Yngve Alreksson, King of Svitjod, Uppsala & Sweden

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Yngve Alreksson, King of Svitjod, Uppsala & Sweden

Nicknames: "Yngve", "Yngvi", "Вышеслав", "King of Svitjod", "King of Uppsala", "King of Sweden"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Sweden
Death: Died in Gravlagt Fyrisvollane
Place of Burial: Fyrisvold,Upsala, Sweden
Immediate Family:

Son of Alrek Agnasson, king of Sweden and Dagreid Dagssdatter Queen of Sweden
Husband of Dagreied Dagsdotter
Father of Jörund Yngvasson, King of Uppsala; Eirik II Yngvasson and Ingibjorg Yngvasdotter
Brother of Alf Alreksson Alreksson, king in Sweden; Thorborg Alreksson; Thorborg Alreksdotter; Elfsi Agnasson, Upsala; Heming Hundingsson of Sweden and 2 others

Occupation: King in Uppsala, Swedish King, King of Sweden, Konge i Uppsala, King in Sweden, King of Upsala, Roi de Svitjod (Novgorod, Russie; Uppsala, Suède et Vingulmark Norvège), Konge, крал, King of Upsal, Swedish King of the House of Yngling, @occu00534@
Managed by: Jennie Jacobson
Last Updated:

About Yngve Alreksson, King of Svitjod, Uppsala & Sweden

Alt birth date: 266 Alt death date: 300

Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

His [Agne's] son, Ingjald, was murdered in Sweden by his own brother because he had brought discredit on the latter's wife, whose name was Bera (Ursa in Latin). After him his son Jorund ruled...

-------------------- http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngve_och_Alf Yngve och Alf var enligt legenden två bröder av Ynglingaätten i förhistorisk tid. De var söner till Alrik. Enligt Heimskringla var Alf kung av Sverige och gift med Bera. Han kallades Elfse och sades vara tystlåten, äregirig och osällskaplig. Han mördade sin bror Yngve när denne satt på tronen med Alfs fru. Yngve lyckades dock sticka sitt svärd i Alf och båda föll döda ned på golvet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

The poem in Ynglingatal:

   Ok varð hinn,
   er Alfr of vá
   vörðr véstalls,
   of veginn liggja,
   er dölingr
   dreyrgan mæki
   öfundgjarn
   á Yngva rauð.
   Var-a þat bært
   at Bera skyldi
   valsœfendr
   vígs of hvetja,
   þá er brœðr tveir
   at bönum urðusk,
   óþurfendr,
   of afbrýði.[1][2]
   I tell you of a horrid thing,
   A deed of dreadful note I sing --
   How by false Bera, wicked queen,
   The murderous brother-hands were seen
   Each raised against a brother's life;
   How wretched Alf with bloody knife
   Gored Yngve's heart, and Yngve's blade
   Alf on the bloody threshold laid.
   Can men resist Fate's iron laws?
   They slew each other without cause.[3][4]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

Cujus [Hogne, i.e. Agne ] filius Ingialdr in Swethia a fratre suo ob infamiam uxoris ejus occisus est, quæ Bera dicta est (hoc nomen latine sonat ursa). Post hunc filius ejus Jorundr [...][5¨]

His [Agne's] son, Ingjald, was murdered in Sweden by his own brother because he had brought discredit on the latter's wife, whose name was Bera (Ursa in Latin). After him his son Jorund ruled, [...][6] Ingjaldr is held to be an error for Yngvi.[7] Unlike Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiæ gives Agne as Yngvi's predecessor. Instead Alrekr precedes Agne and Agne is succeeded by Yngvi. The even earlier source Íslendingabók cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession as Historia Norwegiæ: xi Dagr. xii Alrekr. xiii Agni. xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr. -------------------- Konge i Uppsala (Sverige) -------------------- Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation: His [Agne's] son, Ingjald, was murdered in Sweden by his own brother because he had brought discredit on the latter's wife, whose name was Bera (Ursa in Latin). After him his son Jorund ruled, [...][6]

