5

Совпадения

0 2 3
Дополнения: более полное место погребения, место жительства, супруг(и) и дети.

View Willis Andrew Stewart's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Willis Andrew Stewart
  • Request to view Willis Andrew Stewart's family tree

Поделиться

Nicknames: "Willis Andrew Stewart (full name)"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lauderdale, AL, United States
Death: Died in Ridgeway, Hopkins, Texas, United States
Managed by: Bob Stewart
Last Updated:

About Willis Andrew Stewart

Praising the Lord and cussing Yankees

"A tall, straight-nosed Scotsman, (Willis) Stewart had two passions: the Confederacy, which he had served as cavalryman under Gen. Bedford Forest, and the Presbyterian Church. A zeal for religious freedom had brought Stewart's parents to America, and that same spark had brought him to the Texas frontier."

Thus wrote a journalist in 1985 in a feature story about the Texas cemetery that bears my great grandfather's name — and he had him pegged. Willis went to his grave praising the Lord and cussing Yankees.

Willis Andrew Stewart was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., in 1846 and was only a year old when his dad died. An only child, he and his mother, Martha Ann, went to live with her mother, who was also widowed.

However, the grandmother — Mary Herman — was more fortunate than Martha Ann because she had two strapping sons, four healthy girls and undoubtedly several slaves to keep the family farm going. I say "undoubtedly" because there is no record of the Hermans owning slaves, but that's just the way it was in the 1840s in Alabama. In this environment, Willis grew to be a man deeply devoted to family and righteous in his beliefs. The extended family worked hard and gave thanks for their prosperity when they worshipped at the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Rising Star.

Then came the Civil War and the 18-year-old Willis rode with the Confederacy's 11th Alabama Cavalry during the last months of the bloody struggle. Unharmed physically but forever changed emotionally, he came home to burned barns and devastated fields. Under the yoke of Reconstruction, he set about putting in the spring crops with Union soldiers all about. Some blamed the Yankees when the family's Cumberland Presyterian Church mysteriously burned one night.

Willis suffered the loss in silence, and continued work to restore the family farm. He got a helpmate at the age of 20 when on Dec. 18, 1866, he took Nancy A. "Nannie" Phillips, 22, of Center Star, Ala., as his bride in a marriage that was to endure for 53 years.

While Willis and Nannie were building a family of seven children in Alabama, some of their relatives — the Birdwells and the Hermans — were picking up stakes and moving West.

Some settled in the Oakland community of Hopkins County, Texas, and wrote back glowing reports about the fine soil and plentiful wildlife. Finally, in 1880 after the crop was harvested, Willis saddled up and left his wife with a houseful of kids (including my grandfather, James William) and headed off to see if his relatives' tales about Texas were true. He liked what he saw and rode back to Alabama to work another year on his farm to raise money to move his family to Oakland in Northeast Texas.

Here's how Bill Porterfield, the Dallas Times Herald reporter who wrote the Stewart Cemetery story, tells it:

"The Stewarts came by train from Alabama, and they must have made a sight when they got off at the depot in Black Jack Grove, now Cumby. Willis and Nannie had brought with them Willis' mother, . . . their seven children and a couple of ex-slaves, Abraham and Chloe, who had chosen to remain with the Stewarts after they were freed. Abraham and Chloe brought with them a small son."

They built a two-room log cabin, and it was there that the deeply religious couple started evening Bible studies and singings that eventually led to the founding of the Oakland Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Life in Texas was good for the Stewarts, but even in the 1880s it could still be a dangerous place. Along about the spring of 1885, Abraham was breaking land behind an old Georgia stock one-horse plow when an Indian slipped out of the timber and struck him from behind with a tomahawk. The Stewart children heard Abraham screaming and sent their father to help. Willis killed the Indian with a rifle shot, but Abraham died of his wound. Willis buried both the former slave and the Indian in what came to be Stewart Cemetery. Today, neither grave is marked.

Reporter Porterfield again: "Curiously, there was but one Stewart buried in the Stewart Cemetery, and she was Willis Stewart's mother, Martha, who was, of course, only a Stewart by marriage. ... Recently, great-grandson A.T. Stewart dug up her dirt (it was all that remained of her) and carried it to Lauderdale County, Alabama, where he placed it beside the 137-year-old grave of her husband, James William."

Willis and Nannie lived in Oakland for the next 40 years, raising their childen, farming their 301 acres of land and becoming pillars of the community. The old Rebel died Dec. 20, 1920.

He was remembered at his funeral thusly:

"In his daily life, he was a plain, unassuming, unobtrusive man, polite and courteous to all. He believed in honesty, morality, and industry and was of a charitable and sympathetic nature. He ... favored better educational facilities and endorsed and supported all attempts at bettering the social and moral standing of his community. He was a loyal member of the Oakland Presbyterian Church for many years and was one of the strongest supporters of that church in his community. He frowned on misconduct of any kind by anyone and his influence has been of much benefit in molding the characters of many.

"On all matters that arose that affected the body politic, he was always to be found entrenched on the moral side of the question.

"He was a successful farmer, a good financier and though he began life very poor, yet by hard work, good management and fair dealing, he had amassed a sufficiency of this world's goods to afford him ease and comfort."

— Bob Stewart

http://www.geni.com/people/Willis-Andrew-Stewart/2233870

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/12262403/person/-48405252

Family soul-searching in the cemetery

By Bill Porterfield Dallas Times Herald

July 21, 1985

The Stewart Cemetery in East Hopkins County was not as lost in the woods as we had thought. David Bays of Dallas mailed us not only a map leading to the old graveyard, but a partial list of the bodies buried there. Louise Stewart Parker of Sulphur Springs wrote to say she was a granddaughter of Willis Stewart, after whom the boneyard was named, and then her grandson, Keith Maddox, showed up to lead us to the clutter of tombstones in a grove of cedar and live oak below the South Sulphur River.

The cemetery is on land now owned by Vera Herrington of Sulphur Springs, and we found it in surprisingly good condition, thanks to a restoration effort organized some years ago by Louise Parker's brother, A.T. Stewart of Waco. Keith Maddox, a student at East Texas State in Commerce, was so moved by the spirit of the place that he swore, "I'm going to call Mrs. Herrington and get permission to come out with mowers. This old cemetery needs tending to."

The burial grounds had beckoned for several reasons, Zacharias Birdwell (1801-1880), one of the early pioneers of Hopkins county, was buried there. Indeed, the plot had been known as the Birdwell Cemetery before Willis and Nannie Stewart bought the land from Birdwell's widow, Polly, in 1882. The Stewarts were of interest. Willis Stewart was Polly Birdwell's nephew. A tall, straight-nosed Scotsman, Stewart had two passions: the Confederacy, which he had served as cavalryman under Gen. Bedford Forest, and the Presbyterian Church. A zeal for religious freedom had brought Stewart's parents to America, and that same spark had brought him to the Texas frontier.

The Stewarts came by train from Alabama, and they must have made a sight when they got off at the depot in Black Jack Grove, now Cumby. Willis and Nannie had brought with them Willis' mother, Martha Herman Stewart (Aunt Polly's sister), their seven children and a couple of ex-slaves, Abraham and Chloe, who had chosen to remain with the Stewarts after they were freed. Abraham and Chloe brought with them a small son. Uncle James Frank Herman, who lived on the Birdwell farm with his widowed sister Polly, came with two wagons to take them to their new home.

The house was a two-room log cabin for Abraham and Chloe. It was in the dogtrot house that Willis and Nannie started the evening Bible studies and singings that led to the founding of the Oakland Cumberland Presbyterian Church, which still draws worshipers three miles to the southeast on Farm Rd. 2653. The house would serve two generations of Stewarts. Louise Parker and her sisters were born there after the turn of the century.

Along about the spring of 1885, Abraham was out breaking dirt behind an old Georgia stock one-horse plow when an Indian slipped out of the timber and struck him from behind with a tomahawk. The Stewart children heard Abraham screaming and sent their father to help. Willis killed the Indian with a rifle shot. Abraham died of his wounds. Willis buried both in the Stewart Cemetery. Today, neither grave is marked.

A.T. Stewart says there is another Indian buried there, that in fact it is his grave that brought the others. Years before the Stewarts came, Zacharias Birdwell was accosted by an Indian on the place. The brave chased him around and around a wagon as Zacharias called for Polly to bring him his long rifle. A neighboring farmer, a man named Brannon happened by on horseback and felled the Indian with one shot. They dug a hole for him in the grove, and thereafter used it for their own departed. The oldest grave still marked is that of James Dodson Herman, Uncle Frank Herman's month-old son, who died in 1879. The most recent grave is that of Mary Casey, who died in 1915 at the age of 29.

