Charles II "the Bald", Western Emperor

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Charles 'le Chauve', roi des Francs

Nicknames: "Charles II "the Bald"", ""le Chauve"", ""el Calvo"", "Karel "de Kale"", ""il Calvo"", "Charles II", "Holy Roman Emperor", "King of West Francia", "Charles the Bald", "The Bald", "Emperor of HolyRoman empire", "Karel de Kale", "Charles the Bald.he was not in fact bald", "but rat..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Frankfurt, Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany
Death: Died in Montpezat, Lot-et-Garonne, Aquitaine, France
Place of Burial: Eglise de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis, St. Denis (within present Paris), Western Francia (Present France)
Immediate Family:

Son of Emperor Louis I 'The Pious', son of Charlemagne & Hildegard; Louis I "The Pious Emperor of Holy Roman Empire; Judith of Bavaria and Judith
Husband of Ermentrude (Irmtrud) Countess of Orleans; Judith "Augusta”; Ermentrude d'Orléans, reine des Francs and Richildis d'Ardennes, de Provence
Father of Judith, Queen of Wessex, Countess of Flanders; Gisela,; Charles; Rothilde of the Franks; Louis II "le bègue", roi des Francs and 17 others
Brother of Gisela of Cysoing, daughter of Louis and Judith
Half brother of Emperor Lothar I (Carolingian); Pépin I, Roi d'Aquitaine; Rotrude, daughter of Louis I the Pious and Ermengard; Louis II, 'The German'; Berte, daughter ot Louis I the Pious and Ermengard and 4 others

Occupation: King of West Francia (843–877), Emperor of the Romans (875-877), King of Franks, roi de France, roi d'Aquitaine, roi de Lotharingie, roi d'Italie, roi de Provence, empereur d'Occident, Emperor, keizer, King of France, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Charles 'le Chauve', roi des Francs

Ben M. Angel notes: Again, if the year is before 962, it is not the Holy Roman Empire, and the ruler is not the Holy Roman Emperor. The first Emperor of the entity that later becomes known as the Holy Roman Empire was Otto I, coroneted in 962. This individual precedes him by over a century.

References to "Holy Roman Empire" in secondary sources can be regarded as poorly researched (perhaps from obsolete documentation suggesting the German Holy Roman Empire to be a continuation of the Carolingian Frankish Empire - no longer considered to be so) and incorrect.

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Alternative Data from merges (Sharon):

  • Born 5/15/823
  • Nicknames/ Transliteration Names? Kaljupaa; el Calvo

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Family of Origin

Louis I The Pious m Judith second m secondly (Aix-la-Chapelle Feb 819) JUDITH, daughter of WELF [I] Graf [von Altdorf] & his wife Heilwig --- ([805]-Tours 19 Apr 843, bur Tours Saint-Martin). His second wife was, Judith of Bavaria:[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_the_Pious

With her had three children/ a daughter and a son: :[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_the_Pious

2.1 Gisela (c819-c874)

2.2 Charles (823-877)

CHARLES (Frankfurt-am-Main 13 Jun 823-Avrieux or Brides-les-Bains, Savoie 6 Oct 877, bur Nantua Abbey, transferred to église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the birth of "Karolus filius Ludowici" in Frankfurt "Idus Iun 824"[214]. Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names Charles as son of his father by his second wife[215]. Under the division of Imperial territories by the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, he became CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks. Charles the Bald, king of West Francia:[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_the_Pious

2.3? Daughter

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Marriages and children

Charles married Ermentrude, daughter of Odo I, Count of Orléans, in 842. She died in 869. In 870, Charles married Richilde of Provence, who was descended from a noble family of Lorraine.

With Ermentrude:

  • 1. Judith (844–870), married firstly with Ethelwulf of Wessex, secondly with Ethelbald of Wessex (her stepson) and thirdly with Baldwin I of Flanders
  • 2. Louis the Stammerer (846–879)
  • 3. Charles the Child (847–866)
  • 4. Lothar (848–865), monk in 861, became Abbot of Saint-Germain
  • 5. Carloman (849–876)
  • 6. Rotrud (852–912), a nun, Abbess of Saint-Radegunde
  • 7. Ermentrud (854–877), a nun, Abbess of Hasnon
  • 8. Hildegard (born 856, died young)
  • 9. Gisela (857–874)

With Richilde:

  • 1. Rothild (871–929), married firstly with Hugues, Count of Bourges and secondly with Roger, Count of Maine
  • 2. Drogo (872–873)
  • 3. Pippin (873–874)
  • 4. a son (born and died 875)
  • 5. Charles (876–877)

Notes

  • 1. ^ Charles II
  • 2. ^ Dutton, Paul E, Charlemagne's Mustache
  • 3. ^ From German Wikipedia, where it is probably derived from Reinhard Lebe (2003), War Karl der Kahle wirklich kahl? Historische Beinamen und was dahintersteckt, ISBN 3 42330 876 1.

Charles the Bald

  • Carolingian Dynasty
  • Born: June 13 823
  • Died: October 877

King of Western Francia (843 - 877)

  • Preceded by Louis I
  • Succeeded by Louis II

Holy Roman Emperor (correct title: Emperor of the Romans, 875 - 877)

  • Preceded by Louis II
  • Succeeded by Charles III

King of Italy (875 - 877)

  • Succeeded by Carloman

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Ben M. Angel's summary:

Parents:

  • Father: Louis/Hludowic I, Emperor of the Romans (778 - 20 June 840)
  • Mother: Judith von Bayern, Empress of the Romans (c805 - 19 April 843)

Siblings:

  • 1. Gisela (819/822 - 1 July 874), wife of Eberhard, Marchese di Friulia.
  • 3. Unknown Sister, wife to an Udalrichinger.

Legitimate Half Siblings:

  • 1. Lothaire/Lothar (795 - 29 September 855), Emperor of the Romans, King of Lotharingia
  • 2. Pepin I (c797 - 13 December 838), King of Aquitaine
  • 3. Hrotrud/Rotrude (b. c800)
  • 4. Berta
  • 5. Hildegard (802/804 - 857/860), Abbess of Notre-Dame and St-Jean at Laon
  • 6. Louis (c806 - 28 August 876) "le Germanique/der Deutsche", King of the Eastern Franks.

Illegitimate Half-Siblings:

  • 1. Alpais (793/794 - 23 July 852), wife of Bego, Comte de Paris, and Abbess of St-Pierre-le-Bas at Reims.
  • 2. Arnoul (c794 - after April 841), Comte de Sens (817 - 841)

Spouses and Children:

Wife 1: Ermentrudis (27 September 830 - 6 October 869)

  • 1. Judith (c844 - after 870), wife of Aethelwulf, King of Wessex, and Aethelwulf's son, Aethelbald, King of Wessex, and Baudouin, Comte de Flandres.
  • 2. Louis II (1 November 846 - 10 April 879) "le Begue", King of the West Franks.
  • 3. Charles (847/848 - 29 September 866), King of Aquitaine (October 855 - 866), husband of the widow of Humbert, Comte de Bourges.
  • 4. Carloman (d. 877/878), Abbot de St-Medard at Soisons, Abbot of Echternach in Luxembourg.
  • 5. Lothaire (d. 14 December 865), Abbot of St-Germain at Auxerre.
  • 6. Hildegardis
  • 7. Ermentrudis (d. after 11 July 877), Abbess of Hasnon, near Douai (present France)
  • 8. Gisela
  • 9. Rotrudis (b. c850), Abbess of St-Radegonde at Poitiers (868 - 870)

Wife 2: Richildis (d. after 30 January 910)

  • 1. Rothildis (c871 - 22 March 929), wife of Roger, Comte du Maine, and Abbess of Chelles
  • 2. Drogo (872/873 - 873/874) twin.
  • 3. Pepin (872/873 - 873/874) twin.
  • 4. Unknown son (23 March 875 - died young after baptism)
  • 5. Charles (10 October 876 - before 7 April 877)

Basic information and justifications: pretty much everything taken from either FMG, or where lacking there, Wikipedia.

Birth: 13 June 823 at Frankfurt-am-Main, Austrasia, Frankish Empire

Marriages:

  • With Ermentrudis: 13 December 842 - Quierzy-sur-Oise, (Present Departement d'Aisne), Neustria, Frankish Empire. Separated 867, retiring to a Monastery St-Dionysus
  • With Richildis: marriage 12 October 869, confirmed at Aix-la-Chapelle, Ostenfrankenreich, 22 January 870

Death: 6 October 877 - Avrieux or Brides-les-Bains, Regno Longobardo (Present Region Savoie, France), Western Francia

Burial: église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis, Present Paris

Occupation:

  • August 829 - March 830: Dux in Alemania, Rhetia, Alsace and part of Burgundy
  • September 832 - 15 March 834: King of Aquitaine (first reign)
  • 837 - 838: Ruler of lands between Frisia and the Seine.
  • 838 - 28 May 839: Ruler of Maine and the lands between the Seine and the Loire.
  • 28 May 839 - 20 June 840: Ruler of Western Francia
  • 20 June 840 - 11 August 843: King of the Franks of the West
  • 11 August 843 - 6 October 877: King of the West Franks
  • 848 - 6 October 877: King of Aquitaine (second reign)
  • 8 August 869 - 6 October 877: King of Lotharingia

25 December 875 - 6 October 877: Emperor of the Romans 876 - 6 October 877: King of Italy

Alternate names: Charles/Karl, epitaph: [en] The Bald, [fr] le Cheuve, [es] el Calvo, [no] den skallede, [de] der Kahle, [nl] de Kale, [it] il Calvo, [hu] Kopasz, [sv] den skallige, [dk] den Skaldede, [pt] o Calvo, [pl] Łysy, [ru] Лысый, [bg] Плешиви

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Carolingian Kings:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAROLINGIANS.htm#_Toc240955195

LOUIS I 814-840


LOUIS [Hludowic], son of CHARLES I King of the Franks & his second wife Hildegard (Chasseneuil-du-Poitou {Vienne} [16 Apr/Sep] 778-island in the Rhine near Ingelheim 20 Jun 840, bur Metz, église abbatiale de Saint-Arnoul[178]).

  • He is named, and his parentage recorded, in the Gesta Mettensium, which specifies that he was his parents' third son, born a twin with Hlothar[179].
  • Crowned King of the Aquitainians in Rome 15 Apr 781 by Pope Hadrian I.
  • His armies occupied Girona, Urgel and Cerdanya in 785 and besieged Barcelona 802, establishing the "March of Spain"[180].
  • At the partition of territories agreed at Thionville in 806, he was designated sovereign of Aquitaine, Gascony, Septimania, Provence and southern Burgundy. His father named him as his successor at Aix-la-Chapelle, crowning him as joint emperor 11 Sep 813[181].
  • On his father's death, he adopted the title Emperor LOUIS I “der Fromme/le Pieux” 2 Feb 814, and was crowned at Reims [Jul/Aug] 816 by Pope Stephen IV. He did not use the titles king of the Franks or king of Italy so as to emphasise the unity of the empire[182].
  • He promulgated the Ordinatio Imperii at Worms in 817, which established his eldest son as his heir, his younger sons having a subordinate status, a decision which was eventually to lead to civil war between his sons. His nephew Bernard King of Italy, ignored in the Ordinatio Imperii, rebelled against his uncle, but was defeated and killed. After his death, Italy was placed under the direct rule of the emperor.
  • Emperor Louis crowned his son Lothaire as joint emperor at Aix-la-Chapelle in Jul 817, his primary status over his brothers being confirmed once more at the Assembly of Nijmegen 1 May 821.
  • In Nov 824, Emperor Louis placed Pope Eugene II under his protection, effectively subordinating the papal role to that of the emperor.
  • The birth of his son Charles by his second marriage in 823 worsened relations with his sons by his first marriage, the tension being further increased when Emperor Louis invested Charles with Alemannia, Rhætia, Alsace and part of Burgundy at Worms in Aug 829, reducing the territory of his oldest son Lothaire to Italy. His older sons revolted in Mar 830 and captured their father at Compiègne, forcing him to revert to the 817 constitutional arrangements.
  • However, Emperor Louis reasserted his authority at the assemblies of Nijmegen in Oct 830 and Aix-la-Chapelle in Feb 831, depriving Lothaire of the imperial title and relegating him once more to Italy. A further revolt of the brothers followed. Emperor Louis was defeated and deposed by his sons at Compiègne 1 Oct 833. He was exiled to the monastery of Saint-Médard de Soissons.
  • His eldest son Lothaire declared himself sole emperor but was soon overthrown by his brothers Pepin and Louis, who freed their father. Emperor Louis was crowned once more at Metz 28 Feb 835.
  • He proposed yet another partition of territories in favour of his son Charles at the assembly of Aix-la-Chapelle in 837, implemented at the assembly of Worms 28 May 839 when he installed his sons Lothaire and Charles jointly, setting aside the claims of his sons Pepin and Louis. This naturally led to revolts by Pepin in Aquitaine and Louis in Germany, which their father was in the process of suppressing when he died[183].
  • The Annales Fuldenses record the death "in insulam quondam Rheni fluminis prope Ingilenheim XII Kal Iul 840" of Emperor Louis and his burial "Mettis civitatem…in basilica sancti Arnulfi"[184]. The necrology of Prüm records the death "840 12 Kal Iul" of "Ludvicus imperator"[185]. The necrology of St Gall records the death "XII Kal Jul" of "Hludowicus imperator in insula Rheni quiæ est sita iuxta palatium Ingelheim"[186]. The Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris records the death "XII Kal Jul" of "Ludovicus imperator"[187]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XII Kal Jul" of "Ludovicus imperator"[188].

m firstly ([794]) ERMENGARD, daughter of ENGUERRAND Comte [de Hesbaye] & his wife --- ([775/80]-Angers 3 Oct 818[189], bur Angers).

  • Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names the wife of Emperor Ludwig "filiam nobilissimi ducis Ingorammi…Irmingarda"[190].
  • The Gesta Francorum records the death "818 V Non Oct" of "Irmingardis regina"[191]. The Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records the death "V Non Oct" of "Hirmingardis regina" three days after falling ill[192].

m secondly (Aix-la-Chapelle Feb 819) JUDITH, daughter of WELF [I] Graf [von Altdorf] & his wife Heilwig --- ([805]-Tours 19 Apr 843, bur Tours Saint-Martin).

  • The Annales Xantenses record the marriage in Feb 819 of "Ludewicus imperator" and "Iudith"[193]. Thegan names "filiam Hwelfi ducis sui, qui erat de nobolissima progenie Bawariorum…Iudith…ex parte matris…Eigilwi nobilissimi generic Saxonici" as second wife of Emperor Ludwig, specifying that she was "enim pulchra valde"[194]. Einhard's Annales record that Emperor Louis chose "Huelpi comitis filiam…Judith" as his wife in 819 after "inspectis plerisque nobelium filiabus"[195].
  • Judith was influential with her husband, which increased the tensions with the emperor's sons by his first marriage.
  • Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris records that "quondam duce Bernhardo, qui erat de stirpe regali" was accused of violating "Iudith reginam" but comments that this was all lies[196].
  • Judith was exiled to the monastery of Sainte-Croix de Poitiers during the first rebellion of her stepsons in 830, was released in 831, but exiled again to Tortona in Italy in 833 from where she was brought back in Apr 834[197].
  • The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIII Kal Mai" of "Judith regina"[198]. The Annales Xantenses record the death in 843 of "Iudhit imperatrix mater Karoli" at Tours[199].

Mistress (1): ---. The name of Emperor Lothar's mistress or mistresses is not known.

Emperor Louis I & his first wife had six children:

1. LOTHAIRE [Lothar] (795-Kloster Prüm 29 Sep 855, bur Kloster Prüm).

  • Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Hlutharius, Pippinus, Hludowicus" as sons of Emperor Ludwig I & his wife Ermengard[200].
  • He was crowned joint Emperor LOTHAIRE I, jointly with his father, in Jul 817 at Aix-la-Chapelle.

2. PEPIN ([797]-Poitiers 13 Dec 838, bur Poitiers, église collégiale de Sainte-Radégonde).

  • Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Hlutharius, Pippinus, Hludowicus" as sons of Emperor Ludwig I & his wife Ermengard[201].
  • Under the Ordinatio Imperii promulgated by his father at Worms in 817, he became PEPIN I King of Aquitaine.

3. HROTRUD [Rotrude] ([800]-).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hlotharium Pipinum et Hludovicum Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as children of "Hludovicus ymperator…ex Yrmingardi regina"[202].

4. BERTA .

  • Settipani cites charters which name Berta as the daughter of Emperor Louis[203].

5. HILDEGARD ([802/04]-857, or maybe after [23 Aug 860]).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hlotharium Pipinum et Hludovicum Rotrudim et Hildegardim" as children of "Hludovicus ymperator…ex Yrmingardi regina"[204]. Hildegard is named as sister of Charles by Nithard[205].
  • Abbess of Notre-Dame and Saint-Jean at Laon.
  • She supported her brother Lothaire against her half-brother Charles and, in Oct 841, imprisoned Adalgar at Laon. After Laon was besieged, she surrendered Adalgar but was herself released by her half-brother [205].
  • The Annales Formoselenses record the death in 857 of "Hildegard, Lothawici regis filia"[206], corroborated in the Annales Alemannici[207].

6. LOUIS ([806]-Frankfurt-am-Main 28 Aug 876, bur Kloster Lorsch).

  • Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names (in order) "Hlutharius, Pippinus, Hludowicus" as sons of Emperor Ludwig I and his wife Ermengardis[208].
  • Under the Ordinatio Imperii promulgated by his father at Worms in 817, he became King of Bavaria and Carinthia.
  • Under the partition of territories agreed by the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, Louis was installed as LUDWIG II "le Germanique/der Deutsche" King of the East Franks.

Emperor Louis I & his second wife had [three] children:

7. GISELA ([819/822]-after 1 Jul 874, bur Cysoing, Abbey of St Calixtus).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Karolum et Gislam" children of "Hludovicus ymperator…ex Iudith ymperatrice"[209]. Her marriage is deduced from a charter in which Gisela states that their eldest son Unruoch brought back the body of Eberhard from Italy[210].
  • She founded the abbey of St Calixtus at Cysoing, Flanders, where she lived as a widow. "Gisle" granted "le fisc de Somain en Ostrevant" to "filii…Adelarde" by charter dated 14 Apr 869, which names "rex Karolus meus…germanus…senioris mei dulcis memorie Evrardi…tres infantes meos Rodulfum…et Berengarium…et…Adelarde"[211]. The Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis records that “Gisla” donated property to Cysoing abbey for her burial next to “coniugis mei dulcis memoriæ Evrardi”, by charter dated 2 Apr 870 which names “filiæ meæ Ingiltrudis…filius meus Rodulfus”, and by charter dated “Kal Jul anno XXXV regnante Carolo Rege”, naming “filii mei Unroch…filiorum meorum Adalardo atque Rodulfo” and signed by “Odelrici Comitis”[212]. "Gisle" donated property to Cysoing for the anniversaries of "Ludovico imperatore patre meo et…Judith imperatrice matre mea et…rege Karolo…germano et…prole mea…Hengeltrude, Hunroc, Berengario, Adelardo, Rodulpho, Hellwich, Gilla, Judith" by charter dated to [874][213].
  • m ([836]) EBERHARD Marchese di Friulia, son of UNRUOCH Comte [en Ternois] & his wife Engeltrude (-in Italy 16 Dec 866, bur Cysoing, Abbey of St Calixtus).

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8. CHARLES (Frankfurt-am-Main 13 Jun 823-Avrieux or Brides-les-Bains, Savoie 6 Oct 877, bur Nantua Abbey, transferred to église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the birth of "Karolus filius Ludowici" in Frankfurt "Idus Iun 824"[214].

Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names Charles as son of his father by his second wife[215].

Under the division of Imperial territories by the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, he became CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks.

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9. [daughter .

  • The Casus Monasterii Petrishusensis records that "rex Francorum qui et imperator Romanorum" (which appears to indicate Charles II "le Chauve") gave his sister in marriage to "vir nobilissimo genere decoratus", that the couple had two sons to whom their uncle gave "in Alemannia loca…Potamum et Brigantium, Ubirlingin et Buochorn, Ahihusin et Turingen atque Heistirgou, Wintirture…et in Retia Curiensi Mesouch", and that one of the sons returned to France while the other "Oudalricus" retained all the property in Alamannia[216]. The editor of the MGH SS compilation dates this source to the mid-12th century[217].
  • The information has not been corroborated in any earlier primary source, although it is not known what prior documentation may have been available to the compiler of the Casus.
  • There are several other difficulties with this marriage which suggest that the report in the Casus should be treated with caution. If the information is accurate, it is likely that the bride was a full sister of King Charles, although if this is correct her absence from contemporary documentation is surprising. If she had been Charles's half-sister, it is difficult to see how Charles would have had much influence on her marriage, which would have been arranged by one of her full brothers.
  • In any case, it is unlikely that Emperor Louis's first wife would have had further children after [812/15] at the latest, given the birth of her eldest son in 795. If that estimated birth date is correct, then it is more likely that this daughter's marriage would have been arranged by her father Emperor Louis before his death in 840.
  • Another problem is the potential consanguinity between the parties. Although the precise relationship between the couple's son Udalrich [III] and the earlier Udalrichinger cannot be established from available documentation, it is probable that he was closely related to Hildegard, first wife of Emperor Charles I, who was the paternal grandmother of Emperor Louis's children.
  • Lastly, Udalrich [III] is recorded in charters dated 847 and 854, suggesting a birth date in the 820s assuming that he was adult at the time, which is inconsistent with Charles II "le Chauve" (born in 823) having arranged his parents' marriage.
  • m --- [Udalrichinger].]

Emperor Louis I had [two] illegitimate children by Mistress (1):

10. [ALPAIS ([793/94]-23 Jul 852 or after, bur [Reims]).

  • Flodoard refers to "Ludowicus Alpheidi filie sue uxori Begonis comitis"[218]. The Annales Hildesheimenses name "filiam imperatoris…Elpheid" as the wife of "Bicgo de amici regis" when recording the death of her husband[219].
  • Settipani discusses the debate about the paternity of Alpais, preferring the theory that Emperor Charles I was her father[220]. If Emperor Louis was her father, it is unlikely that she was born before [793/94], given his known birth date in 778. It would therefore be chronologically tight for her to have had [three] children by her husband before his death in 816. However, no indication has been found in primary sources of the age of these children when their father died. The question of Alpais's paternity is obviously not beyond doubt, but it is felt preferable to show her as the possible daughter of Emperor Louis in view of the clear statement in Flodoard.
  • No indication has been found of the name of Alpais's mother. If Alpais was the daughter of Emperor Louis, it is likely that she was not her husband's only wife in view of Bego's estimated birth date.
  • After her husband died, she became abbess of Saint-Pierre-le-Bas at Reims in [817]. She was still there 29 May 852.
  • m ([806]) [as his second wife,] BEGO, son of [GERARD [I] Comte de Paris & his wife Rotrud] ([755/60]-28 Oct 816). He governed the county of Toulouse as "marchio" for Septimania in 806. Comte de Paris in [815], succeeding comte Stephanus.]

11. ARNOUL ([794]-after [Mar/Apr] 841).

  • The Chronicon Moissacense names "quartum…filium [Ludovici]…ex concubina…Arnulfum" recording that his father gave him the county of Sens[221].
  • Comte de Sens 817.
  • He was a supporter of his half-brother Emperor Lothaire in [Mar/Apr] 841[222].

Chapter 2. KINGS of the WEST FRANKS 751-840 (CAROLINGIANS)


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CHARLES II 843-877


CHARLES, son of Emperor LOUIS I "le Pieux" & his second wife Judith [Welf] (Frankfurt-am-Main 13 Jun 823-Avrieux or Brides-les-Bains, Savoie 6 Oct 877, bur Nantua Abbey, transferred to église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the birth of "Karolus filius Ludowici" in Frankfurt "Idus Iun 824"[223]. Thegan's Vita Hludowici Imperatoris names Charles as son of his father by his second wife[224].

His father invested Charles as dux in Alemania, Rhetia, Alsace and part of Burgundy at Worms Aug 829, reducing the territory of his oldest brother Lothaire to Italy. This triggered the revolt of his older half-brothers in Mar 830, when they captured their father at Compiègne and forced him to revert to the constitutional arrangements decided in 817.

His father installed Charles as King of Aquitaine in Sep 832, having deprived Charles's half-brother Pepin. His father restored Aquitaine to Pepin 15 Mar 834 at Quierzy-sur-Oise.

His father accorded Charles the land between Frisia and the Seine at the Assembly of Aix-la-Chapelle in 837, Maine and the land between the Seine and the Loire (as well as a royal crown) in 838, and Francia between the Meuse and the Seine, western and southern Burgundy, Provence, Neustria, the march of Bretagne, Aquitaine, Gascogne and Septimanie at the Assembly of Worms 28 May 839.

On the death of his father, he became King of the Franks of the West. His brother Emperor Lothaire sought to deprive him of his lands. Charles allied himself with his half-brother Ludwig and together they defeated Lothaire at Fontenoy-en-Puisaye 25 Jun 841.

Under the division of imperial territories agreed under the Treaty of Verdun 11 Aug 843, he became CHARLES II “le Chauve” King of the West Franks.

King of Aquitaine in 848, when he deposed his nephew Pepin II. When King Charles II was faced with widespread rebellion, his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks invaded his kingdom in Aug 858 but was defeated 15 Jan 859 in the Laonnais and forced to withdraw.

In 865, Charles agreed with King Ludwig II "der Deutsche" the future division of the territories of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia, but on the latter's death in 869 Charles invaded Lotharingia and proclaimed himself CHARLES King of Lotharingia before Ludwig could assert his rights. A settlement was reached at Meerssen in Aug 870 under which Charles received the Meuse valley, Lyonnais, Viennois and Vivarais, declaring himself king of Lotharingia in 869.

He was crowned Emperor CHARLES II at Rome 25 Dec 875 by Pope John VIII, and elected king of Italy at Pavia in 876[225].

The Annales S. Benigni Divisionensis record the death of "Karolus imperator Prid Non Oct 877"[226]. The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "III Non Oct" of "Karolus Calvus rex Francorum"[227].

---

m firstly (Quierzy, Aisne 13 Dec 842, separated 867) ERMENTRUDIS, daughter of EUDES Comte [d’Orléans] & his wife Engeltrudis (27 Sep [830]-Saint-Denis 6 Oct 869, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

  • The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage in 842 of "Ermendrud neptem Adalardi comitis" and "Karolus" at "Carisiacum palatium"[228]. Nithard names "Hirmentrude, daughter of Odo and Ingiltrud" as wife of Charles[229].
  • She was crowned in Aug 866 at Saint-Médard de Soissons.
  • After she was separated from her husband, she retired to a monastery.
  • The Annales Bertiniani record the death "869 II Non Oct in monasterio Sancti Dyonisii" of "Hyrmentrudem uxorem suam [=Karoli]" and her burial at Saint-Denis[230]. The Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris records the death "Non Oct" of "Irmentrudis regina uxor Caroli"[231]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Non Oct" of "Hirmentrudis regina"[232].

m secondly (12 Oct 869, confirmed Aix-la-Chapelle 22 Jan 870) RICHILDIS, daughter of comte BUVIN & his wife --- d'Arles (-[30 Jan] [910 or after]).

  • The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage "869 VII Id Oct" of "sororem…Bosonis…Richildem" and King Charles II[233].
  • She was crowned empress at Tortona in Lombardy by Pope John VIII in 877. “Richildis quondam regina” donated property, among which “in pago Gerbercinse in Langeii villa”, to Gorze Abbey by charter dated 910[234].
  • The necrology of Reims Saint-Rémi records the death "III Kal Feb" of "RICHILDIS"[235].

Emperor Charles II & his first wife had nine children:

1. JUDITH ([844]-after 870).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina", specifying that she married "Balduinus comes"[236]. The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in Jul 856 of "Iudith filiam Karli regis" and "Edilvulf rex occidentalium Anglorum" after the latter returned from Rome and their marriage "Kal Oct in Vermaria palatio", during which "Ingmaro Durocortori Remorum episcopo" set a queen's diadem on her head[237]. Her first husband placed her "by his own side on the regal throne", contrary to normal practice in the kingdom of Wessex[238].
  • The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage of "Iudit reginam" and "Adalboldus filius eius [=Edilvulf regis]" in 858 after the death of her first husband[239]. Asser records that when King Æthelwulf was dead, his son Æthelbald married Judith daughter of Charles king of the Franks "contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans…and drew down much infamy upon himself"[240].
  • The Annales Bertiniani record that Judith returned to her father after the death of her second husband, lived at Senlis "sub tuitione paterna", and from there was abducted by "Balduinum comitem" with the consent of her brother Louis, her father consenting to the marriage the following year[241]. Flodoard names "Balduini comitis et Iudita…Karoli regis filia, Edilvulfo regi Anglorum qui et Edelboldus in matrimonium"[242].
  • m firstly (Verberie-sur-Oise, near Senlis 1 Oct 856) as his [second/third] wife, ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex, son of ECGBERT King of Wessex & his wife Redburga --- ([795/800]-13 Jan 858, bur Winchester).
  • m secondly (858) ÆTHELBALD King of Wessex, son of ÆTHELWULF King of Wessex & his [second] wife Osburga --- (-20 Dec 860, bur Sherborne).
  • m thirdly (Auxerre 13 Dec 862) BAUDOUIN I Count of Flanders, son of ODACRE [Audacer/Odoscer] Graf van Harlebeek & his wife --- ([837/840]-Arras 879, bur Abbaye de Saint-Bertin near Saint-Omer).

2. LOUIS (1 Nov 846-Compiègne 10 Apr 879, bur Compiègne, église collégiale Saint-Corneille).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[243].
  • He succeeded his father in 877 as LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks.

3. CHARLES ([847/48]-near Buzançais, Indre 29 Sep 866, bur Bourges, église de Saint-Sulpice).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[244].
  • Elected King of Aquitaine in Oct 855 at Limoges, and crowned. His residence was at Bourges.
  • He married against the wishes of his father, and was deprived of his titles in 863.
  • He was restored as king of Aquitaine in 865.
  • The Annales Bertiniani record the death "866 III Kal Oct in villa secus Bosentiacas" of "Karoli filius Karolus et Aquitanorum rex" two years after suffering severe brain injuries, and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Sulpitii apud Biturigum"[245]. The Chronico Floriacensi records that "duo filii illius [Karolo Ludovici filio]…Hlotharius Abbas et Karolus Rex Aquitanorum" died in 866[246].
  • m (862, annulled 863) as her second husband, ---, widow of HUMBERT Comte [de Bourges], daughter of ---. The Annales Bertiniani record the marriage in 862 of "Karolus rex Aquitannorum, Karoli regis filius" and "relictam Humberti comitis", on the advice of "Stephani" against the will of his father[247].

4. CARLOMAN (-[877/78]).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[248]. "Carlomannum" is named son of King Charles by Folcuin, who specifies that his father installed him as abbot "Laubiensi"[249].
  • The Annales Bertiniani record that "Karlus rex Karlommanum filium suum" was tonsured in 854[250].
  • Abbé de Saint-Médard at Soissons 860.
  • He conspired against his father, was imprisoned at Senlis and deprived of his abbeys in 870.
  • He escaped to Belgium.
  • He was rejected by the church by judgment of the bishops meeting at Senlis in 873. His father had him blinded and imprisoned at the monastery of Corbie in 873.
  • He fled to Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks. He was sent to Luxembourg where he became Abbot of Echternach in 874[251].

5. LOTHAIRE (-14 Dec 865).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Hludovicum Karolum Karlomannum et Hlotharium" as the four sons of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[252].
  • He was lame from birth.
  • The Annales Bertiniani record that "Karlus rex filium Lotharium claudum" became a monk "in monasterio Sancti Iohannis" in 861[253]. He became a monk at the abbey of Moutier Saint-Jean in 861.
  • Abbé de Saint-Germain at Auxerre[254].
  • The Chronico Floriacensi records that "duo filii illius [Karolo Ludovici filio]…Hlotharius Abbas et Karolus Rex Aquitanorum" died in 866[255]. One necrology of Saint-Germain d´Auxerre records the death "XIX Kal Jan" of "domni Lotharii abbatis"[256].

6. HILDEGARDIS.

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[257].

7. ERMENTRUDIS (-after 11 Jul 877).

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[258].
  • The Historia Monasterii Hasnonensis names "Ermentrudis imperatrix et regina cum filia Ermendtrude"[259]. Abbess of Hasnon near Douai 11 Jul 877.

8. GISELA.

  • The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Iudith et Hildegardim, Hirmintrudim et Gislam" as the four daughters of "Karolus imperator…ex Hyrmentrudi regina"[260].

9. [ROTRUDIS ([850]-).

  • Settipani names Rotrudis as the daughter of King Charles II but appears to base this on her being named as such in the Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis[261], but this does not appear to be the case.
  • Flodoard names "Rotrudi" when recording her election as abbess of "monasterii Sanctæ Crucis et Sanctæ Radegundis" but does not give her parentage[262]. Abbess of Sainte-Radégonde at Poitiers 868-870.]

Emperor Charles II & his second wife had five children:

10. ROTHILDIS ([871]-22 Mar 929).

  • Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks confirmed donations of property "in comitatu quoque Cœnomannico" made by "Hugo comes et mater sua Rothildis", at the request of "genitrix nostra Adeleidis et…comes Hugo consanguineus, necnon et…comes Ecfridus" by charter dated 1 Nov 900[263]. The charter dated 929 subscribed by "Hugonis comitis filii Rotgerii comitis" suggests that Rothildis must have been the wife of Roger[264]. Flodoard names "Rothildis, amitæ suæ [regis Karoli], socrus autem Hugonis" when recording that the king deprived her of "abbatiam…Golam" [Chelles] in favour of his favourite Haganon, the context dictating that "Hugonis" was "Hugo filius Rotberti"[265].
  • As the paternal aunt of King Charles III, chronology determines that she must have been the daughter of her father's second marriage, although no source has so far been identified which states this to be the case.
  • She acquired the monasteries of Chelles, and Notre-Dame and Saint-Jean at Laon. She retreated to Chelles in 922 but was deprived of the monastery by her nephew Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks in favour of his favourite Haganon, an event which led to the rebellion of Robert Marquis en Neustrie who was the father of Rothilde's son-in-law (Hugues, later "le Grand" Duc des Francs)[266].
  • Her death is dated to late 928/early 929 as Flodoard names "Rothildis…nuper defunctæ" when recording that "Heribertus et Hugo comites" (specifying that "Hugo" was "gener ipsius Rothildis") attacked "Bosonem Rodulfi regis frater" in 929 over the property of Rothilde[267]. This is also the only source so far identified from which her marriage is deduced.
  • The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XI Kal Apr" of "Rothildis abbatisse et monache filia regis magni Karoli"[268]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XI Kal Mar" of "Rotildis abbatissa"[269]. These entries could refer alternatively to Rothildis, daughter of Emperor Charlemagne, but it is more likely that the former entry would have referred to her father as "imperator" if that was the case.
  • m ([890]) ROTGER [Roger] Comte, nephew of [HUGUES Comte de Bourges], son of --- (-before I Nov 900). Comte du Maine 897.

11. DROGO ([872/73]-[873/74], bur Abbaye de Saint-Amand, Flanders).

  • The Chronico Floriacensi records the birth and death of "de Caroli Carolus…rex…Pippinus…simulque Drogo"[270]. Twin with Pepin.

12. PEPIN ([872/73]-[873/74], bur Abbaye de Saint-Amand, Flanders).

  • The Chronico Floriacensi records the birth and death of "de Caroli Carolus…rex…Pippinus…simulque Drogo"[271]. Twin with Drogo.

13. son (23 Mar 875-soon after).

  • The Annales Bertiniani record that in 875 "Richildis uxor eius [=Karoli]" gave birth to a child "noctu ante quartam feriam paschæ" which died immediately after being baptised[272].

14. CHARLES (10 Oct 876-877 before 7 Apr, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

  • The Annales Bertiniani record the death in early 877 of "filius eius [=Karoli]…Karolus" and his burial at Saint-Denis[273].

References:

  • [178] Nithard I.8, p. 140.
  • [179] Pauli Gesta Episcop. Mettensium, MGH SS II, p. 265.
  • [180] Settipani (1993), p. 250.
  • [181] RFA 813, p. 95.
  • [182] Settipani (1993), p. 252.
  • [183] Settipani (1993), pp. 252-3.
  • [184] Annales Fuldensium Pars Secunda, auctore Euodolfo 840, MGH SS I, p. 362.
  • [185] Annales Necrologici Prumienses, MGH SS XIII, p. 219.
  • [186] Libri Anniversariorum et Necrologium Monasterii Sancti Galli, Konstanz Necrologies, p. 462.
  • [187] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris, p. 227.
  • [188] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 320.
  • [189] RFA 818, p. 104.
  • [190] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 4, MGH SS II, p. 591.
  • [191] Gesta quorundam regum Francorum 818, MGH SS I, p. 356.
  • [192] Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 31, MGH SS II, p. 623.
  • [193] Annales Xantenses 819, MGH SS II, p. 224.
  • [194] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 26, MGH SS II, p. 596.
  • [195] Einhardi Annales 819, MGH SS I, p. 206.
  • [196] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 36, MGH SS II, p. 597.
  • [197] Settipani (1993), pp. 254-5.
  • [198] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 315.
  • [199] Annales Xantenses 843, MGH SS II, p. 227.
  • [200] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 4, MGH SS II, p. 591.
  • [201] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 4, MGH SS II, p. 591.
  • [202] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [203] Settipani (1993), p. 255 footnote 446, citing MGH Dipl Carol, no. 48, p. 143, 101, 241, 197, p. 353, spur. 34, p. 441.
  • [204] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [205] Nithard III.4, p. 160.
  • [206] Annales Formoselenses 857, MGH SS V, p. 35.
  • [207] Annales Alemannici 857, MGH SS I, p. 50 "Hludovici regis filia Hiltikart", footnote 1 referring to "Necrolog S Galli" recording "X Kal Dec".
  • [208] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 4, MGH SS II, p. 591.
  • [209] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [210] Coussemaker, I. de (ed.) (1886) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Cysoing et de ses dépendances (Lille) ("Cysoing"), V, p. 10.
  • [211] Cysoing III, p. 7.
  • [212] Historia Ecclesiæ Cisoniensis, Spicilegium II, pp. 878 and 879, and Cysoing IV and V, pp. 8 and 10.
  • [213] Cysoing VI, p. 11.
  • [214] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 824, MGH SS V, p. 39.
  • [215] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 35, MGH SS II, p. 597.
  • [216] Casus Monasterii Petrishusensis I.2, MGH SS XX, p. 628.
  • [217] MGH SS XX, pp. 622-25.
  • [218] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ IV, XLVI, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 448.
  • [219] Annales Hildesheimenses 815, MGH SS III, p. 42.
  • [220] Settipani (1993), pp. 200-02.
  • [221] Chronicon Moissacense 817, MGH SS I, p. 312.
  • [222] Settipani (1993), p. 255.
  • [223] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 824, MGH SS V, p. 39.
  • [224] Thegani Vita Hludowici Imperatoris 35, MGH SS II, p. 597.
  • [225] Settipani (1993), pp. 302-6.
  • [226] Annales S. Benigni Divionensis 877, MGH SS V, p. 39.
  • [227] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 272.
  • [228] Annales Bertiniani II 842.
  • [229] Nithard IV.6, p. 173.
  • [230] Annales Bertiniani III 869.
  • [231] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Obituaire de Notre-Dame de Paris, p. 230.
  • [232] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 328.
  • [233] Annales Bertiniani III 869.
  • [234] D´Herbomez, A. (ed.) (1898) Cartulaire de l´abbaye de Gorze, Mettensia II (Paris), 87, p. 157.
  • [235] 'Obits mémorables tirés de nécrologes luxembourgeois, rémois et messins', Revue Mabillon VI (1910-1911), p. 272 (upper-case in original).
  • [236] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [237] Annales Bertiniani II 856.
  • [238] Giles, J. A. (trans.) (2000) Asser, Annals of the Reign of Alfred the Great (Cambridge, Ontario, In parentheses Publications) Part I.
  • [239] Annales Bertiniani II 858.
  • [240] Asser, p. 8.
  • [241] Annales Bertiniani auct Hincmari Remensis 862 and 863, MGH SS I, pp. 456 and 462.
  • [242] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III.12, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 218.
  • [243] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [244] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [245] Annales Bertiniani III 866.
  • [246] Chronico Floriacensi apud Chesnium Tomo 3, p. 355, cited in RHGF 7, p. 272.
  • [247] Annales Bertiniani III 862.
  • [248] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [249] Folcuini Gesta Abbatum Lobiensium 14, MGH SS IV, p. 61.
  • [250] Annales Bertiniani II 854.
  • [251] Settipani (1993), p. 310.
  • [252] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [253] Annales Bertiniani II 861.
  • [254] Settipani (1993), p. 310.
  • [255] Chronico Floriacensi apud Chesnium Tomo 3, p. 355, cited in RHGF 7, p. 272.
  • [256] Obituaires de Sens Tome III, Abbaye de Saint-Germain d´Auxerre, p. 274.
  • [257] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [258] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [259] Tomelli, Historia Monasterii Hasnonensis 4, MGH SS XIV, p. 151.
  • [260] Genealogiæ Comitum Flandriæ, Witgeri Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis MGH SS IX, p. 303.
  • [261] Settipani (1993), p. 511 footnote 814.
  • [262] Flodoardi Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ III , MGH SS XIII, p. 548.
  • [263] RHGF X, p. 489.
  • [264] 'Catalogue des actes des évêques du Mans jusqu'à la fin du XIII siècle', Revue historique et archéologique du Maine, t. 63 (1908) 2, pp. 32-63 and 144-185, quoted in Latouche Histoire du Maine, p. 15 footnote 4.
  • [265] Flodoard 922, MGH SS III, p. 370.
  • [266] Settipani, p. 406.
  • [267] Flodoard 929, MGH SS III, p. 378.
  • [268] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 254.
  • [269] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 312.
  • [270] Epitaphium Drogonis et Pippini, Caroli Calvi filiorum, cited in RHGF 7, p. 224.
  • [271] Epitaphium Drogonis et Pippini, Caroli Calvi filiorum, cited in RHGF 7, p. 224.
  • [272] Annales Bertiniani III 875.
  • [273] Annales Bertiniani III 877.

--------------------

Dito o Calvo, pois tinha os cabelos ralos, era filho de Luís I, o Piedoso e de Judith da Baviera, sua segunda esposa.

Depois de seu nascimento, seu pai, o Imperador, quis distribuir seus Estados entre os três filhos que tivera em seu primeiro casamento, e a necessidade de rever essa partilha em função do menino Carlos, dentro da desordem que resultou a péssima situação política da França, depois da usurpação de Pepino, o Breve.

Um dos filhos do primeiro casamento de Luís, o Piedoso havia morrido, e esse doou a Carlos II a Aquitânia, sem consultar os demais filhos, o que causou a divisão da família real. Assim, depois da morte de seu pai, Carlos II se uniu a Luís, o Germânico para combater Lotário I, seu irmão mais velho, que queria excluí-los da partilha, e forçá-los a reconhecer a sua supremacia política.

Eles se bateram na batalha de Fontenay, uma luta tão sangrenta, que os nobres declararam que em virtude dos acontecimentos, doravante não tinham mais nenhum compromisso com seu soberanos, pois esses não estavam agindo em defesa do Estado, e que dali em diante, os soldados não se reportariam mais diretamente ao monarca, senão a seus senhores, que tratavam de consolidar seu regime feudal. Como resultado da batalha de Fontenay, ocorrida no dia 25 de junho de 842, o Império foi repartido entre os três irmãos, tendo Carlos II herdado a França.

Alguns anos mais tarde, em 869, eles voltaram a se reunir para repartir a herança deixada por Lotário que falecera, o que envolveu a interferência do Papa Adriano II. O Papa escreveu a Carlos II, uma mensagem que marcava um vivo ressentimento por não ter sido escutado na sucessão de Lotário, declarando o Rei como perjuro, como vingativo e como pai desnaturado. Carlos rebateu com firmeza, declarando que os Reis da França jamais seriam submissos ao Papa, pois eram esses que deviam submissão ao Rei.

Carlos II deixou um único filho varão, que seria conhecido como Luís II, o Gago, que o sucederia. Carlos II o Calvo morreu no ano de 877.

--------------------

Charles II[1] dit le Chauve (né le 13 juin 823 à Francfort-sur-le-Main, Allemagne - mort le 6 octobre 877 à Avrieux, Savoie).

Petit-fils de Charlemagne, il est le fils de l'empereur Louis le Pieux et de sa troisième épouse Judith de Bavière. Il est roi de Francie occidentale de 840 à 877, et empereur d'Occident de 875 à 877.

Il est surnommé le Chauve, non en raison d’une calvitie, mais parce que le 5 mai 877, jour de la consécration de la collégiale Sainte-Marie, future abbaye Saint-Corneille à Compiègne, il se serait fait raser le crâne en signe de soumission à l’Église, et ce, malgré la coutume franque exigeant qu’un roi ait les cheveux longs.

À l'âge de sept ans, Charles est confié à un précepteur de renom, Walahfrid Strabo (v. 808/809-849), moine au monastère de Reichenau, en Alémanie, esprit cultivé attaché au mythe impérial, poète, auteur d'une glose qui contient des commentaires de la Bible, sur lesquels se fondent, des siècles durant, les interprétations du livre sacré. Pendant neuf ans, Strabo assure l'éducation du jeune prince, convaincu de la grande destinée qui attend son élève.

En conflit avec ses demi-frères pour le partage de l'immense empire de leur grand-père, maintenu par leur père, Charles doit attendre la fin de sa vie pour ceindre la couronne impériale.

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http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I13719

Charles II (the Bald) Roman

  • Charles II (the Bald) was born on June 13th, 0823.
  • Charles II (the Bald)'s father was Emperor Louis I (The Pious) Roman and his mother was Judith Bavaria. His paternal grandparents were Charlemagne Roman and Hildegard Von Vinzgau Of Serbia; his maternal grandparents were Guelph I (Welf) Altdorf and Hedwig Eigilwich Chelles. He was the youngest of two children.
  • He had a sister named Gisela. He had two half-brothers and two half-sisters, named Lothair, Louis II "The German", Hildegard and Adelaide (Adelheid).
  • He died, at the age of 54 years, 3 months and 23 days, on October 6th, 0877.

o Death Notes

  • B: 13 Jun 0823
  • P: Frankfurt, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia
  • D: 6 Oct 0877
  • P: Brides Les Bains, Bourgogne

Burial: Dt Denis,France

o General Notes

  1. Note: Charles II, King de France
  2. Note: (Andre Roux: Scrolls,191.)
  3. Note: (Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 130, Line 171-39.)
  4. Note: (Rosamond, Frankish kingdom under Carolingians, Page 180.)
  5. Note: (Paul, Nouveau Larousse Universel.)
  6. Note: (Andre Castelot, Histoire de La France, Tome 1, Pages 369, 387).
  7. Note: AKA: Charles II, Emperor of the West. AKA: Charles II, King de Bourgogne. AKA: Charles II, King of Italy. Also Known As: Charles "Le Chauve".
  8. Note: Born: on 13 Jun 823 in Francfort-sur-le-Main, Germany, son of Louis I, King de France and Judith de Baviere , Some sources assert King Charles II was born in the year 829.
  9. Note - between 824 and 875 in France: The birth of Charles II in 823 did not at first excite jealousy or rivalry among his brothers. In 829, Charles was granted the region of Alemannia, Rhaetia and part of Burgundy. In 837, his Father Louis I "Le Debonnaire", by arrangement with Louis the German and Pepin gave Charles the land West of the Meuse, Burgundy, Chartres and Paris together with all the bishops, abbots and counts who held benefices in these territories. A portion of Neustria was added in 838, and upon Pepin's death, Louis Le Pieux made Charles King of Aquitaine. On 24 July 840, the new Emperor, Lothar, in Strasburg, refuses to support the land claims of Charles (from the agreement of Worms on 30 May 839). The two brothers, Louis and Charles, unite against Lothar and the War of the Three Brothers begins. Meanwhile, on 12 May 841, the Normands ravage Rouen and all the localities along the Seine, increasing their wealth considerably. At Fontenoy-en-Puisaye (24 June 841), Charles defeats his brothers Lothar (in spite of the arrival of the Army of Aquitaine in the Imperial ranks -- and at a total loss of 40,000 lives at the battle) and Louis Le Germanique. Charles and Louis signed an alliance on 14 February 842 at Strasbourg. Leaving Strasbourg, the two brothers defeat the imperial army of Lothar just West of Comblence. Lothar leaves Aix-le-Chapelle precipitously, pursued by the two brothers. In Mellecey, not far from Chalon-sur-Saone, Lothar proposes a plan to establish perpetual peace which is acceptable to both Louis and Charles. On 15 June, they sign the preliminary peace document. On 1 October 842, each of them sends 40 commissioners to Metz to forge the official document. Prudence, the Bishop of Troyes, notes that Louis regained Germania in the East, Lothar gets the middle part of the Franc Kingdom, including Italy, and Charles obtains the Western lands (West of the Rhone, including Soissons). After that Charles goes to the Palace in Quierzy, where he marries Ermentrude.
  10. Note: Charles signed the Treaty of Verdun (843) which split the Kingdom of Charlemagne. By the Treaty, the destiny of Occidental Europe would be heavily influenced to this day. Louis obtains all lands East of the Rhine, including the cities of Spire, Worms, Mayence. Lothar gets all the lands extending between the Rhine and the Escaut, the Cambresis, the Hainaut, the country of Mezieres, and all the countships neighboring the Meuse, through the Saone and the Rhone, the Artois and Italy. Charles got all the lands East all the way to Spain. The Kingdom of Charlemagne thus was split forever, with the most serious rift between the germanic lands of Louis, and the French lands of Charles. The intervening lands extending from Frisia to Rome, from the North Sea to the Mediterranean including what would become Holland, Belgium, Lorraine and Switzerland would become a sore point of contention between these two peoples. The only thing that mattered to Lothar was the fact that both capitals (Aix and Rome) were located within his territory, thus legitimizing the title of Emperor.
  11. Note: Meanwhile, the Normands pillage Nantes and lower Aquitaine. Charles laid siege to Toulouse in vain (May to July 844). The Normands led by Ragnar Lodbrog arrive in Paris and must be heavily bribed to leave. Other Normand armies ravage Toulouse and Bordeaux (burned to the ground in 848). On 6 May 848, Duke Nomenoe proclaims the indepence of the Church of Bretagne and the following year proclaims himself King of Bretagne. Charles fought Brittany (Bretagne) in 845-851 and was victorious. Not liking Pepin II, the people of Aquitaine request Charles' help, and he obliges by accepting the Crown, and on 6 June 848 is consecrated King of Aquitaine, though he could not defend his kingdom against the Normands. He had Charles of Aquitaine jailed (849 in Corbie). In 850 Charles attacks Bretagne and leaves a garrison in Rennes. No sooner does he leave, that Nomenoe takes the city and then takes Nantes as well. The next year, Nomenoe ravages Maine, but, fortunately for Charles, the King of Bretagne dies suddenly on 7 March in Vendome. Charles has Pepin II locked in the Monastery of Saint-Medard de Soissons in 852. The Normands under Godfrid pillage Tours and Angers and penetrate via the Valley of Escaut all the way to the Seine. The loyalty of Aquitaine shifts in 853, and Louis the German is called upon to help against Charles le Chauve. He in turn defeats Louis and offers Aquitaine his son by Ermentrude, Charles, who would be crowned sovereign in Limoges in October 855. Both Pepin II and Charles d'Aquitaine escape raise armies against Charles le Chauve. Charles fought against Louis for Lorraine (859, 870 [Treaty of Mersen] and 875).
  12. Note: When Louis le Germanique becomes ill in 869 near Rastisbonne, shortly after his nephew Lothar II died, Charles see the opportunity to claim his heritage as Uncle of the deceased. He has himself annointed King of Lorraine in Metz on 9 September, by the Bishop Hincmar. In March, 867, Charles d'Aquitaine dies, and his father Charles le Chauve is recognized as King by the Assembly in Pouilly-sur-Loire. Upon the death of his nephew, Lothar II on 8 August 869, Charles sped to Lotharingia and had himself crowned King of Lotharingia annointed on 9 September in the cathedral at Metz by Bishop Adventius of Metz and Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims. In 9 August 870, through the Treaty of Meerseen, Louis "Le Germanique" and Charles "Le Chauve" reach an agreeable compromise whereby they divide the lands of Lothar II between themselves, leaving Louis II no part of the inheritance. As soon as Louis II died on 12 August 875, Charles rushed to Italy and received the imperial crown and is annointed by Pope John VIII on 25 December 875. In Pavia on 5 January 876, by acclamation of the counts and nobles of Italy, Charles becomes King of Italy. On 31 January 876, the Archbishop of Milan proclaims Charles as Emperor. The French ecclesiasticals and nobles, having some misgivings about Charles' ability to take care of his Kingdom meet in Ponthion. Charles joins them dressed in the attire of the Frankish King. As soon as they declare him elected and recognize his imperial authority, Charles donned the Byzantine crown, and purple vestment of emperor. When Louis le Germanique dies on 28 August 876, Charles claims Lorraine as his own. While on an expedition in Italy against the Sarrasins, through the specific request of Pope Jean VIII, Charles le Chauve dies at the foot of Mount Cenis.
  13. Note: Married on 13 Dec 842 in Quierzy-sur-Oise, Aisne, Ile-de-France, France: Ermentrude d'Orleans , daughter of Odon=Eudes, Count d'Orleans and Ingeltrude de Paris; Ermentrude was crowned Queen of France in 866, having already produced a number of children including 6 sons but none of them was satisfactory as far as Charles Le Chauve was concerned. By September 866, four of them were dead.
  14. Note: Married on 25 Nov 869 in Aix-la-Chapelle, France: Richilde de Bourgogne, daughter of Beuve=Bouin, Comte de Bourgogne and Richilde d'Arles; The honeymoon is short-lived, as Louis le Germanique demands, as part of his heritage from the death of his nephew Lothar II, a part of Lorraine. Died: on 6 Oct 877 in Avrieux, Dauphine, France, at age 54 Charles II is buried at Saint Denis although originally he was buried in Nantua. Before expiring, he named his son, Louis Le Begue as his successor, and the Empress Richilde, crowned by Pope Jean VIII earlier that year, is charged with taking the royal garbs and sword to her step-son.
  15. Note: Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
  16. Note: Page: Charles II
  17. Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
  18. Note: Page: 49-16

Charles II (the Bald)'s first family with Ermentrude (Irmtrud) Orleans

Charles II (the Bald) and Ermentrude (Irmtrud) were married (further details are not known). They had a son and four daughters, named Louis II (The Stammerer), Judith, Rothildis, Hersent and Godehilde.

1. Male Louis II (The Stammerer) France

  • Louis II (The Stammerer) was born on November 1st, 0843.
  • Death Notes
  • B: 1 Nov 0843
  • P: France

2. Female Judith France

  • Judith was born in year 0844. She died, at the age of 26 years, in year 0870.
  • Death Notes
  • B: 0844
  • P: France
  • D: Aft. 0870

3. Female Rothildis d' Aquitaine

  • Rothildis was born in year 0844 in Aquitaine, France.
  • Birth Notes
  • B: Abt. 844,871
  • She died, at the age of 84 years, in year 0928.1
  • Death Notes
  • D: Abt. 928

4. Female Hersent France

  • Hersent was born in year 0865.
  • Death Notes
  • B: 0865
  • P: France

5. Female Godehilde France

  • Godehilde was born in year 0868.
  • Death Notes
  • B: Abt. 0868
  • P: France

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Charles II (the Bald)'s second family with Richaut Metz

Charles II (the Bald) and Richaut were married (further details are not known). They had a son and a daughter, named Reheut and Rothilde.

1. Male Reheut France

  • Reheut was born in year 0870.

2. Female Rothilde Carolingian

  • Rothilde was born in year 0871 in Frankfort-am-Main, Germany.2
  • Birth Notes
  • B: Abt. 871
  • She died, at the age of 56 years, on March 22nd, 0927.2
  • Death Notes
  • D: 22 Mar 0927/28

1 http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=jdp-fam&id=I84369&style=TABLE

2 http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=tjglad&id=I77032&style=TABLE

View the entire genealogy report of Roman families, or surname index of Roman pedigrees or report summary of Roman heritage from "The Skaggs-Files".

Family Tree Software.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_the_Bald

Charles the Bald[1] (13 June 823 – 6 October 877), Holy Roman Emperor (875–877, as Charles II) and King of West Francia (840–877), was the youngest son of the Emperor Louis the Pious by his second wife Judith.

Struggle against his brothers

He was born on 13 June 823 in Frankfurt, when his elder brothers were already adults and had been assigned their own regna, or subkingdoms, by their father. The attempts made by Louis the Pious to assign Charles a subkingdom, first Alemannia and then the country between the Meuse and the Pyrenees (in 832, after the rising of Pepin I of Aquitaine) were unsuccessful. The numerous reconciliations with the rebellious Lothair and Pepin, as well as their brother Louis the German, King of Bavaria, made Charles's share in Aquitaine and Italy only temporary, but his father did not give up and made Charles the heir of the entire land which was once Gaul and would eventually be France. At a diet near Crémieux in 837, Louis the Pious bade the nobles do homage to Charles as his heir. This led to the final rising of his sons against him and Pepin of Aquitaine died in 838, whereupon Charles received that kingdom, finally once and for all. Pepin's son Pepin II would be a perpetual thorn in his side.

The death of the emperor in 840 led to the outbreak of war between his sons. Charles allied himself with his brother Louis the German to resist the pretensions of the new emperor Lothair I, and the two allies defeated Lothair at the Battle of Fontenay-en-Puisaye on June 25, 841. In the following year, the two brothers confirmed their alliance by the celebrated Oaths of Strasbourg. The war was brought to an end by the Treaty of Verdun in August 843. The settlement gave Charles the Bald the kingdom of the West Franks, which he had been up till then governing and which practically corresponded with what is now France, as far as the Meuse, the Saône, and the Rhône, with the addition of the Spanish March as far as the Ebro. Louis received the eastern part of the Carolingian Empire, known as the East Francia and later Germany. Lothair retained the imperial title and the Iron Crown of Lombardy. He also received the central regions from Flanders through the Rhineland and Burgundy as king of Middle Francia.

Reign in the West

The first years of Charles's reign, up to the death of Lothair I in 855, were comparatively peaceful. During these years the three brothers continued the system of "confraternal government", meeting repeatedly with one another, at Koblenz (848), at Meerssen (851), and at Attigny (854). In 858, Louis the German, invited by disaffected nobles eager to oust Charles, invaded the West Frankish kingdom. Charles was so unpopular that he was unable to summon an army, and he fled to Burgundy. He was saved only by the support of the bishops, who refused to crown Louis king, and by the fidelity of the Welfs, who were related to his mother, Judith. In 860, he in his turn tried to seize the kingdom of his nephew, Charles of Provence, but was repulsed. On the death of his nephew Lothair II in 869, Charles tried to seize Lothair's dominions, but by the Treaty of Mersen (870) was compelled to share them with Louis the German.

Besides these family disputes, Charles had to struggle against repeated rebellions in Aquitaine and against the Bretons. Led by their chiefs Nomenoë and Erispoë, who defeated the king at Ballon (845) and Juvardeil (851), the Bretons were successful in obtaining a de facto independence. Charles also fought against the Vikings, who devastated the country of the north, the valleys of the Seine and Loire, and even up to the borders of Aquitaine. Several times Charles was forced to purchase their retreat at a heavy price. Charles led various expeditions against the invaders and, by the Edict of Pistres of 864, made the army more mobile by providing for a cavalry element, the predecessor of the French chivalry so famous during the next 600 years. By the same edict, he ordered fortified bridges to be put up at all rivers to block the Viking incursions. Two of these bridges at Paris saved the city during its siege of 885–886.

Reign as emperor

In 875, after the death of the Emperor Louis II (son of his half-brother Lothair), Charles the Bald, supported by Pope John VIII, traveled to Italy, receiving the royal crown at Pavia and the imperial insignia in Rome on December 29. Louis the German, also a candidate for the succession of Louis II, revenged himself by invading and devastating Charles' dominions, and Charles had to return hastily to Francia. After the death of Louis the German (28 August 876), Charles in his turn attempted to seize Louis's kingdom, but was decisively beaten at Andernach on October 8, 876. In the meantime, John VIII, menaced by the Saracens, was urging Charles to come to his defence in Italy. Charles again crossed the Alps, but this expedition was received with little enthusiasm by the nobles, and even by his regent in Lombardy, Boso, and they refused to join his army. At the same time Carloman, son of Louis the German, entered northern Italy. Charles, ill and in great distress, started on his way back to Gaul, but died while crossing the pass of Mont Cenis at Brides-les-Bain, on 6 October 877.

According to the Annals of St-Bertin, Charles was hastily buried at the abbey of Nantua, Burgundy because the bearers were unable to withstand the stench of his decaying body. He was to have been buried in the Basilique Saint-Denis and may have been transferred there later. It was recorded that there was a memorial brass there that was melted down at the Revolution.

Charles was succeeded by his son, Louis. Charles was a prince of education and letters, a friend of the church, and conscious of the support he could find in the episcopate against his unruly nobles, for he chose his councillors from among the higher clergy, as in the case of Guenelon of Sens, who betrayed him, and of Hincmar of Reims.

Baldness

It has been suggested that Charles was not in fact bald, but that his epithet was applied ironically—that, in fact, he was extremely hairy. In support of this idea is the fact that none of his enemies commented on what would be an easy target. However, none of the voluble members of his court comments on his being hairy; and the Genealogy of Frankish Kings, a text from Fontanelle dating from possibly as early as 869, and a text without a trace of irony, names him as Karolus Caluus ("Charles the Bald"). Certainly, by the end of the 10th century, Richier of Reims and Adhemar of Chabannes refer to him in all seriousness as "Charles the Bald".[2]

An alternative or additional interpretation is based on Charles' initial lack of a regnum. "Bald" would in this case be a tongue-in-cheek reference to his landlessness, at an age where his brothers already had been sub-kings for some years.[3]

Marriages and children

Charles married Ermentrude, daughter of Odo I, Count of Orléans, in 842. She died in 869. In 870, Charles married Richilde of Provence, who was descended from a noble family of Lorraine.

With Ermentrude:

  • 1. Judith (844–870), married firstly with Ethelwulf of Wessex, secondly with Ethelbald of Wessex (her stepson) and thirdly with Baldwin I of Flanders
  • 2. Louis the Stammerer (846–879)
  • 3. Charles the Child (847–866)
  • 4. Lothar (848–865), monk in 861, became Abbot of Saint-Germain
  • 5. Carloman (849–876)
  • 6. Rotrud (852–912), a nun, Abbess of Saint-Radegunde
  • 7. Ermentrud (854–877), a nun, Abbess of Hasnon
  • 8. Hildegard (born 856, died young)
  • 9. Gisela (857–874)

With Richilde:

  • 1. Rothild (871–929), married firstly with Hugues, Count of Bourges and secondly with Roger, Count of Maine
  • 2. Drogo (872–873)
  • 3. Pippin (873–874)
  • 4. a son (born and died 875)
  • 5. Charles (876–877)

Notes

  • 1. ^ Charles II
  • 2. ^ Dutton, Paul E, Charlemagne's Mustache
  • 3. ^ From German Wikipedia, where it is probably derived from Reinhard Lebe (2003), War Karl der Kahle wirklich kahl? Historische Beinamen und was dahintersteckt, ISBN 3 42330 876 1.

