William Carpenter, of Shalbourne (1576 - 1638) MP

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Birthplace: of Newtown, Shalbourne Parish, Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA
Managed by: Steven Roger Nelson
Last Updated:

About William Carpenter, of Shalbourne

WILLIAM1 CARPENTER OF NEWTOWN, SHALBOURNE, WILTSHIRE (BEVIS, 1638)

Eugene Cole Zubrinsky, FASG Ojai, California, 2008 Last revised 16 October 2010

Prepared for Carpenters’ Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2008 Update

WILLIAM1 CARPENTER was born in England about 1575 and was still living a few days before 2 May 1638; he died probably at Weymouth, Massachusetts Bay Colony, or Rehoboth, Plymouth Colony (see BIRTH, DEATH, MARRIAGE, IMMIGRATION, and RESIDENCES sections, below; TAG 70:193–94, 203). [While the foregoing genealogical data is presented in Register style, the embedding, grouping, and severe abbreviating of source citations are conveniences that depart from it. Sources are cited in full in KEY TO SOURCE NOTES, at the end of this sketch. The format below is patterned loosely after that used by Robert Charles Anderson in his Great Migration series.]

BIRTH: William1 was of Newtown, parish of Shalbourne, Wiltshire, England, by 1608, when he became a copyholder (semipermanent leaseholder) at Westcourt Manor (Westcourt Recs 7). Shalbourne, completely in Wiltshire since 1895, previously straddled the line separating Wiltshire and Berkshire, with Westcourt comprising the Wiltshire part of the parish (Shalbourne Map); the Hampshire border was/is about four miles away. It is likely that William was born in one of these three counties. The record of William’s renewal of his Westcourt tenancy on 22 June 1614 gives his age as 40 (Westcourt Recs 7). The passenger list of the Bevis, the ship on which he left England, is dated 2 May 1638 and states William’s age as 62 (NEHGR 14:336; TAG 70:193, 203; see also IMMIGRATION, below). From these facts is calculated a birth year of about 1575. A William Carpenter was baptized in the parish of Great Coxwell, Berkshire (now in Oxfordshire), on 5 May 1576, son of Henry Carpenter (GCPaR). Evidence that this is more than coincidence has not been found. But since Great Coxwell is only about thirty road miles due north of Shalbourne, further research in the vicinity of the former place is warranted. DEATH: The latest known record of William1 is the aforementioned Bevis passenger-list entry of 2 May 1638. His namesake son, William2 Carpenter, settled at Weymouth probably in 1638 and certainly before 13 May 1640, when he was admitted a freeman there. That William1 was not made a freeman at the same time was perhaps because he haddied. It might, on the other hand, have been due to his modest station, when considered apart from that of his son (see TAG 14:336, 70:193, 195n13; EDUCATION/OFFICES, below). MARRIAGE: Despite claims to the contrary, the identity of William1’s wife (or wives) is unknown. His having emigrated only three months after the death of Alice Carpenter, who was buried at Shalbourne on 25 January 1637[/8], suggests that she had been his wife (though not necessarily William2’s mother); it is possible, however, that she was an unmarried sister or daughter (TAG 70:194–95). A William Carpenter married at St. Thomas the Martyr, Salisbury, Wiltshire, 18 April 1605, Mary Bath (not Batt, as per various informal sources) (WiltPaR 5:22). Christopher Batt, a tanner of [New] Sarum (i.e., Salisbury), Wiltshire, was one of the Carpenters’ fellow passengers on the Bevis. Records of the Batt family of Salisbury, however, indicate that he and a Mary Batt of appropriate age (baptized at St. Thomas 7 Aug. 1584, daughter of Richard and Agnes (Danyell) Batt) “would be no more than distant cousins” (NEHGR 14:336; Martin, citing NEHGR 51:181–88, 348–57, 52:44–51, 321–22). It has not been established that William1 Carpenter was the man of that name who married Mary Bath. IMMIGRATION: William1, with son William2 and the latter’s family, embarked at Southampton, Hampshire, on the Bevis. The preamble to the ship’s passenger list indicates that by 2 May 1638 “they [had been] some Dayes gone to sea” (NEHGR 14:336). They landed probably at Boston (the point of all but a handful of Bay Colony arrivals) in June or July 1638 (the average ocean crossing took five to eight weeks). RESIDENCES: He was living at Newtown by 1 June 1608 and until at least about 18 September 13 Charles [1637]; on the latter date a new family assumed tenancy of the parcels previously leased by the Carpenters (Westcourt Recs 7). The last Carpenter record at Shalbourne is that of Alice Carpenter’s burial, in 1637/8 (see MARRIAGE, above). Although her place in the Carpenter family is uncertain, we may be fairly confident that the others were present in or near Shalbourne at this time (TAG 70:194–95). Amos B. Carpenter’s claim that William1 (whom he inappropriately numbers as William2) resided in London prior to emigrating is completely baseless (see Carpenter [1898] 34, 38). As above, William was at Shalbourne by 1608. In 2004, John R. Carpenter of La Mesa, California, requested a search by Guildhall Library, London, of that city’s Carpenters’ Company freemen’s lists (begun in the sixteenth century) and of various catalogs; no reference to a William Carpenter was found. Despite the Bevis passenger list’s description of William1 (and son William2) as “of Horwell”—that is, Wherwell, Hampshire (about 15 air miles south-southeast of Shalbourne)—the aforementioned Shalbourne records make it clear that he was at the former place no more than a few months, perhaps only a day or two (see William2 of Rehoboth sketch, RESIDENCES).

