William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby

Is your surname de Ferrers?

Research the de Ferrers family

William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby

Also Known As: "High Sheriff of Lancashire", "4th Earl of Derby"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ferrers, Derbyshire, England
Death: Died in Ferrers, Derbyshire, England
Cause of death: Long afflicted with gout.
Place of Burial: England
Immediate Family:

Son of William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby and Sybil de Ferrers
Husband of Agnes de Meschines, Lady of Chartley
Father of Sybil Vipont; William de Ferrers the 5th Earl of Derby; Bertha Furnival; Isabella de Ferrers; Ivette de Ferrers and 3 others
Brother of Agatha de Ferrers; Robert de Ferrers, Lord Eggington; Millicent de Ferrers; Petronille (Pernell) de Ferrers, of Derby; Henry de Ferrers and 2 others

Occupation: 4th Earl of Derby, High Sheriff of Lancashire, Knight
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby

William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby

Links: http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/5/6904.htm

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby, [c.1168–c.1247] was a favourite of King John of England. He succeeded to the estate (but not the title) upon the death of his father at the Siege of Acre in 1190. He was head of a family which controlled a large part of Derbyshire which included an area known as Duffield Frith.

He adopted his father's allegiance to King Richard as the reigning king. On Richard's return from the Third Crusade, in the company of Earl David Ceannmhor and the Earl of Chester he played a leading role in besieging Nottingham Castle, on the 28th March 1194, which was being held by supporters of John Lackland. For seven weeks after this he held the position of Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. [1]

On the accession of John after the death of his brother, in 1199, William gave him his allegiance, and became a great favourite. He restored to the Ferrars' family the title of Earl of Derby, along with the right to the "third penny", and soon afterwards bestowed upon him the manors of Ashbourne and Wirksworth, with the whole of that wapentake, subject to a fee farm rent of £70 per annum. [2]

When, in 1213, John surrendered his kingdoms of England and Ireland to the Pope, William was one of the witnesses to the "Bulla Aurea." In the following year William gave surety on behalf of the king for the payment of a yearly tribute of 1,000 marks.

In the same year, 1214, the King granted the Earl the royal castle of Harestan (Horsley Castle). William was a patron of at least 2 abbeys and 4 priories. In 1216, John made him bailiff of the Peak Forest and warden of the Peak Castle Peveril Castle.

In that year, John was succeeded by the nine year-old Henry III. Because of continuing discontent about John's violations of the Magna Carta, some of the barons had approached Prince Louis of France who invaded in that year. William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke acting on behalf the young King sought to repel the invaders and pacify the barons. His forces with the assistance of de Ferrers, the Earl of Chester and others, defeated the rebels at the siege of Lincoln.

De Ferrers was allowed to retain the royal castles of Bolsover, Peak and Horston (Horsley until the King's 14th birthday. The last named had been given him in 1215 as a residence for his wife, during its planned absence with the King on Crusade. [3] and the Earl was among those who made representation to the King, which would in 1258 led to the Provisions of Oxford .

Henry reached his fourteenth birthday in 1222 and his administration sought to recover the three royal castles, to de Ferrers indignation. (In 1254 they would pass to Edward, Henry's son, exacerbating Robert, the sixth's earl's resentment against the prince.) [4]

He was married to Agnes De Kevelioch, sister of Ranulph de Blondeville, 4th Earl of Chester, for 55 years. As the Earl advanced in years he became a martyr to severe attacks of the gout, a disease which terminated his life in the year 1247. He was succeeded by his elder son, also William, the Fifth Earl of Derby.

Children:

  1. William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby
  2. Sybil de Ferrers, married Sir John Vipont [1], Lord of Appleby and had issue.
  3. Sir Thomas of Chartley Ferrers
  4. Sir Hugh of Bugbrooke Ferrers (married and had issue)

--------------------

William II was the 4th Earl of Derby.

He was 79 years old when he died.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p394.htm#i6944 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rwfurtaw&id=I14706 -------------------- William de Ferrers, 4th Earl Derby & Earl Ferriers was born circa 1168 at of Derbyshire, England. -------------------- William de Ferrers, 4th Earl Derby & Earl Ferriers was born circa 1168 at of Derbyshire, England. He married Agnes of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Meschines, Earl Chester, Viscount Avranches and Bertrade de Montfort, on 2 November 1192.2 William de Ferrers, 4th Earl Derby & Earl Ferriers died on 22 September 1247; After a "long affliction." -------------------- William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby (c. 1168 – c. 1247) was a favourite of King John of England. He succeeded to the estate (but not the title) upon the death of his father, William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby, at the Siege of Acre in 1190. He was head of a family which controlled a large part of Derbyshire which included an area known as Duffield Frith.

He adopted his father's allegiance to King Richard as the reigning king. On Richard's return from the Third Crusade, in the company of David Ceannmhor and the Earl of Chester he played a leading role in besieging Nottingham Castle, on the 28th March 1194, which was being held by supporters of Prince John. For seven weeks after this he held the position of Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.[1]

On the accession of John after the death of his brother, in 1199, William gave him his allegiance, and became a great favourite. He restored to the de Ferrars' family the title of Earl of Derby, along with the right to the "third penny", and soon afterwards bestowed upon him the manors of Ashbourne and Wirksworth, with the whole of that wapentake, subject to a fee farm rent of £70 per annum.[2]

When, in 1213, John surrendered his kingdoms of England and Ireland to the Pope, William was one of the witnesses to the "Bulla Aurea." In the following year William gave surety on behalf of the king for the payment of a yearly tribute of 1,000 marks.

