William de Warenne, 2nd Earl Of Surrey

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William de Warenne

Also Known As: "Earl Warrenne", "Earl of Warrenne", "2nd Earls of Surrey and Warren", "Earl Warenne", "Earl of Warenne", "10186"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lewes, Sussex, England
Death: Died in Chapter House, Priory Lewes, Lewes, Sussex, England
Place of Burial: Priory of Lewes, Lewes, Sussex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey; William I de Warenne; Gundred de St. Omer, Countess of Surrey and Gundrade de Normandie
Husband of Elizabeth de Vermandois, countess of Leicester
Father of Isabel de Warenne; Ella de Warenne; Radulf (Ralph) de Warenne; Gundred de Warenne, Countess of Warwick; William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and 5 others
Brother of Richard Reynold de Warenne, II; de de Warren; Editha 'Edith' de Warenne; Anne De Warenne; adelina de dunstanville and 3 others

Occupation: Earl of Surrey, 2nd Earl of Warren and Surrey, 2nd Earl of Surrey
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William de Warenne, 2nd Earl Of Surrey

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on English Earls:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#_Toc186716618

WILLIAM de Warenne, son of WILLIAM de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his first wife Gundred --- (-[11 May] 1138, bur Lewes Priory).

His parentage is specified by Orderic Vitalis[979]. "Willelmo et Reynaldo filiis et heredibus meis" are named in the charter of "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes" dated 1080[980]. He succeeded his father in 1088 as Earl of Surrey, though usually styled Earl de Warenne.

He supported Robert Duke of Normandy in 1101 against his brother Henry I King of England, who confiscated his lands in England in consequence although they were restored in 1103[981].

"…Guillaume comte de Varennes…" witnessed the undated charter under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Saint-Etienne de Caen[982]. “W comes de Warenna et Isabella comitissa uxor mea necnon filii nostri Willelmus…et Radulfus” donated property to Castle Acre Priory by undated charter[983].

m (1118) as her second husband, ISABELLE [Elisabeth] de Vermandois, widow of ROBERT de Beaumont Comte de Meulan, Earl of Leicester, daughter of HUGUES I "le Maisné" Comte de Vermandois et de Valois [Capet] & his wife Adelais Ctss de Vermandois [Carolingian] ([before 1088][984]-17 Feb 1131, bur Lewes Priory).

Guillaume de Jumièges names "Elisabeth fille de Hugues-le-Grand comte de Vermandois" as wife of "Guillaume II de Warenne comte de Surrey", specifying that her previous husband had been "Robert comte de Meulan" by whom she had three sons and three daughters[985].

William de Garenne donated property to St Faith, Longueville by charter dated to [1130], witnessed by "Ysabel comitissa uxor comitis et Willelmo et Radulfo filii eorum"[986]. “W comes de Warenna et Isabella comitissa uxor mea necnon filii nostril Willelmus…et Radulfus” donated property to Castle Acre Priory by undated charter[987].

Earl William & his wife had five children:

1. William de Warenne (1119-19 January 1148, Killed in the Battle of Laodicea in the Second Crusade).

2. Gundred (b. 1120 or after, d. after 1166, OUR ANCESTOR)

3. Ralph (d. after 1130)

4. Ada de Warenne (d. 1178, married Henry King of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon, son of David King of Scotland, 1115-12 June 1152, buried Kelso Abbey, Roxburghshire)

5. Rainald de Warenne (d. 1179, married Alice de Wormegay)

From the Wikipedia page on William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey

William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 1138), was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He is more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.

In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert [1].

Sometime around 1093 he tried to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland. She instead married Henry I of England, and this may be the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which was to be his apparent motivator in the following years.

He accompanied Robert Curthose (Duke Robert) in his 1101 invasion of England, and afterwards lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy[2]. There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort on the duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up all he had received after the 1101 invasion, and subsequently William was loyal to Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity. The precise nature of the consanguineous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. By this maneuver king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.

He fought at the Battle of Bremule in 1119 [3], and was at Henry's deathbed in 1135.

William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes priory and he was buried with his father at the chapter-house there.

Family

In 1118 William acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when married Elizabeth de Vermandois. She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a son of Henry I of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.

By Elizabeth he had three sons and two daughters:

1. William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey;

2. Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer[4] He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay), whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh; Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.

3. Ralph de Warenne

4. Gundrada de Warenne, who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick, and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle

5. Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon who made many grants to the priory of Lewes.[5]

Footnotes

1.^ Orderic Vitalis, p. 692

2.^ Orderic Vitalis p.785

3.^ Orderic Vitalis p.853-4

4.^ Faedera, i.18.

5.^ Manuscript Register of Lewes

Sources

C. Warren Hollister, "The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne", Historical Reflections 3 (1976) 83-91

C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (2001)

Warren Family History Project

The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. M. Chibnall, vol. 2, p. 264 (Oxford, 1990).

