William I de Braose

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William (Guillaume) de Braose (de Briouze), 1st Lord of Bramber

Also Known As: "braiose/", "de Brieuze", "de Briouse", "de Briouze", "Lord", "Guillaume de Briouze"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Briouze, Normandy, France
Death: Died in Bramber, Sussex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Unknown Father of William de Braose and Gunnor
Husband of Eve 1st Lord of Bramber de Briouze and Agnes de Saint-Clair
Father of Philip de Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber; Matilda e de Braose; John de Braose; Agatha de Braose, may be de Bruce instead; Hortense de Braose and 1 other

Occupation: Lord of Bramber
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William I de Braose

William (Guillaume) de Braose (Briouze), 1st Lord of Bramber

  • son of unknown father, and mother named Gunnor
  • name of his wife is unknown*-- alternately reported as Eve de Boissey or Agnes de St. Clare
  • one son: Philip (before 1073-[1131/39])
  • "Brydges edition of Collins' Peerage claims William de Braose was first married to Agnes, dau of Waldron de Saint Clare, but no evidence for this can be found. It may be an example of Bruce - Braose confusion. According to L C Perfect, a 13th century genealogy in the Bibliothèque de Paris gives the name of his wife as Eve de Boissey, widow of Anchetil de Harcourt." (http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/de-saint-clare.htm)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (accessed 15 May 2013) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_1st_Lord_of_Bramber

William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber

The early Norman church at Bramber was at the centre of a dispute between William de Braose and Fécamp Abbey.

William de Braose (or William de Briouze), First Lord of Bramber (died 1093/1096) was previously lord of Briouze, Normandy. He was granted lands in England by William the Conqueror soon after he and his followers had invaded and controlled Saxon England.

Norman victor

De Braose was given extensive lands in Sussex[1] by 1073. He became feudal baron of the Rape of Bramber[2] where he built Bramber Castle. De Braose was also awarded lands around Wareham and Corfe in Dorset, two manors in Surrey, Southcote in Berkshire and Downton in Wiltshire.[1] He became one of the most powerful of the new feudal barons of the early Norman era.

He continued to bear arms alongside King William in campaigns in England, Normandy and Maine in France.

He was a pious man and made considerable grants to the Abbey of St, Florent, Saumur and endowed the formation of priories at Sele near Bramber and at Briouze.

He was soon installed in a new Norman castle at Bramber, to guard the strategically important harbour at Steyning and so began a vigorous boundary dispute and power tussle with the monks from Fécamp Abbey, in Normandy to whom King William I had granted Steyning, brought to a head by the Domesday Book, completed in 1086.

Domesday squabble

It found that de Braose had built a bridge at Bramber and demanded tolls from ships travelling further along the river to the busy port at Steyning. The monks also challenged Bramber's right to bury people in the churchyard of William de Braose's new church of Saint Nicholas, and demanded the burial fees for themselves, despite it being built to serve the castle not the town. The monks then produced forged documents to defend their position and were unhappy with the failure of their claim on Hastings, which was very similar. The monks claimed the same freedoms and land tenure in Hastings as King Edward had given them at Steyning. Though on a technicality William was bound to uphold all aspects of the status quo before Edward's death, the monks had already been expelled 10 years before that death. King William wanted to hold Hastings for himself for strategic reasons and ignored the problem until 1085, when he confirmed their Steyning claims but swapped the Hastings claim for land in the manor of Bury (near Pulborough in Sussex). In 1086 the King William called his sons, barons and bishops to court (the last time an English king presided personally, with his full court, to decide a matter of law) to settle this. It took a full day, and the Abbey won over the baron, forcing William de Braose to curtail his bridge tolls, give up various encroachments onto the Abbey's lands, including a farmed rabbit warren, a park, 18 burgage plots, a causeway, and a channel to fill his moat, and organise a mass exhumation and transfer of all Bramber's dead to the churchyard of Saint Cuthman's Church in Steyning.[3]

Progeny

William de Braose was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, Philip de Braose, and started an important Anglo-Norman dynasty (see House of Braose).

Death

William de Braose was present in 1093 at the consecration of a church in Briouze, his manor of origin whence originates his family name, thus he was still alive in that year. However, his son Philip was issuing charters as Lord of Bramber in 1096, indicating that William de Braose died sometime between 1093 and 1096.