Ingjaldr is held to be an error for Yngvi.[7] Unlike Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiæ gives Agne as Yngvi's predecessor. Instead Alrekr precedes Agne and Agne is succeeded by Yngvi. The even earlier source Íslendingabók cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession as Historia Norwegiæ: xi Dagr. xii Alrekr. xiii Agni. xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr.[8]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf -------------------- Yngve (Yngvi) and his brother ruled the Swedes together after their father's death. Yngvi was a beloved, generous, handsome and great warrior, while Alf was harsh, silent and unfriendly, with an agreeable, frisky and gay wife, Bera. After a major viking expedition and during the following celebration, Yngvi and Bera remained up talking while Alf went to bed, ordereing Bera not to wake him when she came to bed. She had repeatedly stated that the woman Yngvi picked would be a happy one, and Alf became jealous. Yngvi's guards did not notice Alf entering the hall with a knife, where he stabbed Yngvi, who managed to kill Alf before he died. They were both buried under mounds in Fyrisvold.

Upon their death, Alf's son Hugleik ruled, reputed as not being a warrior and being quite greedy. Two sea king brothers, Hake and Hagbard, invaded Sweden and killed Hugleik, Hake ruled the Swedes.

Meanwhile, Yngvi's sons, Jorund and Eric, invaded Denmark, taking and hanging the king, Gudlog.at Stromones. They went after Hake next, who killed Eric and cut the brother's banner in two at a great battle on the Fyrisvoid near Uppsala, Hake was wounded enough to have set his boat free with all his men and burned it, falling upon the flames to die. Jorund becmae the king at Uppsala. Heimskringla, Ynglinga Saga, Section 24-27

Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds). Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf

-------------------- According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf -------------------- Alrekssønene Yngve/Ingjald og Alv var samkongar i Ynglingeætta. Alv er far til Hugleik, medan Yngve er far til Jorund og Eirik Dei er omtala i Ynglingesoga, og i Den eldste Noregshistoria (Historia Norvegiæ), forutan i Ynglingatal. I Historia Norvegiæ har Yngve namnet Ingjald.

Snorre Sturlason fortel at Yngve var den store hermannen, "ovende sigersæl, væn og ein stor idrottsmann, sterk og djerv i slahe, raust på hand og gladværug". Alv var motsett, "tagal, rådrikin og gretten". Mor til Alv var ein Dageid, dotter av Dag den mektuge. Han var gift med Bera, som openberrt var meir oppteken av Yngve, og ein kveld han kom heim frå ferd, vart det til at han vart sitjande i lag med Bera, medan Alv la seg tidleg. Soleis kom Bera til å rø mykje med Yngve, og Alv mislika dette sterkt. Bera sa då at det var betre å vera gift med Yngve enn med Alv, og dette vart Alv harm for.

Ein kveld drog Alv sverd mot bror sin, og stakk det gjennom Yngve. Yngve drog sitt sverd og drap Alv. Dei døydde båe to i same stunda, og er hauglagde på Fyrisvollane.

Tjodolv frå Kvine seier:

Daud laut han liggja, drepin av Alv, herren som vaktar på heilagdomen, då kongen ovundssjuk mot Yngve fór, og med blodut sverd til bane stakk han. Harmelegt var det at hovdingar djerve dronningi skulde til dråp eggja, då bror gav bror banehogg åbruige i utrengsmål. Hugleik, son av Alv, rådde for riket i åra etter.

Historia Norvegiæ [endre]

Ingjald (Yngve) er her son av Agne, og forteljinga seier berre at han vart drepen av bror sin for di han krenkte kona hans, Bera (Ursa). Namnet på broren er ikkje kjend i denne framstillinga.

Brordrapet som er skildra her, følgjer spådomen om at frende støtt skulle drepa frende i Ynglingeætta. Nokre forskarar har samanførd Alv-namnet med vestgotarhovdingen Athaulf, som vart drepen av ein frende. Han etterfølgde Alarik (Alrek). Elles kunne namnet Alv knytast til naturvetta med same namn, nært bunde saman med vanekulten og dyrkinga av Frøy, som er opphavet til heile ynglingeætta.

