William Spooner

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William Spooner

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
Death: Died in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States
Place of Burial: Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of John Colt Spooner and Ann Peck
Husband of Hannah Spooner (Pratt) and Elizabeth Spooner
Father of Isaac Spooner; Sarah Sherman; William Spooner, II; Samuel Spooner, Sr.; Martha Wing and 5 others
Brother of John Spooner and Thomas Spooner

Occupation: Indentured servant to John Coombs
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William Spooner

4. William SPOONER

   The first of the name on this side of the ocean, 27 March 1637, William was apprenticed to John Holmes of New Plymouth in America. He was transferred 1 July 1637 to John Coombs of Plymouth. From this it may be inferred that he was a minor. He settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where he was admitted freeman on 6 Jun 1654. He was appointed Surveyor of highways in 1654; he was a member of the Plymouth militia in 1643. William was ordered to pay the debts of his master, Mr. Coombs, and to take care of his children, August 1670 in a will dated 8 March, with inventory taken 14 March. He resided in Plymouth until about 1660, when he moved to Acushnet, Bristol county, Massachusetts, where he died in 1684.
   The earliest record that we have relating to William Spooner, is the assignment of articles indenturing him by John Holmes to John Coombs, as is seen in Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. XII, p. 19, as follows:
   "Whereas, William Spooner of Colchester, in the County of Essex by this Indenture, bearing date the twenty-seaventh day of March Anno Dmi., 1637, in the thirteenth year of his Magisty's Raigne, hath put himself apprentice with John Holmes, of New Plymouth, in America, gent. from the first day of May next after the date of the said Indenture unto thend terme of six yeares thence ensuing with diuers other couenant both pts to be pformed eich to other by the Indent it doth more plainly appear.   Now the said John Holmes with the consent likeinge of the said William Spooner hath the first day of July assigned and set ouer the said William Spooner unto John Coombs of New Plymouth, aforesd gent. for all the residue of his terme vnexpired to serue the sd John Coomes, and the sd John Coomes in then of his said terme shall giue the said William Spooner one comely suit of apparell for holy days and one suit for working days, and twelve bushells of Indian Wheate, and a good seruiceable muskett, bandaliers and sord fitt for service."
   It thus appears that William Spooner began life in America as an apprentice to a Mr. John Coombs, a well-to-do citizen of New Plymouth. His age at the time of his indenture is unknown, but it is natural to suppose that he was then in his minority.
   William Spooner then, "of Colchester, in the county of Essex, " (England or Massachusetts), arrived in the New Plymouth settlement early in the year 1637.   Whence he came, whether with Ann Spooner from Leyden, whether direct from the mother country, or whether - which we think the most probable - from the little embryo town of Colchester, Massachusetts Colony, is not known.   Let this much be said, however, that considering his youth, (he probably was not more than sixteen or seventeen years old at the time of his indenture), and considering also the fact that a Mr. Ann Spooner (doubtless from Leyden, Holland) was in Salem in 1637, it is more than probable that william made the journey to America with Ann Spooner and Thomas Spooner, whom we suppose to have been his mother and brother, and that, on their arrivalin this country, the family separated, Ann and Thomas settling tin Salem, and William seeking his fortune first in the little Colchester settlement and subsequently in New Plymouth.
   William Spooner's life after his apprenticeship to Mr. Coombs, we have, from the records, a tolerably well connected account.   From the various orders of the Court, we conclude that he was a faithful and competent steward, entrusted with the administration of his master's estate and the custody of his children.   These were no common marks of confidence, especially amoung the early New England settlers, with whom sturdy self-reliance was one of the first and greatest of virtues.
   In the list of August, 1643, William Spooner is mentioned as one "of all the males that are able to beare arms, from xvi years old to 60 years with in the several townships."   He was proponded to take up his freedom, June 7, 1653," and was "sworn and admitted June 6, 1654," and at the same time was appointed Surveyor of Highways.   He also served on the "Grand Enquest" 1657 and 1666.
   He continued to reside in Plymouth until about 1660, when he removed to the new settlement at Acushnet in the Dartmouth purchase.   Here he held lands in his own name and an interest in the purchase, which were confirmed to him and to his heirs in their proprietory rights by his will.   His lands and the grants made to his sons and grandson, were situated near The-Head-of-the-River, somewhat to the north and east, thence to the south on the east side of the river Acushnet; a small portion of the inheritance of his son, John, was the West or New Bedford side of the Acushnet, and they held land on Sconticut Neck and at Nasquatucket.
   It is traditionally claimed, (and this claim seems to be well founded,) that William and his sons built the first mill within Dartmouth bounds, which was located in what is now Acushnet village.
   William Spooner's educational advantages in the way of "book learning," etc., were certainly very limited.   His will, in common with many of the instruments executed by the early colonists, bears the "mark" of illiteracy.
   Source:  Records of William Spooner of Plymouth, Massachusetts & his descendants Thomas Spooner, 1883

4. William SPOONER 1 (John , James ) was born 1 Jan 1621/1622 in Leiden, Holland. He died 8 Mar 1683/1684 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts.

   William married (1) Elizabeth PARTRIDGE 1 about 1642 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts. Elizabeth was born about 1622 in England. She died 28 Aug 1648 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.

They had the following children:

   + 	6 	M 	i 	John S. SPOONER was born about 1644 and died 7 Feb 1733/1734.

William also married (2) Hannah PRATT 1, daughter of Joshua PRATT and Bathsheba FAY, on 18 Mar 1651/1652 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts. Hannah was born about 1630 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts. She died about 1684 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts.

   [Notes] 

They had the following children:

   + 	7 	M 	ii 	Isaac SPOONER was born about 1652 and died 27 Dec 1709.
   + 	8 	F 	iii 	Sarah SPOONER was born 5 Oct 1653 and died after 1720.
   + 	9 	M 	iv 	William SPOONER was born about 1654 and died after 27 Oct 1735.
   + 	10 	M 	v 	Samuel SPOONER was born 14 Jan 1654/1655 and died 1739.
   + 	11 	F 	vi 	Martha SPOONER was born about 1657 and died after 25 Mar 1717.
   + 	12 	F 	vii 	Hannah SPOONER was born 1663 and died BET 1651 AND 1755.
     	13 	F 	viii 	Mercy SPOONER 1 was born 1663. She died after 1684.
   + 	14 	M 	ix 	Ebenezer SPOONER was born 1666 and died 5 Feb 1717/1718.

--------------------

The first of the name on this side of the ocean, 27 March 1637, William was apprenticed to John Holmes of New Plymouth in America. He was transferred 1 July 1637 to John Coombs of Plymouth. From this it may be inferred that he was a minor. He settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where he was admitted freeman on 6 Jun 1654. He was appointed Surveyor of highways in 1654; he was a member of the Plymouth militia in 1643. William was ordered to pay the debts of his master, Mr. Coombs, and to take care of his children, August 1670 in a will dated 8 March, with inventory taken 14 March. He resided in Plymouth until about 1660, when he moved to Acushnet, Bristol county, Massachusetts, where he died in 1684.

The earliest record that we have relating to William Spooner, is the assignment of articles indenturing him by John Holmes to John Coombs, as is seen in Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. XII, p. 19, as follows:

"Whereas, William Spooner of Colchester, in the County of Essex by this Indenture, bearing date the twenty-seaventh day of March Anno Dmi., 1637, in the thirteenth year of his Magisty's Raigne, hath put himself apprentice with John Holmes, of New Plymouth, in America, gent. from the first day of May next after the date of the said Indenture unto thend terme of six yeares thence ensuing with diuers other couenant both pts to be pformed eich to other by the Indent it doth more plainly appear. Now the said John Holmes with the consent likeinge of the said William Spooner hath the first day of July assigned and set ouer the said William Spooner unto John Coombs of New Plymouth, aforesd gent. for all the residue of his terme vnexpired to serue the sd John Coomes, and the sd John Coomes in then of his said terme shall giue the said William Spooner one comely suit of apparell for holy days and one suit for working days, and twelve bushells of Indian Wheate, and a good seruiceable muskett, bandaliers and sord fitt for service."

It thus appears that William Spooner began life in America as an apprentice to a Mr. John Coombs, a well-to-do citizen of New Plymouth. His age at the time of his indenture is unknown, but it is natural to suppose that he was then in his minority.

William Spooner then, "of Colchester, in the county of Essex, " (England or Massachusetts), arrived in the New Plymouth settlement early in the year 1637. Whence he came, whether with Ann Spooner from Leyden, whether direct from the mother country, or whether - which we think the most probable - from the little embryo town of Colchester, Massachusetts Colony, is not known. Let this much be said, however, that considering his youth, (he probably was not more than sixteen or seventeen years old at the time of his indenture), and considering also the fact that a Mr. Ann Spooner (doubtless from Leyden, Holland) was in Salem in 1637, it is more than probable that william made the journey to America with Ann Spooner and Thomas Spooner, whom we suppose to have been his mother and brother, and that, on their arrivalin this country, the family separated, Ann and Thomas settling tin Salem, and William seeking his fortune first in the little Colchester settlement and subsequently in New Plymouth.

William Spooner's life after his apprenticeship to Mr. Coombs, we have, from the records, a tolerably well connected account. From the various orders of the Court, we conclude that he was a faithful and competent steward, entrusted with the administration of his master's estate and the custody of his children. These were no common marks of confidence, especially amoung the early New England settlers, with whom sturdy self-reliance was one of the first and greatest of virtues.

In the list of August, 1643, William Spooner is mentioned as one "of all the males that are able to beare arms, from xvi years old to 60 years with in the several townships." He was proponded to take up his freedom, June 7, 1653," and was "sworn and admitted June 6, 1654," and at the same time was appointed Surveyor of Highways. He also served on the "Grand Enquest" 1657 and 1666.

He continued to reside in Plymouth until about 1660, when he removed to the new settlement at Acushnet in the Dartmouth purchase. Here he held lands in his own name and an interest in the purchase, which were confirmed to him and to his heirs in their proprietory rights by his will. His lands and the grants made to his sons and grandson, were situated near The-Head-of-the-River, somewhat to the north and east, thence to the south on the east side of the river Acushnet; a small portion of the inheritance of his son, John, was the West or New Bedford side of the Acushnet, and they held land on Sconticut Neck and at Nasquatucket.

It is traditionally claimed, (and this claim seems to be well founded,) that William and his sons built the first mill within Dartmouth bounds, which was located in what is now Acushnet village.

William Spooner's educational advantages in the way of "book learning," etc., were certainly very limited. His will, in common with many of the instruments executed by the early colonists, bears the "mark" of illiteracy.

Source: Records of William Spooner of Plymouth, Massachusetts & his descendants Thomas Spooner, 1883

-------------------------

This information was taken from the Records of William SPOONER of Plymouth, Mass. and His Descendants, a book published in 1883. The author was Thomas SPOONER.

William SPOONER came over in 1637 with his mother Ann SPOONER and brother Thomas . William was indentured to John COOMBS who owned considerable property. COOMBS died prior to 1645. By 1646 Mrs. COOMBS had returned to England leaving her child or chidren with William SPOONER who was ordered by the Cout to pay off the debts of John COOMBS; also to care for the children. In this way William SPOONER came into possession of the land of Mr. and Mrs. COOMBS.

The first of the name on this side of the ocean, 27 March 1637, William was apprenticed to John Holmes of New Plymouth in America. He was transferred 1 July 1637 to John Coombs of Plymouth. From this it may be inferred that he was a minor. He settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where he was admitted freeman on 6 Jun 1654. He was appointed Surveyor of highways in 1654; he was a member of the Plymouth militia in 1643. William was ordered to pay the debts of his master, Mr. Coombs, and to take care of his children, August 1670 in a will dated 8 March, with inventory taken 14 March. He resided in Plymouth until about 1660, when he moved to Acushnet, Bristol county, Massachusetts, where he died in 1684.

The earliest record that we have relating to William Spooner, is the assignment of articles indenturing him by John Holmes to John Coombs, as is seen in Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. XII, p. 19, as follows:

"Whereas, William Spooner of Colchester, in the County of Essex by this Indenture, bearing date the twenty-seaventh day of March Anno Dmi., 1637, in the thirteenth year of his Magisty's Raigne, hath put himself apprentice with John Holmes, of New Plymouth, in America, gent. from the first day of May next after the date of the said Indenture unto thend terme of six yeares thence ensuing with diuers other couenant both pts to be pformed eich to other by the Indent it doth more plainly appear. Now the said John Holmes with the consent likeinge of the said William Spooner hath the first day of July assigned and set ouer the said William Spooner unto John Coombs of New Plymouth, aforesd gent. for all the residue of his terme vnexpired to serue the sd John Coomes, and the sd John Coomes in then of his said terme shall giue the said William Spooner one comely suit of apparell for holy days and one suit for working days, and twelve bushells of Indian Wheate, and a good seruiceable muskett, bandaliers and sord fitt for service."

It thus appears that William Spooner began life in America as an apprentice to a Mr. John Coombs, a well-to-do citizen of New Plymouth. His age at the time of his indenture is unknown, but it is natural to suppose that he was then in his minority.

William Spooner then, "of Colchester, in the county of Essex, " (England or Massachusetts), arrived in the New Plymouth settlement early in the year 1637. Whence he came, whether with Ann Spooner from Leyden, whether direct from the mother country, or whether - which we think the most probable - from the little embryo town of Colchester, Massachusetts Colony, is not known. Let this much be said, however, that considering his youth, (he probably was not more than sixteen or seventeen years old at the time of his indenture), and considering also the fact that a Mrs. Ann Spooner was in Salem in 1637, it is more than probable that william made the journey to America with Ann Spooner and Thomas Spooner, whom we suppose to have been his mother and brother, and that, on their arrivalin this country, the family separated, Ann and Thomas settling tin Salem, and William seeking his fortune first in the little Colchester settlement and subsequently in New Plymouth.

William Spooner's life after his apprenticeship to Mr. Coombs, we have, from the records, a tolerably well connected account. From the various orders of the Court, we conclude that he was a faithful and competent steward, entrusted with the administration of his master's estate and the custody of his children. These were no common marks of confidence, especially amoung the early New England settlers, with whom sturdy self-reliance was one of the first and greatest of virtues.

In the list of August, 1643, William Spooner is mentioned as one "of all the males that are able to beare arms, from xvi years old to 60 years with in the several townships." He was proponded to take up his freedom, June 7, 1653," and was "sworn and admitted June 6, 1654," and at the same time was appointed Surveyor of Highways. He also served on the "Grand Enquest" 1657 and 1666.

He continued to reside in Plymouth until about 1660, when he removed to the new settlement at Acushnet in the Dartmouth purchase. Here he held lands in his own name and an interest in the purchase, which were confirmed to him and to his heirs in their proprietory rights by his will. His lands and the grants made to his sons and grandson, were situated near The-Head-of-the-River, somewhat to the north and east, thence to the south on the east side of the river Acushnet; a small portion of the inheritance of his son, John, was the West or New Bedford side of the Acushnet, and they held land on Sconticut Neck and at Nasquatucket.

It is traditionally claimed, (and this claim seems to be well founded,) that William and his sons built the first mill within Dartmouth bounds, which was located in what is now Acushnet village.

William Spooner's educational advantages in the way of "book learning," etc., were certainly very limited. His will, in common with many of the instruments executed by the early colonists, bears the "mark" of illiteracy.

Source: Records of William Spooner of Plymouth, Massachusetts & his descendants Thomas Spooner, 1883

In 1637, Ann and her two sons, Thomas and William, left Leiden on a ship for the new world. Although there is no hard evidence to support it, they probably travelled on the ship "Hector", which sailed from Holland to Massachusetts and then to Connecticut that year.

William SPOONER 1 (John , James ) was born 1 Jan 1621/1622 in Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands. He died 8 Mar 1683/1684 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA.

William married (1) Elizabeth PARTRIDGE 1 about 1642 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA. Elizabeth was born about 1622 in England. She died 28 Aug 1648 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA.

They had the following children:

M i John S. SPOONER was born about 1644 and died 7 Feb 1733/1734.

William also married (2) Hannah PRATT 1, daughter of Joshua PRATT and Bathsheba FAY, on 18 Mar 1651/1652 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA. Hannah was born about 1630 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA. She died about 1684 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA.

They had the following children:

M ii Isaac SPOONER was born about 1652 and died 27 Dec 1709.

F iii Sarah SPOONER was born 5 Oct 1653 and died after 1720.

M iv William SPOONER was born about 1654 and died after 27 Oct 1735.

M v Samuel SPOONER was born 14 Jan 1654/1655 and died 1739.

F vi Martha SPOONER was born about 1657 and died after 25 Mar 1717.

F vii Hannah SPOONER was born 1663 and died BET 1651 AND 1755.

F viii Mercy SPOONER 1 was born 1663. She died after 1684.

M ix Ebenezer SPOONER was born 1666 and died 5 Feb 1717/1718.

view all 20

William Spooner's Timeline

1621
January 1, 1621
Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
1622
1622
Age 1
Colchester,Essex,England
1644
April 28, 1644
Age 23
Plymouth, Plymouth, MA, USA
1646
1646
Age 25
Colchester, Essex, England
1652
March 18, 1652
Age 31
Plymouth,Plymouth,Massachusetts
1652
Age 31
Plymouth,Plymouth,Massachusetts
1653
October 5, 1653
Age 32
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts
October 5, 1653
Age 32
Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States
1654
1654
Age 33
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States
1655
January 14, 1655
Age 34
Bristol, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, United States