Curiously, there was but one Stewart buried in the Stewart Cemetery, and she was Willis Stewart's mother, Martha, who was, of course, only a Stewart by marriage. Aunt Polly had died on a trip and was buried where she fell, so there was a place beside Uncle Zacharias, and that is where Willis put his mother when she died. Recently, great-grandson A.T. Stewart dug up her dirt (it was all that remained of her) and carried it to Lauderdale County, Alabama, where he placed it beside the 137-year-old grave of her husband, James William.

Obviously, A.T. is the family historian as well as sexton, but there is one chapter in their past which even he cannot recount, and that is the fate of Chloe, the wife of Abraham. He knows that their son, who was about 8 years old when his father was tomahawked, died of a fever shortly after Abraham's death, and was buried beside his father. Chloe is not thought to be in Stewart Cemetery, nor Ridgeway Cemetery where Willis and Nannie and the later Stewarts ended up.

"She is a mystery," A.T. says. "After the deaths of her husband and son, she seems to have disappeared, at least in the family memory. And she was, in a sense, family."

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

OAKLAND

Oakland Community is in the northwestern part of the county on farm to market road 2655 between Ridgeway and Emblem. Although it never had a post office, many families settled in this area. This is known because of the many graves in the Old Oakland Cemetery. Most of the people buried there died in the late 1800s. The cemetery is located about one-half mile due west of the Oakland Cumberland Presbyterian Church on land donated by Rev. James Young (1790-1856). At one time there was a building on the cemetery grounds that was used for both a church and school. One has to use the road that runs through a pasture to reach the cemetery.

After the Civil War during the turbulence of Reconstruction, the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Rising Star, Ala., was burned. Members W. A. Stewart (1845-1920) and his wife Nannie Stewart (1844-1933) sought a place where they could worship as they pleased. They came to Hopkins County in 1882 with their seven children and ex-slavesh, Abraham and Chloe (both buried in the old Stewart Cemetery). Stewart bought 301 acres and built a two-room dog-trot house three miles from the present day church.

The family continued their custom of evening singing, prayer and Bible study. Soon neighbors joined the services. In 1883 a circuit rider, Rev. Felice Johnson, came and held services in their home. In 1884 Stewart received permission for services to be held in Oakland School.

In 1896 Mrs. M. A. Young gave two acres for a church. W. A. Stewart and his uncle Frank Herman, drew plans and erected a meeting house with the help of the community. In 1944 a fire caused extensive damage. The fellowhip repaired the structure and the Oakland Cumberland Presbyterian Church continues to serve the area. The church received a State Historical Marker in 1980.

Another State Historical Marker was placed in the community in 1984 for the Stewart Cemetery, located on land originally owned by Zacharias Birdwell (1801-1880). The earliest marked grave is of infant James Becton Herman, dated 1879. In 1882 Polly, the widow of Zacharias Birdwell, deeded land including the cemetery to her nephew, W. A. Stewart. The burial ground soon became known as Stewart Cemetery. It was last used in 1915 and contains 23 marked graves, including that of Zacharias Birdwell. This little cemetery, lyng in a pasture due north of Oakland Cemetery, can boast of having one Indian, two blacks, and several settlers of the community buried there.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A tall, straight-nosed Scotsman, Willis Andrew Stewart had two passions, the Confederacy, which he had served as a cavalryman under Gen. Bedford Forrest, and the Presbyterian Church. A zeal for religious freedom brought Stewart's parents to America, and that same spark brought him to the Texas frontier. The Stewarts came by train from Alabama, and they must have made a sight when they got off at the depot in Black Jack Grove, now Cumby. Willis and Nannie had brought with them Willis' mother, Martha Herman Stewart, their seven children and a couple of ex-slaves, Abraham and Chloe, who had chosen to remain with the Stewarts after they were freed. Willis and Nannie and their brood settled in Oakland in Hopkins County. There the farmer and his wife helped found the Oakland Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Willis Andrew Stewart was born to Martha A. Herman and James William Stewart one year after their marriage on June 19, 1845. Soon after Willis Andrew's birth on June 20, 1846, James William Stewart died and Martha A. took Willis Andrew to live with her mother, Mrs. Mary Herman (father was Robert Herman). Their Post Office was listed as Center Star, Alabama in the 1860 Census.

The National Archives has one record of the Civil War service of Willis Andrew. This is a document indicating that as a volunteer he received no pay in the Eleventh Cavalry of Alabama, under General Bedford Forrest, at age 18.

From a copy of an old newpaper article bearing neither date nor name of paper.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

W. A. Stewart

Another tired and worn out veteran of the Army of the Southern Confederacy has answered his last roll call and has joined his immortal comrades of these trying days in that better land beyond the skies.