Apparently based solely on the absence of any record of William1 in Massachusetts, Amos Carpenter claims that William1 returned to England on the ship that brought him (see Carpenter [1898] 38). There is no evidence of this, however, and no reason to suppose it. His having endured the rigors of the voyage to Massachusetts (assuming he completed it), it is doubtful that William1, an old man by the conditions and standards of the time, would have opted to face, unaccompanied, the physical demands of a return trip. And to what would he have returned? William2 was his eldest (perhaps only) son and heir. (This we infer from the inclusion of William Carpenter Jr. with his father in the Westcourt Manor copy court roll beginning with the initial record of their tenancy.) Where better for this father and grandfather to spend his last years than in the company of those with whom he had come? Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence: considering his age (advanced), marital status (single), and position in his family (almost certainly subordinate to his son), it is not significant that William1 fails to appear in Massachusetts records as a freeholder or town officer, for example. And with deaths at this time being the vital event least-often recorded, it is unremarkable that no such record is found for him. (Also unrecorded is the birth, probably in late 1638, of his grandson Samuel3.) OCCUPATION: The Bevis passenger list describes William1 as a carpenter (NEHGR 14:336). That his copyhold included not only a messuage (house and adjoining land) with a garden but also a small number of acres in nearby common fields indicates that he was also a husbandman (subsistence farmer) (see Westcourt 7; “Recommended Reading,” GMN16, no. 3). EDUCATION/OFFICES: William “Crpentr,” church warden, signed with his mark a glebe terrier (describing lands belonging to the Shalbourne vicarage) dated 6 June 1628 (SVGT). William2’s obvious literacy excludes him from consideration as the subscriber (see William2 of Rehoboth sketch, EDUCATION). The only other man of that name found in Shalbourne records is William1. CHILDREN: The only known child of William1 Carpenter is the son named with him in his record of tenancy at Shalbourne Westcourt and with whom he emigrated: the eventual William2 Carpenter of Rehoboth (Westcourt Recs 7; NEHGR 14:336; see also William2 of Rehoboth sketch). The Carpenters’ Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2009 main database’s attribution to William1 of additional children, through alleged wife Mary “Batt” (see MARRIAGE, above), is baseless. COMMENTS: The will of Robert Carpenter of Marden, Wiltshire, dated 12 January 1606[/7?] and proved 21 May 1607, names (among others) adult sons William and Richard. It has been claimed that these brothers were William1 Carpenter (father of William2 of Rehoboth) and RichardA Carpenter of Amesbury, Wiltshire (father of William1 of Providence, R.I.). While it is not impossible that William1 of Shalbourne was the son of Robert of Marden, evidence of it has not been found; it is unlikely that Richard of Amesbury was Robert’s son. Genetic testing of agnate descendants of William of Shalbourne and Richard of Amesbury has established with a high degree of probability that the two were in fact related but far more remotely than generally believed. For more-detailed discussions of these matters, see NEHGR 159 (2005):64–66, 67n63; William2 of Rehobothsketch, COMMENTS. In Carpenters’ Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2001 (CECD 2001), compiler John R. Carpenter presents an extensive ancestry for the subject William1 Carpenter and RichardA Carpenter of Amesbury, beginning with the aforementioned Robert Carpenter of Marden and his widow, Elinor, as their parents. Most of this ancestry—back from Rev. Richard Carpenter of Herefordshire and Wiltshire (d. 1503)—has been proven invalid (NEHGR 159:65n53–66n53[contd.]); as above, the remainder is unsubstantiated and, particularly for the Amesbury man, dubious. Earlier versions of this ancestry, which differ from it for the first few generations (beginning with parents), are even more improbable than the CECD 2001 version (see, for example, Carpenter [1898] 1, 34). The ancestry