William Trowbridge

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William Trowbridge

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Exeter, Devon, England
Death: Died in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut Colony
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Trowbridge and Elizabeth Trowbridge
Husband of Elizabeth Trowbridge
Father of Deacon Thomas Trowbridge; William Trowbridge; Elizabeth Mallory; James Trowbridge; Margaret Goodwin and 5 others
Brother of Elizabeth Trowbridge; John Trowbridge; Thomas Trowbridge; Deacon James Trowbridge and NN 2 Trowbridge

Occupation: Master of sloop ship "Cocke"
Managed by: Gene
Last Updated:

About William Trowbridge

In 1644, Thomas Trowbridge left his sons in the care of his servant, Henry Gibbons. He remained in close contact with the boys, but never returned to America. Thomas died in Taunton in 1673. Mr. Gibbons was charged by New Haven town authorities with mismanaging the property and moneys of Thomas and the boys (Thomas, William & James) were then placed in the care of Sgt. Thomas Jeffrey and his wife, there they passed their boyhood.

 

It was William who, upon reaching his majority, attempted to bring Mr. Gibbons to an account of the moneys spent during his stewardship:


"William Trowbridge propounded to ye court if he might have an account of his father's estate that was left in New Haven, and for this end presented two letters from his father, one dated March 6, 1655, the other March 4, 1658, wherein his father writes, that he marvells that there is not an account of it given. It was told him that some time has been spent in searching ye records, but it could not be cleared. Wherefore he paying the secretary then ye secretary would afford him that help he could therein to clear it."


"January 3, 1664, William Trowbridge having had a warrant for Henry Gibbons to answer him in action of ye case, was now called to clear this action. He required of Henry Gibbons an account of his father's estate that was left with him when he went to England. Wm. Trowbridge was asked by what authority he had made his demand? He showed a letter of attorney from his father, which being read was allowed and accepted. Henry Gibbons said that he had given him an account as well as he could, but the estate was taken out of his hands by order of authority here and therefore it must be referred to ye records. The records having been looked into formerly and matters not found so clear as was desired and there being much business at this time, the case was referred to another time."


At the county court held at New Haven on June 10, 1664, before James Bishop, assistant and moderator, commissioners and a jury in the case of Trowbridge vs. Gibbons:


"Wm. Trowbridge of New Haven, plaintiff, Henry Gibbons of same place, defendant, in the action of the case for an account of the estate of Mr. Thomas Trowbridge of Taunton in the realm of England mentioned in his letters of attorney dated ye 19th of January, 1662, and sometime in ye possession of trust of ye said Henry ye defendant disposed of and not accounted for."


The records of the transaction concerning the estate were read. Mr. Gibbons made some restitution, in which the plaintiff "seemed to be satisfied".


In 1664 William was master of the sloop COCKE, making many voyages out of New Haven. In July of 1667 he became one of the first residents in the parish of West New Haven. He built his house on Lamberton Farm in which he had received a 1/6th share from his father-in-law, George Lamberton. He owned an additional 144 acres on Long Island Sound near Oyster River. In early West Haven town records William is referred to as a "planter", in later records he is described as a "husbandman".


William was nominated a Freeman (having exclusive rights in the community) of the colony of Connecticut on 13-May-1669. He and his wife, Elizabeth (Lamberton) were admitted as members of the First Church of New Haven on 28-Apr-1686.

-- http://members.aol.com/kjtcet2/trowbridge.htm

William Trowbridge is usually described in the public records of that time as a “planter,” and later as a “husbandman” meaning that he was a gentleman farmer. In 1664, he appears to have been master of the sloop Cocke, making voyages out of New Haven. Probably about that time, he became one of the first residents in the parish of West Haven. He built a house on that part of the Lamberton farm that came into his possession through his wife’s inheritance. His share was one-sixth of the Lamberton farm, and it included all the land between the present day Campbell and Washington avenues from Brown Street nearly to Long Island Sound. William also owned 144 acres on the Sound near Oyster River.

William was nominated a freeman (a person having full citizenship rights) of the colony of Connecticut on May 13, 1669. The “First Church” in New Haven admitted William and his wife as members on April 28, 1686. He lived on his farm in West Haven the remainder of his life. He made gifts to his children during this lifetime of much of his real estate, so that the inventory of his estate mentions only 55 acres of “second division” land and a small amount of personal property. He made no will. William and Elizabeth had ten children all born in New Haven. Those children were: William; Thomas; Elizabeth; James; Margaret; Hannah; Abigail; Samuel; Mary; and Joseph. They were born in that order between 1657 and 1676.

Y-DNA Profile

Three known descendants of William Trowbridge have Y-DNA profiles on record with the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation. The following alleles (among those tested) are matches; therefore one may assume that these Y-DNA values are representative of this branch of the Trowbridge family:

╔═════════╤══════╤═══════╤════════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤═════════╗ DYS385a,bDYS388DYS389IDYS389IIDYS390DYS391DYS392DYS393DYS394/19 ╟─────────┼──────┼───────┼────────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼─────────╢ ║..14,15..│..14..│..12...│...**...│..23..│..11..│..11..│..13..│...14....║ ╚═════════╧══════╧═══════╧════════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧═════════╝

╔══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╗ DYS426DYS437DYS438DYS439DYS441DYS442DYS444DYS445DYS446DYS447 ╟──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────╢ ║..11..│..16..│..10..│..11..│..17..│..17..│..**..│..11..│..13..│..23..║ ╚══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╝

╔══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤══════╤═════════╤══════╤══════╗ DYS448DYS449DYS452DYS454DYS455DYS456DYS458DYS459a,bDYS460DYS461 ╟──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼──────┼─────────┼──────┼──────╢ ║..20..│..28..│..31..│..11..│...8..│..14..│..15..│...8,9...│..10..│..**..║ ╚══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧══════╧═════════╧══════╧══════╝

╔══════╤══════╤═════════════╤═════════╤════════╤════════╤═════════╤═════════╗ DYS462DYS463DYS464a,b,c,dGGAAT1B07YCAIIa,bYGATAA10Y-GATA-C4GATA H4.1 ╟──────┼──────┼─────────────┼─────────┼────────┼────────┼─────────┼─────────╢ ║..13..│..21..│.12,14,14,15.│...11....│.19,21..│...15...│...21....│...11....║ ╚══════╧══════╧═════════════╧═════════╧════════╧════════╧═════════╧═════════╝

The non-matching alleles (designated "**") are likely due to mutation, and were found to be as follows:

Descendant of Sylvester Trowbridge:

  • DYS389II = 28
  • DYS444 = 13
  • DYS461 = 12

Descendant of Ira Benjamin Trowbridge:

  • DYS389II = 30
  • DYS444 = 12
  • DYS461 = 13

Descendant of Richard Harry Trowbridge:

  • DYS389II = not tested
  • DYS444 = not tested
  • DYS461 = 12

Note that the last two tested subjects are rather closely related (third cousins, twice removed), so the mutation in DYS461 occurred recently, within the past five generations.

This Y-DNA profile for the Trowbridge family can be categorized as follows:

Haplogroup: I (M170); Subgroup: I1 (M253); Ext. modal haplotype: I1a-uN (ultra-Norse)

This haplotype originated in northern Scandinavia, and is the most common haplotype presently found in the Norwegian population.

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-------------------- William Trowbridge was brought in childhood by his parents from England, first to Dorchester in the Massachusetts Bay colony, and then to the plantation of NewHaven. When his father was called back to England, he and his brothers were left in charge of his father's former servant, Henry Gibbons. The latter mismanaged the property left for the boys' support, and after a time they were taken away from him by the town authorities and put under the care of Sergt. Thomas Jeffrey and his wife, and in their home William and his brothers passed their boyhood. His school master was Mr. Ezekiel Cheever. Soon after reaching his majority William Trowbridge made an attempt to bring Gibbons to an account for his stewardship. His efforts were continued over a series of years, but gained little result during his father's lifetime. A few years after the latter's death Gibbons made some restitution, as has been printed on a previous page. "William Trowbridge propounded to ye Court if he might have an account of his father's estate that was left in New Haven, and for this end presented two letters from his father, one dated March 6, 1655, the other March 4, 1658, wherein his father writes, that he marvells that there is not an account of it given. It was told him that some time has been spent in searching ye records, but it could no.t be cleared, wherefore he paying the Secretary then ye Secretary would afford him what help he could therein to cleare it." "January 3, 1664, William Trowbridge having had a warrant for Henry Gibbons to answer him in an action of ye case, was now called to enter his action. He required of Henry Gibbons an account of his father's estate that was left with him when he went for England. Wm. Trowbridge was asked by what authority he made this demand? He showed a letter of attorney from his father, which being read was allowed and accepted. Henry Gibbons said that he had given him an accompt as well as he could, but the estate, he said, was taken out of his hands by order of the authority here, & therefore it must be referred to ye records. But the records having been looked into formerly and matters not found so cleare as was desired & there being much business at this tyme, the case was referred to another time." "At a County Court held at New Haven June 10, 1674," before James Bishop, assistant and moderator, the assistants, commissioners and a jury, in the case of Trowbridge vs. Gibbons. "Wm. Trowbridge of New Haven or his lawful attornie, plaintif. Henry Gibbons of the same place, defendant, in the action of the case for an accompt of the estate of Mr. Thomas Trowbridge of Taunton in the realm of England mentioned in his letters of Attornie dated ye 19th of January, 1C62, and sometime in y" possession or trust of ye said Henry ye defendant disposed of & not accounted for." "In the action wherein Wm. Trowbridge is Plaintif & Henry Gibbons Contra Defend- ant : after the Records of the transaction about the estate were read. The Court saw not cause to admit the protest. In which the plaintif seemed to rest satisfied." William Trowbridge is usually described in the public records of that time as a "planter," and later on as a "husbandman." In 1664 he appears to have been master of the sloop Cocke, making voyages out of New Haven. In July, 1667, he sold his house and lot in the village of New Haven, and probably about that time became one of the first residents in the parish of WestHaven. He probably built a house on that part of the "Lamberton Farm" that through his wife eventually came into his possession.* His share was one-sixth of the Lamberton farm, and it included all the land between the present Campbell and Washington avenues from Brown street (the site of the piano factory) nearly to Long Island Sound. He also owned 144 acres on the Sound near Oyster river. William Trowbridge was nominated a freeman of the colony of Connecticut on May 13, 1669. He lived on his farm in West Haven the remainder of his life. He made gifts to his children during his lifetime of much of his real estate, so that the inventory of his estate mentions but 55 acres of "second division" land and a small amount of personal property. He made no will. He and his wife were admitted members of the First Church in New Haven on April 28, 1686.

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William Trowbridge's Timeline

1633
September 3, 1633
Exeter, Devon, England
September 3, 1633
Exeter, Devon, England
September 3, 1633
Exeter, Devonshire, England at St. Mary Arches
September 3, 1633
St Petrock, Exeter, Devon., Eng.
1633
Exeter, Devon, England
1657
March 9, 1657
Age 24
Milford, New Haven Colony
November 12, 1657
Age 24
West Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
1659
October 2, 1659
Age 26
New Haven, New Haven Colony
1661
January 5, 1661
Age 28
West Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
1664
March 26, 1664
Age 31
New Haven, New Haven Colony