William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton

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William De de Bohun

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Caldecot, Northamptonshire, England
Death: Died in Walden Abbey, Essex, England
Place of Burial: Walden Abbey, Essex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Humphrey VIII de Bohun, 4th Earl of Herford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, Countess of Hereford
Husband of Elizabeth (Countess of Northampton) de Bohun and Elizabeth de Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton
Father of Humphrey (7th Earl of Hereford) de Bohun; Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel
Brother of Margaret (Mary) de Bohun; Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde; Humphrey IX de de Bohun; John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford; Agnes Ferrers and 5 others

Occupation: English Nobleman, Military Commander, KG, 7th Earl of Hereford
Managed by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)
Last Updated:

About William De de Bohun

William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (ca. 1312-1360) was an English nobleman and military commander.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Bohun,_1st_Earl_of_Northampton

Lineage He was the fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He had a twin brother, Edward.

His maternal grandparents were Edward I of England and his first Queen consort Eleanor of Castile.

Many Lands & Titles In 1332 he received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Hasley, Ascot, Dedington, Pyrton and Kirklington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex.

He was created Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annuity until suitable estates could be found.

Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland, and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crécy.

Renowned Diplomat In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of David Bruce, prisoner of the English.

Succession De Bohun was succeeded by his son Humphrey, who also succeeded his uncle and became 7th Earl of Hereford.

His daughter Elizabeth de Bohun was married to Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel.

De Bohun's wife and the mother of his children was Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartolomew De Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare

Heraldic Coat of Arms:

Knight of the Garter 1349, Stall 13, became a member of the order of the garter after the death of Hugh Courtenay. According to the custom upon the admission of the early knights of that order, he executed a deed of gift, dated London, 4 May following, of the advowson of Dadington to the canons of the said chapel.

William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton in 1337 carried a seal with the whole of the family Arms reproduced on it.

William assisted in the overthrow of Roger Mortimer. The manor of High-Wycombe was granted to William de Bohun in 1332. In 1336 William was made Constable of England. In a Parliament William was made Earl of Northampton on March 17 1337 by Edward III, at the occasion of conferring the Dukedom of Cornwall to Prince Edward. The elevation of William de Bohun, backed up by £1,000 a year helped William supply men to Edward III for his campaigns. In 1337 William was appointed one of the commissioners to treat with Philip of Valois, discussing the right to the French Crown, and also to negotiate a peace with David Bruce. In 1339 William was one of the marshals in the third battalia of Edward III's army, drawn up at Vironfosse. William took part in the naval Victory at the battle of Sluys 1340. In 1342, William was made the King's Leutenant and Captain General in Brittany, with powers to receive fealty and homage from the inhabitants on behalf of Edward III under his assumed title as King of France. In August 1342 William de Bohun, Constable of England, along with Robert of Artois, lands in Brest, advances across Brittany and captures Vannes. On 30 September 1342 William de Bohun defeated Charles de Blois at the Battle of Morlay, and took the town of Roch-Dirien by assault. In 1343, William was in the expedition of the Earl of Lancaster into Scotland and was appointed Governor of Lochmaben Castle. Later in 1343 William was back in Brittany. On 16 August 1346 William led a heavy cavalry detachment accross the recently rebuilt bridge over the Seine at Poissy to clear the militia guarding the north bank stationed by King Philippe of France. Together with the Earl of Warwick he led the crossing of the Somme at Blanche-Taque to secure the northern bank and allow the English army to cross prior to the battle of Crecy. At Crecy he led the second battle of the English army on the right wing.

On 10 May 1346 Letters Patent of Edward III, granting license (at the request of William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton) to Richard and Ann Hakoun and John and Isabel Burdoun to grant one quarter of Bricett manor to Bricett priory. The Great Seal of Edward III is attached.

In 1347, he is particularly mentioned by the King in his letter to the Archbishop of York, detailing the events before Calais. Also in 1347 William De Bohun was at the Siege of Calais, with his nephew Hugh Courtenay and in the camp around Calais, the King, upon their joint supplication, excused the Earl of Devon, on account of infirm health, from attending on any military service out of the realm. After the surrender, he probably returned in the Royal suite to England and he was at Eltham Palace, Surrey, towards the close of 1347, distinguishing himself at a tournament, and receiving from the King, as his reward, a hood of white cloth, buttoned with large pearls and embroidered with figures of men in dancing postures.

