of age. William Lord of Douglas was one of the magnates called to witness. Douglas was a partisan of Durward's party. This can be explained by the fact that although most of his territories lay in Douglasdale, through his wife, Constance, he had obtained the rich Manor of Fawdon in Northumberland and it would do well to keep English Royal favour.

David Hume of Godscroft, the arch-panegyricist of the House of Douglas, states that Longleg married Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and had by her two sons and a daughter, the daughter inheriting the Earldom of Carrick. Marjorie went on to marry Robert the Bruce, father to King Robert I of Scotland, this however does not make any sense historically.

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas, died c. 1274, and is said to have married Marjory de Abernethy, daughter of Orm de Abernethy leaving two sons:

Hugh I, Lord of Douglas, d. c. 1274

William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas (1240-1298)

Preceded by

Archibald I, Lord of Douglas

Lord of Douglas

c.1240–c.1274 Succeeded by

Sir William Douglas the Hardy

This biography of a Scottish peer or noble is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

Categories: 1220 births | 1274 deaths | Scoto-Normans | House of Douglas and Angus | Scottish nobility stubs -------------------- The years of the minority of King Alexander III (1249–1262) featured an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by the nationalistic Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith, the other by pro-English Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotia. The former dominated the early years of Alexander's reign. In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso led to Menteith and his party losing to Durward's party. Later both parties called a Meeting of the great Magnates of the Realm to establish a regency until Alexander came of age. William Lord of Douglas was one of the magnates called to witness. Douglas was a partisan of Durward's party. This can be explained by the fact that although most of his territories lay in Douglasdale, through his wife, Constance, he had obtained the rich Manor of Fawdon in Northumberland and it would do well to keep English Royal favour.

David Hume of Godscroft, the arch-panegyricist of the House of Douglas, states that Longleg married Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and had by her two sons and a daughter, the daughter inheriting the Earldom of Carrick. Marjorie went on to marry Robert the Bruce, father to King Robert I of Scotland, this however does not make any sense historically.

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas, died c. 1274, and is said to have married Marjory de Abernethy, daughter of Orm de Abernethy leaving two sons:

Hugh I, Lord of Douglas, d. c. 1274

-------------------- William, Lord of Douglas (c. 1220 – c. 1274) known as 'Longleg' was a Scoto-Norman nobleman.

The years of the minority of King Alexander III (1249–1262) featured an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by the nationalistic Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith, the other by pro-English Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotia. The former dominated the early years of Alexander's reign. In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso led to Menteith and his party losing to Durward's party. Later both parties called a Meeting of the great Magnates of the Realm to establish a regency until Alexander came of age. William Lord of Douglas was one of the magnates called to witness. Douglas was a partisan of Durward's party. This can be explained by the fact that although most of his territories lay in Douglasdale, through his wife, Constance, he had obtained the rich Manor of Fawdon in Northumberland and it would do well to keep English Royal favour.

David Hume of Godscroft, the arch-panegyricist of the House of Douglas, states that Longleg married Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and had by her two sons and a daughter, the daughter inheriting the Earldom of Carrick. Marjorie went on to marry Robert the Bruce, father to King Robert I of Scotland, this however does not make any sense historically.

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas, died c. 1274, and is said to have married Marjory de Abernethy, daughter of Orm de Abernethy leaving two sons:

Hugh I, Lord of Douglas, d. c. 1274

William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas (1240-1298) -------------------- William, Lord of Douglas (c. 1220 – c. 1274) known as 'Longleg' was a Scoto-Norman nobleman.

The years of his minority of Alaxander III featured an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by a nationalistic Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith, the other by pro English Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotia. The former dominated the early years of Alexander's reign. In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso led to Menteith and his party losing to Durward's party. Later both parties called a Meeting of the great Magnates of the Realm to establish a regency until Alexander came of age. William Lord of Douglas was one of such Magnates called to witness. Douglas was a partisan of Durward's party. This can be explained by the fact that although most of his territories lay in Douglasdale, through his wife, Constance, he had obtained the rich Manor of Fawdon in Northumberland and it would do well to keep English Royal favour.

David Hume of Godscroft the Arch-panegyricist of the House of Douglas, states that Longleg married Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and had by her two sons and a daughter, the daughter inheriting the Earldom of Carrick, also Marjory went on to marry Robert the Bruce, father to King Robert I of Scotland, this however does not make any sense historically.

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas died c. 1274, and is said to have married Marjory de Abernethy, daughter of Orm de Abernethy leaving two sons:

Hugh I, Lord of Douglas, d. c. 1274

William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas (1240-1298)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Longleg%2C_Lord_of_Douglas -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Longleg,_Lord_of_Douglas

William, Lord of Douglas (c. 1220 – c. 1274), known as 'Longleg', was a Scoto-Norman nobleman. He was the son of Archibald I, Lord of Douglas.

The years of the minority of King Alexander III (1249–1262) featured an embittered struggle for the control of affairs between two rival parties, the one led by the nationalistic Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith, the other by pro-English Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotia. The former dominated the early years of Alexander's reign. In 1255 an interview between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso led to Menteith and his party losing to Durward's party. Later both parties called a Meeting of the great Magnates of the Realm to establish a regency until Alexander came of age. William Lord of Douglas was one of the magnates called to witness.[1] Douglas was a partisan of Durward's party. This can be explained by the fact that although most of his territories lay in Douglasdale, through his wife, Constance, he had obtained the rich Manor of Fawdon in Northumberland and it would do well to keep English Royal favour.[2]

David Hume of Godscroft, the arch-panegyricist of the House of Douglas, states that Longleg married Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and had by her two sons and a daughter, the daughter inheriting the Earldom of Carrick. Marjorie went on to marry Robert the Bruce, father to King Robert I of Scotland; this, however, does not make any sense historically.

William Longleg, Lord of Douglas (died c. 1274) married Constance Battail of Fawdon, and had two sons and a daughter:[3] Hugh I, Lord of Douglas (died c. 1274) William the Hardy, Lord of Douglas (1240–1298) Willelma de Douglas (d. 1302)

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William "Long Legs," 3rd Lord of Douglas's Timeline

1220
1220
Douglas Castle,Douglas,Lanarkshire,Scotland
1234
1234
Age 14
Hermiston, Midlothian, Scotland
1243
1243
Age 23
UK
1254
1254
Age 34
Scotland
1255
1255
Age 35
Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland
1255
Age 35
UK
1261
1261
Age 41
Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland
1274
October 16, 1274
Age 54
Douglas Castle,Douglas,Lanarkshire,Scotland
????
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