William "Brito" d'Aubigny (d'Albini), Lord of Belvoir (1086 - 1155) MP

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Nicknames: "William Brito /D' Aubigne/"
Birthplace: Saint-Aubin-d'Aubigné (Ille-et-Vilaine), France OR in England
Death: Died in Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England
Occupation: Lord of Belvoir
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About William "Brito" d'Aubigny (d'Albini), Lord of Belvoir

Guillaume (William) "Brito" d'Aubigny or William de Albini Brito

Son of Main d'Aubigny, seigneur de Saint-Aubin-d'Aubigné (Ille-et-Vilaine) and Adelaide de Bohun. Husband of Cecily (Cicely) Bigod, Heiress of Belvoir (de Bigod), from whom he received the honor of Belvoir (he did not inherit it).

Children:

  • William m. Matilda (Maud) de Senlis
  • Robert
  • Roger
  • Ralph
  • Matilda
  • Basilia

Guillaume d'Aubigné (ou d'Aubigny) called Brito (the Breton) († 1148 or a little after), Lord of Belvoir, was an Anglo-Norman baron. 'He was nicknamed Brito to distinguish him from his contemporary Guillaume d'Aubigny († 1139), called Pincerna (the Butler), who was descended from the seigneurs of Saint-Martin-d'Aubigny.(trans. from French wikipedia--see below)

Two Bigod sisters each married men named William d"Aubigny. Cecily Bigod married William "Brito" d'Aubigny while her sister Maud Bigod married William "Pincerna" d'Aubigny.

The d'Aubigny's of Belvoir are from this "Brito" line, since Cecily Bigod inherited Belvoir from her mother, Adeliza de Toeni (Tosny/Toni), who inherited it from her mother, Adeliza FitzOsulf.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy:

CECILY Bigod (daughter of Roger Bigod and Alice/Adelisa de Tosny). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. She inherited Belvoir from her mother. m GUILLAUME d'Aubigny "Brito", son of MAIN Seigneur de Saint-Aubin-d'Aubigné & his wife Adelaide de Bohun (-after 1148). He owned part of the fee of Belvoir before Cecily's mother held it, Complete Peerage concluding therefore that the marriage may have been arranged to settle rival claims[621].

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm#_Toc272563986:

WILLIAM de Albini Brito (-after 1148).

  • "…Willo de Albin Brit…" subscribed the charter dated to [10 Apr/29 May] 1121 which records the arrangements for the marriage of "Miloni de Gloec" and "Sibilia filia Beorndi de Novo Mercato"[1019].
  • "W. de Alb Britone" witnessed the charter dated to [1125/29] under which Henry I King of England confirmed a donation to Thorney abbey[1020].
  • He owned part of the fee of Belvoir before his mother-in-law held it, the Complete Peerage concluding therefore that the marriage may have been arranged to settle rival claims[1021].
  • The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Albin brit" in Essex, Hertfordshire, Northamptonshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, in the honour of Berkelay in Rutlandshire, and in Northamptonshire[1022].
  • "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…”[1023].
  • "Willielmus de Albenei Brito" donated "terram de Pipewell…de feodo de Bellovidere" to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire, with the consent of "Ceciliæ uxoris meæ et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…tres nepotes mei, Oliverus filius Galfridi et Iwanus et Gaufridus de Cabivin…”[1024].

m CECILY Bigod, daughter of ROGER le Bigod & his second wife Alice [Adelisia] de Tosny (-after 1136).

  • Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated 23 Apr [1430] under which her descendant “Thomas dominus de Ros, de Hamelake, de Trussebout et de Beavoir” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire made by "antecessores nostros…Robertum de Toteneio, Willielmum de Toteneyo filium suum, Agnetem de Toteneio filiam dicti Roberti de Toteneyo, Henricum de Rya filium Huberto de Rya, Agnetem de Toteneyo, Willielmum de Albeneio primum, Willielmum de Albeneio secundum, Willielmum de Albeneio tertium, Willielmum de Albeneio quartum, Ywynum de Albeneyo, Heliam de Albeneyo et uxores eorundem, Isabellam filiam domini Willielmi de Albeneio quæ fuit uxor domini de Ros, domini de Beauvoire et de Hamelake"[1025], the connection with Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir, her maternal grandfather, being established through her marriage.
  • She inherited Belvoir from her mother.
  • "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…”[1026].
  • "Willielmus de Albenei Brito" donated "terram de Pipewell…de feodo de Bellovidere" to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire, with the consent of "Ceciliæ uxoris meæ et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…tres nepotes mei, Oliverus filius Galfridi et Iwanus et Gaufridus de Cabivin…”[1027].
  • "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1028].
  • “Willielmus de Albineio” confirmed the possessions of Belvoir priory, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon de Radulphi de Albineio fratris mei", by undated charter[1029].

