William de la Pole (c.1302 - 1366) MP

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Nicknames: "Sir William De /La Pole/", "Of Hull", "William De /La Pole/", "William De /Pole/"
Birthplace: Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England
Death: Died in Hull, Yorkshire, England
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About William de la Pole

William De La POLE (Sir)

Born: ABT 1302, Linby, Nottinghamshire, England

Died: 21 Jun 1366

Buried: Carthusian Priory, Hull

Notes: The Complete Peerage vol.XIIp1.p.434-437.

Father: William De La POLE (Sir)

Mother: Elena ROTENHERYNG

Married: Margaret (Catherine) De NORWICH (b. ABT 1306 - d. 1382) (dau. of Walter De Norwich and Catherine De Hadersete)

Children:

1. Michael De La POLE (1º E. Suffolk)

2. Edmund De La POLE (Sir)

3. Walter De La POLE (Sir)

4. Thomas De La POLE (Sir)

5. Blanche De La POLE (B. Scrope of Bolton)

6. Catherine De La POLE

7. Margaret De La POLE

8. Isabel De La POLE

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William de la Pole of Hull (d. 1366) was a wealthy merchant in Kingston upon Hull, a royal moneylender, a baron of the Exchequer, and ultimately a baron.

Sir William and his (probably older) brother Sir Richard de la Pole (died 1345) were merchants at Hull by 1317, importing Gascon wines. From 1317, they were deputies of the Royal Chief Butler. From 1321, they were collectors of customs and chamberlains of the town. With the accession of Edward III (then under the tutelage of Roger Mortimer and Queen Isabella), war with Scotland was resumed. They loaned the pair large sums of money in 1327, and in return Richard received the appointment of Chief Butler of England. When the Bardi, Edward's Florentine bankers were unable to lend the king money to pay his troops, the Pole brothers did so. They were owed £13,482 by February 1329.

Contrary to earlier suggestions, they did not lose power with Mortimer's fall, but their wealth meant they could not be totally excluded from the government of Edward III. Richard continued to attend court at a time when Mortimer's supporters were absent. In July 1331, the brothers divided their assets. Richard was again Chief Butler of England from 1333 to 1338. He was an alderman of London from 1330 to 1340 (when he was knighted), but died in 1345. His son William is principally known as a Northamptonshire landowner.

In 1331 Sir William persuaded the king to make Hull into an autonomous borough, instead of having a royal warden. On the death of the last warden in 1333, the brothers took over the royal property there and Sir William became Mayor of Hull, a post which he filled for the next 4 years. He also represented the city of Hull in five sessions of Parliament (March 1332, September 1334, May 1335, September 1336, and February 1338).

He continued financing Edward's Scottish wars but also bought much property in Yorkshire and Durham. His trading activities included the large scale export of wool to Dortrecht, but he and his partners abused the right of compulsory purchase that they were granted, smuggling wool, and thus ruined the financing of the king's campaigns in the Netherlands in 1338–40.

As a result of this, he and his associates were arrested after the king's return in November 1340, and deprived of the property. However, he was released in May 1342 and the proceedings were quashed, probably because the king needed his help financially. He organised a new company, which managed the Customs and lent vast sums to the king, also buying up royal debts at a large discount. He withdrew from the company in 1345. The company continued, and financed the Crécy campaign and the Siege of Calais, but were ruined as a result of the Black Death. He escaped liability for the debts of the now bankrupt company. However, the prosecution of 1341 was revived, and Sir William only escaped by renouncing all debts due from the crown. This, however, still left him a wealthy man. He died in May 1366, five months after his son Michael was summoned to Parliament as a peer.

Family

The orgins of Sir William are obscure. His father's name is not certainly known but may have been William. His mother Elena remarried John Rotenheryng. Some genealogical tables indicate Sir William was related to the old ruling house of Powys Wenwynwyn [1], however other contest this and there is no concrete evidence that he was or wasn't related to these princes whose descendants used the surname de la Pole,[1] (i.e. of Welshpool). The surname (meaning 'of the pool') was no doubt not exceptional. Sir William had three sons:

Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk

Sir Edmund de la Pole

Sir Thomas de la Pole

De la Pole Avenue, located in the west of Kingston upon Hull, is named after Sir William.

References

E. B. Fryde, ‘Pole, Sir William de la (d. 1366)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 12 April 2008

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William de la Pole of Hull

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William de la Pole of Hull (died 1366) was a wealthy merchant in Kingston upon Hull, a royal moneylender, a baron of the Exchequer, and ultimately a baron.

Sir William and his (probably older) brother Sir Richard de la Pole (died 1345) were merchants at Hull by 1317, importing Gascon wines. From 1317, they were deputies of the Royal Chief Butler. From 1321, they were collectors of customs and chamberlains of the town. With the accession of Edward III (then under the tutelage of Roger Mortimer and Queen Isabella), war with Scotland was resumed. They loaned the pair large sums of money in 1327, and in return Richard received the appointment of Chief Butler of England. When the Bardi, Edward's Florentine bankers were unable to lend the king money to pay his troops, the Pole brothers did so. They were owed £13,482 by February 1329.

Contrary to earlier suggestions, they did not lose power with Mortimer's fall, but their wealth meant they could not be totally excluded from the government of Edward III. Richard continued to attend court at a time when Mortimer's supporters were absent. In July 1331, the brothers divided their assets. Richard was again Chief Butler of England from 1333 to 1338. He was an alderman of London from 1330 to 1340 (when he was knighted), but died in 1345. His son William is principally known as a Northamptonshire landowner.

In 1331 Sir William persuaded the king to make Hull into an autonomous borough, instead of having a royal warden. On the death of the last warden in 1333, the brothers took over the royal property there and Sir William became Mayor of Hull, a post which he filled for the next 4 years. He also represented the city of Hull in five sessions of Parliament (March 1332, September 1334, May 1335, September 1336, and February 1338).

He continued financing Edward's Scottish wars but also bought much property in Yorkshire and Durham. His trading activities included the large scale export of wool to Dortrecht, but he and his partners abused the right of compulsory purchase that they were granted, smuggling wool, and thus ruined the financing of the king's campaigns in the Netherlands in 1338–40.

As a result of this, he and his associates were arrested after the king's return in November 1340, and deprived of the property. However, he was released in May 1342 and the proceedings were quashed, probably because the king needed his help financially. He organised a new company, which managed the Customs and lent vast sums to the king, also buying up royal debts at a large discount. He withdrew from the company in 1345. The company continued, and financed the Crécy campaign and the Siege of Calais, but were ruined as a result of the Black Death. He escaped liability for the debts of the now bankrupt company. However, the prosecution of 1341 was revived, and Sir William only escaped by renouncing all debts due from the crown. This, however, still left him a wealthy man. He died in May 1366, five months after his son Michael was summoned to Parliament as a peer.

[edit] Family

The origins of Sir William are obscure. His father's name is not certainly known but may have been William. His mother Elena remarried John Rotenheryng. Some genealogical tables[1] indicate Sir William was related to the old ruling house of Powys Wenwynwyn. However, there is no concrete evidence whatever of this alleged relationship, though those princes' descendants used the surname de la Pole (i.e. "of the Pool", referring to their case to Welshpool).[1] This surname was no doubt not exceptional.

Sir William had three sons:

Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk

Sir Edmund de la Pole

Sir Thomas de la Pole

De la Pole Avenue, located in the west of Kingston upon Hull, is named after Sir William.

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  1. ID: I51174
  2. Name: William De la Pole Earl of Suffolk
  3. Surname: De la Pole
  4. Given Name: William
  5. Suffix: Earl of Suffolk
  6. Prefix: Sir
  7. Nickname: Sir
  8. Sex: M
  9. Birth: 1302 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  10. Death: 21 Jun 1366 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  11. Burial: Trinity Church, Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England
  12. _UID: 3507583900CCE846A44A0FF24DDE71C81A6A
  13. Note:
   Sir William de la Pole, called in English William Atte Pool (d 1366), baron of the exchequer and merchant, was second son fo Sir William de la Pole, a merchant of Ravenser Odd (Ravensrode) and Hull, who is described as a knight in 1296 and died about 1329, having made his will in December 1328. The father married Elena, daughter of John Rotenheryng, 'merchant of Hull,' by whom he had three sons, Richard, William, and John.
   The eldest brother, Sir Richard de la Pole (d 1345), was, in 1319, attorney for the king's butler at Hull, and a mainpernor for certain merchants of Lubeck. He was collector of the customs at Hull in 1320, as was M.P. for that town in the parliaments of May 1322 and September 1327. Through the influence of Roger Mortimer he became the king's chief butler in 1327, and, in conjunction with his brother William, obtained the office of gauger of wines throughout the realm for life on 22 May 1329, and a similar grant of the customs of Hull, on 9 May 1330. The two brothers are frequently mentioned as advancing money for the king. After the fall of Mortimer they lost the post of granger of wines, but Sir Richard continued to be chief butler until 1338. He was a guardian of the peace for Derbyshire, and served on a commission of oyer and terminer in Leicestershire in 1332. About 1333 he seems to have moved to London, and in his will and elsewhere is styled a citizen of London. He was knighted in 1340 and, dying on 1 Aug 1345 at his manor of Milton, Northamptonshire, was buried in the Trinity Chapel at Hull. His will is printed in 'Testamenta Everacensin.' By his wive Joan he had two sons, William and John, and three daughters: Joan, wife of Ralph Basset of Weldon, Northampshire; Elizabeth a nun; and Margaret. His son William (1316), who is carefully to be distinguished from his uncle, married Margaret daughter of Edmund Peverel, and held propberty at Brington and Ashby, Northamptonshire. He died on 26 June 1366, leaving a son John, who married Joan, daughter of John lord Cobham; by her he was father of Joan, baroness Cobham and wife of Sir John Oldcastle. The armes of this branch of the family were azure, two bars wavy, or.
   Sir William de la Pole, the baron of the exchequer, first learnt the business of a merchant at Ravenser Odd, but afterwards moved to Hull, and is mentioned as a merchant of that town in 1319 and 1322. He was associated with his elder brother as gauger of wines in 1327, and in supplying money for the royal service. During the regency of Mortimer and Isabella they advanced large sums to the government: 4,000 £ on 12 July 1327 for the abortive Scots campaing, and 2,000 £ six weeks later as wages for the Netherland mercenaries, who had landed to effect Edward II's deposition. As repayment they received the issues of customs in London and other principal ports. They also received a grant of the manor of Myton in Yorkshire for their good services in 1330, and on 2 Aug were appointed joint wardens of Hull. On the fall of Mortimer their position was endangered, and they lost the office of gaugers of wine. But they kept aloof from politices, and their wealth insured their pardon. On 15 July 1331 William de la Pole, then described as the king's yeoman and butler, was granted repayment for his advances to Queen Philippa out of the customs of Hull. In 1332 he entertained the king at Hull, and obtained from Edward the title of mayor of the chief magistrate of the town, being himself the first to fill the office, which he retained for four years til 1335. Pole represented Hull in the parliaments of March 1332, September 1334, May and September 1336, and February 1338. During 1333 and the two following years he was employed on the various negotiations with Flanders, with which, as a wool merchant, he had commercial relations.
   On 29 Sept 1335 he was appointed custos of the tables of exchange, established to prevent the export of gold and silver, and receiver of the old and new customs of Hull and Boston. In consideration of the latter appointment he undertook to pay the expenses of the royal household at 10 £ a day. In 1337 he was charged ot build a galley for the king at Hull, and on 1 Sept of this year was associated with Reginal de Conduit in purchasing wool to be sent abroad for the king. On 14 Nov 1338 Edward gave his an acknowledgment for 11,000 £ advanced, and for 7,500 £ for which he had become bound; and this same year, in consideration of other moneys advanced by Pole, granted him various manors in Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire, including the lordship of Holderness, together with the rank of knight-bannerer, the reversion of one thousand marks in rent in France when the king recovered his rights there, and the houses in Lombard Street, London, which had belonged to the 'Societas Bardorum.'
   The 'Chronicle of Meaux' also states that Pole's appointment as baron of the exchequer was in reward for the same services. The date of his appointment as second baron was 26 SEpt 1339, and as one of the judges he was present in the parliament of October 1339 and April 13340. He was a commissionar of array for Yorkshire in 1339. During this and the following year he was much employed by the king in commercial and financial business. In 1339 he was a hostage for the payment of the king's expenses at Antwerp. In 1340 he undertook to obtain wool for the king's aid, and to advance three thousand marks. But his conduct of affairs did not satisfy the king, and when Edward returned in haste to London on 30 Nov 1340, William de la Pole, his brother Richard, and Sir John de Pulteney were among the merchants who were arrested. Pole's lands were taken into the king's hands and he was for a short time imprisoned at Devizes Castle. The particular charge against Pole arose out of his commission with Reginald de Conduit three years before; but though judgment was given against them in the exchequer, the whole process was annulled in the parliament of July 1344. Sir William de la Pole survived to enjoy the king's favour for more than twenty years, but he does not again appear in a prominent position. About 1350 he founded a hospital, the Maison Dieu, outside Hull, which he had at first intended to be a cell of Meaux, but afterwards converted to a college for six priests. In the last year of his life he obtained license to change it to a house for nuns of the order of St Clare, and eventually, in 1376, his son Michale established it as a Carthusian priory. Pole died at Hull on 21 April or 22 June 1366, and was buried, like his brother, in the Trinity Chapel. HIs will is printed in 'Testamenta Eboracensia.'
   He married Katherine, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, who survived him, and dying in 1381, was buried at the Charterhouse, Hull; her will is printed in 'Testamenta Eboracensa.' Pole had four sons: Michael, earl of Suffolk, Walter and Thomas (d 1361), both of whom were knights; and Edmund (1337-1417), who was captain of Calais in 1387, when he refused admission to his brother Michael lest he should be found false to his trust. The Edmund who fought at Agincourt was probably his grandson. Pole had also two daughters: Blanche, who married Richard, first lord le Scrope of Bolton; and Margaret, married Robert Neville of Hornby, Lancashire. Sir William de la Pole's arms were azure, a fess between three leopards' faces cr. The 'Chronicle of Meaux' describes him as 'second to no merchant of England.' He is memorable in English commercial history as the first merchant who became the founder of a great noble house. His own and his wife's effigies, from the tomb in the church of the Holy Trinity, Hull, are engraved in Gough's 'Sepulchral Monuments.' [Dictionary of National Biography XVI:48-50]
   _________________________
   WILLIAM DE LA POLE, in 1319 with his brothers Richard and John obtained an acknowledgment of a debt; in 1325 he was pardoned for acquiring the manor of Linby, Notts. In 1327 grants were made to his brother Richard (King's butler) and himself towards the King's indebtedness to them, and thereafter they constantly appear as advancing money to the King. In May 1329, with his brother, he was appointed gauger of wines throughout the kingdom, but this appointment was vacated on the fall of Mortimer by the re-appointment in December 1330 of the previous holder, who had been removed without the King's consent; in the same month, however, the brothers, described as King's serjeants, were granted that they should have for life the custody of the town of Hull, on the death of the then warden, Robert Hastang, and were subsequently appointed jointly with him. William was M.P. for Hull in 1328, 1332, 1334, 1335, 1336 and 1338. In July 1331, described as King's yeoman and merchant, he received a sum out of the customs of Hull in return for paying the expenses of Queen Philippa's household. In February 1332/3 Henry de Beaumont and Isabel de Beaumont, Lady of Vescy, were licensed to demise to him for ten years the manor of Barton, Lincs. In 1333 he was mayor of Hull, and in the same year, and again in 1335, was appointed to treat with Lewis, Count of Flanders. On 23 Sep. 1334 he had his writ de expensis for attending Parliament at Westminster on 2o September. On 7 October 1337 he was summoned to be at London on the morrow of St. Andrew to give counsel. In 1337 he was an executor of the will of John le Gras, who had been sheriff of Yorkshire. In 1338 he was three times summoned to be before the Council, in February and November in London, in July at Northampton. In June 1338, for a sum of £6,000, the King enfeoffed him of certain manors for ten years. In August 1338, described as King's merchant, he was mayor of the staple in Antwerp. In October he was with the King overseas. On 26 September 1339 he was appointed 2nd Baron of the Exchequer. From 1339-1349 he is described as "Lord of Holderness, knight and merchant." In July 1340 he had returned from Dordrecht, and a commission was appointed to audit his accounts. He is styled knight. In August he had licence to go beyond seas to sell wool, in return for one of his frequent loans to the King. In November 1340 the King crossed from Flanders to London, and had some of the judges and officers of state arrested privily by night, among them William de la Pole. On 16 May 1342 it was ordered that he should be released from the Fleet prison on being mainperned to be before the Treasurer and Barons from day to day to render his accounts. In 1344 claims were made against him and another as receivers of wool, and a commission was appointed to consider whether they might be relieved. In the same year it was ordered that he should have his own lands, but not those which he had had from the King by gift or purchase. In July 1345 he was directed to go to London to treat with certain lieges on arduous affairs of the realm, and in February 1346/7 to attend a council in London to speak on secret matters. In March 1348/9 he was collector of the custom of wool hides and wool fells in the port of Hull, and was ordered to be before the King and his council at Westminster on the day after Low Sunday to speak upon certain matters touching the realm. In November 1354 he was licensed to found a hospital in Hull. In May 1355 it is recorded that in return for his great services in lending money to the King, he had been made knight and banneret; but in the preceding February there were proceedings pending against him in the Exchequer, and he had apparently been imprisoned, because the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer were directed to let him go free until after Easter without mainprise. In March he surrendered certain manors, and on 6 August executed a release to the King from all debts up to the preceding 20 November. In 1360 he was in France, and in June he and his wife had a grant of escheated land in Yorkshire, in consideration of his great services to the King and the great place which he held in many ways in his necessities. In October 1362 he was going beyond seas, and in May 1363, styled 'chivaler,' he was pardoned for selling wool intended for export. He married Katharine. He died 21 June 1366, and was buried at Trinity Church, Kingston-upon-Hull. M.I. Katherine survived him and died 28 January 1381/2. [Complete Peerage XII/1:434-7]
   1 _FA1
   2 PLAC Merchant.
   1 _FA2
   2 PLAC All 3 daughters unmarried in 1339, when King promised to findhusbands for them.
   1 _FA3
   2 PLAC Interred: Trinity Church, Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire,England.
   1 _FA4
   2 PLAC Mayor of Hull, Baron of the Exchequer.
   2 SOUR S001127
   3 PAGE line 218 p 182
   William de la Pole died 1366, his wife Katherine died
   1381.
   Charles Frost in his article on the family thought
   the de la Pole brothers (Richard and William) were
   the sons of William and Elena, who subsequently
   remarried John Rottenherring. However A.S. Harvey
   "The de la Pole Family of Kingston-upon-Hull" published
   Hull, 1957 proved neither parent correct.
   William and Katherine had three daughters, Katherine,
   Blanche and Margaret. All three were still unmarried
   in 1339, when the king promised to provide them with
   suitable husbands. By May 1340 Katherine had married
   Constantine, the son of Adam de Clifton. The second
   daughter, Blanche, married Richard lord Scrope of
   Bolton. Margaret, the third daughter, married Robert
   Neville of Hornby. This marriage probably took place
   around 1362. Dr. Horrox stated "Robert's father,
   Robert senior, was then heavily in debt to William,
   and had been imprisoned in the Fleet for non-payment of
   two thousand pounds. Michael de la Pole obtained his
   release in May claiming that the money had been repaid.
   This seems unlikely; three days later Robert senior took out
   another bond promising repayment of the two thousand
   pounds."

