William X, Duke of Aquitaine

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Guillaume X 'le Toulousain' ou 'le Saint' d'Aquitaine, X Duc d'Aquitaine VIII Comte de Poitou

Nicknames: "Also known as William X of Poitiers Duke of Aquitaine", "Duke William X /Toulousan/", "Guillaume X /Duke Of Aquitaine/", "Guillaume X /Aquitaine/", "William VIII or X /D'AQUITAINE/", "nicknamed the Saint", "William X Duke of Aquitaine", "X Duc d'Aquitaine", "VIII Comt..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Toulouse, Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France
Death: Died in Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Galicia, Spain
Cause of death: Illness
Place of Burial: Compostela Cathedral, Galicia, Spain
Immediate Family:

Son of Guillaume IX le Troubadour, duc d'Aquitaine and Philippa de Toulouse, comtesse de Poitiers
Husband of Emma de Limoges and Aénor de Châtellerault, duchess of Aquitaine
Father of Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of France and England; Petronilla (Alix) (Pernelle) d'Aquitaine and Guillaume d'Aquitaine
Brother of Inés de Poitou, reina consorte de Aragón; Adélaïde de Poitiers; Raymond of Poitiers, Prince of Antioch; aimar /i/ d'aquitaine and Henri de Poitiers, Abbé de Cluny

Occupation: Duke of Aquitaine, Duke, Conde de Poitiers de 1126 a 1137 - duque de Aquitania, Duque da Gasconia e da Aquitancia, Burke says he died in 1156. Some call him William VIII., Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) between 1126 and 1137
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Guillaume X 'le Toulousain' ou 'le Saint' d'Aquitaine, X Duc d'Aquitaine VIII Comte de Poitou

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy:

GUILLAUME d'Aquitaine (1099-Santiago de Compostela 9 Apr 1137, bur Santiago de Compostela). The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the birth in 1099 of "Willelmo comiti…filius æquivoce Guillelmus"[479]. William of Tyre names him and his father[480]. Robert of Torigny names "Guillermum…pater…Alienor reginæ Anglorum" as the son of "Guillermus comes Pictavensis et dux Aquitanorum" & his wife "filia [comitis Tolosani fratris Raimundi comitis Sancti Ægidii]"[481]. He succeeded his father in 1126 as GUILLAUME X Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VIII Comte de Poitou. “Guillelmus comes Pictaviensis et dux Aquitanorum” confirmed rights of “monachi Monasterii Novi Pictaviensis” granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 1129[482]. “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[483]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1136 that "Guillaume comte de Poitou et prince d'Aquitaine" died while on pilgrimage at "Saint-Jacques…la veille de Pâques" and was buried there[484].

m firstly ELEONORE de Châtellerault, daughter of AMAURY [I] Vicomte de Châtellerault & his wife Amauberge "Dangereuse"[485] --- (-after Mar 1130). “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[486]. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not so far been identified.

m secondly (1136) as her second husband, EMMA de Limoges, widow of BARDON de Cognac, daughter of ADEMAR [III] "le Barbu" Comte de Limoges & his [second wife Marie des Cars]. The Chronicon Gaufredi Vosiensis names "aliam filiam [Ademari]…Ennoa (seu Emma)" stating that she married "Guillermus Dux, frater Raymundi Antiochiæ principis" after the death of her earlier husband "Bardoni de Coniaco", before being abducted by "Willelmus Sector-ferri, filius Wlgrini Comitis Engolismensis"[487]. She married thirdly (after 1137) as his first wife, Guillaume d'Angoulême, who succeeded his father in 1140 as Guillaume VI "Taillefer" Comte d'Angoulême.

Duke Guillaume X & his first wife had three children:

a) ELEONORE d'Aquitaine (Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or Château de Belin, Guyenne or Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux 1122-Abbaye de Fontevrault 1 Apr 1204, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" as wife of "regi Francie Ludovico"[488]. “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[489]. She succeeded her father in 1137 as ELEONORE Dss d’Aquitaine, Ctss de Poitou, Ctss de Saintonge, Angoûmois, Limousin, Auvergne, Bordeaux et Agen. She left France with her husband in Jun 1147 on the Second Crusade[490]. She was crowned Queen Consort of England with her husband 19 Dec 1154 at Westminster Abbey. She supported the revolt of her sons against their father in 1173, was captured and imprisoned in the château de Chinon, later at Salisbury until 1179. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XII Kal Apr" [1204] of "regina Alienor" and her burial "ad Fontem Ebraldi"[491]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the burial of "uxor [regis Henrici] regina Alienordis" in the same abbey as her husband[492]. m firstly (Bordeaux, Cathedral of Saint-André 22 Jul 1137, annulled for reasons of consanguinity Château de Beaugency 21 Mar 1152) as his first wife, LOUIS associate King of France, son of LOUIS VI "le Gros/le Batailleur" King of France & his wife Adélaïde de Maurienne [Savoy] (1120-Paris, Palais Royal de la Cité 18/19 Sep 1180, bur Abbaye cistercienne de Notre-Dame-de-Barbeaux near Fontainebleau, transferred 1817 to l'église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He succeeded his father in 1137 as LOUIS VII "le Jeune/le Pieux" King of France. He was crowned Duke of Aquitaine, in right of his first wife, 8 Aug 1137 at Bordeaux. m secondly (Poitiers or Bordeaux Cathedral 18 May 1152) HENRI Duke of Normandy, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine, son of GEOFFROY "le Bel/Plantagenet" Comte d'Anjou et de Maine & his wife [Empress] Matilda [Maud] of England (Le Mans, Anjou 5 Mar 1133-Château de Chinon 6 Jul 1189, bur Abbaye de Fontevrault). He was recognised as HENRY II King of England after the death of Stephen 25 Oct 1154, he was crowned in Westminster Abbey 19 Dec 1154.