of William1 Carpenter, including his parentage, is unknown (as is that of RichardA). Amos Carpenter, the first to assert that RichardA Carpenter was William1s brother, further claims that AlexanderA Carpenter of Wrington, Somersetshire, and Leiden, Netherlands, was another brother (Carpenter [1898] 34). There is absolutely no support for this. A Robert Carpenter was among those who took the estate inventory of William Shefford of Shalbourne in 1609 (Shefford Inv). Although it seems reasonable to suppose that he is related to William1 (perhaps a brother [born by 1688]), evidence linking them has not been found. Robert is not a Rehoboth Carpenter forename. A Wikipedia article about Culham, Oxfordshire, states that “[r]ecords from Culham Manor of the late 1500s to the early 1600s . . . show a William Carpenter senior and his son William Carpenter junior, who emigrated to Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 1638 and helped found Rehoboth, Massachusetts, in 1645 [sic]” (Wikipedia1). Another Wikipedia article, about the Rehoboth Carpenters (the same person is the main contributor to both), asserts that “[m]anor records from Culham . . . contain various references to a father-son William Carpenter whose activities conform to Shalbourne records. The Carpenters [of] Culham [were] a prosperous yeoman family . . . William Carpenter Sr. served as assessor of fines in the Culham Manor Court. Many pages of Latin records bearing his name are now in the Bodleian Library at Oxford. William Carpenter Sr. educated his eldest son Robert at Oxford for the church. Many of what were perhaps Robert’s books made there [sic] way to Massachusetts in the possession of Carpenter’s son William Carpenter Jr. (b. 1605)” (Wikipedia2). These passages reflect one of the most common types of error in genealogy: “right name, wrong man,” the merging of different persons of the same name into a single identity; in this case, four are reduced to two. The author of the above-quoted statements ignores important evidence refuting his identification of the Carpenters of Shalbourne, Weymouth, and Rehoboth with those of Culham. Far from being the scholarly yeoman (land-owning farmer) who sat on a manorial court at Culham, William1 Carpenter of Shalbourne (35 miles distant) was an illiterate carpenter and husbandman (see OCCUPATION, EDUCATION/ OFFICES, above). And as such, he was in no position to send a son to Oxford. (There is no evidence that the Robert Carpenter recorded at Shalbourne in 1609 was a clergyman; in any case, he was too old to have been William1’s son [see above].) On 22 November 1636, moreover, William Carpenter of Culham was appointed to administer the estate of his son Thomas of London, whose will failed to name an executor (PCC Probate Acts 83). By this time, William1 Carpenter and his only known son, the eventual William2 of Rehoboth, had been living at Shalbourne for twenty-eight years! In summary, there is absolutely no basis for the claim that the two immigrant William Carpenters formerly of Shalbourne were identical to a Culham father and son of the same name—or that the two pairs of men were connected at all. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND: See, for example, Virginia DeJohn Anderson, New England’s Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century (New York, 1991; repr. 1992 [paperback]); Francis J. Bremer, The Puritan Experiment: New England Society from Bradford to Edwards, rev. ed. (Lebanon, N.H., 1995 [paperback]); John Chandler, Marlborough and Eastern Wiltshire (Salisbury, England, 2001), and “Shalbourne Concise History,” online at www.wilt shire.gov.uk/community/getconcise.php?id=199, a Wiltshire County Council – Wiltshire Community History webpage; Shalbourne History Project, Shalbourne to the Millennium (Shalbourne, England, 1999); Stephen Foster, The Long Argument: English Puritanism and the Shaping of New England Culture, 1570–1700 (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1991; repr. 1996 [paperback]); Hugh Trevor-Roper, Archbishop Laud: 1573–1645 (London, 1940; repr. 2000 [paperback]); Keith Wrightson and David Levine, Poverty and Piety in an English Village: Terling, 1525–1700, 2nd ed. (Oxford, England, 1995 [paperback]).

KEY TO SOURCE NOTES: Carpenter [1898] Amos B. Carpenter, A Genealogical History of the Rehoboth Branch of the Carpenter Family in America [informal title: Carpenter Memorial] (Amherst, Mass., 1898) GCPaR Great Coxwell Parish Records (not paginated) [Family History Library (FHL), Salt Lake City, film #88,267] GMN Great Migration Newsletter, online at www.great migration.org (subscription website; printed issues available) Martin David Kendall Martin, FASG, letter to Gene Zubrinsky, 16 March 1998 NEHGR The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol. 1 (1847) through present PCC Probate Acts John Matthews and George F. Matthews, Abstracts of Probate Acts in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 1635– 1639 (London, 1903); digital image online at http:// books.google.com Shalbourne Map Parish of Shalbourne, from Andrews and Dury’s Map of Wiltshire, 1810, online at www.wiltshire.gov.uk/ community/getcom2.php?id=199, a Wiltshire County Council – Wiltshire Community History webpage Shefford Inv William Shefford estate inventory, facsimile online at http:// history.wiltshire.gov.uk/wills/P5-1609_71_A1{TCL}.jpg, a Wiltshire County Council – Wiltshire Archive Catalogue webpage; abstract online at www.genuki.org.uk/ big/eng/BRKwills/wa10419.html, a GENUKI: UK & Ireland Genealogy website maintained by Nick Hidden (1998) SVGT Shalbourne Vicarage Glebe Terrier, ref. D/5/10/2/8, Wiltshire and Swindon Archives, Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre, Chippenham (formerly Wiltshire and Swindon Record Office, Trowbridge), England TAG The American Genealogist, vol. 9 (1932) through present Westcourt Recs Survey of Shalbourne Westcourt (c1610–1639/40), Savernake Estate Collection, ref. 9/24/460, Wiltshire and Swindon Archives Wikipedia1 Wikipedia contributors, “Culham,” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cul ham (accessed 5/4/2009) Wikipedia2 Wikipedia contributors, “Rehoboth Carpenter Family,” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, online at http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rehoboth_Carpenter_Family (accessed 5/4/2009) WiltPaR Wiltshire Parish Registers. Marriages, vol. 5, ed. W. P. W. Phillimore, Edmund Nevill, and John Sadler (London, 1907) [FHL film #496,691, item 4] Thanks to Jim Bullock (Littleton, Colo.), John R. Carpenter (La Mesa, Calif.), Terry L. Carpenter (Germantown, Md.), and John F. Chandler (Harvard, Mass.) for reviewing the original sketch. Gene Zubrinsky (GeneZub@aol.com) has contributed many articles, including four Carpenter pieces, to the leading genealogical journals and local-history magazines. __________________________________________

William Carpenter was born 1576 in Newtown, England. He died after 2 May 1638 (Bevis passenger list) and certainly before 1644 when his son, William settled in Rehoboth. He was of Newtown, Shalbourne Parish, Wiltshire, England, by 1608, when he became a copyholder (semipermanent leaseholder) at Westcourt Manor (Westcourt Recs 7). Shalbourne, completely in Wiltshire since 1895, previously it straddled the line separating Wiltshire and Berkshire, with Westcourt comprising the Wiltshire part of the parish (Shalbourne Map); the Hampshire border was/is about four miles away. It is likely that William was born in one of these three counties. William's renewal of his Westcourt tenancy on 22 June 1614 gives his age as 40 (Westcourt Recs 7). The passenger list of the Bevis, the ship on which he left England, is dated 2 May 1638 and states William's age as 62 leading to an estimate of about 1576 for his birth.[3]

Links

Sources

  1. Carpenter, Amos B. A Genealogical History of the Rehoboth Branch of the Carpenter Family in America, a.k.a. "The Carpenter Memorial", Press of Carpenter & Morehouse, Amherst, Mass., 1898), reprinted and duplicated by many organizations in print, CD, and DVD formats. Note: This 900-plus page tome was remarkable for its day, but many corrections has been made in the genealogies it contains over the last century. The best compiled corrections to this work and related lines is in the "Carpenters' Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2009", data DVD format.
  2. Bowen, Richard LeBaron. Early Rehoboth: Documented Historical Studies of Families and Events in This Plymouth Colony Township, 4 vols. (Rehoboth, Mass.: Rumford Press, 1945-1950).
  3. Zubrinsky, Eugene Cole. "William Carpenter of Newtown, Shalbourne, Wiltshire (Bevis, 1638)" (Ojai, Calif., 2009).

-------------------- William Carpenter was born in England around 1600.

Children:

  1. John Carpenter
  2. William Carpenter
  3. Joseph Carpenter
  4. Hannah Carpenter
  5. Abigail Carpenter
  6. Abiah Carpenter
  7. Samuel Carpenter

Links

-------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/r/Linda-B-Cortis/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1078.html --------------------

Links

William b. 1576 in Newtown, England, progenitor of the Rehoboth family, came to America via "BEVIS" with son, William, and son's family in 1638 (from Southampton to Weymouth, Mass.) He died after 2 May 1638 (Bevis passenger list) and certainly before 1644 when his son, William settled in Rehoboth. He was of Newtown, Shalbourne Parish, Wiltshire, England, by 1608, when he became a copyholder (semipermanent leaseholder) at Westcourt Manor (Westcourt Recs 7). Shalbourne, completely in Wiltshire since 1895, previously it straddled the line separating Wiltshire and Berkshire, with Westcourt comprising the Wiltshire part of the parish (Shalbourne Map); the Hampshire border was/is about four miles away. It is likely that William was born in one of these three counties. William's renewal of his Westcourt tenancy on 22 June 1614 gives his age as 40 (Westcourt Recs 7). The passenger list of the Bevis, the ship on which he left England, is dated 2 May 1638 and states William's age as 62 leading to an estimate of about 1576 for his birth. The first immigrant and founder of this line was William Carpenter (generation 1) (b. c1575 in England), his namesake son, William Carpenter (Generation 2) (c1605 in England -1658/9 Rehoboth, Bristol, MA), and the son's wife and children (then numbering four) arrived on the Bevis from Southampton, England, in 1638. Nothing more is known of the father, William, in Massachusetts and he is presumed to have perished either in passage, shortly after arriving in the new world or, less likely he returned to England. William Carpenter (Gen. 2) is buried in the Newman Congregational Church Cemetery with a simple field stone marked with a "W. C.".[2] William Carpenter, (Gen. 2) first appears in New England records in 1640, as a resident of Weymouth, Massachusetts. He was among the founders (at Weymouth in late 1643) of the Plymouth Colony town of Rehoboth (settled 1644). His son, William (Gen. 3) Carpenter (b. 1631 in England - 1702/3 Rehoboth, Bristol, MA), was for many years Rehoboth town clerk, by virtue of which his name—not that of his father—appears with some frequency in Plymouth Colony records, in association with a number of local vital-records lists that he certified and forwarded to colony authorities. The name William Carpenter appears in copious Plymouth Colony records and in the writings of John Winthrop and in other public records over the generations.[3] Three Carpenter family houses in Rehoboth are listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places: Christopher Carpenter House, Col. Thomas Carpenter III House, and Carpenter House. [edit]English ancestry St. Michael and All Angels, Shalbourne These Carpenters previously lived in Shalbourne, an English parish near Hungerford that straddled the boundary between Wiltshire and Berkshire. The Rehoboth Carpenters' English origins were obscure until the discovery of Bishops' Transcripts of Shalbourne parish records containing marriage, baptismal, and burial records pertaining to them. Among these records is that of William (Senior) Carpenter's marriage in 1625 to Abigail Briant of Shalbourne. A search of Westcourt Manor tenants' records reveals William Carpenter (Gen. 1) as a copyholder at Westcourt Manor in Shalbourne from 1608 to late 1637.[2] [edit]Immigrant family William Carpenter (Gen. 1) born about 1575 in England. He died after 2 May 1638 (Bevis passenger list) and certainly before 1644 when his son, William settled in Rehoboth. He was of Newtown, Shalbourne Parish, Wiltshire, England, by 1608, when he became a copyholder (semipermanent leaseholder) at Westcourt Manor (Westcourt Recs 7). Shalbourne, completely in Wiltshire since 1895, previously it straddled the line separating Wiltshire and Berkshire, with Westcourt comprising the Wiltshire part of the parish (Shalbourne Map); the Hampshire border was/is about four miles away. It is likely that William was born in one of these three counties. William's renewal of his Westcourt tenancy on 22 June 1614 gives his age as 40 (Westcourt Recs 7). The passenger list of the Bevis, the ship on which he left England, is dated 2 May 1638 and states William's age as 62 leading to an estimate of about 1575 for his birth.[4] His son William Carpenter (Gen. 2) was born about 1605 in or of Wiltshire, England. He died 7 February 1658/1659 in Rehoboth, Bristol, MA. He married Abigail Briant, daughter of John & Alice, on 28 April 1625 in Shalbourne Parish, Berkshire, now in, Wiltshire, England.[5] Their children: John Carpenter - Christened 8 Oct.1626 in Shalborne Parish - Bevis passenger Abigail Carpenter - Chr. 31 May 1629 in Shalborne Parish - Bevis passenger William Carpenter (Gen. 3) - Chr. 22 Nov. 1631 in Shalborne Parish - Bevis Passenger Joseph Carpenter - Chr. 6 Apr. 1634 in Shalborne Parish - Bevis Passenger Samuel Carpenter - Chr. 1 Mar 1636/1637 d. 20 Apr 1637 both in Shalbourne Parish. Samuel Carpenter - b. abt. 1638 of, Weymouth, Norfolk, MA - his mother was probably pregnant on the Bevis Hannah Carpenter - b. 3 Apr. 1640 Weymouth, Norfolk, MA Abiah Carpenter - b. 9 Apr. 1643 of, Weymouth, Norfolk, MA [edit]Church Newman Congregational Church and Carpenter graves There is no record to confirm it, but it is said that certain Rehoboth Carpenters were among the founders of the Rehoboth (now Newman) Congregational Church (See: Newman Congregational Church and the Newman Cemetery)[6][7] This much we know: William (Gen. 2) Carpenter's admission as a Massachusetts Bay Colony freeman from Weymouth in 1640 required church membership. The minister at Weymouth was Rev. Samuel Newman, most of whose congregation accompanied him to Rehoboth, where he was also the minister. William (Gen. 2) Carpenter was one of Rehoboth's fifty-eight original proprietors and is buried in Old Rehoboth (Newman Church) Cemetery. (While records of the time provide no direct evidence as to the religious affiliation of William (Gen. 2) Carpenter of Rehoboth, he was certainly not a Baptist, even though other Carpenters in New England were. In this regard, he is sometimes confused with William Carpenter (Rhode Island) of Providence and others.[8][9] [edit]Notable Carpenters of the Rehoboth Carpenter family Through his five sons, Capt. William Carpenter became known as the father of "The Family of Heroes." Over 300 of his male lineal descendants served America in the Revolutionary War, more than any other American family.[citation needed] Among the Rehoboth Carpenter descendants who fought in the American Revolutionary War was Captain Benajah Carpenter, a founding member of the United States Army Field Artillery Corps under Henry Knox.[2][10][11] Thomas Carpenter III (October 24, 1733 – April 26, 1807), great-great-grandson of William Carpenter, was a Colonel in the Massachusetts militia during the American Revolutionary War, and also served in the Massachusetts Provincial Congress and the General Court of Massachusetts, and built the Col. Thomas Carpenter III house.[2][12][13] Another member of this family was George Rice Carpenter (1863–1909), born in Labrador and a graduate of Harvard in 1886. He taught at Harvard from 1888 to 1890 and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1890 to 1893. In 1893 he became a professor of English rhetoric at Columbia University and authored a long list of textbooks on literature and rhetoric and biographies of Whittier, Whitman, and Longfellow. A classics library at Columbia is named in his honor. Painter Francis Bicknell Carpenter's (1830–1900) work hangs in the United States Capitol. Carpenter also resided with President Lincoln in the White House and published a memoir of his stay.[14] Project Mercury astronaut and argonaut M. Scott Carpenter (b. May 1, 1925) descends from Joseph Carpenter, the fourth son of William Carpenter (Gen. 2). Early U.S. Naval Aviator Donald Marshall Carpenter of whom the USS Carpenter DD 825 was named for. He descends from William Carpenter, a son of William Carpenter (Gen. 2). Cyrus C Carpenter, eighth Governor of Iowa, is a descendant of William Carpenter, a son of William Carpenter (Gen. 2). Dr. Edmund Snow Carpenter (1922-2011), anthropologist and educator, a descendant of William Carpenter William H. Carpenter (1821-1885), U.S. Consul to Foochow, China, 1861-1865 [edit]Relationship with other New England Carpenter families William Carpenter (Rhode Island), son of Richard Carpenter of Amesbury was a reportedly a first cousin of William Carpenter of Rehoboth, son of William Carpenter of Shalbourne, England. In addition he supposedly was closely related to Alexander Carpenter of Wrington, Somersetshire, and Leiden, Netherlands, of whom his four married daughters were in the Plymouth Colony in the early 1620s. This derives from Amos B. Carpenter’s[2] unsupported claim that Richard of William of Shalbourne, and Alexander Carpenter were brothers. No genealogical evidence has been found even hinting at a link between the Wrington Carpenters, on the one hand, and either of the other two afore-mentioned families, on the other; a connection is highly improbable. Traditional genealogical research methods provide good reasons to doubt also that Providence William and Rehoboth William were closely related.