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alrekss%C3%B8nene»

-------------------- Alf og Yngve, Alriks Sønner, regjerede derefter sammen. Yngve var en kjæk Stridsmand og Vikingefarer. Alf sad hjemme uvenlig og storsindet. Da Yngve hjemkom fra sine Hærtog og overvintrede, hørte den skjønne Bera, Alfs Dronning, gjerne paa hans Fortællinger om Eventyr og Kamp; en Moro hvormed hun fordrev Qvellerne til langt paa Nat. Alf blev skinsyg, styrtede en Qvel ind med draget Sværd og gjennemborte Yngve; men denne sprang op og gav Alf sin Bane. -------------------- Yngvi Alreksson 355 SmartMatches

Birth: About 466 in , , , Sweden 1 2

Death:

Sex: M

Father: Alrek Agnasson King In Sweden b. About 445 in , , , Sweden

Mother: Dageith Dagsdotter b. About 449 in , , , Sweden

  
  Spouses & Children    
  
  

 Yngvi Alreksson (Wife) b. About 470 in , , , Sweden  

1 2

Marriage: Abt 486 in (, , , Sweden) 6 Nov 2004 14:29

Children:

Jorund Yngvasson b. About 487 in , , , Sweden

Erick Yngvasson b. About 489 in , , , Sweden


 

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  Notes    
  
  

 Individual:

REFN: HWS8890

Ancestral File Number: G6SZ-J4CHAN20 Mar 2001


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  Sources    
  
  

 Title: "FamilySearch® Ancestral Fileâ„¢ v4.19"

Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Publication: 3 Feb 2001

Title: "Genealogical Research of Kirk Larson"

Author: Larson, Kirk

Publication: Personal Research Works including Bethune & Hohenlohe Desce

ndants, 1981-2001, Kirk Larson, Private Library


-



--------------------

   Killed by brother King Alf and Alf was killed in same fight.
   Yngvi was a successful warrior and his brother Alf sat at home and was unfriendly. Alf's wife. Queen Bera was beautiful and happy. She told Alf that Yngve was really a better catch for a woman and this made him angry. As Yngve and Bera sat by thethrone in Uppsala one night after returning from a raid, Alf ran a sword through Yngvi and Yngve did the same to Alf and both died. They were buried at Fyresvollene. Alf had a son Hugleik. Son of Alrek; joint king with his brother Alf. He and his bro. killed each other in the royal hall by the high-seat. [History of Sweden, p. 36]
  1. Reference Number: G6SZ-J4

---

  1. Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
  2. Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
  3. Note: 24. OF YNGVE AND ALF.
   Alric's sons, Yngve and Ali, then succeeded to the kingly power inSweden. Yngve was a great warrior, always victorious; handsome,expert in all exercises, strong and very sharp in battle, generous and full of mirth; so that he was both renowned and beloved. Alf was a silent, harsh, unfriendly man, and sat at home in the land, and never went out on war expeditions. His mother was called Dageid, a daughter of King Dag the Great, from whom the Dagling family is descended. King Alf had a wife named Bera, who was the most agreeable of women, very brisk and gay. One autumn Yngve, Alric's son,had arrived at Upsal from a viking cruise by which he was become very celebrated. He often sat long in the evening at the drinking-table; but Alf went willingly to bed very early. Queen Bera sat often till late in the evening, and she and Yngve conversed together for their amusement; but Alf soon told her that she should not sit up so late in the evening, but should go first to bed, so as not to waken him. She replied, that happy would be the woman who had Yngve instead of Alf for her husband; and as she often repeated the same, he became very angry. One evening Alf went into the hall, where Yngve and Bera sat on the high seat speaking to each other. Yngve had a short sword upon his knees, and the guests were so drunk that they did not observe the king coming in. King Alf went straight to the high seat, drew a sword from under his cloak, and pierced his brother Yngve through and through. Yngve leaped up, drew his short sword, and gave Alf his death-wound; so that both fell dead on the floor. Alf and Yngve were buried under mounds in Fyrisvold.Thus tells Thjodolf of it:

"I tell you of a horrid thing, A deed of dreadful note I sing -- How by false Bera, wicked queen, The murderous brother-hands were seen Each raised against a brother's life; How wretched Alf with bloody knife Gored Yngve's heart, and Yngve's blade Alf on the bloody threshold laid. Can men resist Fate's iron laws? They slew each other without cause." -------------------- According to the Ynglinga saga, Alrek and Eirík were sons and heirs of the previous king Agni by his wife Skjálf. They shared the kingship. They were mighty in both war and sports, but were especially skillful horsmen and vied with one another about their horsemanship and their horses.

