William Stone, 3rd Provincial Governor of Maryland

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William Maximillian Stone

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Derbyshire, England
Death: Died in Charles County, Province of Maryland
Immediate Family:

Son of unknown father of William Stone and unknown mother of William Stone
Husband of Elizabeth Stone (Spriggs) and Verlinda Stone
Father of Dr. Thomas Stone; Mary Tucker; Mary Mildred Stone; Richard Stone; Matthew Stone and 7 others

Occupation: Third Governor of Maryland under Lord Baltimore, Captain, Governor of the Colony of Maryland, 1648-54, 3rd appointed Gov. of MD and first Protestant appointed by Lord Baltimore
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William Stone, 3rd Provincial Governor of Maryland

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Stone_(Maryland_governor)

Larry Overmire's page on Governor William Stone is probably the most thorough in its treatment of his biography (the web pages in which he collected the information, mostly verbatim, are in his list of references):

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=lovermire&id=I6988

Name: GOV. WILLIAM (IMMIGRANT) * STONE

  • Sex: M 1
  • Birth: Abt 1595-1603 in Northamptonshire, England
  • Christening: 7 OCT 1603 Twiston, Lancashire, England
  • Death: BEF 21 DEC 1660 in Avon Manor, Nanjemoy, Charles Co., MD

...

William may have immigrated as early as 1620 on the "Temperance." He and his wife Verlinda moved to Maryland in 1648. Governor Stone is an important figure in American history for taking steps to preserve religious freedom in Maryland. He is said to have died at his home Avon Manor in Charles Co., MD. His will was dated 3 Dec 1659 and probated 21 Dec 1660.

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THE BATTLE OF THE SEVERN, 1655

The occasion of the battle was this: When the parlimentary commissioners had reduced the colony to obedience, they retained the then governor, Stone, he promising to conform, in his administration, to the new order of things. When, however, Lord Baltimore rebuked him for betraying the trust committed to him, and stimulated him to reassurne authority in his name, Stone was moved to attempt it, and, gathering a force in that part of the colony that had always been loyal to Lord Baltimore, St. Mary's County, he led them up along the bay to the Severn, where a few years before a settlement of Puritans from Virginia had been made. The force was divided, some passing by land and some by water, the vessels keeping near enough to the shore to assist the land forces, when needful, in crossing the creeks and rivers.

These Puritans, in the present troubles, had of course resisted the authority of the proprietary, because they were in sympathy with the parliamentary cause, and because for religion's sake they objected to being under the jurisdiction of Lord Baltimore, who was of the faith which they abhorred. They also objected to the powers and title which he held, as being absolute lord, to whom the oath of allegiance and obedience was to be taken.

When Stone reached the Severn, whatever may have been his expectations, he found himself face to face with a force, partly military and partly naval, which soon, in the encounter which ensued, put his whole army to rout and took him and many others prisoners. Under what plea, it is not said, but in spite of the promise of quarter, when the surrender was made, some of the soldiers were put to death by court-martial, and Stone himself was only saved by the appeal of the Puritan soldiers themselves and some of the women of the place. The battle was fought about where Annapolis now stands.

These Puritans had sought refuge in Maryland, having been compelled by Governor Berkeley to leave Virginia on account of their religion. They had, also, been induced by Governor Stone to choose Maryland as their place of refuge, under the promise of indulgence for their religious views and methods. It is not clear why, when they had the opportunity, they should have indulged such malignant feelings toward him." --History of Early Maryland, by Rev. Theodore C. Gambrall

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WARNING: There is a lot of conflicting information out there regarding Gov. William Stone, especially concerning when he immigrated and who his wives were.

  • Some say he immigrated as 35-year-old Maximilian Stone with wife Elizabeth Sprigg on the "Temperance" in 1620, some say he immigrated to Virginia in 1628,
  • some say he came on the "Alexander" in 1635.
  • If he were 35 in 1620, his birthdate would be about 1585.
  • It may be that he went back and forth to England and is therefore listed on more than one ship's list.
  • Some show he married three times to Elizabeth Sprigg, Verlinda Graves and Verlinda Cotton.
  • Virtual American Biographies says Gov. Stone died about 1695 in Charles Co., MD.