The Earl of Northampton, who succeeded in 1349 Sir Hugh Courtenay in the seventh Garter Stall on the Sovereign's side in St. George's College Chapel, Windsor, Berks, had licence, on the 26 January 1350, to assign the advowson of Dadington to the custodians and chaplains of the said college, and that, on the 4 May 1350, the Earl completed that donation, which was made in conformity to a custom observed by Knights of the Order soon after the foundation.

The Isle of Foulness lies just off of the Essex coast near Shoebury. The area was already considered an island back in roman times and the name seems to be derived from old English fulga-naess meaning "wild birds nest". Foulness manor in 1235 was granted to Hugh de Burg Earl of Kent , then in 1271 passed down to Guy de Rochford and then his nephew John and then Robert de Rochford in 1324. After this date it is recorded in the records as part of the estate of William de Bohun Earl of Hereford until 1373

-------------------- Received the Knight of Garter -------------------- ID: I163368 Name: Earl William [@ <^v] de Bohun Sex: M Birth: 3 APR 1311 in Caldecot, Northampton, ENGLAND Death: BET 16 SEP 1360 AND 1361 Burial: aka Earl of Northampton

Father: Earl Humphrey [VIII @<^v] de Bohun b: BET 1275 AND 1276 in Pleshy Castle, Essex, England Mother: Princess Eliz Isabel P-genet [@ <^v] de England b: 7 AUG 1282 in Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England

Marriage 1 Countess Elizabeth [@ <^v] de Badlesmere b: 1313 in Hereford, England Married: BET 1335 AND 1337 in Badlesmere Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England Children

Earl Humprey [X @] de Bohun b: 24 MAR 1342 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England
Elizabeth [@ <^v] de Bohun b: ABT 1350 in Derbyshire, England

source:


http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=gilead07&id=I253485 -------------------- B: Abt 1312 Of, Caldecot, Northampton, England D: 16 Sep 1360 M: (Lic) 1335 Of, Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Bohun,_1st_Earl_of_Northampton William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (ca. 1312-1360) was an English nobleman and military commander. Lineage

He was the fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He had a twin brother, Edward.

His maternal grandparents were Edward I of England and his first Queen consort Eleanor of Castile. [edit] Many Lands & Titles

In 1332 he received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Great Haseley, Ascott, Deddington, Pyrton and Kirtlington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex.

He was created Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annuity until suitable estates could be found. [edit] Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy

In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland, and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crécy. [edit] Renowned Diplomat

In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of David Bruce, prisoner of the English. [edit] Succession

De Bohun was succeeded by his son Humphrey, who also succeeded his uncle and became 7th Earl of Hereford.

His daughter Elizabeth de Bohun was married to Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel.

De Bohun's wife and the mother of his children was Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartolomew De Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare

http://www.themcs.org/characters/William%20De%20Bohun.htm Born: 1312 Caldecot, Northampton, England

Christened:

Died: 16 September 1360

Buried: on the north side of the presbytery, Walden Abbey, Essex, England

Parents: Humphrey de Bohun VIII, Earl of Hereford and Essex, (born about 1276, Pleshy Castle, Essex, England, died 16 March 1321, Battle of Boroughbridge, York, England) married (14 November 1302, Westminster Abbey, London, England) Elizabeth Plantagenet (born 7 August 1282, Rhudlan Castle, Rhudlan, Flintshire, Wales, died 5 May 1316, Quendon, Essex, England)

Siblings:

   Edmund de Bohun
   Eleanor/Alianore de Bohun Countess of Ormonde (born 1302 died 7 October 1363) married 1: (1327) James Butler 1st Earl of Ormonde (born about 1304/5 died 6 January 1337/8 or 17 Feb 1337, Gowran, Ireland, buried Gowran, Ireland) married 2: (before 20 April 1344) Thomas De Dagworth (died before August 1350) married 3: John De Bromwich
   Hugh de Bohun (born about 1303, died 1305)
   Mary de Bohun (born 1305, died 1305)
   John de Bohun 5th Earl Hereford and 4th Earl Essex (born 23 November 1306, St Clements, Oxfordshire, England, died 20 January 1335/6) married (about 1325) Alice Fitzalan (born about 1310)
   Humphrey de Bohun 6th Earl. Hereford and 5th Earl Essex, (born 6 December 1309, died 15 October 1361, Pleshey, buried Friars Augustine, London)
   Margaret de Bohun Countess of Devon (born 3 April 1311, Caldecote, Northamptonshire, England, died 16 December 1391, Exeter, Devonshire, England) married Hugh de Courtenay 2nd Earl of Devon
   Edward de Bohun (born about 1312, Caldecote, Northamptonshire, England, died 1334) married: Margaret De Ros (born about 1327, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England)
   Agnes/Margaret/Aeneas de Bohun de Bohun (born about 1314, Caldecot, Northampton, England, died about 1343) married (21 November 1324) Robert de Ferrers Baron Ferrers of Chartley (born 25 March 1309, Chartley, Staffordshire, England, died 28 August 1350) John married secondly Joan De La Mote (Lady of Willisham)
   Isabella de Bohun (born 1316, died 1316)

Married: 1335, Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England

Spouse: Elizabeth de Badlesmere (born 1313, Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England, died 8 June 1356) daughter of Bartholomew Badlesmere Lord Badlesmere (born 1275, Chilham, Kent, England, died 14 April 1322, Canterbury, Kent, England) married (about 1305, Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England) Margaret de Clare (born 1280/6, Thormond, Connaught County, Clare, Ireland, died 1333, Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England). Elizabeth was the widow of Edmund Mortimer married (27 June 1316) and had one son Roger Mortimer (born 11 November 1328)

Offspring:

   Elizabeth de Bohun (born about 1335, Derbyshire, England, died 3 April 1385) married (28 September 1359, Derbyshire, England) Richard Fitz Alan 10th Earl of Arundel and Earl of Surrey (born 1346, Arundel, Sussex, England, died 21 September 1397, London, England)
   Humphrey de Bohun X. 2nd Earl of Northampton, (born about 25 March 1342, died 16 January 1373) married (9 December 1359, Norfolk, England) Joane Fitz Alan Countess of Hereford, (born about 1345/51, Arundel, Essex, England, died 7 April 1419, Saffron Walden, Essex, England)

Heraldic Coat of Arms:

Knight of the Garter 1349, Stall 13, became a member of the order of the garter after the death of Hugh Courtenay. According to the custom upon the admission of the early knights of that order, he executed a deed of gift, dated London, 4 May following, of the advowson of Dadington to the canons of the said chapel.

William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton in 1337 carried a seal with the whole of the family Arms reproduced on it.

William assisted in the overthrow of Roger Mortimer. The manor of High-Wycombe was granted to William de Bohun in 1332. In 1336 William was made Constable of England. In a Parliament William was made Earl of Northampton on March 17 1337 by Edward III, at the occasion of conferring the Dukedom of Cornwall to Prince Edward. The elevation of William de Bohun, backed up by £1,000 a year helped William supply men to Edward III for his campaigns. In 1337 William was appointed one of the commissioners to treat with Philip of Valois, discussing the right to the French Crown, and also to negotiate a peace with David Bruce. In 1339 William was one of the marshals in the third battalia of Edward III's army, drawn up at Vironfosse. William took part in the naval Victory at the battle of Sluys 1340. In 1342, William was made the King's Leutenant and Captain General in Brittany, with powers to receive fealty and homage from the inhabitants on behalf of Edward III under his assumed title as King of France. In August 1342 William de Bohun, Constable of England, along with Robert of Artois, lands in Brest, advances across Brittany and captures Vannes. On 30 September 1342 William de Bohun defeated Charles de Blois at the Battle of Morlay, and took the town of Roch-Dirien by assault. In 1343, William was in the expedition of the Earl of Lancaster into Scotland and was appointed Governor of Lochmaben Castle. Later in 1343 William was back in Brittany. On 16 August 1346 William led a heavy cavalry detachment accross the recently rebuilt bridge over the Seine at Poissy to clear the militia guarding the north bank stationed by King Philippe of France. Together with the Earl of Warwick he led the crossing of the Somme at Blanche-Taque to secure the northern bank and allow the English army to cross prior to the battle of Crecy. At Crecy he led the second battle of the English army on the right wing.