b) GUILLAUME d'Aquitaine (-[3 Mar 1130/9 Apr 1137]). “Willelmus…dux Aquitanorum” donated property to “ecclesiæ B. Hilarii de Cella” (La Celle, outside Poitiers) granted by “Gaufredus avus et Guillelmus pater mei” by charter dated 3 Mar 1130, subscribed by “Willielmi ducis Aquitanorum, Aenordis comitissæ, Alienordis filiæ eorum, Wilelmi Aigres filii eorum”[493].

c) AELIS [Petronille] d'Aquitaine ([1125]-after 24 Oct 1151, bur St Arnould in Crépy). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines specifies that "Alienor Guilielmi filia comits Pictavorum et Aquitanie ducis" had two sisters one of whom married "Radulfus…comes Perone et Veromandie", although he does not name them[494]. The Historiæ Tornacenses record the wife of "Radulfem comitem" as "germanam Alienore regine Francorum" but also do not name her[495]. Robert of Torigny refers to the mother of the infant children of "Radulfus de Perrona comes Viromandorum" as "iuniore filia Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum" but he does not name her either[496]. The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis names "Eléonore et Pétronille" as the two daughters of "Guillaume comte de Poitou et prince d'Aquitaine", recording in 1142 that Pétronille married "Raoul comte de Vermandois" after he repudiated his first wife[497]. m (1142) as his second wife, RAOUL I "le Vaillant" Comte de Vermandois, son of HUGUES "le Maisné" de France Comte de Vermandois & his wife Adelais Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy ([1094]-13 Oct 1152, bur Priory of Saint-Arnoul de Crépy).

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_X,_Duke_of_Aquitaine

and in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_X_de_Poitiers

William X (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William IX by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: Willelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus ("a son was born to Count William, named William like himself"). Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Aenor de Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121. He had from her three children: Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy; Petronilla, who married Raoul I of Vermandois; and William Aigret, who died young.

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

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Guillaume X de Poitiers1, dit le Toulousain ou le Saint, né en 1099 à Toulouse est le dernier des comtes de Poitiers de la dynastie des Ramnulfides.

Il règne de 1126 à 1137 sous le nom de Guillaume VIII, comte de Poitiers et duc d’Aquitaine sous le nom de Guillaume X. Il est le fils de Guillaume le Troubadour, auquel il succède, et de Philippa, fille du comte de Toulouse Guillaume IV.

Il s’allie contre la Normandie au comte d’Anjou Geoffroy le Bel. Tranquille sur sa frontière nord, il doit par contre longtemps guerroyer au sud pour contraindre son vassal d’Aunis, Isembert de Châtelaillon.

Mal inspiré, il soutient avec le légat Girard d’Angoulême l’antipape Anaclet II, pendant cinq ans, à partir de 1130 et jusqu’à une entrevue avec Bernard de Clairvaux au château de Parthenay.

Il meurt le 9 avril (jour du Vendredi saint 1137) au cours d’un pèlerinage à Saint-Jacques-de-Compostelle, il prie dans ses dernières volontés le roi de France Louis VI le Gros de bien vouloir consentir à marier son fils Louis à sa fille aînée, Aliénor d'Aquitaine.

Il devient, à la fin du Moyen Âge, un personnage de légende, en partie confondu avec Guillaume de Gellone et saint Guillaume de Maleval, à l’origine de l’ordre des Guillemites. Unions et descendance

Il épouse en 1118 ou en 1121, Aénor de Châtellerault, fille d'Aymeric Ier.

   Aliénor d’Aquitaine (1122 ou 1124-1204)
   Pétronille d’Aquitaine (1125-1153)
   Guillaume Aigret (1126-1130)

En secondes noces, il épouse Emma de Limoges, fille du vicomte Adémar III († 1139), dit "le Barbu", et veuve de Bardon de Cognac.

_____________________

William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was duke of Aquitaine, duke of Gascony and count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William, the troubadour by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Ænor of Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121.

He had from her three children:

Aliaenor, or Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy

Aelith, who married Raoul I of Vermandois

William Aigret, who died young

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

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http://www.languedoc-france.info/190202_aquitaine.htm

William X, Duke of Aquitaine "the Saint" (1099 – April 9, 1137)

The Name in Occitan. Click here to find out more about occitan. Guilhèm X duc d'Aquitània e de Gasconha, Guilhèm VIII comte de Peitieus

The Name in French Guilaume X duc d'Aquitaine

William was Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. Later that same year, 1126, his father William IX mortgaged Toulouse to his wife's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse. His wife, Philippa of Toulouse was less than pleased, and less pleased still when he then left on Crusade. Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers.