William & his wife had six children: i) WILLIAM de Albini Brito (-1168). "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…”[1030]. "Willielmus de Albenei Brito" donated "terram de Pipewell…de feodo de Bellovidere" to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire, with the consent of "Ceciliæ uxoris meæ et Willelmi filii mei", by undated charter, witnessed by "…tres nepotes mei, Oliverus filius Galfridi et Iwanus et Gaufridus de Cabivin…”[1031]. "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1032]. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights´ fees held by "Willelmi de Albenny Britonis quam pater suus tenuit" in Leicestershire[1033]. m MATILDA de Senlis, daughter of ROBERT FitzRichard & his wife Maud de Senlis (-after 1185). "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1034]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Matillis de Sainlis que fuit filia Roberti filii Ricardi et mater Willelmi de Albineio” and “terra sua in Hungertone et in Winewelle”[1035]. ...

ii) ROGER de Albini Brito . "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…”[1050].

iii) ROBERT de Albini Brito (-after 1166). "Willielmus de Albeneio Brito…et Ceciliam uxorem meam et Willielmum filium meum" donated land to Thorney monastery, Cambridgeshire by undated charter, witnessed by "Rogero et Roberto filiis meis et Warino Ridel et Olivero et Iwan et Gaufrido nepotibus meis et Roberto Brito…”[1051]. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Albenny frater suus" held 15 knights´ fees from "Willelmi de Albenny Britonis quam pater suus tenuit" in Leicestershire[1052].

iv) RALPH de Albini Brito (-Acre 1191). "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1053].

v) MATILDA de Albini Brito .

vi) BASILIA de Albini Brito .

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http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_d%27Aubign%C3%A9_(Brito)

Guillaume d'Aubigné (Brito)

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

Guillaume d'Aubigné (ou d'Aubigny) dit Brito (le Breton) (en anglais : William de Albini) († 1148 ou peu après), lord de Belvoir, fut un baron anglo-normand. Il était surnommé Brito pour le distinguer de son homonyme (en anglo-normand) Guillaume d'Aubigny († 1139), dit Pincerna (le bouteiller), issu des seigneurs de Saint-Martin-d'Aubigny.

Biographie

Guillaume d'Aubigné est un fils cadet du Breton Main, seigneur de Saint-Aubin-d'Aubigné (Ille-et-Vilaine), et de sa femme normande Adelaïde de Bohun[1].

En 1106, Guillaume d'Aubigné participe à la bataille de Tinchebray aux côtés du roi Henri Ier d'Angleterre[1]. Après la capture de son frère aîné Robert Courteheuse, le roi s'empare du duché de Normandie. Guillaume est alors très en faveur auprès du roi-duc[1]. Grâce à son patronage, en 1107, il épouse Cécile, la fille aîné de Roger Bigot († 1107), shérif du Norfolk et officier royal, et d'Alice de Tosny[1].

Il tient apparemment des terres dans divers comtés (Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Essex, Hertfordshire et Northamptonshire), une partie provenant de la dot de sa femme[1]. Au début des années 1130, après la mort de sa belle-mère, sa femme devient co-héritière des possessions des Tosny. Par sa femme, il entre donc en possession d'une partie de l'honneur de Belvoir (Leicestershire)[1]. Son quasi-homonyme Guillaume d'Aubigny (le bouteiller), qui est devenu son beau-frère en épousant Maud Bigot, la sœur de Cécile, est l'autre co-héritier.

Guillaume d'Aubigné est un témoin fréquent des chartes royales d'Henri Ier, et à la fin de son règne est juge itinérant dans le Lincolnshire[1]. Après l'accession au trône d'Étienne de Blois en 1135, il continue d'attester des chartes royales concernant le Lincolnshire[1].

