Jacob Janse Schermerhorn

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Jacob Janse Schermerhorn

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Schermerhorn, Schermer, North Holland, The Netherlands
Death: Died in Schenectady, Albany, New York
Place of Burial: Schenectady, Albany, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Jan Schermerhorn and N.N. N.N.
Husband of Janneite Egmont Schermerhorn and Jannetje Segerse Schermerhorn
Father of Jacob Janse Jacobse Schermerhorn; Reyer Jacobse Schermerhorn; Symon Jacobse Schermerhorn; Helena Schermerhorn; Cornelius Jacobse Schermerhorn and 4 others

Occupation: Trader, Brewer, Freeholder In Schenectady, Brewer/ Trader, Brewer & Fur Trader
Managed by: Marilou Goldfarb
Last Updated:

About Jacob Janse Schermerhorn

From Hadler, 1942, pg. 77:

was a prominent trader in Beverwyck in 1648, when he was arrested by Stuyvesant on a charge of selling fire-arms and ammunition to the Indians. His books and papers were seized and himself removed a prisoner to Ft. Amsterdam, where he was sentenced to banishment for five years and confiscation of his property. By the interference of some leading citizens, the first part of the sentence was struck out but his property was toally lost. These proceedings against Schermerhorn formed, subsequently, a ground of complaint against Stuyvensant to the States-General. -------------------- Information for Jacob and children taken from:

http://www.bsu.edu/classes/vancamp/jjschermer.html

The ancestral history of the Schermerhorn family in America begins with Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, who was one of the early settlers of Beverwyck (Albany), New York. The following information, taken from The Vedder Family in America 1657 -1973 by Edwin H. Vedder, is a summary of what is known about Jacob's life.

Immigrant:

Jacob Janse Schermerhooren

Name of Ship:

?

Arrival Date:

1636

Origin of Immigrant:

Waterland, Holland

Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth:

1622, Waterland, Holland

Immigrant's Date & Place of Death:

c.1688, Schenectady, NY

Immigrant's Spouse:

Jannetje Segers

"Genealogies of the First Settlers of Schenectady", by Jonathan Pearson,

Published by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore.

Notes:

Family also known as Schermerhorn.

Quote from aforementioned book follows: "Jacob Janse (Schermerhorn),was born in 1622, in Waterland, Holland, it is said;

though in 1654 his father was living in Amsterdam.

He came to Beverwyck quite early where he prospered

as a brewer and a trader. In 1648 he was arrested at Fort Orange

by Governor Stuyvesant's order, on a charge of selling arms

and ammunition to the Indians. His books and papers were seized,

and he himself was removed a prisoner to Fort Amsterdam,

where he was sentenced to banishment for five years

with the confiscation of all his property.

By the interferance of some leading citizens,

the first part of the sentence was struck out,

but his property was totally lost. These proceedings

against Schermerhorn formed subsequently

a ground of a complaint against Stuyvesant

to the States General.

[O'Callaghan's Hist. N.Y. I.,441]

He made his will May 20, 1688, and soon after

died at Schenectady.

His estate was large for the times,

amounting to 56,882 guilders.

His wife was Jannetje Segers,

dau. of Cornelis Segerese Van Voorhoudt.

the following is from:

http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/families/schermerhorn/chronicles/1b.html

[This information has been taken from pp. 27-54 of Schermerhorn Genealogy and Family Chronicles by Richard Schermerhorn, Jr. (New York: Tobias A. Wright, Publisher, 1914).]

Jacob Janse Schermerhorn

The name of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn is a familiar one in the early colonial records of Albany, New York. Previous to 1648, however, his activities are not easy to trace, and it appears that he was known during this period as Jacob Jansen, van Amsterdam. It is said that he was born in 1622 (Pearson's Albany Settlers), and it is quite likely that he was among the colonists who sailed from Holland on the ship Rensselaerswyck, Oct. 8, 1636. In the Van Rensselaer-Bower Mss. it is recorded that Jacob Janse, van Amsterdam, was a carpenter by trade, and was engaged for four years, beginning Apr. 2, 1637, at wages of 40f. a year. Part of this time he was employed by Albert Andriesz (Bratt), and in the harvest of 1640, he served under Cornelis Teunisz, van Breucklin. Other references to him contained in the same Mss. are to the effect that on May 1, 1640, he received 32f. extra for "faithful service to the Patroon," and that in 1641 he was employed by Van Curler to do some copying. From that date until Aug. 20, 1643, when his account was closed by Van Curler, he was engaged with other carpenters, building houses and barns. It is thought that he was one of the young men or boys who came over with Albert Andriesz (Bratt) to assist in the building of a mill at Rensselaerswyck, the contract for which Bratt had entered into with Patroon Van Rensselaer.

But in 1643 Jacob Janse had just reached the age of 21 years and perhaps had gathered together a little capital, sufficient to embark in enterprises of his own, and as the fur trade was of the most importance, he is next found following this vocation. At this time came the realization that his name must be used in full, as should become the position in affairs which he proposed to make for himself, and hereafter Schermerhorn was added. The appellation "van Amsterdam" had been used merely as designating the place of his former residence and to distinguish him from other Jacob Jansens. Jacob Janse Schermerhorn had at one time undoubtedly dwelt in Amsterdam, as his father is mentioned as living there in 1654. A certain document refers to "Jacob Janse Van Schermerhorn, formerly a citizen of Waterland, Holland." Waterland was the name of a large territory in North Holland, in which the town of Schermerhorn is located.

