William Tilden Sutton (1641 - 1718)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Plymouth, Scituate, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Piscataway, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States
Managed by: Francis Dellinger
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About William Tilden Sutton

http://www.warrennj.org/wths/sutton.htm

WILL THE RIGHT JEREMIAH SUTTON PLEASE STEP FORWARD?

[From Warren History, Volume One, No. 3, Spring 1990]

In our Fall l989 issue, we traced the story of William Ford, one of three early Warren settlers whose homes are shown on General Erskine's Revolutionary War map No. 70C. Jeremiah Sutton, a Ford neighbor on what is now Mt. Bethel Road, is the subject of the following article by Society Vice President Shirley Morgan Christopher.

A hundred years ago a historian wrote that "much of the early individual history was but a meagre record -- this was much regretted as they lived during a period of time when some of the most thrilling and exciting occurences ever visited a people." Jeremiah Sutton was such an individual: An early resident of Warren, he is completely omitted from local history to this day. Jeremiah Sutton did not leave a personal history although he was among Warren's pioneers. Through research, however, we can now document his presence in our area from c. l740 to l787, the year he and his family moved west.

Sutton family research is complicated by the fact that two branches of the family, both descended from a common ancestor, settled in the Somerset hills. Confusing matters further is the family's habit of using identical given names in each generation. At the time of the Revolution, at least three Jeremiah Suttons were in this area, all cousins of differing degree. The two branches of the family enjoyed one distinction at least, for one was of the Baptist persuasion, the other of the Presbyterian.

The Sutton family tree begins with William, progenitor of the Middlesex-Somerset-Morris County Suttons. On July ll, l666, in Eastham, Mass., he married Damaris, daughter of Richard and Alice Bishop. It was in that same year that tidings began to spread throughout New England of the founding of a colony in the Jerseys where settlers were welcome, the Indians friendly, the soil and climate excellent and civil and religious liberty guaranteed. About l672 William, a Quaker, left Eastham seeking reprieve from Puritan domination. He settled in Piscataqua, or Piscataway, where, thanks to fair dealings with the Indians, only the wolves and the dense forest threatened.

By l682 William Sutton owned several hundred acres of land burdened only by a yearly quit-rent of a half penny. A pillar of the tiny community, he served as freeholder, constable and town clerk. Member of the Quaker congregation that met in nearby Woodbridge, he served his church on the boards of discipline and inquiry. Interestingly, William's sons strayed from the Quaker fold, joining the Baptist or Presbyterian churches.

William Sutton first appears in the Jersey records in l677 when he purchased l20 acres of land. On March 10, l697/98, the East Jersey Proprietors leased a large tract to William, Thomas, Judah, John and Charles Sutton and others. Sutton's name does not appear after 1713, indicating that he probably died about that time. He was the father of ten children: Alice, Thomas, Mary, John, Judah, Richard, Joseph (died young), Benjamin, Daniel and Joseph.

William Sutton's second son, John, born April 20, l674 in Piscataway, married Elizabeth (Conger?) about l695 and moved to the Passaic Valley, buying land in Harrison's Neck Nov. ll, l741. He is probably the same John Sutton who sold land at Piscataway on Dec. 3lst of that year. His will, dated Dec. 17, l746, was probated Dec. 20, l750. He died on Dec. 19, l750, aged 76, and lies buried with his wife in the Baptist Cemetery, Stelton. His eight children were: John, born Sept. 19, l70l, David, born July 31, l703, Moses, born Feb. 2, l696/97, died l740, Aaron, born July 2, l699, married and died before l746, James, born May 9, l709, Jesse, born July 6, l711, Mary, born Aug. 15, l717 and Ephraim, born Dec. 7, 1719.

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http://www.suttonfamilyhome.net/williamsutton.html

William Sutton, who appears in Massachusetts in 1666 at Eastham on Cape Cod. was a son of George Sutton and Sarah Tilden. William Sutton (born. May 25, 1641, died April 28, 1718 at the age of 77) and his first wife Damaris Bishop Sutton (born 1645, died February 6, 1682 at the age of 37) were married July 11, 1666, at Eastham Massachusetts. Damaris died 06 February 1683 in Piscataway, Raritan Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, at 37 years of age. William then married Jane Barnes in Piscataway, Raritan Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, 09 January 1685.