-------------------

WILLIAM II DE WARREN, 2ND EARL OF SURREY of Sussex, England, son of William, Earl and Gundred, Countess of Surrey, was born circa 1081, died on 11 May 1138 in England and was buried in Priory Of Lewes, Lewes, Sussex, England.

He married in France, between 1108 and 1118, COUNTESS ISABEL (ELIZABETH) DE VERMANDOIS of Valois, Bretagne, France, daughter of Duke Hugh Crepi and Countess Adelaide (de VERMANDOIS), who was born circa 1081, was christened in 1131, died on 13 Feb. 1131 in England, and was buried in Lewes, Sussex, England.

"The Royal Line" chart erroneously(?) has him as the son of Gundred and grandson of William the Conqueror.

Children:

WILLIAM III4 DE WARENNE, 3RD EARL OF SURREY, b. in June 1118, d. on 19 Jan. 1148 in Laodicea, Syria; m. (AAH-14) ELA TALVAS.

ADA of Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England, b. circa 1104, d. in 1178; m. (E-17) HENRY DE HUNTINGDON, EARL in 1139.

GUNDRED DE WARENNE of Warwick, Warwickshire, England, b. between 1107 and 1127, d. after 1167 in Warwickshire; m. (1) ROGER DE NEWBURGH, 2ND EARL OF WARWICK before 1130; m. (2) WILLIAM DE LANCASTER I, 5TH BARON KENDAL circa 1154.

REGINALD DE WARENNE (WARREN) of Vermandois, Normandy, France, b. circa 1113.

RALPH DE WARENNE (WARREN) of Vermandois, Normandy, France, b. circa 1115.

--------------------

ID: I1837

Name: William II DE WARENNE (WARREN) Earl of Surrey

Sex: M

Birth: 1071 in Sussex, England

Death: 11 MAY 1138

Occupation: Earl of Surrey

Religion: Sources: Tauté, Anne. "The Kings and Queens of Great Britain"Number: +.

Change Date: 2 OCT 1996

Father: William DE WARENNE Earl of Warenne Y b: ABT 1055 in Bellencombe, Seine-Inferieure, France

Mother: Gundred "the Fleming" DE FLANDRES b: ABT 1063 in Normandy, France

Marriage 1 Isabel (Elizabeth) DE VERMANDOIS Ctssof Leicester b: ABT 1081 in Vermandois, Normandy, France

Married: 1118

Children

1. Gundred DE WARREN b: ABT 1117 in Vermandois, Normandy, France

2. William III DE WARENNE (WARREN) b: 1118/1119 in Vermandois, Normandy, France

3. Ada DE WARENNE b: ABT 1120 in Surrey, England

4.Isabella DE WARENNE b: ABT 1137 in Surrey, England

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http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dmunn81553&id=I1925

Fought at Tenchefrai, 1106 for King Henry I

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He accompanied Robert Curthose in his 1101 invasion of England, and afterwards lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy. There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort in the duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up he had received after the 1101 invasion, and subsequently William was loyal to king Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity. The precise nature of the consanguinous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

--------------------

http://thepeerage.com/p17627.htm#i176268

William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey1

M, #176268, d. circa 11 May 1138

Last Edited=28 Dec 2009

William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey was the son of William I de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and Gundreda (?).1 He married Elizabeth de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois and Aelis de Vermandois, Comtesse de Vermandois, after 5 June 1118.2 He died circa 11 May 1138.1

William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Surrey [E., 1088] in 1088.1

Children of William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois

1. Ada de Warenne+3 d. c 1178

2. Reginald de Warenne+4

3. William III de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey+1 b. c 1119, d. 19 Jan 1147/48

4. Gundred de Warenne+4 b. c 1120, d. 1166

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 496. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 495.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 192. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 569. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

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William II de Warenne (Guillaume de Varennes), 2nd Earl of Surrey, assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert.

Sometime around 1093 he tried to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland. She instead married King Henry I of England, and this may be the cause of William's great dislike of the King, which was to be his apparent motivator in the following years.

He accompanied Robert Curthose (Duke Robert) in his 1101 invasion of England, and afterward lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy. There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort on the Duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful (though Curthose had to give up all he had received after the 1101 invasion). Subsequently William was loyal to Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity. The precise nature of the consanguineous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterward, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterward Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. By this maneuver king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.

He fought at the Battle of Bremule in 1119, and he was at Henry's deathbed in 1135.

William was our ancestor through three distinct descent lines--through his daughter Ada, his daughter Gundred, and his son William, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey for more information.

--------------------

William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 1138), was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He is more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.

In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert [1].

Sometime around 1093 he tried to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland. She instead married Henry I of England, and this may be the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which was to be his apparent motivator in the following years.