Jacob Janse Schermerhorn evidently prospered as a fur trader and in 1649 is mentioned as an "importer" and possessing property which was "somewhat considerable." His enterprise evidently led him into taking advantage of all means available for the substantial increase of his possessions. A business partner of his, Jacob Ryntgens, who dwelt in New Amsterdam, secretly purchased firearms from the employees of the West India Co., and delivered them to Jacob Janse in Albany, who in turn sold them to the Indians. It seems this was against the law, and although Stuyvesant claimed the right to conduct this very same business, and did so openly, he evidently desired to restrict it entirely to himself. He claimed Ryntgens and Schermerhorn were guilty of a felony, and had them arrested and sentenced to banishment with the confiscation of all their property and goods. They were arrested May 29, 1648, and sentenced July 9, 1648. (It is in connection with the papers relating to this action, that the name Schermerhorn is first found in the Colonial Records.) The sentence of banishment was remitted, August 1, 1648, through the interposition of the "Nine Men" and other influential colonists who thought the sentence undeserved. This action of Stuyvesant formed one of the grounds for a stringent remonstrance, the following year, against his administration, as expressed in a document dated July 28, 1649, addressed to the "Mighty Lords States General of the United Netherlands," and sent by the colony of New Netherland. There were very few of the early traders of New Netherland, who did not experience the same kind of difficulty as that in which Jacob Schermerhorn found himself enmeshed, when Stuyvesant decided to make an example of him. It is well to realize certain facts of the case in this connection. In regard to selling to or trading with the Indians, firearms and liquors, this was what all traders did, not necessarily on account of greed of wealth, but because it was necessary for them to trade with these materials, in order to do any business at all. The Indians would demand their liquor and guns, and would invariably set apart a certain amount of their trade capital for the acquirement of these articles.

Although the banishment of Ryntgens and Jacob Janse was remitted, their estates remained confiscated. This, however, seemed to daunt our ancestor but little, and he evidently lost no time to plunge into active business again. It is quite evident that neither he nor his partner suffered from reputation on account of this early embarrassment, as in 1660-1, Jacobus Reynst (Ryntgens) appears as one of the Deputies and Directors of the West India Co., at Amsterdam, and commissary to the General Privileged India Co., and Jacob Janse served as commissary or magistrate at Fort Orange (Albany) for many years (1652, 54, 56, 57, 58, 64, 71, 72, 74, 75, and probably other years). There were three magistrates and the office was one of the most important in the Colony. In 1676 he is mentioned as constable of Albany. He was also a prominent member of the Reformed Dutch Church at Albany, organized in 1642 by Domine Johannes Megapolensis. He was a member of the Church Consistory, kept the records himself in 1666, and was one of the committee to audit the church accounts for the greater period between 1665 and 1686. His name is recorded as twelfth male member of the Church.

He made at least two trips to Holland and probably more which the records do not show. The first trip was made in 1654, and in connection with this he acted as attorney for some of his Albany friends. He visited Holland again in 1668 and then, with a party of other New Netherlanders, loaded the ship "King Charles" with "Goods and Cargoe fitted for their country." A recent order of the King's had prohibited more than one ship to sail yearly, where before three had been allowed. A petition, signed by Jacob Janse and his companions, requested a concession for them in this particular case, which was granted.

Jacob Janse was always ready to help out his neighbors and friends, as is evidenced by the many times the records show he had given bond for various people. That he was a stern man and not easily to be trifled with, may be judged, through the records of the suits brought by him against others, for slander, trespass, moneys due and other matters.

He was a large property owner. Exactly what his possessions were previous to 1648, when his property was confiscated, is not known, but on Nov. 29, 1652, he received a patent of a lot in Beverwyck (Albany) and on Oct. 25, 1653, he received a patent for two lots in the same place. These may be the same lots, one of which is described as being in his name in 1664, 60 ft. x 240 ft., on the east side of North Pearl St., between Maiden Lane and State St., and the other held by him, 1676-3, 26 1/2 ft. x 49 ft., on the corner of an alley, on the north side of Pearl and Chapel Streets. In his will his property is described as follows: "My lot of ground lying at the river side at Albany where Cleyn de Goyer lived, which formerly belonged to Cornelis Segers (his father-in-law). * * * my farm at Schotak, the Pasture over against Marte Garitsen's Eylandt, my two houses and lots in ye City of Albany, the one over against Isaak Sybanks and the other where my son Simon Schermerhorn lived, next to Johannes D. Wandelaer, my house and lot at Schenectady where I now dwell." He also must have owned property in New York, as on Oct. 23, 1656, he entered into suit against Paulus Schrick for non-payment of rent, which action is found among the "Records of New Amsterdam."

It is also recorded that on Dec. 31, 1700, the administrators of the estate of Jacob Jansen Schermerhorn deeded to the Reformed Church of Albany, * * * Pasture land, south of the city, west of the great pasture to the church, along wagon road toward the woods (patent of May 16, 1667), also a lot in the Great Pasture (patent to Jacob Schermerhorn, Nov. 9, 1652).

Just when Jacob Janse moved to Schenectady cannot be exactly determined. It was probably not long after its settlement in 1662. At least, he must have been a resident in 1673, during which year his wife was called to give court testimony concerning a certain happening in Schenectady. His son Ryer was a freeholder in Schenectady before 1684, and at the time Jacob Janse made his will in 1688 he (Jacob), was residing there.

After the death of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, his wife received the income from his estate, which was valued at 56,882 guilders (about $23,000). This included the real estate mentioned and the moneys in Holland. After his wife's death in 1700, the estate was equally divided among the children.

From the foregoing, it is not difficult to fairly judge the character of our ancestor, Jacob Janse Schermerhorn. Coming from Holland, while a mere youth, probably in company with friends or possibly with relations, he indicated his ability at an early date, and rose to positions of trust and importance while still a young man. He possessed great determination and resolution as is shown by his ready ability to make a second fortune after the first one had been taken away from him. He occupied positions of prominence and responsibility in the colony, even before he had reached middle age, and his name is continually associated with others who occupied high positions of authority in the Colony's government. He was broad gauged and conducted his business on a wide scale, dealing directly with his mother country, Holland, and was presumably the owner of vessels plying the river trade between New York and Albany, and part owner, at least, of vessels carrying goods from New York and Holland. Undoubtedly, he acquired most of his fortune as an Indian trader, but his real estate holdings must have brought considerable competence to him and subsequently to his family. He was possessed of a good education, such as educations were in those times, which is indicated by his early transcribing of his accounts and his duties in the church and as magistrate. Were the early records complete, undoubtedly much more would be shown to the credit of our early ancestor. The transgressions of the early settlers were naturally more conspicuous in the records than their virtues. The transgressions of Jacob Janse were evidently no more than actions constituting the overstepping of certain legal bounds, the latter, in most cases, unjustly proscribed. Of his virtues, we are able to judge only by reading between the lines in the account of the actual facts on record.

The authorities for the statements rendered in this biography may be found referred to in Louis Y. Schermerhorn's Genealogy of the third branch of the Schermerhorn family, Philadelphia, 1903, and the Van Rensselaer-Bower Mss., N. Y. State Library, 1908. Considerable amplification has been possible by giving closer study to the books and Mss. mentioned by Louis Y. Schermerhorn.

The following is taken in whole from:

http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/families/schermerhorn/chronicles/1b.html

Schermerhorn Genealogy and Family Chronicles:

Chapter I: General History (Part 2 of 2)

[This information has been taken from pp. 27-54 of Schermerhorn Genealogy and Family Chronicles by Richard Schermerhorn, Jr. (New York: Tobias A. Wright, Publisher, 1914).]

The Schermerhorn Family of Holland

The annals of the Schermerhorn family in Holland have never been thoroughly investigated, although some effort was made, fifteen or twenty years ago, by William C. Schermerhorn of New York and Louis Y. Schermerhorn of Philadelphia, but without particular success. It is known, however, from New York State records, that Jan Schermerhorn, father of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, was living in Amsterdam in 1654. As late as 1884, a tombstone set in the floor of the old church at the village of Schermerhorn, Holland, was in existence, recording the fact that "Jacob Ryer Schermerhorn died Jan. 25, 1645, and his wife, 1665." These were probably the grandparents of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, Ryer being such an individual family name, that its occurence here forms an undisputable connecting link. The above facts are all that are known to be recorded of the ancestors of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn.

The family of Schermerhorn evidently originated at the village of Schermerhorn, Holland. The town evidently being named from its geographical location, it is quite likely that the family took their name from the town. This probably signifies that the family who took the name of Schermerhorn at some early date was the family known to be most closely identified with the village or locality of Schermerhorn, thereby being, perhaps, large property owners and people of some importance. On the other hand it may have been through a casual circumstance that some individual adopted the name of Schermerhorn at some early period, being a resident in the town or in some way intimately connected with it. An old tradition has come from Holland that an orphan boy was adopted by the village authorities in some past age, and took the name of Schermerhorn. Imagination has perhaps enlarged upon this tradition, for, as it comes through one source, the story goes that this orphan boy was of noble, and some even said, royal blood. The legend has been quoted in many versions, none of which is probably correct. The story is one of too easy imagination and too crude to be true.

In the matter of surnames, most individual family names in Holland, as well as in other countries, originated from the names or localities of family landed possessions. In other cases the surname was derived from some peculiar physical or mental characteristic of the first of the family to "make a name for himself;" in still others it pertained to his business or occupation. Many of the Dutch settlers in America acted in accordance with this, for at that time there were few distinct family names in Holland. Some took the name of their home district in Holland, while others reached further back in family history. Many who had distinct family names did not use them until some time after their coming to America, in some cases, in fact, the actual family name not appearing until the second or third generation in this country. The names of Van Antwerp, Van Arnhem, Van Buren, Van Valkenburgh, Van Petten, Visscher, Bakker, Beekman, etc., were taken by the early Dutch settlers in America, in accordance with what has been said in the foregoing, some of the names already known in Holland, and others entirely new. In the majority of the cases, however, the succeeding heads of Dutch families simply took their father's name as a surname, adding se, sen, or similar terminations. Jan, whose father was William, would be Jan Williamsen; Peter, whose father was Henry, would be Peter Hendricksen, etc. The early records of the Dutch Church of New York contain little else but this class of names, and the first records of the Albany Church are hardly different, although in the latter, the "Vans" soon became quite common, as the necessity became apparent for those having similar names to make the necessary distinctions. Though it does not appear that Jacob Janse Schermerhorn used his proper surname during the early period of his residence in America, he took it later on, and thereafter adhered strictly to it.

There are a number of families bearing the name of Schermerhorn still existing in Holland. The following record was written out for Miss Sophie E. Schermerhorn in 1884, by a member of the Holland Schermerhorn family:

       * Anno 1731, Dirk Schermerhorn, Hoofdonderwyzer to Noord Beemster.
       * Anno 1809, Evert Schermerhorn, Landbouwer in de Schermeer Gemeente, Akersloot.
       * Dirk Schermerhorn, Burgomeester, der Gemeente Sintmaarten, Gest. 1813.
       * William Schermerhorn, geboren 18 December, 1799.
       * (Willem and Dirk, zoons v. E. S.)
       * Willem Schermerhorn, Geboren, 10 Juli, 1851.
       * Jacob Schermerhorn, Geboren 17 Maart, 1855.

A letter received in September, 1913, from the Rev. Nicholas J. C. Schermerhorn of Nieuwe Niedorp, Holland, gives the following: "There are still Schermerhorns in Holland. These belong to two groups, one of them descending from Willem and the other from Dirk Schermerhorn. Those two were descended from one Evert." These two families are mentioned in another letter, written to William C. Schermerhorn in 1894. The head of one of these families was at that time the Burgomaster of St. Martins, and the head of the other, one of the syndics of Akersloot. These two families did not claim close relationship to each other, but there is no doubt that they were from the same original stock from which Jacob Janse descended, though the actual connection of the family with the village of Schermerhorn must have ceased several centuries ago. At present, a Schermerhorn is a member of Congress in Holland, and it is said the name is well known there. Undoubtedly this Holland family has been one of distinction, as may be readily judged by a perusal of the letter of Miss Sophie E. Schermerhorn, which follows:

   113 Noorderstaat,
   Amsterdam, Nov. 26, 1884.
   North Holland.
   Dear Sister & Brother:—
   When I first came to Amsterdam, I sent a postal to Schermerhorn (village) saying I should visit the old church at Schermerhorn and if any of the family name lived there, I should be glad to meet them. But I could not speak their language or understand it. My card was sent to Otterleek to Burgomaster Glyius (?), whose wife was a Schermerhorn. Then they wrote to Mr. Blouboor (?), whose wife was Gretia (?) Schermerhorn (now dead), but he and his family live there. He came to see me and made arrangements for me to go to Alkmaar, where Burgomaster (or Mayor) Glyius (?) would meet me. I took my interpreter with me, Mrs. Van Soest, an English widow of a Hollander. We were met by Mr. Glyius (?), who drove us in his real Dutch carriage about three miles over a smooth brick paved road, through a very finely cultivated farming district, drained by 50 large windmills, like that in your Winter Scene I painted, only some are much larger. This tract of land or town is called Schermermeer and the village is in the center, and the old church steeple at Schermerhorn is seen from all parts. As we neared his home we turned into a thickly wooded avenue leading to the house. At the door we were met by Vrouw Glyius (?) with her cap and beads, according to the custom. She gave me a very kindly welcome, then the two sons and then the two daughters, all grown up and good looking. The girls took me by the hand and led me into the house, then to the dinning [sic] room where I first drank coffee. Then after a little while, we had tea and luncheon. While at luncheon Uncle William Schermerhorn from Heilo, a very fine old gentleman, aged 85, arrived. We visited and talked a while. It would have pleased you to have seen them point out in my face the family resemblance. There was a pause and Uncle William Schermerhorn said something, with a look earnest and sad. I asked what it was he said. The reply was, "At last, this is something (said very slowly) very remarkable, that one of the family, and she a woman, should come back after so many years to seek us. And that I should live to see this day. What joy! What pleasure!" He took my hand and shook it so kindly and said: "You are welcome among us. Come to my home. I shall feel honored by a visit from you." After two hours we bid him good-bye, with a promise to visit another time. Then Mr. and Mrs. Glyius (?), Mrs. Van Soest and myself went in the carriage to the Village of Schermerhorn three miles distant, quite a little Dutch town, to see the church, which I found a very fine old church even yet, and still in use. It was built first in the year 1450, then rebuilt in 1634 and is now the same except the windows are not all painted, having been replaced; but they are all of small piece glass, about four inches square, and about 1000 pieces in each window. Then there are several fine Mosaic glass settings, of fine patterns. I did not attempt to count the glass pieces. The paintings on these windows were certainly the finest work in color shading I have seen anywhere in Scotland or England, and I have been in several Cathedrals, Castles and Palaces, where all had glass paintings. (I have visited Windsor Castle, and the King's and Queen's Palace here in Holland.) They were so finely painted, I could not think of copying. Some were very amusing, others were of scriptural subjects, but mostly coat-of-arms. There was one central glass with the name Schermerhorn, surrounded by paintings which represented the country and trades of the people. On each side of the door and aisle hung one of De Ruyter's little model ships, like the ones in which he went to war. They have a nice looking organ, — this is new and of recent date. I was so interested I did not wish to go with only one hour's look, but when I went back the second time to visit the family, I went to Schermerhorn again. The floor of the church is made up of tombstones. In looking around at some of the amusing representations on these stones, I was happily surprised to find this inscription: "Jacob Ryer Schermerhorn, died Jan. 25, 1645, and his wife 1665." This was our grandfather's name, who died in New York. I rejoiced to think our ancestors were so much respected as to be buried in this fine old church, where the Protestant religion had been preached for so many years. The families here that I have met did not seem to know anything of the families in America; a number had gone from here but never had written. Uncle William Schermerhorn's Uncle Evert went to America, but was never heard from, and as his father died when he was young, he knew nothing about him. If I could talk to them myself, I could find out more. My interpreters will not ask half I wish them to, thinking it is not necessary. Besides they have no interests only to talk and have a good time themselves. * * *

Further information on descendants of Jacob can be found in "Genealogical Notes of New York and New England Families" compiled by S.V. Talcott 1876 -------------------- Under information in Dutch Landgrants of 1630-1664 I found that a lot was given 25 oct 1653, and a lot was given 09 Nov 1652 -------------------- [This information has been taken from pp. 27-54 of Schermerhorn Genealogy and Family Chronicles by Richard Schermerhorn, Jr. (New York: Tobias A. Wright, Publisher, 1914).]