See also: House of Braose

References

  1. ^ a b "Domesday Map". Retrieved 10 August 2011.
  2. ^ The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families, Lewis Christopher Loyd, David C. Douglas, The Harleian Society, Leeds, Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Company, 1975, ISBN 0-8063-0649-1, ISBN 978-0-8063-0649-0
  3. ^ Elwes, Dudley G. Cary (1883). The Family of de Braose, 1066–1326. pp. 1, 2.

External links

The Braose website

--------------------

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm

Son of ??? and Gunnor:

GUILLAUME [I] de Briouse (-[11 Dec 1093/1095]). “…Willielmus de Brai, Bernardus de Novomercato” witnessed the charter dated to [1070] under which William King of England donated property to Battle abbey[526]. A charter dated 1073 recorded the donation by "Braiosa Willelmus" to St Nicholas of Bramber, confirmed by "Phylippo filio eius"[527]. “Willielmus de Braiosa” founded Sele Priory, with the consent of "Philippo filio meo unigenito", by charter dated 30 Jan [1075], later confirmed by "Philippi concessit uxor eius Aanor et Willielmus filius suus" by charter dated 5 Jan [no year][528]. The Chronicle of Battle Abbey records that "Willelmus cognomento de Braiosa" donated property to Battle abbey, later confirmed by "Philippus de Braiosa, coram patre suo Willelmo prædicto"[529]. "Willelmus de Braiosa" donated revenue to the church of Saints Gervaise et Protais de Briouze, for the souls of "Radulfi Waldulfi filii, Radulfique filii sui atque Gausfredi", by charter dated 30 Jan 1080[530]. “…Willielmi de Braiosa…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[531]. A charter dated to [1086] notifies a plea held by William I King of England concerning "William de Braiose" and Fécamp abbey[532]. A charted dated 11 Dec 1093 records the dedication of the church of Saint-Gervais de Briouze and the confirmation by "Guillelmus de Braiosa…et Philippi filii sui…Guillelmus…de Crenella nepos ipsius"[533].

m ---. The name of Guillaume´s wife is not known. Guillaume & his wife had one child:

i) PHILIP [I] de Briouse (before 1073-[1131/39]).

--------------------

-------------------- 1677722888. William de BRAOSE Lord of Brambe, born Abt. 1044 in probably, Brienze, Normandy, France; died 1189 in Bramber, Sussex, England. He was the son of 3355443872. Giselbert CRISPIN de BREINNE Count Eu Brion and 3355443873. Herleve Gunnora Countess De AUNOU Countess of.

He

married 1677722889. Agnes De CLare. 1677722889. Agnes De CLare, born 1048 in of, Tunbridge, Kent, England. She was the daughter of 838861500. Gilbert "strongbow" fitz gilbert De CLare Earl and 838861501. Isabel (Elizabeth) de Beaumont

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/f/i/n/Jacqueli-C-Finley/PDFGENE3.pdf -------------------- William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber (aka Guillaume de Briouze) was born on 1049 in Briouze, Normandy, France. William married Agnes De St. Clare and had a child: Philip De Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber. He passed away on c. 1096.

SEE LINK:

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_1st_Lord_of_Bramber]

Lord William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber is my 30th great grandfather.

-------------------- William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Photograph The early Norman church at Bramber was at the centre of a dispute between William de Braose and Fécamp Abbey.

William de Braose (or William de Briouze), First Lord of Bramber (died 1093/1096) was previously lord of Briouze, Normandy. He was granted lands in England by William the Conqueror soon after he and his followers had invaded and controlled Saxon England. Contents

   1 Norman victor
   2 Domesday squabble
   3 Progeny
   4 Death
   5 See also
   6 References
   7 External links

Norman victor

De Braose was given extensive lands in Sussex[1] by 1073. He became feudal baron of the Rape of Bramber[2] where he built Bramber Castle. De Braose was also awarded lands around Wareham and Corfe in Dorset, two manors in Surrey, Southcote in Berkshire and Downton in Wiltshire.[1] He became one of the most powerful of the new feudal barons of the early Norman era.

He continued to bear arms alongside King William in campaigns in England, Normandy and Maine in France.

He was a pious man and made considerable grants to the Abbey of St, Florent, Saumur and endowed the formation of priories at Sele near Bramber and at Briouze.