Long after William IX's return, he took up with the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, although the strife seems to have been resolved when the younger William married Ænor of Châtellerault (the daughter of his father's mistress) in 1121. The couple had three children:

   * Aliaenor, or Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy;
   * Aelith ( aka Petronilla), who married Raoul I of Vermandois;
   * William Aigret, who died young.

William's wife Ænor and their son William Aigret both died in 1130.

Like his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and gave his two daughters an excellent education - just one example of the gap between the sophisticated culture of Occitania and the rest of western Christendom (It was rare enough to give boys a good education, and generally considered "unnatural" and even blasphemous to educated girls. Senior churchmen objected loudly and often).

William became involved in conflicts with Normandy and France. Inside his own borders he faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, happily resolved by total destruction of the enemies.

In 1137, Duke William X set out from Poitiers to Bordeaux, taking his daughters with him. In Bordeaux, he left Eleanor and Petronilla in the charge of the Archbishop of Bordeaux who could be entrusted with the safety of the Duke's daughters. The Duke then set out for the Shrine of Saint James of Compostela in North-western Spain, in the company of other pilgrims; however, on 9th April (Good Friday) 1137 he was stricken with sickness, probably food poisoning. He died that evening, having bequeathed Aquitaine to his fifteen-year-old daughter, Eleanor. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to have King Louis VI of France as protector of Eleanor, and to charge him with finding her a suitable husband. Louis VI, putting his own interests first, as ever, married Eleanor the new Duchess of Aquitaine to his own son, also called Louis, later King Louis VII.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_X_of_Aquitaine

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William X (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William IX by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: Willelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus ("a son was born to Count William, named William like himself"). Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Ænor of Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121. He had from her three children: Aliaenor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy; Aelith, who married Raoul I of Vermandois; and William Aigret, who died young.

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

[edit] See also

Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

[edit] Sources

Parsons, John Carmi. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady, 2002

French nobility

Preceded by

William IX Duke of Aquitaine

1126–1137 Succeeded by

Eleanor

Count of Poitiers

1126–1137

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_X,_Duke_of_Aquitaine"

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William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was duke of Aquitaine, duke of Gascony and count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William, the troubadour by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Ænor of Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121.

He had from her three children:

Aliaenor, or Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy

Aelith, who married Raoul I of Vermandois

William Aigret, who died young

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wikipedia:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_X._%28Aquitanien%29

William X, Duke of Aquitaine

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Coin of William X, 8.90g.

William X (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William IX by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: Willelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus ("a son was born to Count William, named William like himself"). Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Aenor de Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121. He had from her three children: Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy; Petronilla, who married Raoul I of Vermandois; and William Aigret, who died young.

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

[edit] References

   * Parsons, John Carmi. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady, 2002

French nobility

Preceded by

William IX Duke of Aquitaine

1126 – 1137 Succeeded by

Eleanor

Count of Poitiers

1126 – 1137

--------------------

William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was duke of Aquitaine, duke of Gascony and count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William, the troubadour by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Ænor of Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121.

He had from her three children:

  1. Aliaenor, or Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy
  2. Aelith, who married Raoul I of Vermandois
  3. William Aigret, who died young

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strived to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

See also: Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

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BIOGRAPHY: General Notes:

Saint, Duke of AQUITAINE, Count of POITOU.

BOOKS

The Political History of England, Vol II, George Burton Adams Longmans Green and Co, 1905, Ch IX, p210:

"In September, 1136, central Normandy was the scene of another useless and savage raid of Geoffrey of Anjou, accompanied by William, the last duke of Aquitaine, William Talvas, and others. They penetrated the country as far as Lisieux, treating the churches and servants of God, says Orderic Vitalis, after the manner of theheathen, but were obliged to retreat; and finally, though he had been joined by Matilda, Geoffrey, badly wounded, abandoned this attempt also and returned to Anjou."

p212: "...When William, Duke of Aquitaine, returned from his expedition with Geoffrey, he seems to have been troubled in his conscience by his heathenish deeds in Normandy, and he made a pilgrimage to St James of Compostella to seek the pardon of heaven. In this he seemed to be successful, and he died there beforethe altar of the apostle, with all the comforts of religion. When he knew that his end was approaching, he besought his barons to carry out the plan which he had formed of conveying the duchy to the king of France, with the hand of his daughter and heiress Eleanor for his son Louis. The proposition was gladly accepted, the marriage took place in July at Bordeaux..."

Eleanor of Aquitaine the Mother Queen, Desmond Seward, 1978, Dorset Press, p17:

"William X, Eleanor's father, was almost as cultured as William IX, just as colourful and still more pugnacious. He was a patron of poets and there were many troubadours at his court, including foreigners from Aragon, Castile, and Navarre, and from Italy, and there was evena Welshman called Bledhri. When this duke died, his Gascon friend Cercamon wrote a lament that mourned his passing and the end of his munificence. However, William X was better known for quarrelling than for verses. A man of huge physique and enormous strength, he was an outsize personality in every way. He was said to eat enough for eight ordinary mortals at each meal. He was unwise enough to involve himself in the Church schism that began in 1130, supporting the anti-pope Anacletusagainst Innocent II; he menaced prelates and ignored excommunications and interdicts that stopped the bells ringing in entire dioceses. He was completely undaunted by the threats of divine punishment that issued from the redoubtable abbot of Clairvaux, St Bernard, and refused to remove a schismatic bishop. When Bernard deliberately entered his territory and publicly celebrated mass at Parthenay, the duke burst into the church in full armour, to teach the infuriating monk a lesson. However, William had met his match. Bernard advanced on him, holding up the consecrated Host, and spoke to such effect that the duke fell to the ground rigid with fear and foaming at the mouth. But although he had lost his battle with the Church, William in no way abated his quarrelsomeness when dealing with his vassals; only his death prevented the whole of the Limousin from rising in revolt...

"...William X seems to have been noticeably fond of his eldest daughter, making herhis constant companion. In consequence, Eleanor's childhood was passed under many roofs. Like all rulers of the high Middle Ages, her father was perpetually on progress- administering justice and bringing rebellious vassals to heel- and Eleanorwent with him..."

p21: "On Good Friday 1137, despite his strength, Duke William X died at Compostella, where he had gone to pray to St James the Apostle, and was buried under the high altar at Compostella..."

A History of the Plantagenets, Vol I, The Conquering Family, Thomas B Costain, Doubleday & Co, Garden City, 1949, p37:

"Duke William ruled Aquitaine and he was very old. He had one son who had gone to the Crusades and who was so good that the people called him St. William. The old man had not been a saint by any means but had spent a large part of his life wandering up and down his broad domain looking for romance, and always finding it. He now wanted to abdicate and spend his last years as a pilgrim andpenitent, having in full degree that fear of the hereafter and the torments of hell which motivated so much of what happened in those days. His saintly son had two daughters only, Eleanor and Petonille, both of whom took after their grandfather.

"When Eleanor was fifteen and already recognized as Queen of the Courts of Love, her father died..."

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Guillermo el Tolosano, nació en 1099 y fue el último conde de Poitiers y de la dinastía de los Rammulfides.

Reinó de 1126 a 1137 con el nombre de Guillermo VIII, conde de Poitiers, duque de Aquitania con el nombre de Guillermo X.

Era hijo de Guillermo el Trovador, al que sucedió, y de Philippa, hija del conde de Toulouse, Guillermo IV.

Se alía contra Normandía, con el conde de Anjou Geoffroy el Bello que, mientras permanece sin problemas en su frontera, Guillermo tiene que luchar durante, mucho tiempo en el sur, para combatir a su vasallo Aunis, Isembert de Châtelaillon.

Mal aconsejado, desde 1130, apoya durante cinco años junto con el legado Girar d’Angulême al anti-Papa Anacleto II, actitud que depone tras una entrevista con san Bernardo de Claraval en el castillo de Parthenay.

Muerto en el transcurso de una peregrinación a Santiago de Compostela pidió, en sus últimas voluntades, al rey de Francia Luis VI el Gordo que consintiera el matrimonio entre su hijo Luis y su hija mayor Leonor de Aquitania.

A finales de la Edad Media se convirtió en un personaje de leyenda, en parte confundido con Guillermo de Gellone y Guillermo de Maleval, fundador de los guillemites.

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William X, Duke of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William X (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William IX by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: Willelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus ("a son was born to Count William, named William like himself"). Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Ænor of Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121. He had from her three children: Aliaenor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy; Aelith, who married Raoul I of Vermandois; and William Aigret, who died young.

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

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Guillaume VIII/X Duc d'Aquitaine was born in 1099 in Toulouse, Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrenees, France. He died on 9 Apr 1137 in Saint Jacques-de-Compostelle, Spain. He was married to Alienor de Chatellerault in 1121. Alienor de Chatellerault was born in 1103 in Chatellerault, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France. She died after Mar 1130. Nicknamed the Saint was Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. William was born in Toulouse. He was the son of William, the Troubador by his repudiated wife, Philippa of Toulouse. His younger brother was Raymond of Poitiers, ruler of the principality of Antioch, a crusader state. He married (Aenor) Eleanor of Chastellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121 and from her had three children: William Aigret, who died young; the heiress Eleanor of Aquitaine; and Petronilla of Aquitaine, who married Raoul I of Vermandois .As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature . He was an educated man and strived to give his two daughters an excellent education in a time when Europe's rulers where hardly literate. When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court in of Europe's center of knowledge. Despite his love of the arts, William was not a peaceful man and was frequently involved in conflicts with the neighboring Normandy (which he raided in 1136) and France . Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent. In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see King Louis VII of France as protector of his fifteen year old daughter Eleanor. Louis VII accepted this wish and married the heiress of Aquitaine.

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William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was duke of Aquitaine, duke of Gascony and count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William, the troubadour by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Ænor of Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121.

He had from her three children:

Aliaenor, or Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy

Aelith, who married Raoul I of Vermandois

William Aigret, who died young

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William X (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William IX by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: Willelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus ("a son was born to Count William, named William like himself"). Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Aenor de Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121. He had from her three children: Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy; Petronilla, who married Raoul I of Vermandois; and William Aigret, who died young.

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

[edit] References

   * Parsons, John Carmi. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady, 2002

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William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was duke of Aquitaine, duke of Gascony and count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William, the troubadour by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son were left in Poitiers. Long after Duke William's return, he took up with Dangereuse, the wife of one of his vassals, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until William married Ænor of Châtellerault, daughter of his father's mistress, in 1121.

He had from her three children:

Aliaenor, or Eleanor, who would later become heiress to the Duchy

Aelith, who married Raoul I of Vermandois

William Aigret, who died young

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strived to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

When Eleanor succeeded him as Duchess, she continued William's tradition and transformed the Aquitanian court into Europe's centre of knowledge.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

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William X of Aquitaine, nicknamed "the Saint," was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitiers (as William VIII of Poitiers) between 1126 and 1137.

As his father before him, William X was a patron of troubadours, music and literature. He was an educated man and strove to give his two daughters an excellent education, in a time when Europe's rulers were hardly literate.

William was both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey le Bel of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_X_of_Aquitaine for more information.

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AKA: Count of Poitou & William the Toulousan. William was a spirited man, whose vast domains covered a quarter of what would now be France. Resided in a castle at Poitiers on the river Clain. Was excommunicated in 1135 due to his support of the French candidate for pope. Died Saint Jacques-de-Compostelle. William died from polluted water (developed a fever), in the early spring while on a pilgrimage to Compostella.

Sources:

The book, 'Richard the Lion-Hearted', by John Gillingham.

Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia.

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Great Britain'.

The book, 'Eleanor of Aquitaine'.

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe'.

The book, 'Medieval Queens'.

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DUQUES DE AQUITANIA

1) Significado: La palabra "Aquitania" procede de "Occitania", es decir, la región más occidental de la Galias durante la dominación romana.

2) Casa solar: Aquitania, Francia. Ver mapa de Aquitania. Era una de las partes en las que se hallaba dividida la Galia, al sur oeste. Antiguamente estaba constituida por más de 20 pueblos o gentes, ninguno muy numeroso. Los aquitani siempre fueron considerados más afines a los iberos de España que a los galos. La lengua tenía una clara afinidad con la onomástica vasca. Gascuña, al sur del Garona, formaba parte de la Aquitania. Los romanos, entorno al año del nacimiento de Cristo, la dividieron en tres "Aquitanias". Durante la administración visigótica (a partir del año 416 d.C.) la Aquitania forma una unidad con su centro en Clermont Ferrand. Durante la dominación franca Aquitania pierde unidad por ser considerada como tierra de disputa entre los descendientes de Clodoveo. A principios del siglo VII el rey Dagoberto I entrega la Aquitania a su hermano Cariberto II como un "glacis aquitánico" que comprendía los condados de Tolosa, Cahors, Agen, Perigueux y Sanites, con capital en Toulouse. Estos condados desgajados volvieron a las manos de Dagoberto por la muerte de su hermano a mediados del siglo VII. Sin embargo, un hijo de Cariberto II de Neustria, llamado Boggis, se convierte en el primer duque de Gascuña (ver Duques de Gascuña) y principal señor de Aquitania. El bisabuelo de Carlomagno, Pipino de Hiristal, tuvo que luchar con Eudes (hijo de Boggis) por el dominio de la Aquitania. En época de Carlomagno, Aquitania fue constituida como reino e incluido en la Marca Hispánica. Luis "el Piadoso" gobernó Aquitania y luego también Carlos "el Calvo", que dividió el territorio de la antigua Aquitania dando una parte, en feudo, al duque de Poitiers y conde de Auvernia, Gerardo I, que estaba casado con una hermanastra suya, Rotruda. Los territorios desgajados por Carlos "el Calvo" (Poitou, Angomois, Saintogne) formaron el segundo ducado de Aquitania (el primero, la Guyena, quedó en la corona francesa de los capetos), que permaneció durante tres siglos en la Casa de Auvernia. Este territorio se enriqueció en el siglo XI con la anexión de la Gascuña. En 1137, al morir Guillermo VIII (ó X), último duque de Aquitania, Leonor su hija, casó con Enrique Plantagenet, rey de Inglaterra. De esta manera, el ducado de Aquitania quedó anexionado oficialmente a la corona inglesa, el año de 1203.

3) Armas: En campo de gules un leopardo de oro (De gueules, au léopard d'or). Es el blasón del Ducado de Guyena.

4) Antepasados:

I. Luis "el Piadoso" de Aquitania nació en Casseneuil-sur-Garonne, Francia, el 9-X-778. Murió en Ingelheim, Rhinehessen, Hesse, el 27-VIII-840. Casó tres veces (todos los descendientes que señalamos son antepasados de nuestra familia): 1) con Teodolinda de Sens (ver nota 1), de la cual, antes de 794, tuvo por hija a Alpaïs de Francia; 2) con Ermengarda de Haspengau (ver nota 2) casó en 798 y tuvo tres hijos: Lotario I de Francia (795), Rotruda de Aquitania (803, que sigue) y Luis "el Germánico" de Alemania (806); 3) con Judith de Baviera (ver nota 3) casó en febrero de 718/19 y también tuvo tres hijos: Gisela de Francia (c.818-820), Carlos II "el Calvo" (20-VIII-823) y Adelaida de Francia (824). Para la descendencia de cada uno de los hijos y nietos de Ludovico Pío, ver Carolingios.

II. Rotruda de Aquitania nació el año de 803. Murió el 2-X-860. Casó, en 819, con Gerardo I de Auvernia (ver nota 4). Carlos "el Calvo", hermanastro de Rotruda, dió en feudo parte del territorio de Aquitania, a Gerardo de Auvernia, de tal modo que los condes de Auvernia y duques de Poitiers, recibieron el llamado segundo ducado de Aquitania (el primero era la Guyena, que quedó anexionado a la corona desde el año 967). Gerardo y Rotruda tuvieron por hijo a

III. Ranulfo I, duque de Poitiers nació hacia el año de 818. Casó con Aldetruda de Maine (ver nota 5). Tuvieron por hijo a

IV. Ranulfo II, duque de Poitiers nació en 835 y murió el 12-X-890. Casó con Ermengarda y tuvieron por hijo a

V. Ebles Manzer, duque de Aquitania nació en 889 y murió en 935. Casó en 911 con Emiliana. Tuvieron por hijo a

VI. Guillermo III, duque de Aquitania y conde de Poitou nació en el año de 915. Murió el 27-VI-963. Casó, en 935, con Adela de Normandía, hija de Roberto I, duque de Normandía (ver Duques de Normandía), y Poppa de Bayeux de Senlis , condesa de Valois (ver nota 6). Tuvo por hijos a Guillermo IV "Fierabras" (935, que sigue), Alicia (o Adela) de Poitou (945, que casó con Hugo Capeto, rey de Francia, entre junio y agosto del 968: ver Reyes Capetos) y a otra hija, que nació hacia el año 950 (que casó en 972 con Gilberto I de Roucy: ver nota 7).

VII. Guillermo IV "Fierabras", duque de Aquitania nació el año 935. Murió el 28-IV-996. Casó con Emma de Blois (de Champagne) (ver nota 8). Tuvieron por hijo a

VIII. Guillermo V de Poitou, duque de Aquitania nació el año de 969. Murió el 13-V-1030 en Maillezais, Francia. Casó con Inés de Borgoña (ver nota 9). Tuvieron tres hijos que son antepasados de nuestra familia: 1) Inés de Poitou (c.1020, ver nota 10), 2) Guillermo VI de Aquitania (c.1024-1027, que sigue) y 3) Beatriz de Aquitania (c.1030, ver nota 11).

IX. Guillermo VI, duque de Aquitania nació entre 1024 y 1027. Murió el 5-I-1086/87. Casó hacia 1068 con Hildegarda (Aldegarda) de Borgoña (ver nota 12). Tuvieron por hijo a

X. Guillermo VII, duque de Aquitania nació el año de 1071. Murió en 1127. Casó con Philipe (Matilde Maud) (Regent) de Toulouse (ver nota 13). Tuvieron por hijo a

XI. GUILLERMO VIII, DUQUE DE AQUITANIA nació en 1099 en Toulouse, Francia. Murió el 6-VIII-1137 en Santiago de Compostela, España. Casó con LEONOR DE CHASTELLERAULT DE ROCHEFOUCAU (ver nota 14).

XII. Leonor, duquesa de Aquitania y reina de Inglaterra nació el año de 1122. Murió el 28-VII-1204. Casó con Enrique II Plantagenet, duque de Normandía y rey de Inglaterra (ver Casa de Anjou). Tuvieron por hijos a Guillermo (1156), Enrique el Jóven (1183; casado con Margarita de Francia, hija de Luis VII), Matilde (casada con Enrique el León, duque de Sajonia), Ricardo Corazón de León (1199; casado con Berenguela de Navarra, hija de Sancho el Sabio), Geofredo (1187; casado con Constanza de Bretaña), Leonor (casada con Alfonso VIII de Castilla), Juana (casada con Guillermo II de Sicilia y luego con Raimundo VI de Tolosa), y Juan sin Tierra (1216; padre de Enrique III, 1272). Nuestra familia desciende de Leonor de Inglaterra (ver Casa de Anjou).

NOTAS:

[1] Teodolinda de Sens nació hacia el año de 775. Murió hacia el 794. Sus padres fueron Gainfroy de Sens y Teolodlina de Blisgau. Hermano suyo fue Giselberto de Maasgau, también antepasado de nuestra familia, que fue padre de Giselberto I de Maasgau, casado con Ermengarda de Alemania (hija de Lotario I de Francia y Enmengarda de Tours; ver Carolingios). Teodolinda de Sens fue madre, antes de 794, de Alpaïs de Francia (794-852), casada con el conde de París, Begón.

[2] Ermengarda de Haspengau nació el año de 780 en Hesbaye, Lieja, Bélgica. Casó con Ludovico Pío en 798. Murió el 10-XII-818 en Angers. Su padre fue el conde Ingermar de Hesbaye, natural de Lieja, Bélgica.

[3] Judith von Altdorf, de Baviera nació el año de 805. Casó en Aquisgrán, en febrero de 818/19, con Ludovico Pío. Murió en Tours, el 26-VI-843, tres años después de su marido. Sus pares fueron Welf de Suabia, conde de Andech y Baviera, y Heilwig de Sajonia. Tuvo dos hermanos también antepasados nuestros: Conrado I de Auxerre (que casó con Adelaida de Tours, hija de Hugo I de Tours) y Emma von Altdorf (casada con Luis el Germánico). Ver la Casa de Welf.

[4] Gerardo I de Auvernia fue hijo de Geroldo III de Vitzgau y nieto de Imma de Alemania, que era biznieta de Teodorico III de Neustria y Santa Clotilde de Metz: ver Reyes Francos.