One by one they are passing away and swiftly the gaps are widening in that "thin gray line" that in the memorable days of the sixties formed the most gallant band of fighters the world has ever produced and where memories will be honored as long as time shall last.

Mr. Stewart was born in Lauderdale County, Alabama, June 20, 1846 of honest, industrious, farmer parentage. His early life was spent in working on the farm during the summer and in winter attending such rural schools, as the meager education facilities of that day afforded.

At the tender age of 18, when his beloved Southland was in the throes of that great fratricidal strife and was bending every effort in defense of Southern rights and Southern homes, he placed his life at the service of his country and became a member of Company K of the 11th Alabama Cavalry, which was an integral part of that unconquerable fighting legion commanded by that dashing cavalier, General Bedford Forest and for the balance of the war an active participant and followed the Stars and Bars in many fierce and sanguinary charges on the field of battle and often actually lived in the saddle for days at a time, freezing, hungry and sleepy, but ever eager to rush forward at the bugle's blare.

Late in the year 1882 he moved with his family to Texas and located near Oakland, in which neighborhood he resided for nearly 40 years.

In his daily life, he was a plain, unassuming, unobtrusive man, polite and courteous to all. He believed in honesty, morality, and industry and was of a charitable and sympathetic nature. He was favored better educational facilities and endorsed and supported all attempts at bettering the social and moral standing of his community. He was a loyal member of the Oakland Presbyterian Church for many years and was one of the strongest supporters of that church in his community. He frowned on misconduct of any kind by anyone and his influence has been of much benefit in molding the characters of many.

On all matters that arose that affected the body politic, he was always to be found entrenched on the moral side of the question.

He was a successful farmer, a good financier and though he began life very poor, yet by hard work, good management and fair dealing, he had amassed a sufficiency of this world's goods to afford him ease and comfort.

The writer of these lines has known him intimately for more than 30 years and between us there had grown a strong bond of friendship and mutual esteem. We have sold him goods many years ago and he used to bring some of the nicest, cleaned cotton this town, that was ever sold here. Of late years he never came to Cumby, without paying us a social call and we always enjoyed talking with him. We regarded him as one of best and truest friends and now that he is gone, we deeply feel that we have sustained a loss that cannot be replaced.

To his family we can only extend our most sincere sympathy and commend them to the care of Him, who has power to comfort the broken hearted.

He is survived by his wife, 3 daughters and 4 sons and a large number of grandchildren.

His funeral service were conducted on Wednesday afternoon December 22nd in Oakland Presbyterian Church (which he had assisted in organizing and maintaining) by Rev. Fred S. Rogers of this place, assisted by Rev. W. E. Graham of Greenville, after which his remains were laid to rest in the Ridgeway Cemetery in The presence of many of his lifetime friends and associates.

By his friend,

R. W. Harris

Oakland Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Sulphur Springs, Hopkins County, Texas

Marker Erected 1979

Marker Located FM 2653 ROW, 12 NW of Sulphur Springs

Marker Text:

After the Civil War (1861-65), during the turbulence of Reconstruction, the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Rising Star, Alabama, was burned. Members W. A. (Willis) (d. 1920) and Nannie Stewart sought a place where they could worship as they pleased. They came to Hopkins County in 1882 with their seven children and ex-slaves, Abraham and Chloe. Stewart bought 301 acres and built a two-room dogtrot house (3 mi. NW). The family continued their custom of evening singing, prayer, and Bible study. Soon neighbors joined the services. In 1883 a circuit rider, the Rev. Felice Johnson, baptized Mollie Bagget in the Stewart home. When nine more converts joined in 1884, Stewart received permission for services to be held in Oakland School. In 1896 Mrs. M. A. (Aunt Polly) Young gave this two-acre site for a church. Stewart and his Uncle Frank Herman drew the plans and with community help erected this meetinghouse. The congregation continued to grow and Stewart served as church elder until his death. During services in 1944 a fire started in the church loft and caused extensive damage. The fellowship repaired the structure and the Oakland Cumberland Presbyterian Church continues to serve the area.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txhopkin/HistMarkers.html

Confederate Pension Application:

Stewart, Willis Andrew (Mrs) 47057 Hopkins Stewart, Willis Andrew (Application number 47057)

http://files.usgwarchives.net/tx/hopkins/military/civilwar/hopkncsa.txt

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Birth: Jun. 20, 1846 Lauderdale County Alabama, USADeath: Dec. 20, 1920 Ridgeway Hopkins County Texas, USA CO L, 11 ALABAMA CAVALRY

Cumby, Hopkins Co., Texas, Dec. 25. --- Willis A. Stewart, a citizen of Hopkins County for many years, died at his residence about nine miles northeast of here shortly after midnight Monday night. Mr. Stewart was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., June 20, 1846. At the age of 18 he joined the Eleventh Alabama Cavalry, Confederate States Army, which was a part of Gen. Bedford Forest's celebrated command, and served until the end of the war. In the fall of 1882, he moved to this county and spent the balance of his life near where he died. Funeral service was conducted Wednesday afternoon at the Oakland Presbyterian Church by the Revs. Fred S. Rogers of this place and W. E. Graham of Greenville, after which his remains were interred in the Ridgeway Cemetry.

Dallas News 12-26-1920

d. cert: died 21 Dec 1920/stone= Dec 20.

открыть все 11

Хронология Willis Andrew Stewart

1846
June 20, 1846
Lauderdale, AL, United States
1866
December 18, 1866
Age 20
Lauderdale, Alabama, United States
1867
October 20, 1867
Age 21
Alabama
1869
June 6, 1869
Age 22
Lauderdale, AL, USA
1874
August 24, 1874
Age 28
Lauderdale County, AL, USA
1880
February 12, 1880
Age 33
Lauderdale, AL, USA
1881
November 22, 1881
Age 35
Lauderdale, AL, USA
1920
December 20, 1920
Age 74
Ridgeway, Hopkins, Texas, United States

From a copy of an old newpaper article bearing niether date nor name of paper.

W. A. Stewart

Another tired and worn out verteran of the Army of the Southern Confederacy has answered his last roll call and has joined his immortal comrades of these trying days in that better land beyond the skies.

One by one they are passing away and swiftly the gaps are widening in that "thin gray line" that in the memorable days of the sixties formed the most gallant band of fighters the world has ever produced and where memories will be honored as long as time shall last.

Mr. Stewart was born in Lauderdale County, Alabama, June 20, 1846 of honest, industrious, farmer parentage. His early life was spen in working on the farm during the summer and in winter attending such rural schools, as the meager education facilities of that day afforded.

At the tender age of 18, when his beloved Southland was in the throes of that great fraticidal strife and was bending every effort in defense of Southern rights and Southern homes, he placed his life at the service of his country and became a member of Company K of the 11th Alabama Cavalry, which was an integral part of that unconquerable fighting legion commanded by that dashing cavalier, General Bedford Forest and for the balance of the war an active participant and followed the Stars and Bars in many fierce and sanguinary charges on the field of battle and often actually lived in the saddle for days at a time, freezing, hungry and sleepy, but ever eager to rush forward at the bugle's blare.

Late in the year 1882 he moved with his family to Texas and located near Oakland, in which neighborhood he resided for nearly 40 years.

In his daily life, he was a plain, unassuming, unobtrusive man, polite and courteous to all. He believed in honesty, morality, and industry and was of a charitable and sympathetic nature. He was favored better educational facilities and endorsed and supported all attempts at bettering the social and moral standing of his community. He was a loyal member of the Oakland Presbyterian Church for many years and was one of thestrongest supporters of that church in his community. He frowned on misconduct of any kind by anyone and his influence has been of much benefit in molding the characters of many.

On all matters that arose that affected the body politic, he was always to be found intrenched on the moral side of the question.

He was a successful farmer, a good financier and though he began life very poor, yet by hard work, good management and fair dealing, he had amassed a sufficiency of this world's goods to afford him ease and comfort.

The writer of these lines has known him intimately for more than 30 years and between us there had grown a strong bond of friendship and mutual esteem. We have sold him goods many years ago and he used to bring some of the nicest, cleaned cotton this town, that was ever sold here. Of late years he never came to Cumby, without paying us a social call and we always enjoyed talking with him. We regarded him as one of best and truest friends and now that he is gone, we deeply feel that we have sustained a loss that cannot be replaced.

To his family we can only extend our most sincere sympathy and commend them to the care of Him, who has power to comfort the broken hearted.

He is survived by his wife, 3 daughters and 4 sons and a large number of grandchildren.

His funeral service were conducted on Wednesday afternoon December 22nd in Oakland Presbyterian Church (which he had assisted in organizing and maintaining) by Rev. Fred S. Rogers of this place, assisted by Rev. W. E. Graham of Greenville, after which his remains were laid to rest in the Ridgeway Cemetery in The presence of many of his lifetime friends and associates.

By his friend,
R. W. Harris