He accompanied Robert Curthose (Duke Robert) in his 1101 invasion of England, and afterwards lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy[2]. There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort on the duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up all he had received after the 1101 invasion, and subsequently William was loyal to Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity. The precise nature of the consanguineous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. By this maneuver king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.

He fought at the Battle of Bremule in 1119 [3], and was at Henry's deathbed in 1135.

William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes priory and he was buried with his father at the chapter-house there.

In 1118 William acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when married Elizabeth de Vermandois. She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a son of Henry I of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.

By Elizabeth he had three sons and two daughters:

   * William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey;
   * Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer[4] He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay), whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh; Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.
   * Ralph de Warenne
   * Gundrada de Warenne, who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick, and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle;
   * Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon who made many grants to the priory of Lewes.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey

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He had a brother and a sister, named Reynold and Edith.  He was the second oldest of the three children

Sources:

  1. Title: Book: Royalty For Commoners
     Author: Roderick W. Stuart
     Publication: Revised Second Editon, @1988, by Genealogical Publishing Company.
     Note: ABBR Book: Royalty For Commoners
     Page: Page 70 
 WILLIAM (DE WARENNE) II, EARL OF SURREY, 1st son and heir by 1st wife, usually styled EARL DE WARENNE. In 1090 he fought in Normandy against Robert de Belléme (afterwards 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury), who was supported by Duke Robert. Shortly after 1093 he sought unsuccessfully to marry Maud, daughter of Malcolm III, King of Scotland. He was with Henry I at Windsor on 3 September 1101, but later in that autumn he went with Duke Robert to Normandy and supported him against the King, who confiscated his inheritance in England; however, in 1103 the Duke induced Henry to restore his English Earldom. In 1106 he commanded a division of the royal army at the battle of Tinchebrai. In 1109 he was at a Great Council at Nottingharn; and in 1110 he was a surety for the performance of the treaty with the Count of Flanders. In 1111 he was one of the nobles sitting in judgement in Normandy. He commanded a division of the royal army at the battle of Brémule in 1119 (l). In 1131 he attended the Council at Northampton. He was present at the death of Henry I on 1 December 1135 at Lyons-la-Foret; after which the councillors put him in charge of the district of Rouen and the pays de Caux. Later he went to England, and he was at Westminster with Stephen at Easter 1136. He was probably still living in June 1137. He was a benefactor, or confirmed previous benefactions, to the abbeys of St. Evroul and St. Amand (Rouen), and the priories of Lewes, Castle Acre, Wymondham, Longueville and Bellencombre. Henry I had proposed to marry William to one of his illegitimate daughters, but on Archbishop Anselm's objection this match was abandoned on the ground of affinity. William eventually married Isabel (or Elizabeth), widow of Robert (DE BEAUMONT), COUNT OF MEULAN and 1st EARL OF LEICESTER (died 5 June 1118) (c), daughter of Hugh DE CRÉPI (styled "the Great"), COUNT OF VERMANDOIS (younger son of HENRY I, KING OF FRANCE), by Adelaide, daughter and heir of Herbert, COUNT OF VERMANDOIS and VALOIS. He died probably 11 May 1138 and was buried at his father's feet in the chapter-house at Lewes. Isabel survived him and with the consent of her son the 3rd Earl gave the church of Dorking to Lewes priory (g). She died probably before July 1147 (h). [Complete Peerage XII/1:495-6

____________________

William de Warenne, 2nd Earl married 1112 France

b1071 died 5-11-1138 Lewes, Sussex, England

Isabel de Vermandois

b 1081 died 2-13-1130/31

Page 117 Memoirs of the Ancient Earl os Warren & Surrey

William de Warren married Isabel with the consent of the king his father. Her blood indeed was so noble, that the match was hardly unequal, for her father was related to the Normand kings of England, and her mother was a daughter of Hugh the great, earl of Vermandois, and second brother to Philip I. king of France. By the said Henry, this Ada had three sons, and as many daughters, viz. Malcolme, and William,* both kings of Scotland, and David earl of Huntington, &c. Ada, who was married to Floris earl of Holland; Margaret to Conan le Petit earl of Britany; and Maud, who died young. Ada the mother died in 1178.

Isabel, countess of Warren, died Feb. 13, 1131. The earl died May 11, 1138, having enjoyed the title near fifty years, and was buried at his father's feet in the chapter house of Lewes.

  • This William, when earl of Northumberland, had so high an opinion of his mother's family, that he called himself William de Warren, as may be seen in a charter of his Brinkeburne priory in Dugdale's Monast. vol. II. p. 203.