[5] Aldetruda de Maine fue hija de Roricon II de Maine y Bilechilda; Roricon era nieto de Carlomagno a través de su madre: ver Carolingios.

[6] Poppa de Bayeux de Senlis fue hija de Pipino III Beranger de Senlis, y de una hija de Gurwant de Rennes (hijo de Nominoe, duque de Bretaña). Pipino III era hijo de Pipino II "Quintin", conde de Vermandois, y de Rothaïde de Bobbio. A su vez, Pipino II de Vermandois, era hijo de Bernardo de Lombardía (nieto de Carlomagono) y Cunegunda de Gellón, hija de San Guillermo de Gellón y, por tanto, biznieta de Carlos Martel. Ver Carolingios. Rothaïe de Bobbio también era nieta de San Guillermo Gellón conde Toulouse, que casó en segundas nupcias con Witburge de Hornbach, descendiente de los condes de Tréveris.

[7] Gilberto I de Roucy (951) era hijo del conde Renaud de Roucy (917 a 8-VI-973) y de Aubree de Lorena (930 a c.993). Tuvo una hermana llamada Ermetruda de Roucy que casó con el conde Otón Guillermo Macon de Borgoña (ver Condes de Borgoña). Renaud de Roucy era hijo de Heriberto II de Vermandois (ver Vermandois) e Hildebranda de Neustria (hija de Roberto, rey de Francia: ver Capetos). Aubree de Lorena era hija de Giselberto de Hainaut (hijo de Raniero I de Hainaut: ver Condes de Flandes y Hainaut) y Gerberga de Sajonia (hija de Enrique I de Sajonia, emperador —ver Casa de Sajonia— y santa Matilde de Ringelheim).

[8] Emma de Blois (953, de Champagne) era hermana de Eudes I de Blois (945, que casó con Berta de Borgoña, hija de Conrrado III "el Pacífico" y Matilde de Francia: ver Casas de Borgoña y Carolingia). Emma y Eudes fueron hijos de Teobaldo II de Blois (915 a 11-IV-975, hijo de Teobaldo "el Viejo" de Blois y Richilda Capeto: ver Capetos) y Liutgarda de Vermandois (ver Vermandois).

[9] Inés de Borgoña nació en el año 1000 y murió el 18-II-1068/69. Fue hija de Oton Guillermo Macon de Borgoña y Ermetruda de Roucy, condesa de Reims (como ya hemos visto, hermana de Gilberto I de Roucy: ver nota 7).

[10] Inés de Poitou nació en 1020 y murió el 26-III-1078. Casó con Enrique III de Franconia, emperador del Sacro Imperio Germánico (ver Casa de Franconia).

[11] Beatriz de Aquitania nació antes del 1030. Murió en 1109. Casó antes del 1055 con Raimundo II de Substantion. La Casa de Substantion tiene su origen en Bernardo I de Substantion (nacido en 885), hijo de Roberto de Maguelone y Guillermina de Aquitania (hija de Guillermo I de Aquitania y nieta de Bernardo de Septimania y Dhouda de Gascuña: ver Duques de Gascuña). A Bernardo I de Substantion le sucedieron Berenguer I (895), Berardo II (920), Raimundo I (c.960), Bernardo III (c.989) y Raimundo II (c.1010), que fue esposo de Beatriz de Aquitania y tuvieron por hijo a Pedro I de Melgueil. La dinastía Melgueil enlaza con la de Narbona-Pelet, y luego con los señores de Anduze.

[12] Hildegarda de Borgoña nació hacia 1050 y murió después de 1104. Casó hacia 1068 con Guillermo VI de Aquitania. Sus padres fueron Roberto I "el Viejo" de Borgoña (ver Duques de Borgoña de la dinastía capeta) y Ermengarda de Anjou (hija de Folco III e Hildegarda de Sundgau: ver Casa de Anjou).

[13] Philipe (Matilde o Maud) de Toulouse nació hacia 1075. Fue hija de Guillermo IV de Toulouse y Ema de Mortaigne (hija de Roberto de Burgo Mortaigne y Maud Montgomery). Guillermo IV de Toulouse fue hermano del primer cruzado Raimundo IV "Saint Gilles", conde de Toulouse (ver Condes de Toulouse).

[14] Leonor de Châtellerault de Rochefoucau nació en 1102 en Châtellerault, Vienne, Francia, y murió en 1130. Era hija de Aimery de Châtellerault y Dangereuse de L'Isle Bouchard. El primer vástago de la dinastía de L'Isle-Bouchard fue Bouchard y nació hacia 865. El primero del linaje de Châtellerault nació hacia 920. Una abuela de Leonor de Châtellerault se llamaba Leonor (Aénor) de Thouars (1050), y una abuela de esta se llamaba Leonor (Aénor) de Blois (996). Leonor (Aénor) de Riviere es la más antigua Aénor y nació en 975. Fue tatarabuela de Dangereuse. El nombre de "Leonor" se hizo popular en España por Leonor de Inglaterra (ver Casa de Anjou), esposa de Alfonso VIII, hija de Enrique II de Inglaterra, nieta de Leonor de Aquitania y biznieta de Leonor de Châtellerault. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_X,_Duke_of_Aquitaine

William X (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) between 1126 and 1137. He was the son of William IX by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: Willelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus ("a son was born to Count William, named William like himself"). Later that same year, much to his wife's ire, Duke William mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade. -------------------- Royal Family - Ramnulfids Father William IX, Duke of Aquitaine Mother Philippa of Toulouse Born 1099 Toulouse Died 9 April 1137 --------------------

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~cousin/html/p364.htm#i4620

Guillaume X "le Toulousain", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers was called a handsome giant.3 Arms: De gueules, au léopard d'or.4 Guillaume X "le Toulousain", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers also went by the name of William VIII "the Toulousian" of Poitou. He was the successor of Guillaume IX "le Troubadour", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers; Count of Poitou.3 Guillaume X "le Toulousain", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers was born in 1090? At Toulouse, Aquitaine, France. He was the son of Guillaume IX "le Troubadour", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers and Ermengarde d' Anjou.2,1 Guillaume X "le Toulousain", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers was the successor of Guillaume IX "le Troubadour", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers; Duke of Aquitaine, Gascony, and Toulouse.5,3 Guillaume X "le Toulousain", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers married Ænor de Châtellerault, daughter of Aymeric I, vicomte de Châtellerault and Dangereuse "Maubergeonne" de l'Isle Bouchard, vicomtesse de Châtellerault, in 1121; His 1st.3,1 Guillaume X "le Toulousain", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers married Emma de Limoges, daughter of Ademer de Limoges, after 1123; His 2nd. Count of Poitou at France between 1126 and 1137.3 Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony at France between 1126 and 1137.2,3 Guillaume X "le Toulousain", duc de Guyenne, comte de Poitiers recognized the antipope Anaclet in 1131.2 He supported the antipope Anaclet between 1131 and 1134.2 He ravaged Normandy in 1136.2 He died on 9 April 1137 at Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain, at age 47 years. Died while on a pilgramage to St. Iago de Campostela.2 -------------------- Only son of Guillaume IX and his second wife Philippa of Toulouse. He married Aenor of Chatellerault in 1121 who bore him three children. He succeeded his father in 1126. -------------------- From:

William X (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) from 1126 to 1137. He was the son of William IX by his second wife, Philippa of Toulouse.

William was born in Toulouse during the brief period when his parents ruled the capital. His birth is recorded in the Chronicle of Saint-Maixent for the year 1099: Willelmo comiti natus est filius, equivoce Guillelmus vocatus ("a son was born to Count William, named William like himself"). Later that same year, much to Philippa's ire, Duke William IX mortgaged Toulouse to Philippa's cousin, Bertrand of Toulouse, and then left on Crusade.

Philippa and her infant son William X were left in Poitiers. When Duke William IX returned from his unsuccessful crusade, he took up with Dangerose, the wife a vassal, and set aside his rightful wife, Philippa. This caused strain between father and son, until 1121 when William X married Aenor de Châtellerault, a daughter of his father's mistress Dangerossa by her first husband, Aimery.

William had three children with Aenor:

   Eleanor, who later became heiress to the Duchy;
   Petronilla, who married Raoul I of Vermandois;
   William Aigret, who died at age 4 in 1130, about the time their mother Aenor de Châtellerault died.

He possibly had one natural son, William. For a long time it was thought that he had another natural son called Joscelin and some biographies still erroneously state this fact, but Joscelin has been shown to be the brother of Adeliza of Louvain. The attribution of Joscelin as a son of William X has been caused by a mistaken reading of the Pipe Rolls pertaining to the reign of Henry II, where 'brother of the queen' has been taken as Queen Eleanor, when the queen in question is actually Adeliza of Louvain. William, called of Poitiers in the Pipe rolls may have been a half brother of Eleanor. Chronicler John of Salisbury tells us that Petronella died in 1151 or 1152, after which her husband Raoul of Vermandois briefly remarried.

William administered his Aquitaine duchy as both a lover of the arts and a warrior. He became involved in conflicts with Normandy (which he raided in 1136, in alliance with Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou who claimed it in his wife's name) and for France.

Even inside his borders, William faced an alliance of the Lusignans and the Parthenays against him, an issue resolved with total destruction of the enemies. In international politics, William X initially supported antipope Anacletus II in the papal schism of 1130, opposite to Pope Innocent II, against the will of his own bishops. In 1134 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux convinced William to drop his support to Anacletus and join Innocent.

In 1137 William joined the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, but died of suspected food poisoning during the trip. On his deathbed, he expressed his wish to see king Louis VI of France as protector of his fifteen-year-old daughter Eleanor, and to find her a suitable husband. Louis VI naturally accepted this guardianship and married the heiress of Aquitaine to his own son, Louis VII.

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William X, Duke of Aquitaine's Timeline

1099
1099
Toulouse, Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France
1121
1121
Age 22
France
1122
December 6, 1122
Age 23
Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France
1126
1126
Age 27
Aquitaine, France
1126
- 1137
Age 27
Count of Poitou
1126
- 1137
Age 27
1126
- 1137
Age 27
Count of Poitiers
1127
1127
Age 28
Valois, Tréjouls, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France
1136
March 30, 1136
Age 37
1137
April 9, 1137
Age 38
Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Galicia, Spain