1 2

  1. Change Date: 14 Jun 2009 at 01:00:00

Father: William ap Gwilym b: ABT 1278 in Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England

Mother: Elena Rotenheryng b: ABT 1287 in Hull, Yorkshire, England

Marriage 1 Katherine De Norwich b: ABT 1306 in Stoke, Norfolk, England

Children

  1. Has Children Michael De la Pole 1st Earl Suffolk b: ABT 1330 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  2. Has No Children Walter De la Pole b: ABT 1332 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  3. Has No Children Thomas De la Pole b: ABT 1333 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  4. Has No Children Blanche De la Pole b: ABT 1335 in Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England
  5. Has No Children Edmund De la Pole b: 1337 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  6. Has Children Catherine De la Pole b: ABT 1338 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  7. Has Children Margaret De la Pole b: ABT 1340 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
  8. Has No Children John De la Pole
  9. Has No Children Joan De la Pole

Sources:

  1. Repository:
     Title: The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant
     Author: Editor: G.E. Cokayne, with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden
     Publication: St. Catherine Press, 29 Great Queen St, Kingsway, W.C. 1959
     Page: XII/1:434-437
  2. Repository:
     Title: Dictionary of National Biography
     Author: Ed by Sir Leslie S
     Publication: George Smith, Oxford Press, Vols 1-21 (Orignially published 1885-90)
     Page: XVI:48-50 

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William de la Pole's Timeline

1302
1302
Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England
1327
1327
Age 25
Hull, Yorkshire, England
1327
Age 25
1328
1328
Age 26
Probably Ravenscar, Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
1331
1331
Age 29
Of, Wiverton, Nottinghamshire, England
1331
Age 29
Wingfield, Suffolk, England
1331
Age 29
England
1332
1332
Age 30
Of Hull, Yrkshr, Engl
1333
1333
Age 31
Of Hull, Yrkshr, Engl
1337
1337
Age 35
Probably Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England