William Tollemache Parke (1790 - 1851)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Saffron Waldon, Essex, England
Death: Died in Cape Town, WC, South Africa
Managed by: Marjorie Simcox
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About William Tollemache Parke

ID: I01217 Name: William Tollemache PARKE 1 2 3 4 5 Sex: M Birth: 1790 in Saffron Walden, Essex, England Death: in Capetown, South Africa Baptism: 19 JUL 1790 Saffron Walden

Father: William Joseph PARKE b: 27 NOV 1742 in Stoke by Nayland Mother: Elizabeth TOLLEMACHE b: 1756 in of New Place (formerly Gyppeswick Hall) Ipswich

Marriage 1 Elizabeth BUSHE b: 11 DEC 1790 in Saffron Walden, Essex, England Married: 29 JAN 1813 in Parish of Saffron Waldon 6 Children

Anne Buncher PARKE
Elizabeth Talmache PARKE b: 1813 in Saffron Walden, Essex
Mary Bush PARKE b: 31 MAY 1822
Eliza Lake PARKE b: ABT 1824
Lydia Hurst PARKE b: in Of Capetown, South Africa
Sarah Shrieve PARKE b: 1817 in Of Capetown, South Africa
Joseph PARKE

Sources: Title: Amy Lloyd's Family History Text: In the Saffron Walden baptisms, he is listed as a carpenter. Title: 2007 Oct 23 email from Edward Walthew Text: It is interesting that: Samuel Parke is listed as a Brandy and wine merchant William Parke establishes a hotel in cape town William Kidson is listed as a Wine merchant as well as a farmer in the cape Elizabeth Parke married John Pilcher who appears to have been running a pub in Stepney. Title: Heather McAllister email Text: From Heather MacAllister, I learn that he and his wife became the owners of Parkes Hotel which eventually became the famous Grand Hotel in Cape Town PARKE William Parke was the son of Joseph Parke, born 27.11.1742 Stoke by Nayland, and died 3.9.1821 Saffron Walden. Reg. Parish Churches; and of his wife Elizabeth daughter of John Talmash of New Place ( formerly Gyppeswick Hall) Ipswich, who died 19.5.1777 aged 66. Reg. Parish Church Stoke by Nayland. The name Talmash is spelt variously Talmasb, Talmasch, Tollemache. The family has a tag: "Before the Normans to England came Bentley was my seat and Talmash my name." William Parke and his wife had, besides Mary Bush who married Captain James Sedgwick, five other daughters: Elizabeth - John Tyars, whose descendants live in the Union. Anne Buncher - Captain Henry Wilson of the Mercantile Marine. Sarah Shrive - Captain Dare of the Honbi. East India Company. As far as I know there are no descendants in the Union. Their daughter married Sir Thomas Jackson, Baronet, General Manager of the Hong Ko ng and Shanghai Bank. Eliza Lake - Captain William Walker Ball of the Honbl. East India Company. A pleasant account of her and of Captain Ball may be read in the Memoirs and Reminiscences of Sir John Kotze. Many of their d escendants remain in the Union. Two of their daughters married overseas: Anne Elizabeth to Major Archibald Arbuthnot son of Sir William Arbuthnot, Bt., and of his wife Gertrude Sophia daughter of Visc ount Gough. And Emily Lydia to Charles Francis Henry Spencer, grandson of Viscount Churchill. Lydia Hurst - John Philipson Stowe (uncle of the first baronet, who also married a Capetonian, Florence H enchman). They have descendants in the Union. William Parke and Elizabeth also had an only son, Joseph. He ran away, it was surmised to sea, and was not again heard of. When William Parke brought his family back to the Cape after the disaster at Grahamstown he had intended to take ship for England, his small capital having been expended. He was, however, persuaded t o stay, and in order to make a livelihood he and his wife took in paying guests. This venture developed into their launching forth into the hotel trade, and they opened Parke's Hotel at the corner o f Strand Street. This hotel became known in course of time as the Grand Hotel, which still exists. An amusing story is told of William Parke, amusing at this long distance of time, but it gives some idea of the terror that prevailed in Grahamstown. His daughters were handsome young women, or rathe r girls, and it was brought to his ears that the Kaffir Chief then besieging the town had made it known that he would have his choice among them when he got into the town. William Parke ordered his si x daughters to accompany him to the powder magazine where he made them kneel down in a row and swear to accompany him there again to be blown up with the magazine should the Kaffirs succeed in enterin g the town. Fortunately this histrionic effort proved to be unnecessary . Title: 2009 Feb 16 conversation with Pamela Dare Note: We met in Puerto Vallarta. Text: The DARE family have a slightly different version of the story of the PARKE family under siege than the one from Heather McAllister - but the core of it is the same. The father feared for the safety o f his daughters and would rather see them dead than abused at the hands of assailants. The DARE family version is that a gun was given to the eldest daughter and should they be overrun, that she wa s to shoot her sisters and then herself rather than be at the (less than mercy) of their assailants. At the time, they were on the other side of the river from the relative safety of the white settlem ent, possibly outside Elizabethville. William PARKE was injured while escaping and went down to Capetown and bought property outside Capetown. Title: Heather McAllister email Text: William Parke and his wife had, besides Mary Bush who married Captain James Sedgwick, five other daughters: Elizabeth - John Tyars, whose descendants live in the Union. Anne Buncher - Captain Henr y Wilson of the Mercantile Marine. Sarah Shrive - Captain Dare of the Honbl. East India Company. As far as I know there are no descendants in the Union. Their daughter married Sir Thomas Jackson, Ba ronet, General Manager of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank. Eliza Lake - Captain William Walker Ball of the Honbl. East India Company. A pleasant account of her and of Captain Ball may be read in th e Memoirs and Reminiscences of Sir John Kotze. Many of their descendants remain in the Union. Two of their daughters married overseas: Anne Elizabeth to Major Archibald Arbuthnot son of Sir William Ar buthnot, Bt., and of his wife Gertrude Sophia daughter of Viscount Gough. And Emily Lydia to Charles Francis Henry Spencer, grandson of Viscount Churchill. Lydia Hurst - John Philipson Stowe (uncle o f the first baronet, who also married a Capetonian, Florence Henchman). They have descendants in the Union. William Parke and Elizabeth also had an only son, Joseph. He ran away, it was surmised t o sea, and was not again heard of. When William Parke brought his family back to the Cape after the disaster at Grahamstown he had intended to take ship for England, his small capital having been ex pended. He was, however, persuaded to stay, and in order to make a livelihood he and his wife took in paying guests. This venture developed into their launching forth into the hotel trade, and they op ened Parke's Hotel at the corner of Strand Street. This hotel became known in course of time as the Grand Hotel, which still exists. An amusing story is told of William Parke, amusing at this long distance of time, but it gives some idea of the terror that prevailed in Grahamstown. His daughters were handsome young women, or rathe r girls, and it was brought to his ears that the Kaffir Chief then besieging the town had made it known that he would have his choice among them when he got into the town. William Parke ordered his si x daughters to accompany him to the powder magazine where he made them kneel down in a row and swear to accompany him there again to be blown up with the magazine should the Kaffirs succeed in enterin g the town. Fortunately this histrionic effort proved to be unnecessary. Title: Amy Lloyd's Family History Text: [Parish Church Saffron Walden Extracts from Register] 1813 Jan 29 William Parke bachelor of the parish & Elizabeth Bush spinster of the parish.