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  • Christopher J. Handy: "William Stone had one wife: Verlinda Graves. Verlinda Graves' sister Ann was married to a Cotton (who named William Stone as brother-in-law in his will), and her sister Katherine was married to a Sprigg (whom William Stone names 'brother Sprigg' in his will). Sloppy research seems responsible for his gaining two extra wives."
  • The Lois Branch database, citing "The Complete Book of Emigrants": "William came to the Eastern Shore of Virginia in 1620 with his wife Elizabeth and a son of nine months. They came over on the ship 'The Temperance' where william was listed as Maximillian Stone, age 36 years, and his wife, Elizabeth Stone, age 19 years, and their son of nine months. Maximillian (William) was one of Sir George Yeardley's men. (Many names on the passenger list for this ship were misspelled, so it is possible that his full name was William Maximillian Stone or McWilliam Stone) The ship landed at Hog Island. (Later known as James City County)"
  • The Lois Branch database: "William's first wife was Elizabeth Sprigg, sister of Thomas Sprigg, whom he married in England, and by whom he had Thomas and Elizabeth Stone. (Baltimore Sun, Maryland, Sunday, July 8, 1906 and Baltimore Sun, Nov 11, 1908). After her death, he married Verlinda Graves, daughter of Thomas Graves. William married third, Miss Verlinda Stone, the sister of the Rev. Mr. William Cotton, who had wed Anne Graves. (Proof of wife Elizabeth Sprigg: William's will in which he mentions 'Brother Sprigg'; and an assignment of Thomas Stone, son of William, 'right of 100 acres of land to my Uncle Thomas Sprigg'...Land Office, Lib. 5., Folder 182)."
  • Exploring America's Roots: "William Stone was born in England around 1603 and came from a well-known merchant family in London. However, William chose to come to America, and migrated to Virginia in 1628. He was successful there, working as a merchant and planter. He was respected by his neighbors and was appointed justice of the peace and then sheriff in Accomack County, Virginia... William Stone and his wife Verlinda came to Maryland in 1648. That same year Stone was given a great opportunity. With civil war still going on in England and with many new Protestant settlers in Maryland, Lord Baltimore wanted to appoint a Protestant Governor. He chose William Stone, probably partly to reward Stone for promising to bring hundreds of settlers to Maryland. Stone served as Governor for six years until some of the more radical Protestants, called Puritans, gained control of the government and began to pass laws which restricted religious freedom."
  • Stevie Lifkin on Genforum: "Gov. William Stone was born in Eng c 1603 and had an unknown wife there. He came with son Richard (13) on ship Alexander c 1635 and landed near Jamestown Va. Also some siblings - Robert and John and maybe a sister came with him. He married Verlinda Cotton - the daughter of Jane and Rev. John Cotton who came with her widowed mother to be with her brother. She is often mistakenly referred to as Verlinda Graves. Lord Baltimore was looking for a protestant Gov for Md. who respected religious freedom so he brought John to Md in 1635 and made him Gov. Their children were:
    • 1. Thomas STONE was born in 1635.
    • 2. Richard STONE b.1622 died in Jun 1657 in Maryland. Notes for Richard STONE: The Passenger List for the Ship Alexander, lists Richard Stone, 13 years, on May 2, 1635.
    • 3. John STONE, Gentleman
    • 4 Elizabeth STONE (Oldest daughter)
    • 5. Mary STONE
    • 6. Catherine STONE
    • 7. Matthew Stone
    • This inf. is very well documented in a book called - Stones of Poynton Manor (that was in the family for 150 years)."
  • Lois Branch database, citing "Early Virginia Immigrants 1623-1666": "William was probably the McWilliam Stone who brought Andrew Stone over in 1635."
  • Lois Branch database, citing "Order Book, Northampton County, VA, Volume 1": "William took the Oath as Commissioner of Accomack in August 1633."
  • Lois Branch database: "The Lord Baltimore of Maryland appointed William as Governor of Maryland and gave him his commission as such on 6 August 1648. Thus, William took his family and several hundred other Nonconformists from Virginia to Maryland. This was the beginning of the first Protestant Government of Maryland. William convened the General Assembly of Maryland on 2 April 1649. This Assembly was composed of men from many religions, but the majority were Protestant. They passed the 'Act Concerning Religion' (Act of Tolerance) on 21 April 1649."
  • Lois Branch database: "William and his family moved to Maryland and settled at St. Michael's Hundred. He took the office as the first Protestant Governor of Maryland during very troubled times and was taken out of office by the Puritans who were opposed to Lord Baltimore in 1652. His office was restored to him and he served until 1654. He was then replaced by a board of ten commissioners. On Sunday afternoon on the 25th of March in 1655, he led the 'Battle of Severn' at Providence (now Annapolis). This was the first battle in America where Americans fought against other Americans. William was wounded which led to his defeat and capture. He was sentenced by the Puritan Court to be shot, but was saved by the intercession of the people of the colony and given full pardon."
  • Lois Branch database: "In 1658, Charles County, Maryland was formed from St. Mary's County and in the fall of that year William was granted a tract of land from Lord Baltimore for his 'good and faithful service'. This land was known as 'Poynton Manor' and was located on Nanjemoy Creek (now known as Avon Creek) in the southwestern part of Charles County, somewhere between the settlements of Welcome and Hilltop, on the south side of the road that connected them. The Lord Baltimore named William a member of the Privy Council in 1658, when the confidence in Lord Baltimore was restored, and served as justice of the Provincial Court."
  • Lois Branch database: "William died at his home 'Avon Manor' in Charles County, MD. William left a will dated 3 Dec 1659, it was proved on 15 January 1660, and probated 21 Dec 1660.He named his wife Verlinda (Cotton) Stone, and his children: eldest son Thomas; eldest daughter, Elizabeth; and other children. He also mentioned his brother Richard; brother Capt. John who was killed by Indians, and 'Brother Sprigg'."
  • Virtual American Biographies: "His great-grandson, Thomas, signer of the Declaration of Independence, born in Charles county, Maryland, in 1743"

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FROM ST. MARY'S CITY, MEN'S CAREER FILES, MSA SC 5094:

Stone, William ( 1603 - 1660 )

  • Wife: Verlinda, daughter of Thomas Graves.
  • Siblings: Andrew, John, Matthew, Richard.
  • Children:
    • 1. Thomas (m. Mary),
    • 2. Richard,
    • 3. John,
    • 4. Matthew (m. Margery),
    • 5. Elizabeth (m. William Calvert),
    • 6. Mary (m. 1. John Thomas, 2. Robert Doyne),
    • 7. Catherine.
  • Stone arrived in Virginia by 1628, and after 1648 divided his time between St. Marys and Charles Counties.
  • Local Offices:
    • Justice of peace (Accomack County, Virginia), 1633, 1635-1639, 1641-1645, 1647-1648;
    • Hungars Parish Vestry (Accomack County, Virginia), 1635;
    • Sheriff (Accomack County, Virginia), 1634, 1640, 1646;
    • Burgess (Accomack County, Virginia), 1642.
  • Provincial Offices:
    • Governor of Maryland, 1648-1656 (replaced by Parliamentary Commissioners, March-June, 1652, 1654-1656);
    • Council, 1656-1660;
    • Justice, Provincial Court, 1658-1660;
    • Upper House, 1658 (did not attend).
  • Military Offices:
    • Captain, 1659.
  • Land at death: 3000 a. plus, including Nangemy Manor, land at Bustards Island.