Rouen William Rufus gives his father the Title of First Earl

The widow is Countess of Meuilent

2nd Earl of Surrey. He commanded the 3rd Division of the Kings Army in the Battles of Tinchbray and Brenneville and was named the Governor of Rouen. He married Isabel de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh the Great, king of France

It is through Isabel de Vermandois that the lineage goes back to CHARLEMAGNE

c 1088 William de Warenne, 2nd Earl, son of the 1st Earl. To the Priory at Lewes, founded by his parents, he gave the 'living' and income from the Church at Conisbrough together with the Churches at Braithwell, Dinnington, Harthill, Fishlake and Hatfield and the Chapels of Thorne and Armthorpe. He gave the tithe of eels from his fisheries at Hatfield to the Abbey of Roche.

Note: According to Ancestral Roots, Isabel preceeded William in death in 13 Feb 1130/31--not July 1147.

  1. Note: (l) He had encouraged Henry to fight when William (de Tancarville) the Chamberlain urged him to retreat. His alleged speech to the King before the battle is given in "Chron. Men de Hida", pp. 316-7.
  2. Note: (c) According to Henry of Huntingdon [their daughter Ada's husband], the death of Isabel's 1st husband was hastened by an (unnamed) Earl carrying her off, by force or fraud. The truth of this is open to question.
  3. Note:
   (g) He left 3 sons: William - 3rd Earl, Ralph, and Rainald, ancestor of the Warennes of Wormegay; and 2 daughters: (1) Gundred, who m. 1st Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick; 2ndly, (as his 2nd wife), William de Lancaster; (2) Ada, who m. Henry, Earl of Huntingdon, s. of David I, King of Scotland, by whom she was mother of Malcolm IV and William the Lion, Kings of Scotland.
  1. Note: (h) Before her son William, 3rd Earl, went on crusade in June 1147.
  2. Note:
  3. Note: --------------------------------------------------------------------------
   This nobleman, William de Warrenne (Earl of Warrenne), 2nd Earl of Surrey, joined Robert de Belesmé, Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury, in favour of Robert Curthose against Henry I, and in consequence forfeited his English earldom and estates, but those were subsequently restored to him and he was ever afterwards a good and faithful subject to King Henry. His lordship m. Isabel, dau. of Hugh the Great, Earl of Vermandois, and widow of Robert, Earl of Mellent, by whom he had issue, William, Reginald, Ralph, Gundred, and Adeline. The earl d. 11 May, 1138, and was s. by his eldest son, William de Warrenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 569, Warren, Earls of Surrey]

Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999

Page: 155-1

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999

Page: 2944

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000

Page: XII/1:495-6

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968

Page: 112

____________

Another source,

2nd Earl of Warren and 2nd Earl of Surrey, joined Robert de Belesme, Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury, in favor of Robert Curthose, against King Henry I., and in consequence forfeited his English earldom and estates; but those were subsequently restored to him, and he was ever afterwards a good and faithful subject to King Henry. He married Isabel Vermandois, Countess of Leicester, daughter of Hugh the Great, Earl of Vermandois, and Alice, his wife, daughter of Hubert, 4th Count de Vermandois, son of Henry, 3rd Count de Vermandois, by his wife, Edgina, daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England, son of Alfred the Great, King of England. Isabel was also the widow of Robert, Earl of Mellent, and granddaughter of King Henry I of France.

________

According to Wikipedia

He is more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.

In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert [1].

Sometime around 1093 he tried to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland. She instead married Henry I of England, and this may be the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which was to be his apparent motivator in the following years.

He accompanied Robert Curthose (Duke Robert) in his 1101 invasion of England, and afterwards lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy[2]. There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort on the duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up all he had received after the 1101 invasion, and subsequently William was loyal to Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity. The precise nature of the consanguineous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. By this maneuver king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.

He fought at the Battle of Bremule in 1119 [3], and was at Henry's deathbed in 1135.

William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes priory and he was buried with his father at the chapter-house there.

In 1118 William acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when married Elizabeth de Vermandois. She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a son of Henry I of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.

By Elizabeth he had three sons and two daughters:

William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey;

Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer[4] He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay), whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh; Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.

Ralph de Warenne

Gundrada de Warenne, who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick, and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle;

Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon who made many grants to the priory of Lewes

--------------------

2nd Earl of Surrey

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne%2C_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey

http://www.medievalists.net/articles/07051902.pdf

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William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 1138), was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He is more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.

In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert.

Sometime around 1093 he tried to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland. She instead married Henry I of England, and this may be the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which was to be his apparent motivator in the following years.

He accompanied Robert Curthose (Duke Robert) in his 1101 invasion of England, and afterwards lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy. There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort on the duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up all he had received after the 1101 invasion, and subsequently William was loyal to Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity. The precise nature of the consanguinous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. By this maneuver king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.

He fought at the Battle of Bremule in 1119 , and was at Henry's deathbed in 1135.

William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes priory and he was buried with his father at the chapter-house there.

In 1118 William acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when married Elizabeth de Vermandois. She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a son of Henry I of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.

By Elizabeth he had three sons and two daughters:

William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey;

Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer. He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay), whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh; Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.

Ralph de Warenne

Gundrada de Warenne, who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick, and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle;

Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon who made many grants to the priory of Lewes. -------------------- William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 1138) was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He is more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.

In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert [1].

Sometime around 1093 he tried to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland. She instead married Henry I of England, and this may be the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which was to be his apparent motivator in the following years.

He accompanied Robert Curthose (Duke Robert) in his 1101 invasion of England, and afterwards lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy[2]. There he complained to Curthose that he expended great effort on the duke's behalf and had in return lost most of his possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up all he had received after the 1101 invasion, and subsequently William was loyal to Henry.

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. He was however dissuaded by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, for any of the daughters would have been within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity. The precise nature of the consanguineous relationship Anselm had in mind has been much debated, but it is most likely he was referring to common descent from the father of duchess Gunnor.

William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. By this maneuver king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.

He fought at the Battle of Bremule in 1119 [3], and was at Henry's deathbed in 1135.

William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes priory and he was buried with his father at the chapter-house there.

Familly

In 1118 William acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when married Elizabeth de Vermandois. She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a son of Henry I of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.

By Elizabeth he had three sons and two daughters:

   * William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey;
   * Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer[4] He married Adeline, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay), whose daughter and sole heir Beatrice married first Dodo, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh; Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.
   * Ralph de Warenne
   * Gundrada de Warenne, who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick, and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle;
   * Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon who made many grants to the priory of Lewes.[5]

-------------------- http://montanatrail.familytreeguide.com/descend.php?personID=I13218&tree=T1&PHPSESSID=0926d6edf298f6bfce8867608b06a22a

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~havens5/p22327.htm -------------------- EARLDOM OF SURREY (II) WILLIAM (DE WARENNE) II, EARL OF SURREY, 1st son and heir by 1st wife, usually styled EARL DE WARENNE. In 1090 he fought in Normandy against Robert de Belléme (afterwards 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury), who was supported by Duke Robert. Shortly after 1093 he sought unsuccessfully to marry Maud, daughter of Malcolm III, King of Scotland. He was with Henry I at Windsor on 3 September 1101, but later in that autumn he went with Duke Robert to Normandy and supported him against the King, who confiscated his inheritance in England; however, in 1103 the Duke induced Henry to restore his English Earldom. In 1106 he commanded a division of the royal army at the battle of Tinchebrai. In 1109 he was at a Great Council at Nottingharn; and in 1110 he was a surety for the performance of the treaty with the Count of Flanders. In 1111 he was one of the nobles sitting in judgement in Normandy. He commanded a division of the royal army at the battle of Brémule in 1119 (l). In 1131 he attended the Council at Northampton. He was present at the death of Henry I on 1 December 1135 at Lyons-la-Foret; after which the councillors put him in charge of the district of Rouen and the pays de Caux. Later he went to England, and he was at Westminster with Stephen at Easter 1136. He was probably still living in June 1137. He was a benefactor, or confirmed previous benefactions, to the abbeys of St. Evroul and St. Amand (Rouen), and the priories of Lewes, Castle Acre, Wymondham, Longueville and Bellencombre. Henry I had proposed to marry William to one of his illegitimate daughters, but on Archbishop Anselm's objection this match was abandoned on the ground of affinity. William eventually married Isabel (or Elizabeth), widow of Robert (DE BEAUMONT), COUNT OF MEULAN and 1st EARL OF LEICESTER (died 5 June 1118) (c), daughter of Hugh DE CRÉPI (styled "the Great"), COUNT OF VERMANDOIS (younger son of HENRY I, KING OF FRANCE), by Adelaide, daughter and heir of Herbert, COUNT OF VERMANDOIS and VALOIS. He died probably 11 May 1138 and was buried at his father's feet in the chapter-house at Lewes. Isabel survived him and with the consent of her son the 3rd Earl gave the church of Dorking to Lewes priory (g). She died probably before July 1147 (h). [Complete Peerage XII/1:495-6]

Note: According to Ancestral Roots, Isabel preceeded William in death in 13 Feb 1130/31--not July 1147.

(l) He had encouraged Henry to fight when William (de Tancarville) the Chamberlain urged him to retreat. His alleged speech to the King before the battle is given in "Chron. Men de Hida", pp. 316-7.

(c) According to Henry of Huntingdon [their daughter Ada's husband], the death of Isabel's 1st husband was hastened by an (unnamed) Earl carrying her off, by force or fraud. The truth of this is open to question.

(g) He left 3 sons: William - 3rd Earl, Ralph, and Rainald, ancestor of the Warennes of Wormegay; and 2 daughters: (1) Gundred, who m. 1st Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick; 2ndly, (as his 2nd wife), William de Lancaster; (2) Ada, who m. Henry, Earl of Huntingdon, s. of David I, King of Scotland, by whom she was mother of Malcolm IV and William the Lion, Kings of Scotland.

(h) Before her son William, 3rd Earl, went on crusade in June 1147. ............................................

This nobleman, William de Warrenne (Earl of Warrenne), 2nd Earl of Surrey, joined Robert de Belesmé, Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury, in favour of Robert Curthose against Henry I, and in consequence forfeited his English earldom and estates, but those were subsequently restored to him and he was ever afterwards a good and faithful subject to King Henry. His lordship m. Isabel, dau. of Hugh the Great, Earl of Vermandois, and widow of Robert, Earl of Mellent, by whom he had issue, William, Reginald, Ralph, Gundred, and Adeline. The earl d. 11 May, 1138, and was s. by his eldest son, William de Warrenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 569, Warren, Earls of Surrey] ............................................

William de Warenne, second Earl of Surrey (d 1138), elder son of William de Warenne (d 1088) by his wife Gundrada, succeeded his father as earl of Surrey in 1088, and is frequently described as 'Willelmus comes de Warenna'. In January 1091 hs helped Hugn (d 1094) of Grantmesnil to defend Courey against Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert. About 1093-4 he sought to mary Matilda (1080-1118) or Edith, daughter of Malcolm III, king of Scots, who married Henry I. This marrige may have been at the bottom of the earl's hatred of Henry; he mocked at the king's love of hunting and called him 'Harts-boot' and in 1101 shared an inciting Duke Robert to invade England. He joined Robert on his landing. He was disinherited, and accompanied the duke back to Normandy. The duke's visit to England in 1103 is said to have been made at the instigation of the earl, who prayed Robert to intercede for him that he might be restored to his earldom, saying that it brought him in a revenue of 1,000 £. Henry restored him, and from that time he was the king's faithful adherant and trusted friend. Henry comtemplated giving him one of his natural daughters in marriage, but was dissmacded by Anselm, who urged that the earl and the lady were within the prohibited degrees, the earl being in the fourth and the king's daughter in the sixth generation.

At the battle of Tinchebray in 1106 the earl commanded the third division of the king's army, and when the castle of Elias de St Saens on the Varenne was taken in 1108 Henry gave it to him. He fought in the battle of Brennevile, or Bremule, on 20 Aug 1119, and is said to have encouraged the king in his determination to take a personal share in the combat. He was with the king at his death at the castle of Lions on 1 Dec 1135, and was appointed governor of Rouen and the district of Caux by the chief men of the ducy. In 1136 he attended the court held by Stephen at Westminster, and subsequently attested the king's charter of liberties at Oxford. He is said to have died in that year; but as he was alive in 1137 - for in that year his son, William de Warenne III was styled 'juvenia' - it is safe to accept the authority of the manuscript register of Lewes priory, which dates his death 11 May 1138. He was buried with his father in the cahpter-house of Lewes.

He married the beautiful Elizabeth, or Isabel, daughter of Hugh the Great, count of Vermandois, a son of Henry I of France, and widow of Robert de Beaumont (d 1118), count of Meulan, from whom he carried her off while Robert was still living, though she was the mother of eight children. She died on 13 Feb 1131, and was buried at Lewes. By her he had three sons and two daughters, William de Warenne (d 1148), Reginald, and Ralph. Reginald was assured in the possession of the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer by the agreement made between Stephen and Duke Henry (Henry II) in 1153, the rest of the Warenne inheritance passing to Stephen's son William (d 1159); Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170, and became a wealthy baron by his marriage with Adeline or Alice, daughter and sole heir of William de Wormegay in Norfolk. By Adeline Reginald had a son William, who founded the priory of Wormegay and left as his sole heir his daughter Beatrice, who married (1) Dodo, lord Bardolf, and (2) Hubert de Burgh, earl of Kent. Earl William's two daughters were Gundrada, who married (1) Roger de Beaumont, earl of Warwick, and in 1153 expelled Stephen's garrison from the castles of Warwick and surrendered it to Henry; and (2) William, called Lancaster, baron of Kendal, and, it is said, a third husband; and Ada or Adeline, who in 1139 married Henry of Scotland, son of David I. He made many grants to the priory of Lewes, and was regarded as it s second founder, completed the coundation of the priory of Castle Acre begun by his father, and made grants to the abbey of Grestein in Normandy and to the 'infirm brethern' of Bellencombre. [Dictionary of National Biography; XX:831-2] -------------------- Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (1040/50-5 June 1118) was a powerful Norman nobleman, one of the Companions of William the Conqueror during the Norman Conquest of England, and was revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers spoke highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

Contents 1 Origins 2 Fights at Battle of Hastings 3 Inheritance 4 Career 5 Loss of Normandy lands 6 Marriage & progeny 6.1 Sons 6.2 Daughters

7 Death 8 Sources 9 External links 10 References

Origins[edit]

He was born between 1040-1050, the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont (1015-1094) by his wife Adeline of Meulan (d.1081), a daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and was an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (c.1050-1119)

Fights at Battle of Hastings[edit]

Robert de Beaumont was one of only about 15 of the Proven Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, and was leader of the infantry on the right wing of the Norman army, as evidenced in the following near contemporary account by William of Poitiers:

"A certain Norman, Robert, son of Roger of Beaumont, being nephew and heir to Henry, Count of Meulan, through Henry's sister Adeline, found himself that day in battle for the first time. He was as yet but a young man and he performed feats of valour worthy of perpetual remembrance. At the head of a troop which he commanded on the right wing he attacked with the utmost bravery and success".[1]

His service earned him the grant of more than 91 English manors confiscated from the defeated English, as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086.

Inheritance[edit]

When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy, and the title, Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He paid homage to King Philip I of France for these estates and sat as a French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy.

Career[edit]

He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest in Hampshire when King William II Rufus (1087-1100) was shot dead accidentally by an arrow on 2 August 1100. He pledged allegiance to William II's brother, King Henry I (1100-1135), who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

Loss of Normandy lands[edit]

On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Évreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the king; their raid was successful and they collected a vast booty.

Marriage & progeny[edit]

In 1096 he married Elizabeth (or Isabel) de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus (1053-1101) a younger son of the French king and Adelaide,_Countess_of_Vermandois (1050-1120). After his death Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. He had the following progeny:

Sons[edit] 1.Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester (b. 1104), eldest twin and heir. 2.Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester & Earl of Hereford (b. 1104), twin 3.Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (b. circa 1106)

Daughters[edit] 1.Emma de Beaumont (born 1102) 2.Adeline de Beaumont, married twice: 1.Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle; 2.Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)

3.Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Châteauneuf-Thimerais. 4.Agnes de Beaumont, a nun 5.Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102) 6.Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I. Married twice: 1.Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke; 2.Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

Death[edit]

According to Henry of Huntingdon, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem."

Sources[edit]

Portal icon Normandy portal Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

External links[edit] The Conqueror and His Companions: Robert de Beaumont

References[edit] -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 11 May 1138) was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He was more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.[1]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_2nd_Earl_of_Surrey

His father, the 1st Earl, was one of the Conqueror's most trusted and most rewarded barons who, at his death in 1088, was the 3rd or 4th richest magnate in England.[2] In 1088 William II inherited his father's lands in England and his Norman estates including the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Haute-Normandy. But William II was not as disposed to serve the king as his father was.[2] In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert of Normandy.[3] In 1093 he attempted to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland.[4] She instead married Henry I of England, and this may have been the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which motivated him in the following years.[5]

When Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy invaded England 1101 William joined him.[6] But when Curthose promptly surrendered to Henry I, William lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy.[6] There he complained to Curthose that he had expended great effort on the duke's behalf and in return lost all of his English possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother, the king, to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up his 3000 mark annual pension he had received after the 1101 invasion, after which William's lands and titles were restored to him.[5]

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury forbade the marriage based on the couple being related in the 4th generation on one side, and in the 6th generation on the other.[7] William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.[1]

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. In this way king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.[1][8] He fought for Henry I at the Battle of Bremule in 1119.[1][9] William, the second Earl of Surrey was present at Henry's deathbed in 1135.[1][10] After the king's death disturbances broke out in Normandy and William was sent to guard Rouen and the Pays de Caux.[1][11]

William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes Priory and he was buried at his father's feet at the Chapter house there.[12] His wife, the countess Elizabeth, survived him, dying before July 1147.[12]

Family[edit source]

In 1118 William finally acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when he married Elizabeth de Vermandois.[13] She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a granddaughter of Henry I, King of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.[14]

By Elizabeth his wife he had three sons and two daughters: William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey[15][16] Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer.[16] He married Adeline or Alice, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay),[16] whose daughter and sole heir, Beatrice married first Doun, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh.[17][18] Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170. Reginald had also a daughter Alice de Warenne, the wife of Peter Constable de Meaulton.[19] Ralph de Warenne[20] Gundred de Warenne,[20] who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick[21] and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle. Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, the mother of two Scottish kings,[22] she made many grants to the priory of Lewes.[23]

Ancestry[edit source]

[show]Ancestors of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey





























 
























 



























 
























 






















 













 
























 












































References[edit source]