In the New Jersey Archives, volume XXI of the first series, may be found the following entries:

1693- August 28. Wm. Sutton, Constable of Piscataway gives return for the election of a Representative in place of Hopewell Hull, deceased.

1685/6- February 17. Patent to William Sutton of Piscataway for several small parcels of land.

1685-March 25. Patent to William Sutton of Piscataway, for 125 acres; 25 thereof being due to his wife, Jane, as headland, the other 100 acres being granted to William Sutton as an old settler.

1697-March 10. Confirmation of 21 persons including William Sutton, Thomas Sutton, Judah Sutton, all of Piscataway for a small tract of meadow.

William was fined 1 pound for taking a bible out of the meeting house in Barnstable, MA in 1666. (Ref: Treasury Accounts of Colony of New Plymouth, Fines of June Court, 1666)

William and Damaris had the following children :

1. Alice Sutton (born May 13, 1668 in Eastham, Mass.)

2. Thomas Sutton (b. November 11, 1669 in Eastham, Mass.) married Mary Adams.

3. Mary Sutton (born October 4, 1671 in Eastham, Mass.) married in 1689 Daniel McDaniel.

4. Damaris Sutton (born in Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts about 1673. Damaris died about 1733 in New Jersey.) She married Benjamin Force in New Jersey, about 1692.

5. William Sutton (born in Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts about 1672.)

6. John Sutton (b. April 20,1674 in Piscataway, N.J. died December 19, 1750 in Piscataway, Middlesex, NJ) married Elizabeth Conger born January 01, 1677/78 in Woodbridge, Middlesex, NJ married 1695 in Middlesex, NJ died May 10, 1731 in Piscataway, Middlesex

7. Judah Sutton (b. January 24, 1675 in Piscataway, N.J.)

8. Richard Sutton (born July 18, 1676 in Piscataway, N.J.) married Sarah Rongnion - January 25, 1702 (of whom further).

9. Joseph Sutton (born June 27, 1678, died December 19, 1682).

10. Benjamin Sutton (born February 24, 1679/80, died December 22, 1682)

11. Daniel Sutton (born February 25, 1681/2) married 1st Patience Martin on October 31, 1704; 2nd Lydia Collier of Woodbridge August 25, 1724.

William Sutton was married the second time on January 3, 1863/4 to Jane Barnes. The only child of this union was:

1. Joseph Sutton (born September 11, 1693) married Priscilla Langstaff on December 25, 1718.

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http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=tdowling&id=I106472&style=TABLE

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http://bjhughes.org/suttdoc.html

William Sutton of Scituate and Eastham, and of Piscataway, N.J., Quaker, b. about 1641; d. 28 of 4m. 1718; m. (1) at Eastham, on Cape Cod, 11 July 1666, Damaris Bishop, d. 6 Feb. 1682/3, daughter of Richard and Alice (Martin) (Clark) Bishop; m. (2) Jane Barnes, daughter of James Barnes. William Sutton first appears at Barnstable, on Cape Cod, where, on 5 June 1666, he was haled into court and fined for purloining the Bible from the meeting house, "one pound and for telling a lye about the same, ten shillings." His departure from the town was probably expedited by these occurences, and a few weeks later, at the neighboring settlement of Eastham, he took refuge in matrimony with Damaris Bishop. They had ten children, the first three born in Eastham, and the rest born in Piscataway. (New England Historic Genealogical Register, Volume 91, January 1937)

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The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 1937:

William Sutton first appears at Barnstable on Cape Cod, where on 6/5/1666, he was haled to court and fined for purloining the Bible from the meeting house, one pound, and for telling a lye about the same, ten shillings. His departure from the town was probably expedited by these occurrences, and a few weeks later, at the neighboring settlement of Eastham, he took refuge in matrimony with Demaris Bishop. William Sutton was a Quaker.

The Sutton Family moved to NJ when the founding of a colony between the Hudson and Delaware Rivers became known. They were accompanied by Richard Bishop, the father of Demaris. William prospered and held positions of honor in that town.

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The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 1937:

William Sutton first appears at Barnstable on Cape Cod, where on 6/5/1666, he was haled to court and fined for purloining the Bible from the meeting house, one pound, and for telling a lye about the same, ten shillings. His departure from the town was probably expedited by these occurrences, and a few weeks later, at the neighboring settlement of Eastham, he took refuge in matrimony with Demaris Bishop. William Sutton was a Quaker.

The Sutton Family moved to NJ when the founding of a colony between the Hudson and Delaware Rivers became known. They were accompanied by Richard Bishop, the father of Demaris. William prospered and held positions of honor in that town.

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There has been controversy regarding William's ancestry. Various unsubstantiated sources claimed that he was the son of John Sutton of Hingham while others stated that he was the son of George Sutton of Scituate, both of whom came to Massachusetts in 1638. Most modern evidence tends to support the contention that he was the son of George and Sarah (Tilden) Sutton.

He appears first in the Plymouth Colony Court record for June 1666 when he is fined twenty shillings for taking a bible from the meeting house at Barnstable and another ten shilling for telling a lie about it. A month later his marriage to Damaris Bishop at Eastham is noted in the record. Their first three children were born at Eastham, prior to 1672 when the family migrated to Piscataway in Middlesex Co., New Jersey.

In New Jersey he was an influential Quaker and it is probable that matters of religious belief were involved in his leaving Massachusetts. He prospered in New Jersey acquiring patents for 250 acres of land. He was at various times chosen as Constable, Town Clerk, and Freeholder and was prominent in the church.

About two months before the death of his first wife, the following entry appeared in the Piscataway Town Records: Nov. 25, 1682 William Sutton voluntarily gives his son Richard to James and Elizabeth Giles until he should be 21. They agreeing to do for him "as their own".

In early 1685, William married Jane Barnes who was probably the widow of John Barnes. A child, Joseph, born in 1693 is sometimes attributed to William and Jane but he is more likely the first child of William's eldest son Thomas and Mary Adams.

Quakers records indicate that William Sutton, about to remove from Piscataway to Burlington, on the 15th of June, 1706 donated a year old steer "towards building [the Woodbridge] Meeting-house". On 19 January 1713, the Woodbridge Quaker meeting offered to William Sutton and his wife, an aged couple, the privilege of living up-stairs in the meeting house. That is probably where he lived until his death in 1718 at about 78 years of age.

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The first of the family of whom we have record was William Sutton, who appears in Massachusetts in 1666, at Eastham on Cape Cod. As the stream of Puritan immigration had almost dried up twenty years before this date, it is extremely probable that he represents the second generation in New England. Their proximity suggest a relationship to one or the other of two families of Suttons, respectively, of Hinghamland Scituate, small towns of old Massachusetts and Plymouth Colony directly across the bay from Eastham. Careful investigation, however, has failed as yet to establish a connection with either or to suggest any other line of research. Our history opens, therefore, at Eastham, on the eleventh of July, 1666, with the marriage of William Sutton, yeoman (aged probably twenty-five years), of either English birth or descent, to Damaris, daughter of Alice and Richard Bishop. By Edward F. H. Sutton -------------------- A record of him is found is the church records at Barnstable on Cape Cod, Mass. "On 6/5/1666, he was hauled to court and fined for purloining the Bible from the Meeting House, £1 for telling a lie about the same, 10 shillings."

Another record is found in Eastham (originally called Nausett). A tiny outpost of English life and civilization, planted upon the "narrow neck of land" between the bleak bay and the bleaker Atlantic. It was here that he married Damaris Bishop It was in 1666 that news began to spread throughout New England of the founding of a colony to the southwest, between the great North [Hudson] and South [Delaware] rivers. The new area was referred to as "the Jerseys," and it had a reputation for being a place where settlers were welcome, the Indians friendly, the soil and climate excellent and a place where religious and civil liberties were guaranteed.