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Sources:

1) Kenneth Lemmon Database, 19 Dec 2004

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED &db=lemken&id=I08732

2) Ancestors of Jennie Hollis McArdle, Website 2005

http://members.aol.com/bbova2332/A-McArdle.html

3) Spriggs Archives, posting by Tim Mattingly, gtm3@indy.net, 7 Dec 1999

http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/SPRIGGS/1999-12/0944562880

4) Genforum, Gov. Stone & Spriggs/Graves children, 1999

http://genforum.genealogy.com/stone/messages/1871.html

5) Genforum posting by Stevie Lifkin, information from family history, "Stones of Poynton Manor," swslifkin@aol.com, 10 Aug 1999

http://genforum.genealogy.com/stone/messages/2103.html

6) Genforum posting by Herbert A. Wheat, Re: Gov. Stone & Spriggs/Graves children, 28 Jan 2000

http://genforum.genealogy.com/stone/messages/2985.html

7) "Gov. Willam Stone of Maryland", "Genealogical Gleamings in England" July,1895, pg. 314-316

8) ANCESTRY OF WILLIAM STONE, GOVERNOR OF MARYLAND, 1648-1655, by Elliot Stone, Riverdale, N.Y.

9) Virtual American Biographies, Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, 2005 (birthdate and place)

http://www.famousamericans.net/williamstone/

10) Exploring America's Roots, Library, Maryland Public Television, 2005

http://mdroots.thinkport.org/library/williamverlindastone.asp

11) Pamela Smith Database, 18 Oct 2004 (date of will, christening date)

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=:3001815&id=I582108300

12) Lois Branch Database, 15 May 2004

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=loisbranch&id=I17053

13) "Descendants From First Families of Virginia and Maryland", by Maude Crowe

14) The Complete Book of Emigrants, 1607-1660, P. W. Coldham, Genealogical Pub. Co. Baltimore, MD, 1987

15) Early Virginia Immigrants 1623-1666, G. C. Greer, Baltimore Genealogical Pub. Co. , 1960

16) Order Book, Northampton County, VA, Volume I

17) Virginia Magazine of History, St. George, Vol III, page 272

18) Baltimore Sun, Nov 11, 1903

19) "Southern Relatives", by Dixie Hammonds, pub. 1965, Vol III

20) "Southern Relatives", by Dixie Hammonds, pub. 1964, Vol I

21) The Genealogy of Thomas Stone, Website 2005

http://www.nps.gov/thst/gen1.htm

22) Post em by Christopher J. Handy, christopher.j.handy@gmail.com, 8 Jun 2006

23) History of Early Maryland, by Rev. Theodore C. Gambrall, A. M., D.D.

Published by Thomas Whittaker, New York, 1893

http://members.tripod.com/~jweaver300/md/hemd.htm#2

24) St. Mary's City, Men's Career Files, MSA SC 5094, Dr. Lois Green Carr's Biographical Files of 17th and 18th Century Marylanders, Maryland State Archives Website 2006

http://www.mdarchives.state.md.us/megafile/msa/speccol/sc5000/sc5094/003900/html/sm3997.html

_UID: ABCFB0202B174D06B67302A12CEC7480B72C

Change Date: 3 APR 2007

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William was governor of Maryland, the first Protestant governor, and Capt. of Colonial Service. He was the third Colonial Governor and appointed by Lord Baltimore on 6 Aug 1648. After retirement from public life, he resided on his estate "Poynton Manor."

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From the Find A Grave Page on William Stone:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=42376245

Birth: 1595

Death: 1660

Saint Marys City

St. Mary's County

Maryland, USA

William Maximillan Stone (1595/6-1660) was born 1595/1596 in Northamptonshire, England and was christened Oct 7, 1603, Twiston, Lancashire, England. His parents were Dorothy Jennett (1581-?) and Capt John Carr Stone (b: 1578 in Croston, Bretherton, Lancaster, England). [. . .]

In 1648, Captain William Stone had come into Maryland from Virginia Colony. [. . .]