In the same year, 1214, the King granted the Earl the royal castle of Harestan (Horsley Castle). William was a patron of at least 2 abbeys and 4 priories. In 1216, John made him bailiff of the Peak Forest and warden of the Peak Castle.

In that year, John was succeeded by the nine year-old Henry III. Because of continuing discontent about John's violations of the Magna Carta, some of the barons had approached Prince Louis of France who invaded in that year. William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke acting on behalf of the young King sought to repel the invaders and pacify the barons. His forces, with the assistance of de Ferrers, the Earl of Chester and others, defeated the rebels at the siege of Lincoln.

De Ferrers was allowed to retain the royal castles of Bolsover, Peak and Horston (Horsley) until the King's 14th birthday. The latter had been given him in 1215 as a residence for his wife, during his planned absence with the King on Crusade.[3] and the Earl was among those who made representation to the King, which would in 1258 led to the Provisions of Oxford .

Henry reached his fourteenth birthday in 1222 and his administration sought to recover the three royal castles, to de Ferrers' indignation. In 1254 they would pass to Edward I, Henry's son, exacerbating Robert's, the sixth earl, resentment against the prince.[4]

He was married to Agnes De Kevelioch, sister of Ranulph de Blondeville, 4th Earl of Chester, for 55 years. As the Earl advanced in years he became a martyr to severe attacks of the gout, a disease which terminated his life in the year 1247. He was succeeded by his elder son, also William, the Fifth Earl of Derby.

-------------------- William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby was born on 1168 in Ferrers, Derbyshire, England to William I de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby and Sybil de Braose de Ferrers. William II married Agnes de Meschines on 1192 in Cheshire, England and had a child: William III de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby. He passed away on September 22, 1247 in England.

William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby is my 27th great uncle.

-------------------- William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby (c. 1168 – c. 1247) was a favourite of King John of England. He succeeded to the estate (but not the title) upon the death of his father, William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby, at the Siege of Acre in 1190. He was head of a family which controlled a large part of Derbyshire which included an area known as Duffield Frith.

He adopted his father's allegiance to King Richard as the reigning king. On Richard's return from the Third Crusade, in the company of David Ceannmhor and the Earl of Chester he played a leading role in besieging Nottingham Castle, on the 28th March 1194, which was being held by supporters of Prince John. For seven weeks after this he held the position of Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.[1]

On the accession of John after the death of his brother, in 1199, William gave him his allegiance, and became a great favourite. He restored to the de Ferrars' family the title of Earl of Derby, along with the right to the "third penny", and soon afterwards bestowed upon him the manors of Ashbourne and Wirksworth, with the whole of that wapentake, subject to a fee farm rent of £70 per annum.[2]

When, in 1213, John surrendered his kingdoms of England and Ireland to the Pope, William was one of the witnesses to the "Bulla Aurea." In the following year William gave surety on behalf of the king for the payment of a yearly tribute of 1,000 marks.

In the same year, 1214, the King granted the Earl the royal castle of Harestan (Horsley Castle). William was a patron of at least 2 abbeys and 4 priories. In 1216, John made him bailiff of the Peak Forest and warden of the Peak Castle.

In that year, John was succeeded by the nine year-old Henry III. Because of continuing discontent about John's violations of the Magna Carta, some of the barons had approached Prince Louis of France who invaded in that year. William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke acting on behalf of the young King sought to repel the invaders and pacify the barons. His forces, with the assistance of de Ferrers, the Earl of Chester and others, defeated the rebels at the siege of Lincoln.

De Ferrers was allowed to retain the royal castles of Bolsover, Peak and Horston (Horsley) until the King's 14th birthday. The latter had been given him in 1215 as a residence for his wife, during his planned absence with the King on Crusade.[3] and the Earl was among those who made representation to the King, which would in 1258 led to the Provisions of Oxford .

Henry reached his fourteenth birthday in 1222 and his administration sought to recover the three royal castles, to de Ferrers' indignation. In 1254 they would pass to Edward I, Henry's son, exacerbating Robert's, the sixth earl, resentment against the prince.[4]

He was married to Agnes De Kevelioch, sister of Ranulph de Blondeville, 4th Earl of Chester, for 55 years. As the Earl advanced in years he became a martyr to severe attacks of the gout, a disease which terminated his life in the year 1247. He was succeeded by his elder son, also William, the Fifth Earl of Derby.

view all 56

William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby's Timeline

1162
1162
Ferrers, Derbyshire, England
1192
November 2, 1192
Age 30
Of, , Cheshire, England
1193
1193
Age 31
Ferrers, Derbyshire, England
1200
1200
Age 38
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England
1202
1202
Age 40
Of, Derby, Derbyshire, England
1204
1204
Age 42
Of, Baybrook, , England
1206
1206
Age 44
Derby, Derbyshire, England
1216
July 25, 1216
Age 54
Derby, Derbyshire, England
1218
1218
Age 56
Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom
1219
May 14, 1219
Age 57
Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales