Jan Cornelisse van Cleef

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Jan Cornelisse Hanse Van Cleve

Nicknames: "Van Cleef", "Van Cleve"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rhenish Duchy, Cleve, Germany
Death: Died in New Utrecht, Long Island, New York
Place of Burial: New Utrecht Cemetery Bensonhurst Kings County New York
Immediate Family:

Son of Cornelius Van Cleef; Cornelius Van Cleef; Marieken Van Cleef and Marieken Van Cleef
Husband of Engeltje Louwerens; Engeltje Pieterse Laurens and Engeltje Van Cleef
Father of Neeltje Van Cleef; Cornelius Jansen Van Cleef; Laurens Van Cleef; Rebecca Van Cleef; Angelica Louwerens Van Cleef and 13 others

Occupation: emigrated in 1653
Managed by: Deborah Carol Boyd
Last Updated:

About Jan Cornelisse van Cleef

Jan Cornelissen van Cleef emmigrated to America in 1653.

In 1656, Jan Cornelissen van Cleef was a farmer at Gravesent, Long Island, New York, according to the census.

Alternate data to be resolved...

Birth Location Amsterdam, Netherlands Rhenish Duchy,Cleve,,Germany

Death Location New Amsterdam, New York, United States New York,Kings,New York,USA

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Jan or John Van Cleef was a Dutch man born in Amsterdam. He came to the new world in 1653, at New Netherlands (New York). Most likely in the city of New Amsterdam (New York). Eventually in 1664 the English conquered New Netherlands and renamed New Netherlands and New Amsterdam New York. Jan took the oath to the English in 1687.

He landed in Long Island in 1653, where he owned 14 morgens in Gravesend in 1657. He was a farmer and moved to New Utrecht later. In 1686 he received a grant of land from Governor Donegan.

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Errett Van Cleave ("History of the Van Cleave Family, The McMullen Family, The Taylor Family," 1946, pg. 18-19) quotes from a book, "The Gosney Family" published by Mrs. Georgia Gosney Wisda, then of Norwalk, Ohio.

"Jan (John) Van Cleef, the first of the name in the New World, was born in 1628 in Amsterdam, Holland and came to New Netherlands in 1653, landed on Long Island where he owned 14 moorgens in Gravesend in 1657, was a farmer and leater moved to New Utrecht. In 1686 he received a grant of land from Governor Donegan. He took the oath of allegiance to the English Government in 1687. A census of 1688 gives Jan as a resident of New Utrecht for 34 years with a wife and four children. In Feb. of 1664 Jan stated that he was 36 years old, when he made a written declaration of events that happened in New Utrecht.

"He was a representative from the Bushwick Colony to the convention in New Amsterdam April 10, 1664, to send delegates to Holland to represent the States General and the West Indies Company, the distressed state of the country. Jan's name appears in a list of members of the Dutch Church of New Utrecht in1677-1685. He died about 1699 in New York. A few of his descendants reside in New York but most of them removed to New Jersey.

"Prior to March 10, 1661, Jan married Engeltje Loiwerens, who was born in1646 and about 15 years of age when she married. She was the daughter of Laurens Pietersen (Noorman) from Tonsburg in Norway, who was in New Amsterdam as early as 1639. On June 16, 1639 he was declared sole heir to the real and personal property of Roeloff Roeloffsen. In the Chamber of Wills where this declaration is contained he is called 'Laurens Pietersen Van Tonsback' and in the Church record of his marriage with Anetie Pieters from Brutsteen, Germany it is stated that he is from Tonsburg. He married Anetie Pieters August 18, 1641 in New Amsterdam. Lauren's daughter, Sytie was baptized July 15, 1646.

"There is reason to believe that Jan Van Cleef was a son of one of the claimants for the Ducal throne of Cleaves when it was vacated by the death of Duke John William in 1609, without heirs, although he had been married twice. There were eight heirs who claimed the throne but it was given in 1614 by the Treaty of Zanten to the heirs of his wife instead. It is probable that the father of Jan fled across the border into Holland as a political refugee, taking up his residence in Amsterdam.

"Some historians give the Van Cleef family as living in New York in1630. There was a Dierch Van der Clyff and a Sytie Van Cleef in records about the same time as Jan, and it is possible that they were brothers and sister, but it has not yet been proven."

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Emigrated to New Netherlands in 1653. He died after 1698.

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Jan emigrated in 1653. He was a farmer in Gravesend, Long Island in 1656 and possibly living in New Utrecht in 1659. -------------------- http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barbarapumyea&id=I23633 -------------------- This was in the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol. 128 Number 1 page 110 & 111.