When William and Verlinda Stone moved their home from Virginia into Maryland, they brought with them a number of indentured servants. They also brought "four Negroes and one Turk and one Indian." This accounting appears in a formal registration William Stone submitted to the land office in Maryland, demanding the right to enter lands he had been promised in exchange for bringing his family from Virginia to Maryland.

The Stone ledger indicates the dramatically different demographics of arriving immigrants in the colonies along the Chesapeake when compared with New England. One of the biggest differences was the presence of intact families in New England as opposed to individual laborers in the more southerly colonies. English colonists, settling north of the Chesapeake Bay in the seventeenth century, reach the Colonies mostly as family groups. In but a few short years after the arrival of the Mayflower at Plymouth Rock in 1620, colonists landed and disbursed in a remarkable eruption of energy and zeal.

However, in the tobacco colonies of Maryland and Virginia, the stream of immigrant arrivals was steady and continuous for decades after the first permanent settlement at Jamestown in 1607. The continuing influx included a large percentage of single persons, bound to labor for a term of years. These singleton drudges in Maryland and Virginia were mostly from central England by way of the slums of London or one or another port city. Male immigrants arriving in seventeenth century Maryland and Virginia outnumbered females about six to one. [. . .]

The legalization of African enslavement in Maryland was formally established in 1663/4, a generation after its introduction. Note what the colonial legislature, composed of male, land owning immigrants, found of concern in 1663, sufficient to cause them to legalize slavery in their domain, thereby reversing the ancient laws and customs of England.

The problem was White women: English women were "intermarrying" slaves:

"Divers free-born English women, forgetful of their free condition, and to the disgrace of our nation, do intermarry with negro slaves; by which, also, divers suits may arise, touching the issue of such women, and great damage doth befall the master of such negroes, &c."

Therefore:

"Whatsoever free-born woman shall intermarry with any slave, shall serve the master of such slave during the life of her husband, and that all the issue of such free born women, so married, shall be slaves, as their fathers were."

[. . .]

For both commercial and social reasons, the custom of slavery was codified in Maryland in the seventeenth century, as it was in other Southern colonies, at the same time. The region made itself dependent upon a cheap and ready source of debased labor. All aspects of human striving, whether moral, commercial or carnal, were made to include the daily betrayal of the humanity of those least able to protect themselves. These included African men, women and children, as well as indentured English men and women, though of course the indentured class was not enslaved for life. [. . .]

In the middle of the seventeenth century, William and Verlinda Stone were part of the leading edge of these developments. [. . .]

A communicant of the Church of England, Stone became Governor of Maryland shortly before the beheading of Charles I in 1649. He was appointed by the Catholic Cecil Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore and colonizer ("proprietor") of the Province of Maryland. Cecil Calvert "hastened to secure his tenure of Maryland by showing the world that his Province was not all Roman Catholic to the prejudice of Protestants."

Maryland was intended as a refuge in America for persecuted English Catholics. But the province never at any time was Catholic in a majority of its population. In 1632 the charter had to be revised to limit its western boundary after it was discovered that Protestants from Virginia had already moved east across the Potomac River. [. . .]

At the time of his appointment as Governor of Maryland, William Stone was already prominent in Virginia. Born in Northhamptonshire England in 1603, he was living in "the Plantation of Acchowmacke" [Accawmacke] in 1633, a commissioner, and member of the Accawmacke Court (Northampton County) that year. (Records of William Stone's appointments, land transactions and other activities in Virginia are among the oldest surviving records in that state.)

In 1634, Stone was appointed High Sheriff of the county and was still living in Virginia when appointed Governor of Maryland in 1648. He moved there in 1649. [. . .]

The Catholic population was primarily in southern Maryland, around St. Mary's City, while a large group of Puritans from Virginia had settled in Ann Arundel County (named for the wife of Proprietor Cecil Calvert) at the community they called Providence, which shortly was renamed Annapolis (named for Princess Anne, daughter of English Queen Mary).