He was soon installed in a new Norman castle at Bramber, to guard the strategically important harbour at Steyning and so began a vigorous boundary dispute and power tussle with the monks from Fécamp Abbey, in Normandy to whom King William I had granted Steyning, brought to a head by the Domesday Book, completed in 1086. Domesday squabble

It found that de Braose had built a bridge at Bramber and demanded tolls from ships travelling further along the river to the busy port at Steyning. The monks also challenged Bramber's right to bury people in the churchyard of William de Braose's new church of Saint Nicholas, and demanded the burial fees for themselves, despite it being built to serve the castle not the town. The monks then produced forged documents to defend their position and were unhappy with the failure of their claim on Hastings, which was very similar. The monks claimed the same freedoms and land tenure in Hastings as King Edward had given them at Steyning. Though on a technicality William was bound to uphold all aspects of the status quo before Edward's death, the monks had already been expelled 10 years before that death. King William wanted to hold Hastings for himself for strategic reasons and ignored the problem until 1085, when he confirmed their Steyning claims but swapped the Hastings claim for land in the manor of Bury (near Pulborough in Sussex). In 1086 the King William called his sons, barons and bishops to court (the last time an English king presided personally, with his full court, to decide a matter of law) to settle this. It took a full day, and the Abbey won over the baron, forcing William de Braose to curtail his bridge tolls, give up various encroachments onto the Abbey's lands, including a farmed rabbit warren, a park, 18 burgage plots, a causeway, and a channel to fill his moat, and organise a mass exhumation and transfer of all Bramber's dead to the churchyard of Saint Cuthman's Church in Steyning.[3] Progeny

William de Braose was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, Philip de Braose, and started an important Anglo-Norman dynasty (see House of Braose). Death

William de Braose was present in 1093 at the consecration of a church in Briouze, his manor of origin whence originates his family name, thus he was still alive in that year. However, his son Philip was issuing charters as Lord of Bramber in 1096, indicating that William de Braose died sometime between 1093 and 1096. See also

   House of Braose

References

   ^ Jump up to: a b "Domesday Map". Retrieved 10 August 2011.
   Jump up ^ The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families, Lewis Christopher Loyd, David C. Douglas, The Harleian Society, Leeds, Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Company, 1975, ISBN 0-8063-0649-1, ISBN 978-0-8063-0649-0
   Jump up ^ Elwes, Dudley G. Cary (1883). The Family of de Braose, 1066–1326. pp. 1, 2.

-------------------- http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/4/24630.htm

Born: Abt 1049, Brienze, Normandy, France Died: 1087, Bramber, Sussex, , England

Ancestral File Number: 8PTT-WD.

  General Notes:

Ffought in the Battle of Hastings

  Events:

1. Occupation. 1st Lord of Bramber

  Marriage Information:

William married Agnès DE ST. CLAIR [the Younger?], daughter of Walderne DE ST. CLAIR and Helen "le Bon" DE NORMANDIE. (Agnès DE ST. CLAIR [the Younger?] was born about 1058 in St. Clair-sur-Elle, Manche, Normandy, France.)

   Marriage Information:

William also married Eve DE BOISSAY. (Eve DE BOISSAY was born about 1007.) -------------------- William de Braose, First Lord of Bramber born 1049 in Briouze, Normandy (today part of the Argentan Arrondissement in the region of Basse-Normandie). (d. 1093/1096) was a Norman nobleman who participated in the victory at the Battle of Hastings over King Harold Godwinson in support of William the Conqueror as he and his followers invaded and controlled Saxon England. His name at this early stage would have been Guillaume de Briouze.

view all 25

William I de Braose's Timeline

1049
1049
Briouze, Normandy, France
1066
October 13, 1066
Age 17
Hastings, UK

King Harold Godwinson and his army force were spotted about 6 miles outside of Hastings Field the night of October 13, 1066 Ad. At 8 O'Clock the next morning William I, Duke of Normandy assembled his troops and made ready for the Battle at Hastings Field. The battle was expected to last about an hour, but it went on the entire day until dusk that evening. Harold, at that point, It was then that Harold Godwinson took his fatal fall for the Kingship of England. Harold had been protected by a bodyguard of Varangians, known as 'housecarls' to the English, but was unable to sustain against Duke William's attack with his larger military force. The carnage was so great that even William's forces felt remorse for the victory. Unknown at the time, but the Norman Conquest would be the last great foreign invasion of Britain and Harold would be the last Anglo-Saxon King.

October 14, 1066
Age 17
Senlac Hill, Sussex, England
1072
1072
Age 23
1073
1073
Age 24
Horsham, Sussex, England
1077
1077
Age 28
Bramber Castle, Sussex, , England
1079
1079
Age 30
Bramber (Sussexshire) England
1082
1082
Age 33
1082
Age 33
1084
1084
Age 35
France