Wednesday, 7 April 1655

This day, this 7th April 1655, before me, Jacob Kip, Secretary of this City, Amsterdam in New Netherlands, and the undernamed witnesses, appeared Pieter van der Linde on the one part, and Jan Cornelissen Van Kleeff on the other part, acknowledging and declaring to have agreed and conenanted together respecting the purchase of a certain plantation and hogs on condition as follows, to wit:

Pieter van der Linde sells unto Jan Cornelis van Kleeff, who also acknowledges to have purchased, a certain plantation named Lindenborch with the house, fences, timber and all that is therein faastened by earth and nail, situate on the island Manhatans, on the East River between the plantations of Tomas Samelson and Pieter Stoutenburg, and that both great and small according to the groundbrief thereof; together with six pigs, to wit three sows and three (blank) which the purchaser acknowledges run from this time at his risk, and that for the sum of nine hundred carolus guilders payable fifty guilders cash in hand, and four hundred fifty guilders on the first of November next and the balance, four hundred guilders, on the first of November 1656, to wit, half in good merchantalbe beavers, and half in good Long Island Wampum, each at the aforesaid time, together with one good whole beaver as a present to the seller's wife; on this condition that the grain at present sown shall belong to the seller, who shall be at liberty to plant this summer on tha land; also that the purchaser may come and live now with the seller and plant on the land and do what he pleases thereon. It is also agreed that the seller may next harvest sow with winter grain the barley feld which his (sic) over the little kills, and the land next it which he will char for his use, and live with the purchaser from this time forth until the first of November 1656, when when (sic) the last installment as aforesaid becomes due, which being paid, the seller shall execute due transport and conveyance according to the groundbrief, in favor of the purchaser. It is also agreed that the purchaser and seller shall sow, this coming summer on the aforesaid land, five to six schepels of pease which shall to their mutual cost and profit, parties on both sides declaring to have thus agreed and covenanted, each for himself promising the same to observe and perform, the purchaser pledging for the aforesaid payment his person and property, especially the aforesaid plantation and whatever is thereon, having mortgaged the same therefor; and seller, for the free delivery and conveyance submitting his person and property to all courts, without fraud or guile. In testimony these presents are signed by the respective parties and Hendrick Hendricksen Kip and Dirck Jansen Virhaven witnesses hereunto invited. Done as above, at Amsterdam in New Netherland.

Pieter Linde

Hendrick Hendricksen / Kyp / Dirck Verhaven

This is the mark of Jan Corns /\/ van Kleeff made by himself

To my knowledge

Jacob Kip, Secretary

Reply Report Abuse Print


He should have held on to the land---RDL

The progenitor of the Van Cleef family in America, was born about 1627 or 1628, according to an official statement he made on February 14,1664, when he gave his age as thirty six years. It has been said that Jan was from or born in Amsterdam, and, although there are numerous "van kleef" baptismal records there going back before 1600, Jan's babtism was not found in them. It is notable too that he is never referred to by a patronymic, so not even his father's name is known. His surname suggest that his ancestors or he was from the Rhenish Duchy of Cleve (Kleve or Cleves)adjacent to the Netherlands.

This paragraph begins a book by Wilson V. Ledley, C. G. 1976 Polyanthos New Orleans, First edition published in 1976, Drawer 51359 New Orleans,Louisiana 70151, Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 75-7491.

-------------------- I. Jan Van Cleve, b. Holland, 1628, came to New Netherlands 1653, oath of allegiance 1687, farmer in Gravesend, Long Is, NY1656, In 1662 bought land at New Utrecht, NY, 4/10/1664, rep to Gen. Assembly of Bushwick (Brooklyn) NY. In 1693 had family of 4 ch., m.twice, 1st – Engeltje Laurens Pitterse (Engletje Louwerens Lawrence), dau. of Laurns Pitterse (Larenens Pieterse Louwerens Lawrence) 11 ch., 2nd – Catherine Rapalye, b. ca. 1630

Links

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Immigration: - 1653, New Netherland, Long Island, NY.

It is possible that his father was a political refugee from Cleves, who fled across the border into Holland.

Jan Van Cleef married Engeltje Louwerens before March 10, 1661. She was about fifteen years old at the time. Her father was Laurens Pietersen from Tonsburg in Norway, who was in New Amsterdam by 1639. Engeltje’s mother was Anetie Pieters from Brutsteen, Germany. Laurens and Anetie were married in 1641 in New Amsterdam. Their daughter Engletje was baptised July 15, 1646.

In 1664, Jan Van Cleef made a written declaration of events in New Utrecht, and stated he was 36 years old. He was a representative to The Convention in New Amsterdam in April 1664, which sent delegates to Holland to describe the distressed state of the country to the government and the West Indies Company.

In 1686 Jan received a grant of land in from Governor Donegan, and took the oath of allegiance to the English Government in 1687. The 1688 Census listed Jan with wife and four children and stated that Jan had been a resident of New Utrecht for 34 years.

Between 1677-1685, Jan appeared on the membership rolls of the Dutch Church of New Utrecht. He died in 1699 in New York. Some of his descendents remained in New York, but most moved to New Jersey.

-------------------- http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&new=1&MSAV=1&msT=1&gss=angs-c&gsfn=Jan&gsln=Van+Cleef&msbdy=1646&msddy=1716&gskw=%23+220725&uidh=mf2&pcat=33&h=5765011&recoff=4+6&db=bgmi&ml_rpos=13&hovR=1

Name: Jan Van Cleef Birth - Death: 1646-1716

   A Dictionary of Biography, Past and Present. Containing the chief events in the lives of eminent persons of all ages and nations. Edited by Benjamin Vincent. London: Ward, Lock, & Co., 1877. (DcBiPP)
   McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art. Five volumes. Edited by Bernard S. Myers. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1969. (McGDA)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14199565/person/19932324020/storyx/ce790e72-d9d9-47db-9cb8-fa1fe3a3e029?src=search

The VanCleaves

In 1609, the East India Company sent Henry Hudson to seek a passage to the Orient. He reached the present day Albany area. In 1624, the first colonist arrived in the New Netherlands to settle in Fort Orange. In the 1650’s, the Dutch needed more land to provide food, they expanded into present day Long Island. Soon small villages sprang up. Examples of these are Gravesend and New Ultrecht.

According to my research, the earliest known Van Cleave was Jan VanCleef. He is believed to have been born in 1628 in Amsterdam, Holland to Cornelius VanCleef. Jan immigrated to America in 1653. He was a farmer in Gravesend, Long Island. His wife was Angeltji/Engeltje Louwerens, daughter of Laurens Pieterse De Noorman ( which means the Norseman) and Annetja Pieters.

It is thought that the original family name was not Van Cleef, but Waldyke. When Jan arrived in America, introduced himself for the ship’s passenger list as Jan van Cleeve, which meant Jan from Kleve. The Duchy of Kleve is a city presently located in west central Germany, in North Rhine-Westphalia (Nordrhein-Westfalen). It is near the Rhine River and the Dutch border.

Jan’s son, Isbrandt Van Cleave, was born about 1677 in New York. During his life he worked as a butcher and a tavern owner. He married Jannetje Van Der Bilt sometime before 1700. He moved with his family to New Jersey.

Isbrandt’s son was Captain Aaron Van Cleave. He married Rachel Schenck. Aaron and his wife bought property from Daniel Boone in 1764. They bought the farm in the Forks of the Yadkin. A witness to the signing of the deed is Aaron’s brother Benjamin. At some point Aaron moved to Kentucky. In 1787, Aaron went out to hunt with two companions. Aaron had a finger shot off when the group was attacked by Indians. Aaron and one of his companions escaped. Their daughter Jane married Squire Boone, brother of Daniel Boone. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/t/s/a/Valetta-J-Tsangaris/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1398.html

Includes NotesNotes for Jan Hanse VanCleave:

Jan Van Cleef was born in Holland, probably Amsterdam. He is said to have been the son of one of the rival claimants for the Ducal throne of Cleves, when it was vacated byt he death of John Williams, with heir in 1609. In 1614 by the treaty of Xanten, this Duchy was awarded to John Sigiamund, the Elector of Brandenburg. It was probably in this same year that the father of Jan VanCleef fled to Holland as a political refugee. Jan came to America about 1653, probably taking abode in Gravesend for there is mention of him as a farmer there in 1656. He is believed to have died in Gravesend in 1699. It is believed he has a brother, Dirck VanCleef and a sister Ceytie but this is not proved. Jan married Engeltie Pieterson on or about 10 Mar 1661 in New Amsterdam. Engeltie's father, Loweren Pietersen was from Tonsburg, Norway.

an attorney, mayor in NY, farmer of Gravesend, Long Island, NY Immigrated in 1653 will dated 1698 proved 1701 married before 10 Mar 1661

---Source: The Vancleve name is also spelled VanCleve and Van Cleve, As modern spelling. It derives from the eleventh century seat of the Counts of Cleves which later became a duchy. It is now part of Germany, and the town is called Kleve. The town is nine miles from the Netherlands border. Anne of Cleves (1515-1557) was the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England. Jan was in New Utrecht (New York) at lest by 1662. He bought and sold various properties there, was a member of the Dutch church there, and in 1678 served as a constable. The names Gravesend and New Utrecht still persist in Brooklyn; the areas so named are only a few blocks apart. ---Source: Scandinavian Immigrants in New York 1630–1674, page 405 - Jan Van Cleef (Cleves) was in New Amsterdam as early as 1653, when he was twenty-five years of age. In company with Titus Cyre he bought a horsemill belonging to Jacob van Couwenhoven. He later became the sole owner of it, but soon sold it, what brought on considerable litigation in the court. ---NOTE: This interesting discussion was found on the Van Cleef GenForum in 1999/2000. ---Posted by: Doug Van Cleave Date: November 30, 1999 at 13:06:17 There was a Jan Van Cleef born in South Holland about 1598 whose father was also Jan Van Cleef, born in South Holland about 1566 according to LDS ancestral files. I'm wondering if anyone has any further information about these individuals and possible connection to our Jan Van Cleef (b. about 1627). By our Jan's patronymic (Cornelis) we have been looking for a Cornelis with little success. The Jan born about 1598 was married in 1626, which would make the name Jan a logical firstborn name for our Jan who was born in 1627 (the timing is right). A theory: perhaps the Jan born in 1598 is the Cornelis (Cornelis Janszen Van Cleef?) we are seeking. Both Jan and Cornelis are common names for the period. It is also interesting to note that Joos Van Cleve (b. abt 1480), the Flemish painter who painted in court of Francis I and painted a portrait of Henry VIII, had a son (also a painter) named Cornelis (b.abt 1520). ---Posted by: Cleta Terrell Date: January 03, 2000 at 13:21:49 In Reply to: Re: Van Cleave last name by Doug Van Cleave: I don't believe there was a family that immigrated in 1655-56 - just Jan alone. As for information beyond Jan "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record", Vol. 128 #2, April 1997 pages 110-111 says evidence has been found that Cornelissen was Jan Van Cleef's patronymic. So, now we know his father's name was Cornelis ---Posted by: Kahty Boyd Date: December 31, 1999 at 19:48:51 I just got this from a cousin. Family lore says that the real last name of Jan Van Cleave was Waldyke, when the Van Cleef family got to America they where asked what their last name was; they thought they had been asked where they were from, so they said Van Cleef. I was told that Van means from, so they where saying that they where from Cleef. ---Posted by: Peggy Van Cleve Date: February 25, 2000 at 04:30:47 In Reply to: Van Cleave last name by Kahty Boyd I ran across this in my family files ...Decendants of Jan Van Cleef whose real name was Jan Waldike of Cleef Holland. Jan seems to arrive at Monmouth, New Jersey around 1653 and when asked his name he said Jan from Cleef. So the person wrote Jan Van Cleef instead of Jan Waldike. ---Posted by: Cleta Terrell Date: January 01, 1999 at 16:53:19 In Reply to: Dukes of Cleves/Kleve by Rick S. Thomas Rick, Our Jan's father was Cornelis. The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol.128 Number 2.,April 1997 has an article "Finding The Patronymic of Jan Van Cleef in Little-Used New Amsterdam Records". This article on pages 110-111 was written by Henry B. Hoff, F.A.S.G., F.G.B.S. In the article Mr. Hoff says the evidence of Jan's patronymic has been in publication since 1863, and again published in 1901. On page 527 of "Manual of the Corporation of the City of New-York" (1863) is an abstract of a contract of sale in the 1650s from Pieter ven der Linde to Jan Cornelis van Kleef for a plantation "Lindenborch" on Manhattan on the East River. The article continues with further confirmation of Jan's patronymic. ---Ancestry.com -Search Terms: CLEEF (4), JAN (1795), VAN (2695), Database: Biography & Genealogy Master Index (BGMI),# 220725, Cleef, Jan Van 1646-1716, A Dictionary of Biography, Past and Present. Containing the chief events in the lives of eminent persons of all ages and nations. Edited by Benjamin Vincent. Haydn Series. London: Ward, Lock, & Co., 1877. Reprint. Detroit: Gale Research, 1974. (DcBiPP) McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art. Five volumes. Edited by Bernard S. Myers. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1969. (McGDA) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------- http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&new=1&MSAV=1&msT=1&gss=angs-c&gsfn=Jan&gsln=Van+Cleef&msbdy=1646&msddy=1716&gskw=%23+220725&uidh=mf2&pcat=33&h=5765011&recoff=4+6&db=bgmi&ml_rpos=13&hovR=1

Name: Jan Van Cleef Birth - Death: 1646-1716

   A Dictionary of Biography, Past and Present. Containing the chief events in the lives of eminent persons of all ages and nations. Edited by Benjamin Vincent. London: Ward, Lock, & Co., 1877. (DcBiPP)
   McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art. Five volumes. Edited by Bernard S. Myers. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1969. (McGDA)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14199565/person/19932324020/storyx/ce790e72-d9d9-47db-9cb8-fa1fe3a3e029?src=search

The VanCleaves

In 1609, the East India Company sent Henry Hudson to seek a passage to the Orient. He reached the present day Albany area. In 1624, the first colonist arrived in the New Netherlands to settle in Fort Orange. In the 1650’s, the Dutch needed more land to provide food, they expanded into present day Long Island. Soon small villages sprang up. Examples of these are Gravesend and New Ultrecht.

According to my research, the earliest known Van Cleave was Jan VanCleef. He is believed to have been born in 1628 in Amsterdam, Holland to Cornelius VanCleef. Jan immigrated to America in 1653. He was a farmer in Gravesend, Long Island. His wife was Angeltji/Engeltje Louwerens, daughter of Laurens Pieterse De Noorman ( which means the Norseman) and Annetja Pieters.

It is thought that the original family name was not Van Cleef, but Waldyke. When Jan arrived in America, introduced himself for the ship’s passenger list as Jan van Cleeve, which meant Jan from Kleve. The Duchy of Kleve is a city presently located in west central Germany, in North Rhine-Westphalia (Nordrhein-Westfalen). It is near the Rhine River and the Dutch border.

Jan’s son, Isbrandt Van Cleave, was born about 1677 in New York. During his life he worked as a butcher and a tavern owner. He married Jannetje Van Der Bilt sometime before 1700. He moved with his family to New Jersey.

Isbrandt’s son was Captain Aaron Van Cleave. He married Rachel Schenck. Aaron and his wife bought property from Daniel Boone in 1764. They bought the farm in the Forks of the Yadkin. A witness to the signing of the deed is Aaron’s brother Benjamin. At some point Aaron moved to Kentucky. In 1787, Aaron went out to hunt with two companions. Aaron had a finger shot off when the group was attacked by Indians. Aaron and one of his companions escaped. Their daughter Jane married Squire Boone, brother of Daniel Boone. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/t/s/a/Valetta-J-Tsangaris/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1398.html

Includes NotesNotes for Jan Hanse VanCleave:

Jan Van Cleef was born in Holland, probably Amsterdam. He is said to have been the son of one of the rival claimants for the Ducal throne of Cleves, when it was vacated byt he death of John Williams, with heir in 1609. In 1614 by the treaty of Xanten, this Duchy was awarded to John Sigiamund, the Elector of Brandenburg. It was probably in this same year that the father of Jan VanCleef fled to Holland as a political refugee. Jan came to America about 1653, probably taking abode in Gravesend for there is mention of him as a farmer there in 1656. He is believed to have died in Gravesend in 1699. It is believed he has a brother, Dirck VanCleef and a sister Ceytie but this is not proved. Jan married Engeltie Pieterson on or about 10 Mar 1661 in New Amsterdam. Engeltie's father, Loweren Pietersen was from Tonsburg, Norway.

an attorney, mayor in NY, farmer of Gravesend, Long Island, NY Immigrated in 1653 will dated 1698 proved 1701 married before 10 Mar 1661

---Source: The Vancleve name is also spelled VanCleve and Van Cleve, As modern spelling. It derives from the eleventh century seat of the Counts of Cleves which later became a duchy. It is now part of Germany, and the town is called Kleve. The town is nine miles from the Netherlands border. Anne of Cleves (1515-1557) was the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England. Jan was in New Utrecht (New York) at lest by 1662. He bought and sold various properties there, was a member of the Dutch church there, and in 1678 served as a constable. The names Gravesend and New Utrecht still persist in Brooklyn; the areas so named are only a few blocks apart. ---Source: Scandinavian Immigrants in New York 1630–1674, page 405 - Jan Van Cleef (Cleves) was in New Amsterdam as early as 1653, when he was twenty-five years of age. In company with Titus Cyre he bought a horsemill belonging to Jacob van Couwenhoven. He later became the sole owner of it, but soon sold it, what brought on considerable litigation in the court. ---NOTE: This interesting discussion was found on the Van Cleef GenForum in 1999/2000. ---Posted by: Doug Van Cleave Date: November 30, 1999 at 13:06:17 There was a Jan Van Cleef born in South Holland about 1598 whose father was also Jan Van Cleef, born in South Holland about 1566 according to LDS ancestral files. I'm wondering if anyone has any further information about these individuals and possible connection to our Jan Van Cleef (b. about 1627). By our Jan's patronymic (Cornelis) we have been looking for a Cornelis with little success. The Jan born about 1598 was married in 1626, which would make the name Jan a logical firstborn name for our Jan who was born in 1627 (the timing is right). A theory: perhaps the Jan born in 1598 is the Cornelis (Cornelis Janszen Van Cleef?) we are seeking. Both Jan and Cornelis are common names for the period. It is also interesting to note that Joos Van Cleve (b. abt 1480), the Flemish painter who painted in court of Francis I and painted a portrait of Henry VIII, had a son (also a painter) named Cornelis (b.abt 1520). ---Posted by: Cleta Terrell Date: January 03, 2000 at 13:21:49 In Reply to: Re: Van Cleave last name by Doug Van Cleave: I don't believe there was a family that immigrated in 1655-56 - just Jan alone. As for information beyond Jan "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record", Vol. 128 #2, April 1997 pages 110-111 says evidence has been found that Cornelissen was Jan Van Cleef's patronymic. So, now we know his father's name was Cornelis ---Posted by: Kahty Boyd Date: December 31, 1999 at 19:48:51 I just got this from a cousin. Family lore says that the real last name of Jan Van Cleave was Waldyke, when the Van Cleef family got to America they where asked what their last name was; they thought they had been asked where they were from, so they said Van Cleef. I was told that Van means from, so they where saying that they where from Cleef. ---Posted by: Peggy Van Cleve Date: February 25, 2000 at 04:30:47 In Reply to: Van Cleave last name by Kahty Boyd I ran across this in my family files ...Decendants of Jan Van Cleef whose real name was Jan Waldike of Cleef Holland. Jan seems to arrive at Monmouth, New Jersey around 1653 and when asked his name he said Jan from Cleef. So the person wrote Jan Van Cleef instead of Jan Waldike. ---Posted by: Cleta Terrell Date: January 01, 1999 at 16:53:19 In Reply to: Dukes of Cleves/Kleve by Rick S. Thomas Rick, Our Jan's father was Cornelis. The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol.128 Number 2.,April 1997 has an article "Finding The Patronymic of Jan Van Cleef in Little-Used New Amsterdam Records". This article on pages 110-111 was written by Henry B. Hoff, F.A.S.G., F.G.B.S. In the article Mr. Hoff says the evidence of Jan's patronymic has been in publication since 1863, and again published in 1901. On page 527 of "Manual of the Corporation of the City of New-York" (1863) is an abstract of a contract of sale in the 1650s from Pieter ven der Linde to Jan Cornelis van Kleef for a plantation "Lindenborch" on Manhattan on the East River. The article continues with further confirmation of Jan's patronymic. ---Ancestry.com -Search Terms: CLEEF (4), JAN (1795), VAN (2695), Database: Biography & Genealogy Master Index (BGMI),# 220725, Cleef, Jan Van 1646-1716, A Dictionary of Biography, Past and Present. Containing the chief events in the lives of eminent persons of all ages and nations. Edited by Benjamin Vincent. Haydn Series. London: Ward, Lock, & Co., 1877. Reprint. Detroit: Gale Research, 1974. (DcBiPP) McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Art. Five volumes. Edited by Bernard S. Myers. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1969. (McGDA) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Jan Cornelisse van Cleef's Timeline

1627
1627
Rhenish Duchy, Cleve, Germany
1653
1653
Age 26
1661
May 10, 1661
Age 34
1662
January 7, 1662
Age 35
New Amsterdam, New Netherlands
1665
1665
Age 38
King's County, New York
1665
Age 38
Brooklyn, Kings Co,, NY, USA
1669
1669
Age 42
New Amsterdam, New York, United States
1670
1670
Age 43
Kings Co., Long Island
1672
1672
Age 45
New Utrecht,Kings,New York,USA
1674
1674
Age 47
New Utrecht, Kings, New York, United States