On 10 May 1346 Letters Patent of Edward III, granting license (at the request of William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton) to Richard and Ann Hakoun and John and Isabel Burdoun to grant one quarter of Bricett manor to Bricett priory. The Great Seal of Edward III is attached.

In 1347, he is particularly mentioned by the King in his letter to the Archbishop of York, detailing the events before Calais. Also in 1347 William De Bohun was at the Siege of Calais, with his nephew Hugh Courtenay and in the camp around Calais, the King, upon their joint supplication, excused the Earl of Devon, on account of infirm health, from attending on any military service out of the realm. After the surrender, he probably returned in the Royal suite to England and he was at Eltham Palace, Surrey, towards the close of 1347, distinguishing himself at a tournament, and receiving from the King, as his reward, a hood of white cloth, buttoned with large pearls and embroidered with figures of men in dancing postures.

The Earl of Northampton, who succeeded in 1349 Sir Hugh Courtenay in the seventh Garter Stall on the Sovereign's side in St. George's College Chapel, Windsor, Berks, had licence, on the 26 January 1350, to assign the advowson of Dadington to the custodians and chaplains of the said college, and that, on the 4 May 1350, the Earl completed that donation, which was made in conformity to a custom observed by Knights of the Order soon after the foundation.

The Isle of Foulness lies just off of the Essex coast near Shoebury. The area was already considered an island back in roman times and the name seems to be derived from old English fulga-naess meaning "wild birds nest". Foulness manor in 1235 was granted to Hugh de Burg Earl of Kent , then in 1271 passed down to Guy de Rochford and then his nephew John and then Robert de Rochford in 1324. After this date it is recorded in the records as part of the estate of William de Bohun Earl of Hereford until 1373 -------------------- Lineage He was the fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He had a twin brother, Edward.

His maternal grandparents were Edward I of England and his first Queen consort Eleanor of Castile.

Many Lands & Titles In 1332 he received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Hasley, Ascot, Dedington, Pyrton and Kirklington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex.

He was created Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annuity until suitable estates could be found.

Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland, and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crécy.

Renowned Diplomat In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of David Bruce, prisoner of the English.

Succession De Bohun was succeeded by his son Humphrey, who also succeeded his uncle and became 7th Earl of Hereford.

His daughter Elizabeth de Bohun was married to Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel.

De Bohun's wife and the mother of his children was Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartolomew De Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare

-------------------- William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (ca. 1310-1360) was an English nobleman and military commander.

Lineage

He was the fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He had a twin brother, Edward. His maternal grandparents were Edward I of England and his first Queen consort Eleanor of Castile. [edit]Many Lands & Titles

In 1332 he received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Hasley, Ascot, Dedington, Pyrton and Kirklington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex. He was created Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annunity until suitable estates could be found. [edit]Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy

In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland, and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crécy. [edit]Renowned Diplomat

In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of David Bruce, prisoner of the English. [edit]Succession

De Bohun was succeeded by his son Humphrey, who also succeeded his uncle and became 7th Earl of Hereford. His daughter Elizabeth de Bohun was married to Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel.

-------------------- Twin to Edward -------------------- William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (ca. 1312-1360) was an English nobleman and military commander. Renowned Diplomat In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of David Bruce, prisoner of the English.

Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland , and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crécy .

Wikipedia: William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, KG (ca. 1312-1360) was an English nobleman and military commander. Lineage

He was the fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He had a twin brother, Edward.

His maternal grandparents were Edward I of England and his first Queen consort Eleanor of Castile. Many Lands & Titles

In 1332 he received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Great Haseley, Ascott, Deddington, Pyrton and Kirtlington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex.

He was created Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annuity until suitable estates could be found. Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy

In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland, and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crécy. Renowned Diplomat

In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of David Bruce, prisoner of the English. Succession

De Bohun was succeeded by his son Humphrey, who also succeeded his uncle and became 7th Earl of Hereford.

His daughter Elizabeth de Bohun was married to Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel.