William and Damaris moved to Piscataway, NJ (so named because may settlers in the area had come from the parts of NH and ME that border the Piscataqua River). By 1682, William owned 249 acres of land with a quit rent of one half penny per acre annually.

He was a "pillar of the congregation" at the nearby Woodbridge Meeting. He is listed as at different times as a freeholder, a constable, town clerk and as he aged, he was requested to serve on boards of church discipline and inquiry.

It is recorded that he contributed a "year old steer" to the proposed building of a Meeting House at Woodbridge [apparently to the consternation of the finance committee as they couldn't seem to sell the animal and ended up boarding it for 3 winters at exorbitant rates for the time!].

A little less than a year after Damaris' death, William married Jane Barnes, daughter of John Barnes in Piscataway on 1/3/1683-4.

From the NJ Colonial Documents, E. Jersey Deeds, Liber A:

p. 75 - 2/17/1685/6. Patent to William Suttone of Piscataway, for several parcels, Vizt: 1. a houselot of 22 acres, 19 acres of upland, 79 acres of upland, 4 acres of meadow [properties bounding these are also listed].

p. 98 - 3/25/1687. Patent to William Suttone of Piscataway, for 125 acres there, 25 thereof being due to his wife Jane as headland, the other 100 acres being granted to William Suttone as an old settler..."

p. 159 - 8/28/1693. Writ for election of a Representative in place of Hopewell Hull, dec'd., directed to the Constable of Piscataway, William Sutton, who returns Thomas Fitzrandolph as elected.

Quaker Monthly Meeting records dated 2/18/1706 note that William and his wife Jane were planning to move to Burlington, NJ. Their certificate of approval was signed by Nathaniel FitzRandolph and others. They either ended up not moving or moving back to Piscataway at a later date as William is referred to in Piscataway records of 1713 as an old man.

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The Sutton family tree begins with William, progenitor of the Middlesex-Somerset-Morris County Suttons. On July ll, l666, in Eastham, Mass., he married Damaris, daughter of Richard and Alice Bishop. It was in that same year that tidings began to spread throughout New England of the founding of a colony in the Jerseys where settlers were welcome, the Indians friendly, the soil and climate excellent and civil and religious liberty guaranteed. About l672 William, a Quaker, left Eastham seeking reprieve from Puritan domination. He settled in Piscataqua, or Piscataway, where, thanks to fair dealings with the Indians, only the wolves and the dense forest threatened.

By l682 William Sutton owned several hundred acres of land burdened only by a yearly quit-rent of a half penny. A pillar of the tiny community, he served as freeholder, constable and town clerk. Member of the Quaker congregation that met in nearby Woodbridge, he served his church on the boards of discipline and inquiry. Interestingly, William's sons strayed from the Quaker fold, joining the Baptist or Presbyterian churches.

William Sutton first appears in the Jersey records in l677 when he purchased l20 acres of land. On March 10, 1697/98, the East Jersey Proprietors leased a large tract to William, Thomas, Judah, John and Charles Sutton and others. Sutton's name does not appear after 1713, indicating that he probably died about that time. He was the father of ten children: Alice, Thomas, Mary, John, Judah, Richard, Joseph (died young), Benjamin, Daniel and Joseph [WILL THE RIGHT JEREMIAH SUTTON PLEASE STEP FORWARD?," Warren History, Volume One, No. 3, Spring 1990, http://www.warrennj.org/wths/index.htm].

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William Sutton's Timeline

1641
May 26, 1641
Plymouth, Scituate, Massachusetts, United States
1666
July 11, 1666
Age 25
Cape Cod, MA, USA
1669
November 11, 1669
Age 28
Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts
1671
October 4, 1671
Age 30
Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts, USA
1674
January 24, 1674
Age 32
Piscataway, Middlesex, New Jersey, USA
1676
July 18, 1676
Age 35
Piscataway, New Jersey, United States
1678
1678
Age 36
Piscataway, Middlesex Co, New Jersey, USA
1680
February 24, 1680
Age 38
Piscataway, Middlesex Co., NJ
1681
February 25, 1681
Age 39
Piscataway, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States
1693
September 11, 1693
Age 52
Piscataway, Middlesex Co. NJ