The Virginians had come into Maryland to avoid curtailments of their religious practices, as was being attempted by Virginia Governor William Berkeley. The new Marylanders proved unwilling to take an oath of allegiance to Lord Baltimore, holding the oath was "Romish" as it bound them to obey a "Popish Government."

The Puritans offered to swear to be true to Baltimore's interests, but this compromise was not acceptable to the Lord Proprietary, who ordered all who refused the oath to be expelled. The impasse was compounded by continuing turbulence in England.

William Stone was Protestant but not of a Separatist stripe. Unfortunately for him, many of the Virginians who joined him in Maryland, were blood and bone Puritans. [. . .]

In 1654, commissioners from England arrived in Maryland. They insisted that the province be governed directly from England by the Lord Protector, Oliver Cromwell. William Stone was compelled to resign. He stated in a proclamation that he did so "for prevention of the effusion of Blood and ruine of the Country and Inhabitants." But the risk of "ruine" soon was reassessed.

In 1655, a ship, the Golden Fortune, arrived with reinforcements from Lord Baltimore. The emboldened William Stone, to his misfortune, then demanded that he be restored as Governor under the terms of the original charter.

Marching with his supporters toward Patuxent to reclaim official records, Stone was met by an army of Puritans, many of them recently settled asylees from Virginia Colony, whom Stone himself had invited into Maryland. These hearty, serious planters were in no mood to come once again under the thumb of an overreaching colonial administration, and certainly not a Catholic Proprietorship. [. . .]

Near present day Annapolis, at the mouth of the Severn River, the Virginia Protestants, commanded by Captain William Fuller, defeated the little army of William Stone, agent of Lord Baltimore. Some of the defeated "Papists" were court marshaled and at least one was executed on the spot. Stone, wounded in the shoulder, only just escaped execution by firing squad.

For a time, Stone was held prisoner. His wife Verlinda boldly appealed to Lord Baltimore, reciting in her letter some of the details of the battle.

"Not above five of our men escaped," she wrote, "which ran away before the fight was ended . . . They have sequestered my Husband's Estate, only they say they will allow a maintenance for me and my children which I do believe will be but small. They keep my husband with the rest of the Council, all other officers, still prisoners, et cetera."

Stone was freed and regained possession of at least some of his lands, including his estate, Nanjemy, later called Poynton Manor. William Stone died in 1660 in his house in St. Mary's City.

William and Verlinda Stone had seven children: Thomas, Richard, John, Matthew, Elizabeth, Katherine, and Mary Stone (?-before 1689), who became the wife, first of _____ Thomas and then, as a widow, of Robert Doyne (?-1689), High Sheriff of Charles County, Maryland. [. . .]

The Maryland State archives (St. Mary's City Men's Career Files, MSA SC 5094) list William Stone's public offices:

  • Justice of peace (Accomack County, Virginia), 1633, 1635-1639, 1641-1645, 1647-1648;
  • Hungars Parish Vestry (Accomack County, Virginia), 1635;
  • Sheriff (Accomack County, Virginia), 1634, 1640, 1646; and
  • Burgess (Accomack County, Virginia), 1642. [. . .]

Verlinda and William Stone had many prominent connections and descendents collateral to this line. Mary Stone's older sister, Elizabeth married William Calvert, son of Maryland Governor Leonard Calvert and grandson of George Calvert, First Lord Baltimore.

Another descendent, William Murray Stone, was the third Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Maryland.

Thomas Stone, a double great grandson, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Descendent Michael Jennifer was a member of the Maryland Convention that ratified the Constitution of the United States in 1788. John, a brother of the signer Thomas Stone, was a governor of Maryland. [. . .]

This brief biography has been taken from Volume I of a two volume book of family history entitled ALL OF THE ABOVE I & II, by Richard Baldwin Cook. For additional information, visit the contributor profile, #47181028.