[15] [edit]References and notes Biography portal Genealogy portal ^ Carpenter, Amos B. (1898) [1898]. A Genealogical History of the Rehoboth Branch of the Carpenter Family in America, a.k.a. "The Carpenter Memorial". Press of Carpenter & Morehouse, Amherst, Mass., 1898.Note: This book has been reprinted and duplicated by many organizations in print, CD, DVD, & digital formats. This 900-plus page tome was remarkable for its day, but many corrections has been made in the genealogies it contains over the last century. The best compiled corrections to this work and related lines is in the "Carpenters' Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2009", data DVD format. ^ a b c d e Carpenter, Amos B. A Genealogical History of the Rehoboth Branch of the Carpenter Family in America, a.k.a. "The Carpenter Memorial", Press of Carpenter & Morehouse, Amherst, Mass., 1898, reprinted and duplicated by many organizations in print, CD, and DVD formats. Note: This 900-plus page tome was remarkable for its day, but many corrections has been made in the genealogies it contains over the last century. The best compiled corrections to this work and related lines is in the "Carpenters' Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2009", data DVD format. Subject is number 775 on page 136 and 137 in the Carpenter Memorial with his family on page 255 and 256 (# 279). ^ Bowen, Richard LeBaron. Early Rehoboth: Documented Historical Studies of Families and Events in This Plymouth Colony Township, 4 vols. (Rehoboth, Mass.: Rumford Press, 1945-1950). ^ Zubrinsky, Eugene Cole. "William Carpenter of Newtown, Shalbourne, Wiltshire (Bevis, 1638)" (Ojai, Calif., 2009). ^ Zubrinsky, Eugene Cole. "The Family of William Carpenter of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, With the English Origin of the Rehoboth Carpenters," The American Genealogist, Vol. 70 (October 1995), pp. 193-204. This work establishes the English origin of William Carpenter of Rehoboth (c1605-1658[/9]); identifies his wife, Abigail Briant; and revises their children's birth order. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. ^ Now located in present day Rumford, Rhode Island (site of the original Rehoboth settlement). See: History of Rehoboth, Massachusetts. ^ Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settlers of New England Before 1692, Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register - with two supplements in four volumes, Baltimore, Md., Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., originally published 1860-1862, Boston, Mass., reprinted with "Genealogical Notes and Errata" excerpted from The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XXVII, No. 2, April, 1873, pp. 135-139. Corrected electronic version copyright Robert Kraft, July 1994 ^ Dexter, O. P. A Genealogical Cross Index of the Four Volumes of the Genealogical Dictionary of James Savage, originally published 1884, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, Md., 1965, 1969, 1977, 1981, 1986, 1990. Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number 65-18541, International Standard Book Number: 0-8063-0309-3, Set Number: 0-8063-0795. ^ Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army - C - Fifteenth Virginia - page 145. Carpenter, Benajah (R. I.). Captain Lieutenant of Knox's Regiment Continental Artillery, 10th December, 1775; killed at Long Island, 27th August, 1776. ^ Carpenter, Amos. Number 793 on page 139. See in addition: Benajah Carpenter ^ Carpenters' Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2009 (DVD format). Thomas Carpenter is listed as RIN 20748. ^ Rehoboth, Massachusetts, Vital Records, 1642–1896, NEHGS research library, call number REF F74/R3/A6. ^ U.S. Senate Art & History site retrieved 2008. See also Francis Bicknell Carpenter ^ Carpenters' Encyclopedia of Carpenters 2009 (DVD format)

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William "of the Bevis" Carpenter's Timeline

1576
1576
Wiltshire, England
1582
1582
Age 6
Nettlecomb, Somerset, England
1584
1584
Age 8
Amesbury, Wiltshire, England
1588
1588
Age 12
Amesbury, Wiltshire, England
1590
1590
Age 14
Amesbury, Wiltshire, England
1604
August 1604
Age 28
Wiltshire, England
1605
May 23, 1605
Age 29
Shalbourne, Wiltshire, England
1612
October 16, 1612
Age 36
Hingham, Norfolk, England
1638
May 1638
Age 62
Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA
May 1638
Age 62
East Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA