William Albertus Sr. Spurgin (1704 - 1750)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mile End New Town, London, England
Death: Died in Virginia
Managed by: Steve Novoselac
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About William Albertus Sr. Spurgin

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~thesimsfamily/sims/tree/16263.htm

William Spurgin, Sr. 2 3

Born: May 7, 1704, Mile End New Town, Middlesex, England 2 4

Baptized: May 28, 1704, St. Dunstan And All Saints, Stepney, Middlesex, England 5

Marriage: Mary Styles? in 1730 in North Carolina 1 2

Died: Bef Apr 4, 1750, Frederick Co., Virginia 6

 General Notes: 

Spurgeon Family History, Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, p 5:

Born: May 07, 1704 Mile End New Town, London, England

Christened: May 28, 1704 St. Dunstans, Stepney, Sussex, England

Residence: London England & Rowan County, NC

----------

Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 46, Sept. 1996, p357:

Died: aft 1748 & bef 1750

m1. Mary Ann Sellers-13 children?

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Lee Minnis:

Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 38, Sep 1994:

On 14 Jan 1718, William Spurgin of Stepney, laborer, stole goods belonging to Joseph Ruby, including a flaxen shirt, holland sheet, flaxen sheet, holland smock, two linen aprons, silk handkerchief, and a holland pillowcase. The stolen items had been received by Mary Styles, a spinster in Stepney. Spurgin was held by Frances Johnson of Wapping, and Christian Ruby, wife of Joseph. He was intered in Newgate Prison on 25 Feb 1718 on suspicion of theft. See Middlesex Sessions Roll MJ/SRE/2324.

William Surgeon was sentenced to transportation in London, ENG, in Feb 1719 and transported on 11 May in "Margaret," Capt. William Greenwood with 44 persons aboard, to Maryland. There his indenture was sold that Aug to Richard Snowden, a merchant of Anne Arundel Co. See Peter Wilson Coldham, The Complete Book of Emigrants in Bondage 1614-1775 (Baltimore: Gen. Pub. Co, Inc, 1988), p.754 and Harry Wright Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry (Westminster, MD: Family Line Publishing, 1990, Vol 1, p. 90] and PRO T53, Vol 27, p, 266. His brother, James, suffered the same fate being sold in Sep 1719, also to Richard Snowden. An Ann Spurgeon of the same ship was sold to Rosanna Lees that same Sep. Her relationship, if any, is not known.

William Spurgin, probably the same as above died prior to Apr 1750 in old Orange Co. VA; wife Mary, died after 1784, possibly in Rowan Co. VA. After emigrating to America in May 1719, Spurgin is first noted again as a signer of a 1733 list of taxables in Monocacy Hundred, Prince George's Co. MD. He also appears on a list of those who had no tobacco burnt in Monocacy in Aug 1734. A 1737 map of the Northern Neck of Virginia surveyed by William Mayo shows a settlement called "Spurgeant" on both sides of the Potomac River at the crossing of the Philadelphia Wagon Road at the Packhorse Ford. The deed for this land is noted in the 1739-1741 Rent Rolls for Frederick Co. MD. John Moore transferred 50 acres in the tract Antietam Bottom to William Spriggins on 16 Apr 1741. William Spurgion is also noted on the VA side. He purchased 200 acres on the west side of the Shenandoah River from John Welton on 21-22 June 1737. This was then in Orange Co. (II, 420-7). A William Spurgeon, Sr, is shown on the Virginia side on the 1736 Winslow map of the Potomac; evidence shows that he was there earlier. On 22 Jun 1738, Morgan Morgan, et al., were requested to get the dower release on the above tract from Welton's wife, but upon interview, Welton stated that he had no wife. In the deed abstracts of Orange Co. VA (11, 33-4), Wm. Spurgion and Salomon Hedges, Richard Morgan, or any two, were required to view and value 225 acres, fencing, and five houses patented to Just. Hite per application of Rev. Wm. Williams, 22 Jun 1738. William Spurgin was probably deceased by 4 Apr 1750 when a warrant and survey for Thomas Shepard in Frederick Co. VA listed "ye Whidow Spurgin" as the owner of adjoining land.

The known children of William and Mary Spurgin:

1. William, b. ca. 1732; d. 13 Aug 1806 Charlottville, Ontario, Canada; m(l) Jane -; m(2) 1790 Ann Bedsaul Reddick.

2. John, killed 31 Mar 1779; wife Elizabeth Pennington, later Gray.

3. Samuel, b. ca. 1738 or earlier, d. ca. Jan 1789 Rowan Co. NC; wife Sarah Ledford.

----------

Spurgeon Family History, Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, p 4:

William SPURGIN was arrested and charged January 14, 1718, stealing: One flaxen sheet worth 4s; one holland sheets worth 2s; one flaxen shirt shirt worth 12d.; one holland smock 3s.6d.; two linen aprons worth 2s; one silk handkerchief worth 6d.; one holland pillow cover worth 12d., belonging to Joseph Ruby. Mary Stiles, spinster late of said parish received these stolen goods sometime after January 14. From Joseph Ruby - per The Spurgeons of Northeast Missouri, by Mary S Rogers(Mary Elizabeth Spurgeon), p.iv

----------

I,Robert A Spurgeon, had William (Sr.) and Mary having four children:

1.William Spurgeon (Jr.)

2.George Spurgeon

3.James Spurgeon

4.David Spurgeon

Rita Abair, Tempe AZ, June 1996 had them with 3 children:

1,William

2.John

3.Samuel

See also Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 45, June 1996, pp.346-349

----------

Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 46, Sept 1996, p355:

Purchased 200 acres from John Welton in June 1737 in Orange County or Frederick County Virginia.

----------

There have been no concrete records found to prove any daughters for this couple, but there probably were some mixed in with the families that moved with the Widow Mary Spurgin and her sons when they went to NC. They could have been part of the Teague, Wilborn/Welborn/Wellborn or Ross families.

William along with his brother, James, and possibly a sister, Ann, was sent to America on the ship "Margaret" in 1719 for the conviction of stealing in England. They were transported for a term of 14 years and bought by Richard Snowden, Ironmaster in Baltimore. By 1733 he was a signer on the List of Taxables in Monocacy Hundred, Prince George's Co. MD. This was later a part of Frederick Co. MD. A 1737 map shows a settlement called "Spurgeant" on both sides of the Potomac River at the crossing of the Philadelphia Wagon Road. On April 16, 1741, 50 acres was transfered to William "Spriggins" in a tract called "Antietam Bottoms".

He purchased 200 acres on the West side of the Shenandoah River from John Welton on June 21, 1737. At that time it was in Orange Co. VA.

It is only the theory of Mary Glenn that the maiden name of Mary was Styles/Stiles.

Notes for Mary Styles?:

The theft of women's clothes that William was charged with in England was given to Mary Styles. He was sent to America for 14 years in 1719. In 1728, Mary Stiles/Styles is on a ship with John Spurgin bound for the US. It is my contention that in all possiblites, she is the one who married William once they set up housekeeping in this country.

Sources:

Spurgeon Family History,p5, by Dr. Gary Alan Dickey

Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 46, Sept 1996,p357

Rita Abair, Tempe AZ,June 1996

Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 45, June 1996,pp.346-349

Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 46, Sept 1996,p355

Spurgeon Quarterly Issue 3, p82--A lengthy article by Charles H. Spurgeon about William and descensents

Mary W. Glenn Sep 3 1999

----------

Marie Keeler:

John James Henry ?

The Spurgeon Quarterly, June 1998, p473 ?

William and James Spurgeon were born in Suffolk northeast of London, England and christened at St. Dunstan's parish, Stepney. There are numerous Spurgeons listed in London area church records in the 1600's and 1700's. These two christenings, however, fit the names and ages of the two Spurgeon brothers who were deported to Maryland in 1719. Their deportation may have been arranged by friends and neighbors as this was the only way for laborers to emigrate to the colonies, and their subsequent lives do not indicate a criminal mind set.

William Spurgeon of Stepney was arrested for burgling linens and clothing on 14 January 1718 when he attempted to sell the stolen goods. He was confined in Newgate Prison on 25 February 1718. James Spurgeon (Spurgin) of Whitechapel was arrested on 06 February 1718 for burgling clothes and confined in Newgate Prison on 25 February 1718. Both were transported on the ship "Elizabeth", under Captain William Greenwood, to Port Oxford, MD, to serve a 7 year sentence as indentured servants. The ship departed on 11 May 1719. William was indentured to Richard Snowden in August 1719 and James was indentured to the same man in September 1719. Usually the indenture was for seven years, but might be shortened for prison time already served. After the term of service was up, the owner of the indenture was required to have taught each man a trade and many indenture owners gave each servant 50 acres of land so that he could be self supporting. Apparently both were not yet married when they were convicted, although James was no longer living at home, but had residence in nearby Whitechapel.

There was an unusual problem with the land Richard Snowden gave James and William after they served their indenture. Apparently he simply gave them money and they bought land from a John Welton. When they tried to clear up their title in 1738, John Welton, had died and the County Clerk (120 miles away) assumed that the purchase was made from his son, John Welton Jr. John Jr. was willing to give them title (as he knew it was their land) but his wife was sick and could not make the 120 mile trip to the courthouse to agree to relinquish her dower rights. The court sent a man to question her in private and determine if she indeed wished to relinquish her dower rights. When she was questioned she revealed that it was her father-in-law (whose wife was already deceased) who sold the land to the Spurgeons, so she had no dower rights on the land ("The Spurgeon Quarterly", Iss. 46, Sept 1996).

Eventually William moved to Virginia. He first sold his original land and bought land on the Maryland side of the Potomac at "Packhorse Ford" where the Philadelphia wagon road crossed the river. Later he bought more land across the river and moved to Augusta Co., VA.

James stayed in Maryland and acquired substantial acreage, mostly in Western Maryland but some, originally in Frederick Co., MD, now lies in Bedford Co., PA.

Ann Spurgeon who was transported on the same ship with James and William may have been a sister of James and William but christening records could not be found for her at St. Dunstan's. Her indenture was bought by Rosanna Lees in September 1719. A marriage is recorded between Anne Sporgen and John Carter on 7 Feb. 1724 in Frederick Co., MD (close to the time when a five year indenture for Vagrancy would have been up). This may have been her. The records do not state what her crime was, nor where she was from.

There is also a John Spurgeon who was transported for Burglary about 9 years later who may have been James' and William's brother. This John Spurgeon was transported from Newgate Prison on 27 June 1728 on the "Elizabeth" for 14 years (two burglaries -- clothing in one and pigeons in the other). A John Spurgeon shows up at the Baltimore Iron Works in 1734 as a wood cutter, but he left the company in July 1735 and was last known at the Baltimore site in 1737.

I am not aware of any more information on John or Ann Spurgeon, but James and William Spurgeon married and had large families which settled in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Ohio and North Carolina and their grandchildren and great-grandchildren settled in Tennessee, Kentucky and Indiana.

William Spurgeon may have had other children, but my records only include the four sons who moved near Salisbury, Rowan Co., NC. The exact date of their movement is not certain, but William Jr. and John were well established in Rowan Co. before the American Revolution. It is said that the first Court in Rowan Co. (probably about 1756) was held under an Oak Tree on land owned by William Spurgeon Jr.

----------

1737 DEED: Orange Co, VA, DB 4-420, 21 Jun. William Spurgin lease from John Welton, both of Orange, 200 acres of west side of Shanendo (Shenandoah) River part of 442 acres granted John Welton 3 Oct 1734.

1755 MISC: Frederick Co, VA, List of voters, 11 Dec, William Spurgen. [probably son] 2 6 7 8 9

 Death Notes: 

William Spurgin was probably deceased by 4 Apr 1750 when a warrant and survey for Thomas Shepard in Frederick Co. VA listed "ye Whidow Spurgin" as the owner of adjoining land.

 Noted events in his life were:

• First Communion: St. Dunstan And All Saints, Stepney, Middlesex, England. 5

• Court, Jan 14, 1717/18, Stepney, Middlesex, England. 6 10 11 Arrested and charged with stealing from Joseph Ruby

• Imprisonment, Feb 25, 1717/18, Newgate Prison, London, England. 6

• Immigration, May 11, 1719, America. 6 12 13 14 15 Convicted of stealing. Sentenced to transportation to America on the ship "Margaret". Transported for a term of 14 years and bought by Richard Snowden, Ironmaster in Baltimore. His brother James was also sold to Richard Snowden. An Ann Spurgeon of the same ship was sold to Rosanna Lees that same Sep. Her relationship, if any, is not known.

• Tax List, 1733, Monocacy Hundred, Prince George's (now Frederick) Co., Maryland. 12 13 14 15 List of Taxables

• Residence, Aug 1734, Monocacy Hundred, Prince George's (now Frederick) Co., Maryland. 6

• Land Patent, 1736, Orange Co., Virginia. 6 A William Spurgeon, Sr. is shown on the Virginia side on the 1736 Winslow map of the Potomac; evidence shows that he was there earlier.

Pack Horse Ford was later called Hecklenburg, then Shepherdstown (WV)

• Land Patent, Jun 1737, Orange or Frederick Co., Virginia. 16

• Deed, Jun 21, 1737, Orange Co., Virginia. 6 DB 4-420, William Spurgin lease from John Welton, both of Orange, 200 acres of west side of Shanendo (Shenandoah) River part of 442 acres granted John Welton 3 Oct 1734.

• Land Patent, 1737, Frederick Co., Maryland. 6 A 1737 map of the Northern Neck of Virginia surveyed by William Mayo

shows a settlement called "Spurgeant" on both sides of the Potomac River at the crossing of the Philadelphia Wagon Road at the Packhorse Ford.

• Land Patent, Apr 16, 1741, Maryland. 6 From John Moore to William "Spriggins" 50 acres in a tract called "Antietam Bottoms".

• Alt. Death, 1755, On The Indian Trail West Of Frederick Co., Virginia. 2 17 French and Indian War

William married Mary Styles?, daughter of William Styles and Elizabeth Abbot, in 1730 in North Carolina.1 2 (Mary Styles? was born in Aug 1703 in Westminster, London, Essex, England 2 18 and died after 1784 in <Rowan Co., North Carolina> 2 17.)


Sources

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Mary W. Glenn.

2 Lee Minnis, Minnis-Yates (Ancestry.com Database).

3 Spurgeon, Bob.

4 Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, Spurgeon Family History. p. 4

James Spurgin late of [the parish of] St. Mary Matfallon alias Whitechapel, County Middx [Middlesex] labourer, on 6 February, 5 George I [1718/19] at 4 at night burgled the house of Mary Fletcher, a spinster, and stole cloth coats worth 52s; Shag breeches worth 6s; one camel coat worth 2s; one camel waistcoat worth 1s; one furstian frock worth 2s; one furstian waistcoat worth 6s; five druggett coats worth 10s.

5 Baptismal Records at St. Dunstan's Church, Stepney, England.

6 Spurgeon Quarterly (Sept. 1994).

7 Marie Keeler, The Keeler, Mitsky, Pottorf, Doty, Carnahan, Ash, White, Families.

8 Spurgeon Quarterly (Issue 53, June 1998).

9 John James Henry. Descendant of Joseph and Susanna Hawk Spurgeon, through their son Elkanah

10 Mary S. Rogers, The Spurgeons of Northeast Missouri.

11 Dr. Gary Alan Dickey, Spurgeon Family History, p. 4. p. 4

James Spurgin late of [the parish of] St. Mary Matfallon alias Whitechapel, County Middx [Middlesex] labourer, on 6 February, 5 George I [1718/19] at 4 at night burgled the house of Mary Fletcher, a spinster, and stole cloth coats worth 52s; Shag breeches worth 6s; one camel coat worth 2s; one camel waistcoat worth 1s; one furstian frock worth 2s; one furstian waistcoat worth 6s; five druggett coats worth 10s.

"James was held 25 February 1718/19 at Newgate Prison in London for tria being transported from Clerkenwell Prison, Middlesex. Though his age I not given in the minutes of his arrest record, he would have been about 22 years old, given his baptism and birth date in the parish register of St. Dunstan's Church, Stepney.

About Newgate Prison is written: "The condition of the prisoners in Newgate was long most deplorable. They were but scantily supplied with the commonest necessities of life. Light scarcely penetrated their dark and lonesome dungeons...all classes and categories of prisoners were herded indiscriminately together: men and women, tried and untried, upright but misguided zealots with habitual offenders... The goal was at times so hideously overcrowded that plague and pestilence perpetually ravaged it, and the deadly infection often spread into the neighboring courts of law"...

It is further said of Newgate: "After arrest by parish constable, a suspect would be carted to the 'hold' at Newgate where all prisoners, convicted or awaiting trial, were kept. The room, dark with a floor of stone, was entered by a hatch measuring fifteen by twenty feet ... As soon as prisoners entered the jail, heavy iron manacles were clapped on their hands and feet unless they were prepared to buy 'easement' from the turnkey ... In Newgate and other jails, poor inmates were allowed to beg for food and other necessities from charitably inclined passersby in order to supplement the poor rations allowed them."

"Upon conviction for his crime, James was transported to the Port of Oxford, Talbot County, Maryland in America aboard the ship "Margarett," Captain William Greenwood, received on board May 11, 1719, 44 passengers from Newgate ... James was sold as an indentured servant in September 1719, along with William in August 1719 to Richard Snowdon, "The Iron Master", a Baltimore [Anne Arundel] County landowner and 1733 settler of Old Monocacy....This Richard Snowdon was in the Upper House o the Maryland General Assembly and he appears frequently in the "Archives of Maryland". Apparently the Spurgeons moved to Monocacy at the same time as this Richard Snowden for both James and his brother William Spurgeon were listed as taxpayers in Monocacy Hundred of then Prince George's County in 1733. ... They must have been working tobacco farmer for...

12 Ibid, p. 5.

13 Spurgeon Quarterly (Issue 3, May 1985), p. 82.

14 Spurgeon Quarterly (Issue 45, June 1996), p. 346-349.

15 Spurgeon Quarterly (Issue 46, Sept 1996), p. 357.

16 Ibid, p. 355.

17 Ibid.

18 Lineage of Joan E Kohrman Addison, e-mail of 11/17/95 & 11/19/95.

wife: Mary Styles

children:

Samuel Spurgin+

Capt. John Spurgin+

Col. William Spurgin, Jr.+

Jesse Spurgeon

George Spurgin

James Spurgin

David Spurgin

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http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=henryjj&id=I03579

  1. D: I03579
  2. Name: William SPURGEON
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: 7 MAY 1704 in Mile End, New Town, Sussex, England
  5. Death: 1755 in On the Indian Trail west of Frederick Co., VA (French & Indian War).
  6. Event: Christened 28 MAY 1704 St Dunstans, Stepney, Sussex, England
  7. Reference Number: 3579
  8. Note:
   William and James Spurgeon were born in Suffolk northeast of London, England and christened at St. Dunstan's parish, Stepney. There are numerous Spurgeons listed in London area church records in the 1600's and 1700's. These two christenings, however, fit the names and ages of the two Spurgeon brothers who were deported to Maryland in 1719. Their deportation may have been arranged by friends and neighbors as this was the only way for laborers to emigrate to the colonies, and their subsequent lives do not indicate a criminal mind set.
   William Spurgeon of Stepney was arrested for burgling linens and clothing on 14 January 1718 when he attempted to sell the stolen goods. He was confined in Newgate Prison on 25 February 1718. James Spurgeon (Spurgin) of Whitechapel was arrested on 06 February 1718 for burgling clothes and confined in Newgate Prison on 25 February 1718. Both were transported on the ship "Elizabeth", under Captain William Greenwood, to Port Oxford, MD, to serve a 7 year sentence as indentured servants. The ship departed on 11 May 1719. William was indentured to Richard Snowden in August 1719 and James was indentured to the same man in September 1719. Usually the indenture was for seven years, but might be shortened for prison time already served. After the term of service was up, the owner of the indenture was required to have taught each man a trade and many indenture owners gave each servant 50 acres of land so that he could be self supporting. Apparently both were not yet married when they were convicted, although James was no longer living at home, but had residence in nearby Whitechapel.
   There was an unusual problem with the land Richard Snowden gave James and William after they served their indenture. Apparently he simply gave them money and they bought land from a John Welton. When they tried to clear up their title in 1738, John Welton, had died and the County Clerk (120 miles away) assumed that the purchase was made from his son, John Welton Jr. John Jr. was willing to give them title (as he knew it was their land) but his wife was sick and could not make the 120 mile trip to the courthouse to agree to relinquish her dower rights. The court sent a man to question her in private and determine if she indeed wished to relinquish her dower rights. When she was questioned she revealed that it was her father-in-law (whose wife was already deceased) who sold the land to the Spurgeons, so she had no dower rights on the land ("The Spurgeon Quarterly", Iss. 46, Sept 1996).
   Eventually William moved to Virginia. He first sold his original land and bought land on the Maryland side of the Potomac at "Packhorse Ford" where the Philadelphia wagon road crossed the river. Later he bought more land across the river and moved to Augusta Co., VA.
   James stayed in Maryland and acquired substantial acreage, mostly in Western Maryland but some, originally in Frederick Co., MD, now lies in Bedford Co., PA.
   Ann Spurgeon who was transported on the same ship with James and William may have been a sister of James and William but christening records could not be found for her at St. Dunstan's. Her indenture was bought by Rosanna Lees in September 1719. A marriage is recorded between Anne Sporgen and John Carter on 7 Feb. 1724 in Frederick Co., MD (close to the time when a five year indenture for Vagrancy would have been up). This may have been her. The records do not state what her crime was, nor where she was from.
   There is also a John Spurgeon who was transported for Burglary about 9 years later who may have been James' and William's brother. This John Spurgeon was transported from Newgate Prison on 27 June 1728 on the "Elizabeth" for 14 years (two burglaries -- clothing in one and pigeons in the other). A John Spurgeon shows up at the Baltimore Iron Works in 1734 as a wood cutter, but he left the company in July 1735 and was last known at the Baltimore site in 1737.
   I am not aware of any more information on John or Ann Spurgeon, but James and William Spurgeon married and had large families which settled in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Ohio and North Carolina and their grandchildren and great-grandchildren settled in Tennessee, Kentucky and Indiana.
   William Spurgeon may have had other children, but my records only include the four sons who moved near Salisbury, Rowan Co., NC. The exact date of their movement is not certain, but William Jr. and John were well established in Rowan Co. before the American Revolution. It is said that the first Court in Rowan Co. (probably about 1756) was held under an Oak Tree on land owned by William Spurgeon Jr.

Father: John SPURGEON b: BEF 1679 in Stepney, Sussex, England

Mother: Elizabeth Mary OSTER b: BEF 1681 in , Sussex, England

Marriage 1 Mary STYLES b: ABT 1704 in , Sussex, England

   * Married: ABT 1729 in Frederick Co., MD

Children

  1. Has Children William SPURGEON Jr. b: 6 JUN 1734 in , Frederick Co., MD
  2. Has No Children John SPURGEON b: ABT 1735 in , Frederick Co., MD
  3. Has Children Samuel SPURGEON b: ABT 1738 in , Frederick Co., MD
  4. Has No Children Jesse SPURGEON b: ABT 1741 in , Augusta Co., VA

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http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?ref=t17190225-2

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey 25th February, 1719

William Spurgin, Mary Stiles, theft : simple grand larceny, theft : receiving stolen goods.

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey Ref: t17190225-2

Trial Summary:

Crime(s): theft : simple grand larceny, theft : receiving stolen goods,

Punishment Type: transportation,

(Punishment details may be provided at the end of the trial.)

Verdict: Part Guilty: theft under 1s,

Other trials on 25 Feb 1719

Name search for: William Spurgin , Mary Stiles ,

Defendant's Home: St. Dunstan at Stepney

Original Text:

William Spurgin , and Mary Stiles , of St. Dunstan at Stepney, were indicted the former for stealing a Flaxen Sheet, a Holland Smock and other Linnen to the value of 20 s. and Mary Stiles for receiving the same knowing them to be stole. It appear'd that Spurgin took the Goods out of the Garden where they were drying, and that Stiles was to give him a Crown for them, and bought a Peck of Coals to dry them by. The Jury found them Guilty to the value of 10 d. Transportation .

(Transportation

The first major innovation in eighteenth-century penal practice was the extensive use of transportation. Although there was some idea that transportation might lead to the reformation of the offender, the primary motivations behind this punishment were deterrence and the exile of hardened criminals from society.

Although many convicts were transported in the seventeenth century, it had to be done at their own expense or at the expense of merchants or shipowners. In the early eighteenth century there was a desire to extend transportation as a way of creating a more effective alternative to the death penalty (in terms of deterring crime) than benefit of clergy and whipping. In 1718 the first Transportation Act allowed the courts to sentence felons guilty of offences subject to benefit of clergy to seven years transportation to America. In 1720 a further statute authorized payments by the state to the merchants who contracted to take the convicts to America.

The first Transportation Act also allowed those guilty of capital offences and pardoned by the king to be sentenced to transportation, and it established returning from transportation as a capital offence.

Under the terms of the Transportation Act, those sentenced to death could be granted a royal pardon on condition of being transported for fourteen years or life. From 1739, a number of such cases appear in the Proceedings.

In 1776 transportation was halted by the outbreak of war with America. Although convicts continued to be sentenced to transportation, male convicts were confined to hard labour in hulks on the Thames, while women were imprisoned. Transportation resumed in 1787 with a new destination: Australia. This was seen as a more serious punishment than imprisonment, since it involved exile to a distant land.

In the early nineteenth century, as part of the revisions of the criminal law, transportation for life was substituted as the maximum punishment for several offences which had previously been punishable by death.)

-------------------- ID: I03579

Name: William SPURGEON

Sex: M

Birth: 7 MAY 1704 in Mile End, New Town, Sussex, England

Death: 1755 On the Indian Trail west of Frederick Co., Virginia (French & Indian

War).

Event: Christened 28 MAY 1704 St Dunstans, Stepney, Sussex, England

Note:

William and James Spurgeon were born in Suffolk northeast of London, England

and christened at St. Dunstan's parish, Stepney. There are numerous Spurgeons

listed in London area church records in the 1600's and 1700's. These two

christenings, however, fit the names and ages of the two Spurgeon brothers who

were deported to Maryland in 1719. Their deportation may have been arranged by

friends and neighbors as this was the only way for laborers to emigrate to the

colonies, and their subsequent lives do not indicate a criminal mind set.

William Spurgeon of Stepney was arrested for burgling linens and clothing on

14 January 1718 when he attempted to sell the stolen goods to Mary Styles.

He was confined in Newgate Prison on 25 February 1718. James Spurgeon (Spurgin) of Whitechapel

was arrested on 06 February 1718 for burgling clothes and confined in Newgate

Prison on 25 February 1718. Both were transported on the ship "Elizabeth",

under Captain William Greenwood, to Port Oxford, Maryland, to serve a 7 year

sentence as indentured servants. The ship departed on 11 May 1719. William was

indentured to Richard Snowden in August 1719 and James was indentured to the

same man in September 1719. Usually the indenture was for seven years, but

might be shortened for prison time already served. After the term of service

was up, the owner of the indenture was required to have taught each man a

trade and many indenture owners gave each servant 50 acres of land so that he

could be self supporting. Apparently both were not yet married when they were

convicted, although James was no longer living at home, but had residence in

nearby Whitechapel.

There was an unusual problem with the land Richard Snowden gave James and

William after they served their indenture. Apparently he simply gave them

money and they bought land from a John Welton. When they tried to clear up

their title in 1738, John Welton, had died and the County Clerk (120 miles

away) assumed that the purchase was made from his son, John Welton Jr. John

Jr. was willing to give them title (as he knew it was their land) but his wife

was sick and could not make the 120 mile trip to the courthouse to agree to

relinquish her dower rights. The court sent a man to question her in private

and determine if she indeed wished to relinquish her dower rights. When she

was questioned she revealed that it was her father-in-law (whose wife was

already deceased) who sold the land to the Spurgeons, so she had no dower

rights on the land ("The Spurgeon Quarterly", Iss. 46, Sept 1996).

Eventually William moved to Virginia. He first sold his original land and

bought land on the Maryland side of the Potomac at "Packhorse Ford" where the

Philadelphia wagon road crossed the river. Later he bought more land across

the river and moved to Augusta Co., Virginia.

James stayed in Maryland and acquired substantial acreage, mostly in Western

Maryland but some, originally in Frederick Co., Maryland, now lies in Bedford Co.,

PA.

Ann Spurgeon who was transported on the same ship with James and William may

have been a sister of James and William but christening records could not be

found for her at St. Dunstan's. Her indenture was bought by Rosanna Lees Indiana

September 1719. A marriage is recorded between Anne Sporgen and John Carter on

7 Feb. 1724 in Frederick Co., Maryland (close to the time when a five year indenture

for Vagrancy would have been up). This may have been her. The records do not

state what her crime was, nor where she was from.

There is also a John Spurgeon who was transported for Burglary about 9 years

later who may have been James' and William's brother. This John Spurgeon was

transported from Newgate Prison on 27 June 1728 on the "Elizabeth" for 14

years (two burglaries -- clothing in one and pigeons in the other). A John

Spurgeon shows up at the Baltimore Iron Works in 1734 as a wood cutter, but he

left the company in July 1735 and was last known at the Baltimore site in1737.

I am not aware of any more information on John or Ann Spurgeon, but James and

William Spurgeon married and had large families which settled in Virginia,

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Ohio and North Carolina and the

grandchildren and great-grandchildren settled in Tennessee, Kentucky and

Indiana.

William Spurgeon may have had other children, but my records only include the

four sons who moved near Salisbury, Rowan Co., North Carolina. The exact date of their

movement is not certain, but William Jr. and John were well established in

Rowan Co. before the American Revolution. It is said that the first Court in

Rowan Co. (probably about 1756) was held under an Oak Tree on land owned by

William Spurgeon Jr.

Father: John SPURGEON b: BEF. 1679 in Stepney, Sussex, England

Mother: Elizabeth Mary OSTER b: BEF. 1681 in , Sussex, England

Marriage 1 Mary STYLES b: ABT. 1704 in , Sussex, England

Married: ABT. 1729 in Frederick Co., Maryland

Children

William SPURGEON Jr. b: 6 JUN 1734 in Frederick Co., Maryland

John SPURGEON b: ABT. 1735 in Frederick Co., Maryland

Samuel SPURGEON b: ABT. 1738 in Frederick Co., Maryland

Jesse SPURGEON b: ABT. 1741 in Augusta Co., Virginia

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=arimathwaite&id=I00080

view all 20

William Spurgin's Timeline

1704
May 7, 1704
Mile End New Town, London, England
May 28, 1704
St. Dunstan's Church, Stepney, England
May 28, 1704
St.Dunstan's, London, Essex, Eng
May 28, 1704
St.Dustin's,Stepney,London,London
1730
1730
Age 25
Maryland, United States
1734
June 6, 1734
Age 30
Essex, England Or Fredericks County, Virginia
1735
1735
Age 30
of, St. Dunstan, Stepney, London, England
1736
1736
Age 31
Essex, England Or Fredericks County, Virginia
1740
1740
Age 35
Rowan, North Carolina, USA
1741
1741
Age 36
Augusta Co., VA