Vers la fin de 1140, durant la guerre civile entre le roi Étienne et Mathilde l'Emperesse, son château de Belvoir (ou Galclint[2]) devient l'objet de la convoitise du comte Ranulf de Gernon. Ce dernier prend la place forte en l'en expulsant avec sa garnison, et s'empare de l'important trésor qui s'y trouve[3]. Agissant au nom du roi, Alain le Noir, lord de Richmond, le reprend au comte de Chester peu après[2]. En 1146, le roi donne les terres de Guillaume d'Aubigné au comte de Chester. Comme cela ne semble pas être une déchéance, il semble donc que le roi Étienne ait transmis sa suzeraineté sur les terres de Guillaume au comte de Chester afin de s'assurer de son soutien.

Guillaume d'Aubigné vit au moins jusqu'en 1148, date estimée d'une charte de donation à l'abbaye de Pipewell (Northamptonshire)[1]. Il est inhumé dans le prieuré de Belvoir, fondé Robert de Tosny, le grand-père maternel de sa femme, et dont lui et sa femme avaient été les bienfaiteurs. Le lieu devient le lieu d'inhumation familial[1].

Mariage et descendance

En 1107, il épouse Cécile, la fille aîné de Roger Bigot († 1107), shérif du Norfolk et officier royal, et d'Alice de Tosny. Ensemble ils ont pour descendance connue[1] :

   * Guillaume († 1167/68), qui hérite de ses terres. Épouse Mathilde, fille de Robert fitz Richard, lord de Little Dunmow[4] ;
   * Raoul († 1191), mort au Siège de Saint-Jean-d'Acre (1191) durant la troisième croisade ;
   * deux ou trois autres fils et deux filles.

Notes et références

  1. ↑ a , b , c , d , e , f , g , h , i , j  et k  K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, « Aubigné, William d' (d. in or after 1148) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  2. ↑ a  et b  David Crouch, The Reign of King Stephen, 1135-1154, Pearson Education Limited, 2000, p. 145.
  3. ↑ H. A. Cronne, « Ranulf de Gernons, Earl of Chester, 1129-1153 », Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Fourth Series, vol. 20 (1937), p. 103-134.
  4. ↑ Corrections to K. S. B. Keats-Rohan's, Domesday Descendants, sur fmg.ac.

Sources

   * K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, « Aubigné, William d' (d. in or after 1148) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. DOI:ref:odnb/281.

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William D'Aubigne (Brito I) William D'Aubigne (Brito I)||p246. htm#i14262|Patriarch D'Aubigne||p246.htm#i14269||||||||||||||||

    
    He became 3rd Lord of Belvoir.

According to Levot 10 (whose facts and assumptions seem not always to be reliable - a Montsorel escutcheon acquired by the family 100 years later!), the gift by Guillaume Boterat witnessed by Ralph d'Aubigne in 1095 was made on the eve of their departure on a crusade, a popular pastime of the nobility of western Europe in that period, and no indication of his return has been found. While there are many Breton charters extant naming members of the Aubigne family, because of the lack of relationship details or dates on available copies of the documents the next definite sighting found of a Lord of Aubigne is in 1196 when Ralph II was using a seal with the undifferenced ancient escutcheon of Aubigne 11. Fig. 1. [It is not clear from the presentation by de Courcy whether the numbers 1196 & 1200 are dates or numbers of seals in a series, but as Dom Lobineaull also quotes the use by William of the same six bezant seal with the date AD. 1200, and with a picture of the seal, it seems safe to assume that de Courcy's other figure, 1196, is also a date]. It is probable that the Aubigne lordship, on the death of his elder brother Ralph, reverted to William (Brito I) who then passed it to his younger son Ralph 1, and so to Ralph II. William D'Aubigne (Brito I) was born at France. The Breton Lords of Belvoir and the Daubeney family of Ingleby, Lincolnshire, and South Petherton, Somerset, came from the same family of Breton landowners in the small town of Aubigne now St. Aubin d'Aubigne a few kilometres north of Rennes, Brittany, on route 776.. William D'Aubigne (Brito I) was also known as de Albini in some records. He was the son of Patriarch D'Aubigne. William D'Aubigne (Brito I) was also known as William D'Aubigne in some records.

    William D'Aubigne (Brito I) married Cecily Bigod, daughter of Roger Bigod and Adeliza Todeni.
    William 1 it seems, as a second son in search of fortune, joined the forces of Henry 1 as a knight of the Breton contingent under the orders of Helie, Count of Le Mans. He so distinguished himself at the battle of Tinchebrai (27 Sept. 1106) against the forces of Henry's brother Robert that the resulting victory for Henry was said to be largely of his doing". It was possibly this action that brought the favour of Henry and the marriage with Cecily, the heiress of Belvoir, though Adeliza, her mother, was apparently still mistress of Belvoir in 1130, owing tax of £ 188 for the fee`. Even so, references to the collection of appreciable amounts of tax from William (Brito) and his men occur at this date too, so William was then obviously holding a sizeable fee, if not Belvoir..

Children of William D'Aubigne (Brito I) and Cecily Bigod

   * Eudes D'Aubigne
   * Ralph d'Aubigne d. before Michaelmas 1192
   * William D'Aubigne+ d. bt 1166 - 1167

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William d'Aubigny (after 1148), was an itinerant justice under King Henry I of England. He was commonly known by the appellation Brito.

William was a son of Main d'Aubigny, Breton lord of Saint-Aubin-d'Aubigné (now in Ille-et-Vilaine department) and Adelaide de Bohun[1]. He fought at the Battle of Tinchebray (1106) and was high in Henry I's favor[1]. He was allowed to marry Cecily, the elder daughter of Roger Bigod, sheriff of Norfolk. Through her, he acquired a part of the honour of Belvoir in Leicestershire - his castle became the centre of the family estates - after his mother-in-law, who had been the heir of Robert de Tosny, lord of Belvoir, died about 1130[1]. The couple had four or five sons and two daughters[1]. His heir was William, who married Maud Fitz Robert, daughter of Robert Fitz Richard. The Magna Carta surety, William d'Aubigny, was their son[2].

Notes

1.^ a b c d K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, 'Aubigné, William d' (d. in or after 1148)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. 2.^ Section LA: Descendants of William D'Aubigny

References

K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, 'Aubigné, William d' (d. in or after 1148)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. doi:10.1093. [edit] External links

Wikisource has the text of the 1885–1900 Dictionary of National Biography's article about William de Albini (Brito). 

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http://www.geneajourney.com/aubigny1.html#wm2%20aub

-------------------- William, who assumed, from what reason is unascertained, thesurname of Albini, and was known as 'William de Albini, Brito,'in contradistinction to another great Baron, 'William de Albini,Pincerna,' from whom the Earls of Arundel descended. William deAlbini, Brito, Lord of Belvoir, in the Chapter House of St.Albans, confirmed all the grants of his father and mother to theChurch of Our Lady at Belvoir, desiring that he might beadmitted in the fraternity as those his parents had been. Thisfeudal lord acquired great renown at the celebrated battle ofTinchebray, in Normandy, where, commanding the horse, he chargedthe enemy with so much spirit that he determine at once the fateof the day. of the exploit, Matthew Paris says, 'In thisencounter chiefly deserveth honour the most heroic William deAlbini, the Briton, who, with his sword, broke through theenemy, and terminated the battle.' He subsequently adhered tothe Empress Maud and had his castle of Belvoir, with all hisother lands, seized by King Stephen and transferred to Ranulph,Earl of Chester. He m. Maud, dau. of Simon de St. Liz, 1st Earlof Huntingdon, widow of Robert, son of Richard de Tunbridge, andding about the year 1155, left two sons, viz., William, surnamedMeschines, and Ralph. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant,Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London,England, 1883, p. 160, Daubeney, Barons Daubeney, Earl ofBridgewater] -------------------- William De Albini was an itinerant justice under King Henry I of England. He was commonly known by the appellation Brito. More here: http://bit.ly/eAKCpK

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William "Brito" d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir's Timeline

1086
1086
Saint-Aubin-d'Aubigné (Ille-et-Vilaine), France OR in England
1130
1130
Age 44
Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England
1130
Age 44
Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, ABT 1128, England
1132
1132
Age 46
Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
1134
1134
Age 48
South Petherton, Somersetshire, England
1155
1155
Age 69
Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England
1165
1165
Age 69
Of, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
????
????
????
Belvoir Priory, Leicestershire, England