Family links:

Spouse:

  • Verlinda Cotton Stone (____ - 1675)

Burial: Unknown

Created by: Richard Baldwin Cook

  • Record added: Sep 26, 2009
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 42376245

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From Melissa Thompson Alexander's page on Governor William Stone:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=madagtenet&id=I23015

•ID: I23015

  • Name: William * STONE 1
  • Sex: M
  • Title: Gov.
  • Birth: 1603 in Northampton Co, England or Twiston, Lancashire Co, England 2
  • Death: BEF 21 DEC 1660 in SMC, MD 1
  • Event: Occ Gov of MD
  • Event: Land 1658 First land in Durham Parish, Charles Co, MD
  • Religion: Episcopalean (read: Anglican Church)
  • Event: Fact 1696 Member of the Vestry of Durham Parish, Charles Co, MD 3

•Note:

  • He was Governor of Maryland, the first Protestant Governor, Capt. of Colonial Service, and the third Colonial Governor appointed by Lord Baltimore 6 Aug. 1648.

From Paul Tobler:

  • Daughter Elizabeth married before Sept. 1663, William Calvert. Daughter of Captain William Stone.
  • A perusal of her father's will (See part I), gives the impression that Elizabeth, seemingly his eldest child, and the recipient of special bequests, was the issue of a first marriage.
  • The will of Verlinda, widow of William Stone, dated Charles county, MD., 3d day of March, 1674/5; proved 13th day of July, 1675 makes but three bequests;
    • 1st, Benony Thomas heirs to whom she leaves 400 acres of land;
    • 2nd, a daughter Doyen (Doyne), personalty; and
    • 3d, son John whom she makes her Executor, and beneficiary of the residue of her estate both real and personal, at 21 years of age.
  • Omitting mention of all but two of William Stone's children suggests that she may not have been the mother of the other children.

Linda Reno quotes from "Colonial Virginians and Their Maryland Relatives" by Norma Tucker:

  • "William Stone left Accomac Co, VA in 1633 to become high sheriff of Northumberland Co, VA. In 1648, Lord Baltimore commissioned him to become Gov of MD, the first Protestant Gov of that state. When he moved from VA to MD, he took with him about 500 non-conformists from the Norfolk Co, VA area. He was the nephew of Thomas Stone, merchant and haberdasher of London, England. When William Stone came to America he brought with him his brothers John, Matthew, Andrew, and Robert to Accomac Co, VA--none of whom left children."

It was during these troubles that the battle of the Severn was fought, in the year 1655. The occasion of the battle was this:

  • When the parlimentary commissioners had reduced the colony to obedience, they retained the then governor, Stone, he promising to conform, in his administration, to the new order of things.
  • When, however, Lord Baltimore rebuked him for betraying the trust committed to him, and stimulated him to reassurne authority in his name, Stone was moved to attempt it, and, gathering a force in that part of the colony that had always been loyal to Lord Baltimore, St. Mary's County, he led them up along the bay to the Severn, where a few years before a settlement of Puritans from Virginia had been made.
  • The force was divided, some passing by land and some by water, the vessels keeping near enough to the shore to assist the land forces, when needful, in crossing the creeks and rivers.
  • These Puritans, in the present troubles, had of course resisted the authority of the proprietary, because they were in sympathy with the parliamentary cause, and because for religion's sake they objected to being under the jurisdiction of Lord Baltimore, who was of the faith which they abhorred. They also objected to the powers and title which he held, as being absolute lord, to whom the oath of allegiance and obedience was to be taken.