De Bohun's wife and the mother of his children was Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartolomew De Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare -------------------- 1st Earl of Northampton Commanded division at Crecy - 1346 Commanded English army at Morlaix - 1342 Knight of the Garter by Edward III Negotiateed treaties with France - 1343 and 1350 -------------------- 8th Earl of Hereford

Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex. Born 1276. In November 1302, he married the widowed Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Edward I, and was thus Edward II's brother-in-law. Despite this, he was one of the killers of Piers Gaveston, though Edward apparently forgave him for this and they were reconciled. Humphrey was a member of the Middle Party, though remained sympathetic to Lancaster. The death of Elizabeth in childbirth in 1316 possibly weakened his relationship with Edward, and the 'Despenser War' of 1321-22 pushed Humphrey into rebellion again. He died a horrible death at the battle of Boroughbridge in March 1322, fighting against the royal army - a pike skewered him in the anus as he fought on the bridge.

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William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton's Timeline

1312
1312
Caldecot, Northamptonshire, England
1332
1332
Age 20

He received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Great Haseley, Ascott, Deddington, Pyrton and Kirtlington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex

1335
1335
Age 23
1337
1337
Age 25

He was made Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annuity until suitable estates could be found.

1339
1339
Age 27

De Bohun accompanied the King to Flanders due to the English Channel constantly being attacked.

An early winter forced a pause in the Channel warfare, and 1339 saw a vastly different situation, as English towns had taken the initiative over the winter and prepared organised militias to drive off raiders more interested in plunder than set-piece battles. Responsibility over these militias was placed in the hands of several leading Earls, who were warned that if they failed to defend their stretch of coastline there would be penalties. Although piracy at sea was still a serious problem, with ships burnt and crews massacred as far north as the Bristol Channel, the large scale raids of 1338 were over. An attack on Jersey failed as the island was now too strongly defended and attacks on Harwich, Southampton again and Plymouth were driven off with heavy losses, the mercenary elements of the French force unwilling to risk a large scale battle. Hastings was burnt to the ground, but it was little more than a fishing village at the time and did not represent a major success. The combined fleet was reduced to attacking fishing boats and parading the bodies through the streets of Calais.

An English fleet had also been constituted over the winter and this was used in an effort to gain revenge on the French by attacking coastal shipping. The result was an embarrassing disaster as the mercenary captains of the fleet realised that more money could be made by attacking and looting the Flemish convoys of Edward's allies rather than the French, forcing Edward to pay a huge amount of compensation and endure severe diplomatic embarrassment. This force did prove vital though in July, when 67 French and mercenary vessels attempted to attack the Cinque Ports. The expedition was met by organised militia at Sandwich and turned towards Rye, burning several small villages on the way but failing to land at the town. There the English fleet under Robert Morley caught up with them, forcing the French force to flee back across the Channel. This scare had been too much for the Genoese mercenaries who made up the most experienced part of the French fleet, and they demanded more pay. King Philip VI responded by imprisoning fifteen of them, whereupon the others simply returned to Italy, at a stroke costing the French their best sailors and ships as well as two thirds of their navy.

1340
1340
Age 28
United Kingdom

In the early years of the war, Edward III allied with the nobles of the Low Countries and the burghers of Flanders, but after two campaigns where nothing was achieved, the alliance fell apart in 1340. The payments of subsidies to the German princes and the costs of maintaining an army abroad dragged the English government into bankruptcy, heavily damaging Edward’s prestige. At sea, France enjoyed supremacy for some time, through the use of Genoese ships and crews. Several towns on the English coast were sacked, some repeatedly. This caused fear and disruption along the English coast. There was a constant fear during this part of the war that the French would invade. France's sea power led to economic disruptions in England as it cut down on the wool trade to Flanders and the wine trade from Gascony. However, in 1340, while attempting to hinder the English army from landing, the French fleet was almost completely destroyed in the Battle of Sluys. After this, England was able to dominate the English Channel for the rest of the war, preventing French invasions.

1341
March 25, 1341
Age 29
1341
Age 29
Brittany, France

Conflict over the succession to the Duchy of Brittany began the Breton War of Succession, in which Edward backed John of Montfort and Philip backed Charles of Blois. Action for the next few years focused around a back and forth struggle in Brittany, with the city of Vannes changing hands several times, as well as further campaigns in Gascony with mixed success for both sides

1342
March 25, 1342
Age 30
Hereford, Herefordshire, England
1343
1343
Age 31