One day they rode off from their retinue and did not return. They were found dead with their heads battered but no weapons with them save the bridle bits of their horses. Accordingly it was believed that they had quarreled and come to blows and had slain each other with their bridle bits. They were succeeded by Alrik's sons Yngvi and Alf.

Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf -------------------- Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

The poem in Ynglingatal:

   Ok varð hinn,
   er Alfr of vá
   vörðr véstalls,
   of veginn liggja,
   er dölingr
   dreyrgan mæki
   öfundgjarn
   á Yngva rauð.
   Var-a þat bært
   at Bera skyldi
   valsœfendr
   vígs of hvetja,
   þá er brœðr tveir
   at bönum urðusk,
   óþurfendr,
   of afbrýði.[1][2]

   I tell you of a horrid thing,
   A deed of dreadful note I sing --
   How by false Bera, wicked queen,
   The murderous brother-hands were seen
   Each raised against a brother's life;
   How wretched Alf with bloody knife
   Gored Yngve's heart, and Yngve's blade
   Alf on the bloody threshold laid.
   Can men resist Fate's iron laws?
   They slew each other without cause.[3][4]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

Cujus [Hogne, i.e. Agne ] filius Ingialdr in Swethia a fratre suo ob infamiam uxoris ejus occisus est, quæ Bera dicta est (hoc nomen latine sonat ursa). Post hunc filius ejus Jorundr [...][5]

His [Agne's] son, Ingjald, was murdered in Sweden by his own brother because he had brought discredit on the latter's wife, whose name was Bera (Ursa in Latin). After him his son Jorund ruled, [...][6]

Ingjaldr is held to be an error for Yngvi.[7] Unlike Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiæ gives Agne as Yngvi's predecessor. Instead Alrekr precedes Agne and Agne is succeeded by Yngvi. The even earlier source Íslendingabók cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession as Historia Norwegiæ: xi Dagr. xii Alrekr. xiii Agni. xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr.[8]

Hervarar Saga and the Saga of Orvar-Odd

In the Hervarar saga and the saga of Orvar-Odd, Yngvi was the father of Ingeborg, the princess who was in love with the Swedish hero Hjalmar.

Ari Frodi's Younger Íslendingabók

According to Ari Frodi's line of Swedish kings Yngvi was the son of Agne, and not of Agne's son Alrik.

Gesta Danorum

In Gesta Danorum, Alf (Alverus) was the father of Yngve (Ing) and Ingjald (Ingild). Ingjald, in his turn was the father of Sigurd Ring and the grandfather of Ragnar Lodbrok. -------------------- Alt birth date: 266 Alt death date: 300

Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

His [Agne's] son, Ingjald, was murdered in Sweden by his own brother because he had brought discredit on the latter's wife, whose name was Bera (Ursa in Latin). After him his son Jorund ruled...

-------------------- http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngve_och_Alf Yngve och Alf var enligt legenden två bröder av Ynglingaätten i förhistorisk tid. De var söner till Alrik. Enligt Heimskringla var Alf kung av Sverige och gift med Bera. Han kallades Elfse och sades vara tystlåten, äregirig och osällskaplig. Han mördade sin bror Yngve när denne satt på tronen med Alfs fru. Yngve lyckades dock sticka sitt svärd i Alf och båda föll döda ned på golvet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

The poem in Ynglingatal:

  Ok varð hinn,
  er Alfr of vá
  vörðr véstalls,
  of veginn liggja,
  er dölingr
  dreyrgan mæki
  öfundgjarn
  á Yngva rauð.
  Var-a þat bært
  at Bera skyldi
  valsœfendr
  vígs of hvetja,
  þá er brœðr tveir
  at bönum urðusk,
  óþurfendr,
  of afbrýði.[1][2]
  I tell you of a horrid thing,
  A deed of dreadful note I sing --
  How by false Bera, wicked queen,
  The murderous brother-hands were seen
  Each raised against a brother's life;
  How wretched Alf with bloody knife
  Gored Yngve's heart, and Yngve's blade
  Alf on the bloody threshold laid.
  Can men resist Fate's iron laws?
  They slew each other without cause.[3][4]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