Jacob Janse Schermerhorn

The name of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn is a familiar one in the early colonial records of Albany, New York. Previous to 1648, however, his activities are not easy to trace, and it appears that he was known during this period as Jacob Jansen, van Amsterdam. It is said that he was born in 1622 (Pearson's Albany Settlers), and it is quite likely that he was among the colonists who sailed from Holland on the ship Rensselaerswyck, Oct. 8, 1636. In the Van Rensselaer-Bower Mss. it is recorded that Jacob Janse, van Amsterdam, was a carpenter by trade, and was engaged for four years, beginning Apr. 2, 1637, at wages of 40f. a year. Part of this time he was employed by Albert Andriesz (Bratt), and in the harvest of 1640, he served under Cornelis Teunisz, van Breucklin. Other references to him contained in the same Mss. are to the effect that on May 1, 1640, he received 32f. extra for "faithful service to the Patroon," and that in 1641 he was employed by Van Curler to do some copying. From that date until Aug. 20, 1643, when his account was closed by Van Curler, he was engaged with other carpenters, building houses and barns. It is thought that he was one of the young men or boys who came over with Albert Andriesz (Bratt) to assist in the building of a mill at Rensselaerswyck, the contract for which Bratt had entered into with Patroon Van Rensselaer.

But in 1643 Jacob Janse had just reached the age of 21 years and perhaps had gathered together a little capital, sufficient to embark in enterprises of his own, and as the fur trade was of the most importance, he is next found following this vocation. At this time came the realization that his name must be used in full, as should become the position in affairs which he proposed to make for himself, and hereafter Schermerhorn was added. The appellation "van Amsterdam" had been used merely as designating the place of his former residence and to distinguish him from other Jacob Jansens. Jacob Janse Schermerhorn had at one time undoubtedly dwelt in Amsterdam, as his father is mentioned as living there in 1654. A certain document refers to "Jacob Janse Van Schermerhorn, formerly a citizen of Waterland, Holland." Waterland was the name of a large territory in North Holland, in which the town of Schermerhorn is located.

Jacob Janse Schermerhorn evidently prospered as a fur trader and in 1649 is mentioned as an "importer" and possessing property which was "somewhat considerable." His enterprise evidently led him into taking advantage of all means available for the substantial increase of his possessions. A business partner of his, Jacob Ryntgens, who dwelt in New Amsterdam, secretly purchased firearms from the employees of the West India Co., and delivered them to Jacob Janse in Albany, who in turn sold them to the Indians. It seems this was against the law, and although Stuyvesant claimed the right to conduct this very same business, and did so openly, he evidently desired to restrict it entirely to himself. He claimed Ryntgens and Schermerhorn were guilty of a felony, and had them arrested and sentenced to banishment with the confiscation of all their property and goods. They were arrested May 29, 1648, and sentenced July 9, 1648. (It is in connection with the papers relating to this action, that the name Schermerhorn is first found in the Colonial Records.) The sentence of banishment was remitted, August 1, 1648, through the interposition of the "Nine Men" and other influential colonists who thought the sentence undeserved. This action of Stuyvesant formed one of the grounds for a stringent remonstrance, the following year, against his administration, as expressed in a document dated July 28, 1649, addressed to the "Mighty Lords States General of the United Netherlands," and sent by the colony of New Netherland. There were very few of the early traders of New Netherland, who did not experience the same kind of difficulty as that in which Jacob Schermerhorn found himself enmeshed, when Stuyvesant decided to make an example of him. It is well to realize certain facts of the case in this connection. In regard to selling to or trading with the Indians, firearms and liquors, this was what all traders did, not necessarily on account of greed of wealth, but because it was necessary for them to trade with these materials, in order to do any business at all. The Indians would demand their liquor and guns, and would invariably set apart a certain amount of their trade capital for the acquirement of these articles.

Although the banishment of Ryntgens and Jacob Janse was remitted, their estates remained confiscated. This, however, seemed to daunt our ancestor but little, and he evidently lost no time to plunge into active business again. It is quite evident that neither he nor his partner suffered from reputation on account of this early embarrassment, as in 1660-1, Jacobus Reynst (Ryntgens) appears as one of the Deputies and Directors of the West India Co., at Amsterdam, and commissary to the General Privileged India Co., and Jacob Janse served as commissary or magistrate at Fort Orange (Albany) for many years (1652, 54, 56, 57, 58, 64, 71, 72, 74, 75, and probably other years). There were three magistrates and the office was one of the most important in the Colony. In 1676 he is mentioned as constable of Albany. He was also a prominent member of the Reformed Dutch Church at Albany, organized in 1642 by Domine Johannes Megapolensis. He was a member of the Church Consistory, kept the records himself in 1666, and was one of the committee to audit the church accounts for the greater period between 1665 and 1686. His name is recorded as twelfth male member of the Church.

He made at least two trips to Holland and probably more which the records do not show. The first trip was made in 1654, and in connection with this he acted as attorney for some of his Albany friends. He visited Holland again in 1668 and then, with a party of other New Netherlanders, loaded the ship "King Charles" with "Goods and Cargoe fitted for their country." A recent order of the King's had prohibited more than one ship to sail yearly, where before three had been allowed. A petition, signed by Jacob Janse and his companions, requested a concession for them in this particular case, which was granted.

Jacob Janse was always ready to help out his neighbors and friends, as is evidenced by the many times the records show he had given bond for various people. That he was a stern man and not easily to be trifled with, may be judged, through the records of the suits brought by him against others, for slander, trespass, moneys due and other matters.

He was a large property owner. Exactly what his possessions were previous to 1648, when his property was confiscated, is not known, but on Nov. 29, 1652, he received a patent of a lot in Beverwyck (Albany) and on Oct. 25, 1653, he received a patent for two lots in the same place. These may be the same lots, one of which is described as being in his name in 1664, 60 ft. x 240 ft., on the east side of North Pearl St., between Maiden Lane and State St., and the other held by him, 1676-3, 26 1/2 ft. x 49 ft., on the corner of an alley, on the north side of Pearl and Chapel Streets. In his will his property is described as follows: "My lot of ground lying at the river side at Albany where Cleyn de Goyer lived, which formerly belonged to Cornelis Segers (his father-in-law). * * * my farm at Schotak, the Pasture over against Marte Garitsen's Eylandt, my two houses and lots in ye City of Albany, the one over against Isaak Sybanks and the other where my son Simon Schermerhorn lived, next to Johannes D. Wandelaer, my house and lot at Schenectady where I now dwell." He also must have owned property in New York, as on Oct. 23, 1656, he entered into suit against Paulus Schrick for non-payment of rent, which action is found among the "Records of New Amsterdam."

It is also recorded that on Dec. 31, 1700, the administrators of the estate of Jacob Jansen Schermerhorn deeded to the Reformed Church of Albany, * * * Pasture land, south of the city, west of the great pasture to the church, along wagon road toward the woods (patent of May 16, 1667), also a lot in the Great Pasture (patent to Jacob Schermerhorn, Nov. 9, 1652).

Just when Jacob Janse moved to Schenectady cannot be exactly determined. It was probably not long after its settlement in 1662. At least, he must have been a resident in 1673, during which year his wife was called to give court testimony concerning a certain happening in Schenectady. His son Ryer was a freeholder in Schenectady before 1684, and at the time Jacob Janse made his will in 1688 he (Jacob), was residing there.

After the death of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, his wife received the income from his estate, which was valued at 56,882 guilders (about $23,000). This included the real estate mentioned and the moneys in Holland. After his wife's death in 1700, the estate was equally divided among the children.

From the foregoing, it is not difficult to fairly judge the character of our ancestor, Jacob Janse Schermerhorn. Coming from Holland, while a mere youth, probably in company with friends or possibly with relations, he indicated his ability at an early date, and rose to positions of trust and importance while still a young man. He possessed great determination and resolution as is shown by his ready ability to make a second fortune after the first one had been taken away from him. He occupied positions of prominence and responsibility in the colony, even before he had reached middle age, and his name is continually associated with others who occupied high positions of authority in the Colony's government. He was broad gauged and conducted his business on a wide scale, dealing directly with his mother country, Holland, and was presumably the owner of vessels plying the river trade between New York and Albany, and part owner, at least, of vessels carrying goods from New York and Holland. Undoubtedly, he acquired most of his fortune as an Indian trader, but his real estate holdings must have brought considerable competence to him and subsequently to his family. He was possessed of a good education, such as educations were in those times, which is indicated by his early transcribing of his accounts and his duties in the church and as magistrate. Were the early records complete, undoubtedly much more would be shown to the credit of our early ancestor. The transgressions of the early settlers were naturally more conspicuous in the records than their virtues. The transgressions of Jacob Janse were evidently no more than actions constituting the overstepping of certain legal bounds, the latter, in most cases, unjustly proscribed. Of his virtues, we are able to judge only by reading between the lines in the account of the actual facts on record.

The authorities for the statements rendered in this biography may be found referred to in Louis Y. Schermerhorn's Genealogy of the third branch of the Schermerhorn family, Philadelphia, 1903, and the Van Rensselaer-Bower Mss., N. Y. State Library, 1908. Considerable amplification has been possible by giving closer study to the books and Mss. mentioned by Louis Y. Schermerhorn.

Copy of Will of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn

Recorded in Albany County Clerk's Office. Book I, Page 26, Wills.

IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN

The one and Twentieth day of may, 1688, in the fourth year of ye Reign of our most Gracious Sovieraign Lord, James the Second, by ye grace of god of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, King: I, Jacob Janse Schermerhoorn of ye Towne of Schinnechttady in ye County of Albany, yoeman, although Some what weake and sickly in body, yett of good, Perfect, Sound Memory, Praised be Almighty god therefor, do make and ordain this my Present Will and Testament, Containing therin my Last Will in manner and form following; yt is to say: first I commend my Self and al my whole estate to the Mercy and Protection of Almighty god, being fully Persuaded by his holy spirit through the Death and Passion of Jesus Christ, to obtain full Pardon and Remission of al my Sinns and to Inheritt Everlasting Life to which the holy Trinity, one Eternall Deity be al honour and glory, forever, amen, and touching Temporall Estate of goods, Chattells and Debts as the Lord hath been Pleased farr above my Deserts to bestow upon me, I doe order, give, Bequeath and Depose the Same in manner and form following.:

Imp. — I give, grant, Devise and bequeath to Ryer Schermerhoorn, my Eldest Sonne, before any Division or Partition be made of my Estate, my lotte of grounde lying at the River Side at Albany, where Cleyn de goyer Lived, which formerly belong to Cornelis Segerse, as itt Lyes Inclosed within fence, — To have and to hold the said Lotte of grounde to ye said Ryer Schermerhoorn, his heirs and assigns, forever.

2d. My will is that my well beloved wife, Jannetje Schermerhoorn shall Possess and Enjoy during her widowhood, all ye Rents and Profitts of all my Reall Estate, virt: of my farm at Schotak, the Pasture over against Marte Garitsen's Eylant, my two houses and Lotts in ye City of albany, the one over against Isaak Sybanks (?) and the other where my Sonne Symon Schermerhoorn lives next to Johannes D. Wandelaer, my house and Lott at Shinnechtady where I now Dwell.

3d. I do Likewise give and bequeath to my said Wife all my other Estate in this County, moveables and Immovables, goods and Chattells, Plate, Jewels, wares, Merchandise, &c. and Debts to me owing and Ready money, nothing whatever exempted and this all during her widowhood, and that neither my Eldest Sonne or any of the rest of my children shall Disturb my wife after my Decease so long as She Continues widow, leaving it wholly to her to give such Portion or Portions to my four children yett under age, virt. Cornelis, Jannetie, Neeltie, and Lucas Schermerhorn, as the other Children have had when they married, and as She in Conschience Shall See Convenient. But if it should happen that my Said Wife should Remarry, then my will is that she give a full and Perfect Inventory of ye whole Estate, Reall and Personall, the Just half or moyety whereof, I do give, grant, Devise and Bequeath unto my Dear and well beloved wife, Jannetje Schermerhoorn, and the other half or moyety to my nine Children, Virt., Ryer, Symon, helena, the wife of Myndt. harmense, Jacob and Machtoll, ye wife of Johannes Beekman, Cornelis, Jannetie, neeltje and Luykas Schermerhoorn, to be Equally divided among them, Part & Part alike, or among their heirs upon their Decease and yt. the Law or Custome of Joynt Tennancy shall herein cease and each child whether they Survive or not may dispose of their Proportion and Share of ye Reall Estate as well as Personall. But if my said foure Children, Cornelis, Jannetje, Neeltje and Lucas be not come to age or married before my sd. wife happens to Remarry or Decease, my will is that they shall have the Same Portion Severally as the oy'r Children had when they married before any Division be made and then share alike with their Brethren and Sisters. And if my said wife shall Decease without remarrying, my will is that the whole Estate, Real and Personall be equally Divided among my Said nine Children for the behoof of them, their heirs and assigns, severally, forever, all Part and Part alike, and if any of my Sonnes or Daughters do Decease before ye age of one and Twenty years and before their marriage that then in Such Case, the Portion of every of them so Deceasing shall Remain and be to ye Survivours and Survivour of them. My will is yt. all my Cloaths, Linning and Wooling and other apparell belonging to me shall be Divided Equally among my Sonnes and all the wearing apparell and Stricken (trinkets) or Pendants Belonging to my wife shall be Equally Divided amongst my Daughters.

6th. Further it is my will that the hollands money that is in Amsterdam under ye hands of Mr. Sykirk (?) shall remain untouched during my wife's widowhood and natural Life and that she shall Receive ye Rents thereof as hitherto I have done.

7th. And whereas my Sonne in Law Myndt. harmense has a Thousand gilders of said hollands money upon Intrest, my will is yt. he pay Interest for ye same to my wife and if he pays the Principall then he is to share alike with the oyr Children in ye Estate, else it is to be Deducted of his Proportion of ye money that is in holland under Mr. Sykirk (?).

8th. I do freely remitt and Discharge my Sonne Jacob Schermerhoorn that Livs upon my farm at Schotak of ye Rent which he is owing for ye same and which will be due to ye Day of my Decease, not willing that my Executrx. or Admx. shall any wise molest him, the said Jacob Schermerhoorn, Junr. or his heirs for ye same, but is nevertheless obliged to give an True and just acct. of ye half of Increase of ye horses and Cattle.

9th. And Lastly I make, constitute, ordain and appoint my Dear and well beloved wife sole Executrix of this my last will and Testament and to her Care and Tuition also I leave all my Children that are undr. age and I will that my Said wife do maintain them and ye Education of my Said children during there minority and I do hereby nominate and appoint my said wife Tutrix to them and every of them until such time as they shall severally Come to age, and wille and appoint that my said wife to be administratrix and have ye administration of my goods and Chattells and that my Sonnes Ryer and Symon be assistants to their Moyr. in the administration of the Estate and in looking after the Education of there Bretheren and Sisters yt. are under age. In witness whereof I have hereunto Sett my hand and Seale In Albany at the house of Mynd. harmense, ye Day and year first above written.

JACOB JANSE SCHERMERHOORN (L. S.)

Signed, Sealed & Delivered

in the presence of

Gideon Schaets.

past. Jacob Staets.

NOTE — The wording, spelling and capitalization of the foregoing document are copied exactly as they appear, but proper punctuation is inserted for facility in reading. -------------------- http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?vAN,buren::schermerhorn::187.html Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, s/o Jan Schemerhorn, was b. 1622 in Holland and made his will 5/26/1688 and died 1688 in Schenectady, N.Y.

He had: Ryer, 1652 m. Ariaantje Arentse Bratt; Simon b. 1658 m. Willempie Viele; Helena b. ca. 1660 m. Myndert Harmense Van der Bogart; Jacob b. 1662 m. Gerritie Hendrickse Van Buren; Machtelt b. ca. 1663 m. Johannes Martense Beekman; Cornelius b. ca. 1668 m. Maritie Hendrickse Van Buren; Jannetie b. ca. 1672 m. Caspar Springsteen; Neeltje b. ca. 1674 m. Barent Ten Eyck and Lucas b. ca. 1676 who m. Elizabeth Janse Damen.

Capt. Daniel C. was s/o Cornelius Schermerhorn and Maria Winne bp. 3/23/1745 in Kinderhook and he m. Maria Vanderpoel. They did have a dau. Maritje (Maria bp. 9/24/1769 in Kinderhook and she m. 5/27/1788 in Kinderhook, Matthew Bovee. Maria d. 10/6/1843 in Riga, Monroe, N.Y. This Daniel never lived in Troy N.Y., nor was he born there. If this Daniel is yours then:

Daniel; Cornelius J. m. Maria Winne; Jacob Schermerhorn Jr. m. Antie Van Vechten; Jacob J. m. Gerritie H. Van Buren and our 1st ancestor here Jacob Janse who m. Jannetie Segerse Egmont (Van Voorhout). She was b. 1633 in Holland, dau. of Cornelius Segerse Egmont (Van Voorhout) and Bregje Jacobsen. Jannetie d. 1700 Schenectady, N.Y. This is known as "Jacob's line."

http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?vAN,buren::schermerhorn::756.html Jacob J. Schermerhorn, s/o Jacob Janse Schermerhorn and Jannetie Egmont, m. Gerritie Hendrickse Van Buren and they had, among others: Elizabeth Schermerhorn bp. Aug. 28, 1698 Albany and m. Feb. 13, 1728 in Albany, Roelef Jansen. Elizabeth & Roelef Jansen had Johannes Jansen who m., below, Jannetie Schermerhorn, June 28, 1750 Albany Dutch RC; Gertrude bp. Sept. 12, 1731 who m. Johannes A. Huyck; Jacob bp. 5/16/1736 ADRC.

Jacob J. Schermerhorn and Gerritie Van Buren also had: Hendrick Schermerhorn who m. Elisie Jans Albertsen (Jansen)and Cornelius Schermerhorn who m. Margarita Jans Albertsen (Jansen).

Jacob Schermerhorn, Jr. who m. Antie Van Vechten and Elizabeth Schermerhorn who m. Roelef Jansen were brother & sister.

Jacob Schermerhorn, Jr., s/o Jacob J. Schermerhorn and Gerritie H. Van Buren m. June 23, 1714 in Albany, Antie Van Vechten and they had, among others: Jannetie Schermerhorn bp. 2/25/1728 Albany who m. (License)June 28, 1750 Albany Dutch R. C., Johannes Jansen. Jannetie & Johannes Jansen had Elisabeth bp. Jan. 19, 1751 with Roelof & Elisabeth Jansen sps.; Jacob bp. Nov. 18, 1753 with Cornelius Schermerhorn & Maria Winne wife, sps. Elizabeth Jansen d/o Janneie & Johannes Jansen, m. Coenraet A. Ten Eyck, s/o Anthony Ten Eyck, b. May 15, 1746, d. Dec. 14, 1825. According to Ten Eyck history, Elizabeth died of fright April 23, 1770 at the "Crupel Bush." Coenraet Ten Eyck m. (2) Rachel Hallenbeck Aug. 10, 1772.

Johannes Jansen died and Jannetie m. (2) Andries Ten Eyck July 25, 1763. Children (1)Gerritje Ten Eyck 1765-1848 m. Coenradt Ten Eyck, s/o Tobies of Pictuay and their daughter Jane Ten Eyck 1783-1827 m. Andrew Van Derzee 1766-1834. (2) Jacob Ten Eyck bp. Dec. 20, 1772 d.y.

The Albertsen's (Jansen)- Jan s/o Albert Janzen & Elsie Jans m. (1) Geesje Jans Van Mappelen. Geesje was d/o Roelof Janzen Van Mepplen & Geesje Claes who m. ca 1691 Jan Albertse Jansen. Thus these are two different Jansen Families. There are many, Jansen Families in the Hudson Valley.

Anthony VanderPoel, b. Newark, NJ August 15, 1754, bp. Dec. 15, 1754 Newark, NJ, s/o Johannes VanderPoel and Apphia David (?) m. (Banns) May 19, 1776 at Albany DRC, Elisabeth Janssen of Schodack (Johnson as Vanderpoel Genealogy lists her). According to VanderPoel Genealogy they had first 5 children bpt. at Kinderhook and next six at Bradford Co., PA. They moved to PA ca. 1790. The last children, twins, were born Dec. 2, 1787.



            
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Jacob Janse Schermerhorn's Timeline

1622
1622
Schermerhorn, Schermer, North Holland, The Netherlands
1636
1636
- 1636
Age 14
1650
February 20, 1650
Age 28
Schenectady, Albany, NY, USA
1652
June 23, 1652
Age 30
Beverwyck, Albany, New York, United States
1658
1658
Age 36
Beverwyck, Albany, NY
1660
1660
Age 38
Albany, NY, USA
1661
1661
Age 39
Albany, NY, USA
1663
1663
Age 41
Albany, NY, USA
1668
1668
Age 46
Albany, NY, USA
1672
1672
Age 50
Albany, Albany County, New York, United States