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 William Parke and his wife had, besides Mary Bush who married Captain James Sedgwick (Sedgewick Old Brown Sherry), five other daughters: Elizabeth - John Tyars, whose descendants live in the Union.  ''Anne Buncher - Captain Henry Wilson of the Mercantile Marine'''.   Sarah Shrive - Captain Dare of the Honbl. East India Company. Their daughter married Sir Thomas Jackson, Baronet, General Manager of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank.   Eliza Lake - Captain William Walker Ball of the Honbl. East India Company.  Two of their daughters married overseas: Anne Elizabeth to Major Archibald Arbuthnot son of Sir William Arbuthnot, Bt., and of his wife Gertrude Sophia daughter of Viscount Gough. And Emily Lydia to Charles Francis Henry Spencer, grandson of Viscount Churchill. Lydia Hurst - John Philipson Stowe (uncle of the first baronet, who also married a Capetonian,  Florence Henchman).  William Parke and Elizabeth also had an only son, Joseph. He ran away, it was surmised  to sea, and was not again heard of.   When William Parke brought his family back to the Cape after the disaster at Grahamstown he had intended to take ship for England, his capital having been expended. He was, however, persuaded to stay, and in order to make a livelihood he and his wife took in paying guests. This venture developed into their launching forth into the hotel trade, and they opened Parke's Hotel at the corner of Strand Street. This hotel became known in course of time as the Grand Hotel, which still exists.   

A story is told of William Parke that gives some idea of the terror that prevailed in Grahamstown at that time. His daughters were handsome young women, or rather girls, and it was brought to his ears that the Kaffir Chief then besieging the town had made it known that he would have his choice among them when he got into the town. William Parke ordered his six daughters to accompany him to the powder magazine where he made them kneel down in a row and swear to accompany him there again to be blown up with the magazine should the Kaffirs succeed in entering the town. Fortunately this histrionic effort proved to be unnecessary.

· The DARE family have a slightly different version of the story of the PARKE family under siege but the core of it is the same. The father feared for the safety of his daughters and would rather see them dead than abused at the hands of assailants. The DARE family version is that a gun was given to the eldest daughter and should they be overrun, that she was to shoot her sisters and then herself rather than be at the (less than mercy) of their assailants. At the time, they were on the other side of the river from the relative safety of the white settlement, possibly outside Elizabethville. William PARKE was injured while escaping and went down to Capetown and bought property outside Capetown.

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William Parke's Timeline

1790
1790
Saffron Waldon, Essex, England
1817
1817
Age 27
Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa
1822
May 31, 1822
Age 32
1851
February, 1851
Age 61
Cape Town, WC, South Africa
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