Cujus [Hogne, i.e. Agne ] filius Ingialdr in Swethia a fratre suo ob infamiam uxoris ejus occisus est, quæ Bera dicta est (hoc nomen latine sonat ursa). Post hunc filius ejus Jorundr [...][5¨]

His [Agne's] son, Ingjald, was murdered in Sweden by his own brother because he had brought discredit on the latter's wife, whose name was Bera (Ursa in Latin). After him his son Jorund ruled, [...][6] Ingjaldr is held to be an error for Yngvi.[7] Unlike Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiæ gives Agne as Yngvi's predecessor. Instead Alrekr precedes Agne and Agne is succeeded by Yngvi. The even earlier source Íslendingabók cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession as Historia Norwegiæ: xi Dagr. xii Alrekr. xiii Agni. xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr. -------------------- Konge i Uppsala (Sverige) -------------------- Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation: His [Agne's] son, Ingjald, was murdered in Sweden by his own brother because he had brought discredit on the latter's wife, whose name was Bera (Ursa in Latin). After him his son Jorund ruled, [...][6]

Ingjaldr is held to be an error for Yngvi.[7] Unlike Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiæ gives Agne as Yngvi's predecessor. Instead Alrekr precedes Agne and Agne is succeeded by Yngvi. The even earlier source Íslendingabók cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it gives the same line of succession as Historia Norwegiæ: xi Dagr. xii Alrekr. xiii Agni. xiiii Yngvi. xv Jörundr.[8]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf -------------------- Yngve (Yngvi) and his brother ruled the Swedes together after their father's death. Yngvi was a beloved, generous, handsome and great warrior, while Alf was harsh, silent and unfriendly, with an agreeable, frisky and gay wife, Bera. After a major viking expedition and during the following celebration, Yngvi and Bera remained up talking while Alf went to bed, ordereing Bera not to wake him when she came to bed. She had repeatedly stated that the woman Yngvi picked would be a happy one, and Alf became jealous. Yngvi's guards did not notice Alf entering the hall with a knife, where he stabbed Yngvi, who managed to kill Alf before he died. They were both buried under mounds in Fyrisvold.

Upon their death, Alf's son Hugleik ruled, reputed as not being a warrior and being quite greedy. Two sea king brothers, Hake and Hagbard, invaded Sweden and killed Hugleik, Hake ruled the Swedes.

Meanwhile, Yngvi's sons, Jorund and Eric, invaded Denmark, taking and hanging the king, Gudlog.at Stromones. They went after Hake next, who killed Eric and cut the brother's banner in two at a great battle on the Fyrisvoid near Uppsala, Hake was wounded enough to have set his boat free with all his men and burned it, falling upon the flames to die. Jorund becmae the king at Uppsala. Heimskringla, Ynglinga Saga, Section 24-27

Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds). Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf

-------------------- According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf -------------------- Alrekssønene Yngve/Ingjald og Alv var samkongar i Ynglingeætta. Alv er far til Hugleik, medan Yngve er far til Jorund og Eirik Dei er omtala i Ynglingesoga, og i Den eldste Noregshistoria (Historia Norvegiæ), forutan i Ynglingatal. I Historia Norvegiæ har Yngve namnet Ingjald.

Snorre Sturlason fortel at Yngve var den store hermannen, "ovende sigersæl, væn og ein stor idrottsmann, sterk og djerv i slahe, raust på hand og gladværug". Alv var motsett, "tagal, rådrikin og gretten". Mor til Alv var ein Dageid, dotter av Dag den mektuge. Han var gift med Bera, som openberrt var meir oppteken av Yngve, og ein kveld han kom heim frå ferd, vart det til at han vart sitjande i lag med Bera, medan Alv la seg tidleg. Soleis kom Bera til å rø mykje med Yngve, og Alv mislika dette sterkt. Bera sa då at det var betre å vera gift med Yngve enn med Alv, og dette vart Alv harm for.

Ein kveld drog Alv sverd mot bror sin, og stakk det gjennom Yngve. Yngve drog sitt sverd og drap Alv. Dei døydde båe to i same stunda, og er hauglagde på Fyrisvollane.

Tjodolv frå Kvine seier:

Daud laut han liggja, drepin av Alv, herren som vaktar på heilagdomen, då kongen ovundssjuk mot Yngve fór, og med blodut sverd til bane stakk han. Harmelegt var det at hovdingar djerve dronningi skulde til dråp eggja, då bror gav bror banehogg åbruige i utrengsmål. Hugleik, son av Alv, rådde for riket i åra etter.

Historia Norvegiæ [endre]

Ingjald (Yngve) er her son av Agne, og forteljinga seier berre at han vart drepen av bror sin for di han krenkte kona hans, Bera (Ursa). Namnet på broren er ikkje kjend i denne framstillinga.

Brordrapet som er skildra her, følgjer spådomen om at frende støtt skulle drepa frende i Ynglingeætta. Nokre forskarar har samanførd Alv-namnet med vestgotarhovdingen Athaulf, som vart drepen av ein frende. Han etterfølgde Alarik (Alrek). Elles kunne namnet Alv knytast til naturvetta med same namn, nært bunde saman med vanekulten og dyrkinga av Frøy, som er opphavet til heile ynglingeætta.

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alrekss%C3%B8nene»

-------------------- Alf og Yngve, Alriks Sønner, regjerede derefter sammen. Yngve var en kjæk Stridsmand og Vikingefarer. Alf sad hjemme uvenlig og storsindet. Da Yngve hjemkom fra sine Hærtog og overvintrede, hørte den skjønne Bera, Alfs Dronning, gjerne paa hans Fortællinger om Eventyr og Kamp; en Moro hvormed hun fordrev Qvellerne til langt paa Nat. Alf blev skinsyg, styrtede en Qvel ind med draget Sværd og gjennemborte Yngve; men denne sprang op og gav Alf sin Bane. -------------------- Yngvi Alreksson 355 SmartMatches

Birth: About 466 in , , , Sweden 1 2

Death:

Sex: M

Father: Alrek Agnasson King In Sweden b. About 445 in , , , Sweden

Mother: Dageith Dagsdotter b. About 449 in , , , Sweden

  
 Spouses & Children    
 
 
Yngvi Alreksson (Wife) b. About 470 in , , , Sweden  

1 2

Marriage: Abt 486 in (, , , Sweden) 6 Nov 2004 14:29

Children:

Jorund Yngvasson b. About 487 in , , , Sweden

Erick Yngvasson b. About 489 in , , , Sweden


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Individual:

REFN: HWS8890

Ancestral File Number: G6SZ-J4CHAN20 Mar 2001

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 Sources    
 
 
Title: "FamilySearch® Ancestral Fileâ„¢ v4.19"

Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Publication: 3 Feb 2001

Title: "Genealogical Research of Kirk Larson"

Author: Larson, Kirk

Publication: Personal Research Works including Bethune & Hohenlohe Desce

ndants, 1981-2001, Kirk Larson, Private Library

-

--------------------

  Killed by brother King Alf and Alf was killed in same fight.
  Yngvi was a successful warrior and his brother Alf sat at home and was unfriendly. Alf's wife. Queen Bera was beautiful and happy. She told Alf that Yngve was really a better catch for a woman and this made him angry. As Yngve and Bera sat by thethrone in Uppsala one night after returning from a raid, Alf ran a sword through Yngvi and Yngve did the same to Alf and both died. They were buried at Fyresvollene. Alf had a son Hugleik. Son of Alrek; joint king with his brother Alf. He and his bro. killed each other in the royal hall by the high-seat. [History of Sweden, p. 36]
   Reference Number: G6SZ-J4

---

   Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
   Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
   Note: 24. OF YNGVE AND ALF.
  Alric's sons, Yngve and Ali, then succeeded to the kingly power inSweden. Yngve was a great warrior, always victorious; handsome,expert in all exercises, strong and very sharp in battle, generous and full of mirth; so that he was both renowned and beloved. Alf was a silent, harsh, unfriendly man, and sat at home in the land, and never went out on war expeditions. His mother was called Dageid, a daughter of King Dag the Great, from whom the Dagling family is descended. King Alf had a wife named Bera, who was the most agreeable of women, very brisk and gay. One autumn Yngve, Alric's son,had arrived at Upsal from a viking cruise by which he was become very celebrated. He often sat long in the evening at the drinking-table; but Alf went willingly to bed very early. Queen Bera sat often till late in the evening, and she and Yngve conversed together for their amusement; but Alf soon told her that she should not sit up so late in the evening, but should go first to bed, so as not to waken him. She replied, that happy would be the woman who had Yngve instead of Alf for her husband; and as she often repeated the same, he became very angry. One evening Alf went into the hall, where Yngve and Bera sat on the high seat speaking to each other. Yngve had a short sword upon his knees, and the guests were so drunk that they did not observe the king coming in. King Alf went straight to the high seat, drew a sword from under his cloak, and pierced his brother Yngve through and through. Yngve leaped up, drew his short sword, and gave Alf his death-wound; so that both fell dead on the floor. Alf and Yngve were buried under mounds in Fyrisvold.Thus tells Thjodolf of it:

"I tell you of a horrid thing, A deed of dreadful note I sing -- How by false Bera, wicked queen, The murderous brother-hands were seen Each raised against a brother's life; How wretched Alf with bloody knife Gored Yngve's heart, and Yngve's blade Alf on the bloody threshold laid. Can men resist Fate's iron laws? They slew each other without cause." -------------------- According to the Ynglinga saga, Alrek and Eirík were sons and heirs of the previous king Agni by his wife Skjálf. They shared the kingship. They were mighty in both war and sports, but were especially skillful horsmen and vied with one another about their horsemanship and their horses.

One day they rode off from their retinue and did not return. They were found dead with their heads battered but no weapons with them save the bridle bits of their horses. Accordingly it was believed that they had quarreled and come to blows and had slain each other with their bridle bits. They were succeeded by Alrik's sons Yngvi and Alf.

Yngvi and Alf were two legendary Swedish kings of the House of Yngling.

According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik.

Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous.

Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman.

One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves.

One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

Alf was succeeded by his son Hugleik.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngvi_and_Alf -------------------- Roi de Uppland -------------------- 12. YNGVE ALRICKSSON - King in Svitjod from 280 until killed by his brother in the year 306 A.D. King Alf was very jealous of his brother Yngve. Alf's wife taunted him by making flattering remarks about Yngve, and preferred the company of her brother-in-law to that of her husband. One night after a drinking bout where the guests were so drunk they did not see the King enter the room, he went to the high seat where his wife sat with Yngve. Alf stabbed Yngve to death, but not before Alf returned the favor, and both fell dead. Yngve's son was:

13. JORUND - King in Uppsala, Sweden from 302 until he was hanged in 312 A.D. -------------------- Sønn av Alrek og svensk konge etter han. Navnet hans ble også skrevet Ingeld.

Yngve og Alv var Alreks sønner. De fikk deretter kongedømme iSvitjod. Yngve var en stor hærmann og alltid seiersæl, vakker,kunne mange idretter,sterk og kvass i strid, gavmild på gods ogalltid glad. For alt dette ble han vidspurt og vennesæl. KongAlv, hans bror, satt hjemme i landet og var ikke på hærtog. Dekalte ham Elvse ("vesle-Alv"). Han var fåmælt, maktsyk oguvennlig. Hans mor het Dageid, datter til kong Dag den mektige,som daglingene er ættet fra. Kong Alv hadde en kone som hetBera, hun var vakrere enn andre kvinner, storslått og gladlynt.Så var det en høst at Yngve Alreksson kom til Uppsala fra vikingigjen, og det ble gjort stor stas på ham. Han satt gjerne lengeog drakk om kvelden, kong Alv gikk oftest tidlig til sengs.Dronning Bera satt ofte oppe om kvelden, og hun og Yngve satt ogfjaset med hverandre. Alv snakket mange ganger til henne omdette, og ba hun skulle gå og legge seg før. Han ville ikkeligge våke nog vente på henne, sa han. Hun svarte ham og sa atden kvinn ekunne være glad som fikk Yngve til mann og ikke Alv.Han ble svært sint, for hun sa dette flere anger. En kveld kom Alv inn i hallen mens Yngve og Bera satt i høgsetetog talte med hverandre. Yngve hadde sverdet liggende overknærne. Folk var svært drukne og la ikke merke til at kongenkom inn .Kong Alv gikk til høgsetet, dro sverdet fram av kappenog stak kdet gjennom Yngve, broren. Yngve sprang opp, drosverdet og hogg Alv banehogg, og de falt begge to døde pågulvet. Alv og Yngve ble hauglagt på Fyresvollene. -------------------- BIOGRAFI:

Nicknames: "Yngve", "Yngvi", "????????", "King of Svitjod", "King of Uppsala", "King of Sweden"

Birthdate: cirka 460

Birthplace: Sweden

Death: Died 525 in Gravlagt Fyrisvollane

Occupation: King in Uppsala, Swedish King, King of Sweden, Konge i Uppsala, King in Sweden, King of Upsala, Roi de Svitjod (Novgorod, Russie; Uppsala, Suede et Vingulmark Norvege), Konge, ????, King of Upsal, Swedish King of the House of Yngling, @occu00534@

Ingjald (Yngve) er her son av Agne, og forteljinga seier berre at han vart drepen av bror sin for di han krenkte kona hans, Bera (Ursa). Namnet på broren er ikkje kjend i denne framstillinga.

Brordrapet som er skildra her, følgjer spådomen om at frende støtt skulle drepa frende i Ynglingeætta. Nokre forskarar har samanførd Alv-namnet med vestgotarhovdingen Athaulf, som vart drepen av ein frende. Han etterfølgde Alarik (Alrek). Elles kunne namnet Alv knytast til naturvetta med same namn, nært bunde saman med vanekulten og dyrkinga av Frøy, som er opphavet til heile ynglingeætta.

Birth: About 466 in , , , Sweden 1 2

Death:

Sex: M

Father: Alrek Agnasson King In Sweden b. About 445 in , , , Sweden

Mother: Dageith Dagsdotter b. About 449 in , , , Sweden

Spouses & Children

Yngvi Alreksson (Wife) b. About 470 in , , , Sweden

1 2

Marriage: Abt 486 in (, , , Sweden) 6 Nov 2004 14:29

Children:

Jorund Yngvasson b. About 487 in , , , Sweden

Erick Yngvasson b. About 489 in , , , Sweden -------------------- Yngvi and Alf According to Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and Ynglinga saga, Yngvi and Alf were the sons of Alrik. Snorri Sturluson relates that Yngvi was an accomplished king: a great warrior who always won his battles, the master of all exercises, generous, happy and sociable. He was both loved and famous. Alf was unsociable and harsh and stayed at home instead of pillaging in other countries. His mother was Dageid, the daughter of king Dag the Great from whom is descended the Dagling family. Alf was married to Bera who was happy and alert and a very lovable woman. One day in the autumn, Yngvi returned to Uppsala from a very successful Viking expedition which had rendered him famous. He used to spend time at the drinking table until late in the night, like Bera, and they found it pleasant to talk to each other. Alf, however, preferred to go to bed early and he started to tell her to go to bed early as well so that she did not wake him. Then Bera used to answer that Yngvi was much better for a woman than Alf, an answer that was getting on Alf's nerves. One evening, the jealous Alf entered the hall and saw Yngvi and Bera converse on the high seat. Yngvi had a short sword in his lap and the other guests were too drunk to see that Alf had arrived. From under his cloak Alf drew a sword and pierced Yngvi. Yngvi, mortally wounded, got up, drew his own short sword and slew Alf. They were buried in two mounds on the Fyrisvellir (Fyris Wolds).

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Yngve Alreksson, King of Svitjod, Uppsala & Sweden's Timeline

460
460
Sweden
486
486
Age 26
Sweden
487
487
Age 27
Uppsala, Västergötland, Sweden
489
489
Age 29
Sweden
491
491
Age 31
Sweden
525
525
Age 65
Gravlagt Fyrisvollane
1923
May 28, 1923
Age 65
May 28, 1923
Age 65
May 28, 1923
Age 65
1928
April 18, 1928
Age 65