From: History of Early Maryland, by Rev. Theodore C. Gambrall, A. M., D.D. Published by Thomas Whittaker, New York, 1893:

http://members.tripod.com/~jweaver300/md/hemd.htm#2

"When Stone reached the Severn, whatever may have been his expectations, he found himself face to face with a force, partly military and partly naval, which soon, in the encounter which ensued, put his whole army to rout and took him and many others prisoners. Under what plea, it is not said, but in spite of the promise of quarter, when the surrender was made, some of the soldiers were put to death by court-martial, and Stone himself was only saved by the appeal of the Puritan soldiers themselves and some of the women of the place. The battle was fought about where Annapolis now stands. These Puritans had sought refuge in Maryland, having been compelled by Governor Berkeley to leave Virginia on account of their religion. They had, also, been induced by Governor Stone to choose Maryland as their place of refuge, under the promise of indulgence for their religious views and methods. It is not clear why, when they had the opportunity, they should have indulged such malignant feelings toward him."

  • Father: John * STONE b: BET 1572 AND 1578 in Croston, Lancashire, England
  • Mother: Katherine GRIFFIN b: ABT 1581

Marriage 1 Verlinda * GRAVES b: ABT 1618 in VA

  • Married: 1635 in Hungar's Parish, Accomac Co, VA 2
  • Children
    • 1. William STONE
    • 2. Thomas STONE b: 1635
    • 3. Mary STONE b: ABT 1636
    • 4. Richard STONE b: 1642
    • 5. Mathew STONE b: BEF 1644
    • 6. Elizabeth * STONE b: 1644 in Baltimore Co, MD
    • 7. John STONE b: 1647 in Hungar's Parrish, Accomack, VA
    • 8. Kathrine STONE b: BEF 1659

Sources:

1.Title: Maryland Calandar of Wills, Vol 1

2.Title: Linda Reno lreno@erols.com

3.Title: "Gardiner, Generations"

Repository:

Media: Book

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Ben M. Angel's notes:

It should be noted that Maryland Colony was a Lord Proprietorship under Cecil Calvert, second Lord Baltimore. Maryland was originally given to his father in return for relinquishing proprietorship over Newfoundland, which was regarded as more important because of its cod fisheries. When Lord Baltimore's fleet arrived in Chesapeake Bay, they ran into trouble with a well-connected group of Virginian fur trappers on Kent Island. At first, the colony faced a proxy war (with nearby tribesmen), then a more overt war with the islanders. After this war ended in Maryland's favor, the Virginians that were involved with Kent Island continued the war by involving Cromwell and the Parliamentarians in siezing the mostly Catholic colony. Thus the Battle of Severn, in which Governor William Stone played a part. -------------------- Was third Governor of the Province of Maryland. 8 Aug 1648 Lord Baltimore named Stone the Governor of his colony. He was the first Protestant Governor. The Assembly sought a confirmation of their religious liberty and in 1649 Governor Stone signed theReligious Toleration Act, which permitted liberto to all Christian denominations. In 1649 Stone and Puritan exiles from Virginia founded the town of Providence on the north shore of the Severn River and across from what is today the Maryland state capital of Annapolis. William Stone wrote his will on 3 Dec 1659, and it was proved in Charles Co. MD on 21 Dec 1660. Verlinda Graves Stone wrote her will on 3 Mar 1675, and it was proved on 13 Jul 1675 in Charles Co. MD. LEGACY .William Stone's great-great-granddsons made major contributions to the foundation of Maryland as an American state: Thomas Stone signed the Declaration of Independence, Michael Jenifer Stone represented Maryland in the Firs United States Congress, John Hoskins Stone was Governor of Maryland 1794-97, and William Murray Stone was the Episcopal Bishop of Baltimore. -------------------- Governor of Maryland

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William Stone, 3rd Provincial Governor of Maryland's Timeline

1599
December 27, 1599
Steventon, Berkshire, England, United Kingdom
1603
October 7, 1603
Twiston, Clitheroe, Lancashire, England
1603
Derbyshire, England
1605
May 1605
Age 2
Bridgewater, Wells, Somerset, England
1620
1620
Age 17
Northumberland County, Virginia Colony, (Present USA)
1628
1628
Age 25
(Present Accomack County), Virginia Colony
1635
1635
Age 32
1635
Age 32
Charles County, Province of Maryland
1635
Age 32
Virginia Colony
1636
1636
Age 33