1.^ a b c d e f G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 495 2.^ a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976), p. 87 3.^ The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990)p. 692 4.^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 340 5.^ a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections. Vol. 3 (1976) p. 87 6.^ a b The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990), p.785 7.^ Edmund Chester Waters, 'Gundrada de Warenne', Archaeological Journal, Vol. XLI (1884), p. 303 8.^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 89 9.^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. III (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1854) pp. 481-2 10.^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. IV (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1856) p. 150 11.^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 375 12.^ a b G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 496 13.^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 90 n. 36 14.^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1, Herzogs und Grafenhäuser des Heiligen Römischen Reiches Andere Europäiche Fürstenhäuser (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 55 15.^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 500 16.^ a b c Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 27-8 17.^ G.E.Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII (The St. Catherine Press, 1929), p. 142, footnote (a) 18.^ Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 33-4 19.^ Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) p. 28 20.^ a b Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 10-11 21.^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'The Warenne View of the Past 1066-1203', Anglo-Norman Studies XXVI, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Boydell Press, Woodbridge. 2004), p. 109 n. 49 22.^ The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, ed. Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, Vol. I (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904, p. 4 23.^ Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), p. 11

External links[edit source]

"Warenne, William de (d.1138)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. M. Chibnall, vol. 2, p. 264 (Oxford

-------------------- His father, the 1st Earl, was one of the Conqueror's most trusted and most rewarded barons who, at his death in 1088, was the 3rd or 4th richest magnate in England.[2] In 1088 William II inherited his father's lands in England and his Norman estates including the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Haute-Normandy. But William II was not as disposed to serve the king as his father was.[2] In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert of Normandy.[3] In 1093 he attempted to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland.[4] She instead married Henry I of England, and this may have been the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which motivated him in the following years.[5]

When Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy invaded England 1101 William joined him.[6] But when Curthose promptly surrendered to Henry I, William lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy.[6] There he complained to Curthose that he had expended great effort on the duke's behalf and in return lost all of his English possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother, the king, to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up his 3000 mark annual pension he had received after the 1101 invasion, after which William's lands and titles were restored to him.[5]

To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury forbade the marriage based on the couple being related in the 4th generation on one side, and in the 6th generation on the other.[7] William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.[1]

In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. In this way king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.[1][8] He fought for Henry I at the Battle of Bremule in 1119.[1][9] William, the second Earl of Surrey was present at Henry's deathbed in 1135.[1][10] After the king's death disturbances broke out in Normandy and William was sent to guard Rouen and the Pays de Caux.[1][11]

William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes Priory and he was buried at his father's feet at the Chapter house there.[12] His wife, the countess Elizabeth, survived him, dying before July 1147.[12]

Family[edit]

In 1118 William finally acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when he married Elizabeth de Vermandois.[13] She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a granddaughter of Henry I, King of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.[14]

By Elizabeth his wife he had three sons and two daughters: William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey[15][16] Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer.[16] He married Adeline or Alice, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay),[16] whose daughter and sole heir, Beatrice married first Doun, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh.[17][18] Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170. Ralph de Warenne[19] Gundred de Warenne,[19] who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick[20] and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle. Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, the mother of two Scottish kings,[21] she made many grants to the priory of Lewes.[22]

Ancestry[edit]

[show]Ancestors of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey





























 
























 



























 
























 






















 













 
























 












































References[edit]

1.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 495 2.^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976), p. 87 3.Jump up ^ The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990)p. 692 4.Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 340 5.^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections. Vol. 3 (1976) p. 87 6.^ Jump up to: a b The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990), p.785 7.Jump up ^ Edmund Chester Waters, 'Gundrada de Warenne', Archaeological Journal, Vol. XLI (1884), p. 303 8.Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 89 9.Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. III (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1854) pp. 481-2 10.Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. IV (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1856) p. 150 11.Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 375 12.^ Jump up to: a b G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 496 13.Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 90 n. 36 14.Jump up ^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1, Herzogs und Grafenhäuser des Heiligen Römischen Reiches Andere Europäiche Fürstenhäuser (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 55 15.Jump up ^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 500 16.^ Jump up to: a b c Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 27-8 17.Jump up ^ G.E.Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII (The St. Catherine Press, 1929), p. 142, footnote (a) 18.Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 33-4 19.^ Jump up to: a b Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 10-11 20.Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'The Warenne View of the Past 1066-1203', Anglo-Norman Studies XXVI, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Boydell Press, Woodbridge. 2004), p. 109 n. 49 21.Jump up ^ The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, ed. Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, Vol. I (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904, p. 4 22.Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), p. 11

External links[edit]

"Warenne, William de (d.1138)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. M. Chibnall, vol. 2, p. 264 (Oxford, 1990)

Peerage of England

Preceded by William de Warenne

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William de Warenne, 2nd Earl Of Surrey's Timeline

1071
1071
Lewes, Sussex, England
1075
1075
Age 4
Of,,Norfolk,England
1088
1088
- present
Age 17
Earl of Surrey
1105
1105
Age 34
Surrey, , England
1114
1114
Age 43
Dießen am Ammersee, Upper Bavaria, Bavaria, Germany
1114
Age 43
Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, , England
1115
1115
Age 44
Oise, Picardy, France
1117
1117
Age 46
Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
1118
June 1118
Age 47
Cherbourg-Octeville, Basse-Normandie, France
1118
Age 47
France