Charles the Bald

  • Carolingian Dynasty
  • Born: June 13 823
  • Died: October 877

King of Western Francia (843 - 877)

  • Preceded by Louis I
  • Succeeded by Louis II

Holy Roman Emperor (correct title: Emperor of the Romans, 875 - 877)

  • Preceded by Louis II
  • Succeeded by Charles III

King of Italy (875 - 877)

  • Succeeded by Carloman

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Karel II, de Kale, koning, daarna keizer, geb. Frankfurt aan de Main 13.6.823, overl. Maurienne op 6.10.877, begr. klooster Nantua, later Saint-Denis. Vormt reeds vanaf 829 het middelpunt van handelen van zijn ouders om hem (in strijd met de als definitief bedoelde Ordinatio Imperii) een eigen rijk te bezorgen; door zijn vader tot koning gekroond en aangesteld tot hertog van Maine, Quierzy sept. 838 en van Aquitanië 13.12.838; strijdt na de dood van zijn vader samen met zijn halfbroer Lodewijk de Duitser tegen hun oudste broer Lotharius I, welke zij verslaan bij Fontenoy (bij Auxerre) 25.6.841; verkrijgt West-Francië bij het verdelingsverdrag van Verdun aug. 843; wordt na jarenlang verzet van de aristocratie in het hem toebedeelde rijksdeel alsnog door ‘bijna alle’ wereldrijke en geestelijke groten van Aquitanië tot koning gekozen en door de aartsbisschop van Sens gezalfd en gekroond, Orléans 848; weet echter (o.a. door de voortdurende Noormannen-invallen) pas vanaf 860 een zekere consolidering te bereiken; schaart zich van dan af, samen met Lodewijk de Duitser, aan de zijde van Theutberga wier huwelijk met hun neef Lotharius II kinderloos is, wat dus tot een komende verwerving, althans deling van het middenrijk kan leiden; laat zich na de plotselinge dood van Lotharius II (8.8.869) tot koning van Lotharingen wijden Metz 9.9.869, doch moet het oostelijke deel daarvan afstaan aan Lodewijk de Duitser bij het verdrag van Meersen 8.8.870; laat zich na de dood van zijn neef Lodewijk 11 door paus Johannes VIII tot keizer kronen, Rome 25.12.875; geacclameerd door een Italiaanse Rijksverzameling als ‘protector et defensor’ (en daarmee feitelijk tot koning) Pavia febr. 876; tracht na de dood van Lodewijk de Duitser (28.8.876) via een bliksemveldtocht naar Aken alsnog het hele middenrijk te verwerven, maar wordt door Lodewijk de Jonge bij Andernach verslagen 8.10.876; treft op een rijksverzameling te Quierzy (waar voor de duur van zijn afwezigheid de erfelijkheid van lenen per cartularium wordt afgekondigd 14.6.877) voorbereidingen om de paus tegen de Saracenen te hulp te komen, maar ziet daartoe in Italië geen kans. Tr. (1) Quierzy 13.12.842 Ermentrudis, geb. ca. 830; overl. 6-10-869; dr. van graaf Odo van Orléans; tr. 2) 12 .10.869, bevestigd Aix-la-Chapelle 22.1.870, een Bosonide vrouw, overl. tussen 910 en 3 febr. 911, dochter van Bivin, graaf en abt van Gorze en van NN, dochter van Boso de Oude, graaf van Italië, en nicht van koningin Theutberga, echtgenote van Lotharius II.

Uit het eerste huwelijk:

  • a. Judith, (zie Reeks 2 en Reeks 105), geb. ca. 844, overl. na 870, tr. 1) Verberie 1.10.856, Aethelwulf, koning der West Saxen (Wessex), overl. 13 jan. of 13 juni 858, zoon van Egbert, koning van Wessex en Kent, en van Redburgh; tr. 2) 858 Aethelbald, koning van Wessex, overl. 860, zoon van koning Ethelwulf en diens eerste echtgenote Osburgh; tr. 2) Auxerre dec. 862 Boudewijn I, met de IJzeren Arm, graaf van Gantois, Waas, Ternois en Vlaanderen, overl. Arras 879.
  • b. Lodewijk, volgt IVF
  • c. Karel, het kind, koning van Aquitanië, geb. 847 of 848, overl. bij Buzzancais 29.9.866, begr. in de kerk Saint-Sulpice te Bourges. Tr. 862 NN, weduwe van graaf Hunibert (graaf van Bourge?), kinderloos.
  • d. Carloman, de Blinde. Werd op last van zijn vader de ogen uitgestoken; werd abt van Saint-Médard te Soissons, overl. Echternach 877 of 878.
  • e. Lotharius, overl. 865, voor 25 dec. Abt van Moutier-Saint-Jean, daarna te Saint-Germain in Auxerre, waar hij overleed.
  • f. Ermentrudis, vermeld als abdis van Hasnon en Oostervant op 11.7.877.
  • g. Hildegardis
  • h. Gisela
  • i. Rothrudis, abdis van Andlau, overl. na 889.

Uit het tweede huwelijk:

  • j. Rothildis, geb. ca. 871, overl. 928 of 929, tr. ca. 890 Rodgar, graaf van de Maine, overl. voor 31.10.900, neef van Hugo, graaf van Bourges. Volgt Reeks 145
  • k. Drogo, geb. 872 of 873, overl. 873, of 874, begr. in de abdij van Saint-Amand in Vlaanderen.
  • l. Pippijn, geb. 872 of 873, overl. 873 of 874, begr. in de abdij van Saint-Amand in Vlaanderen.
  • m. NN, geb. 23.3.875, overl. kort na de geboorte.
  • n. Karel, geb. 10.10.876, overl. 877, voor pasen, begr. in de kerk van de abdij van Saint-Denis.

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Född 823. Död 877. Karl II, Karl den skallige, född 823, död 877, romersk kejsare 875, västfrankisk kung 843, kung av Akvitanien 848, kung av Lotharingia 869-870, kung av Italien 876. Han var son till Ludvig den fromme, far till Ludvig den stammande och far till Judith som var gift med Baldwin I av Flandern. Den här artikeln är hämtad från

http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_den_skallige

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Charles I, Roi de France (1)

  • M, #102622, b. 13 June 823, d. 6 October 877
  • Last Edited=20 Aug 2005

Charles I, Roi de France was born on 13 June 823 at Frankfurt, Hessen, Germany. (2) He is the son of Louis I, Roi de France and Judith von Bayern. (1)

He married Ermentrude d'Orléans, daughter of Odo, Comte de Orléans, in 842.

He married Richilde Gräfin von Metz, daughter of Beuve Graf von Metz, on 22 January 870 in a Aix-la-Chapelle, France marriage. (2)

He died on 6 October 877 at age 54 at Brides-les-Bains, Bourgogne, France. (2)

Charles I, Roi de France also went by the nick-name of Charles 'the Bald' (?). (3)

  • He gained the title of Roi Charles I de France in 840. (1)
  • He was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 875. (4)
  • He succeeded to the title of Emperor Charles II of the Holy Roman Empire in 875. (4)

Children of Charles I, Roi de France and Ermentrude d'Orléans

  • -1. Charles, Roi d'Aquitaine d. 866
  • -2. Carloman (?) d. 876
  • -3. Judith, Princesse de France+ b. bt 843 - 844 (5)
  • -4. Louis II 'the Stammerer', Roi de France+ b. 1 Nov 843, d. 10 Apr 879 (1)

Forrás / Source:

--------------------

Marriage(s)

Spouse 2: Richilde Countess Of METZ (ARDENNES)

  • Marriage: 22 Jan 870
  • Aix La Chapelle, , France

Spouse 1: Ermentrude (Irmtrud) Countess Of ORLEANS

  • Marriage: 13 Dec 842
  • , Crecy, , France

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Charles II

(born June 13, 823 — died Oct. 6, 877, Brides-les-Bain, Fr.) Carolingian king (843 – 77) and emperor (875 – 77). He was the son of the emperor Louis I and his second wife Judith. Louis's efforts to include Charles in the succession led to revolts against the emperor by his three older sons. After the death of Louis, Charles fought his two surviving half brothers in a bloody civil war (840 – 43) that was concluded with the Treaty of Verdun, which settled the terms of succession. Charles was granted the kingdom of the western Franks, which he ruled with the support of the bishops despite the wavering loyalties of his vassals and the attacks of Norsemen, Bretons, and Germans. In 864 he won control of Aquitaine, and in 870 he gained western Lorraine. He was crowned emperor in 875 but died two years later in the midst of invasion and internal revolt. Inspired by his grandfather, Charlemagne, Charles was a patron of the arts and oversaw the revival of the splendours of the Carolingian renaissance.

For more information on Charles II, visit Britannica.com.

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Reference > Archaeology Dictionary Charles the Bald

[Na]

Frankish leader, born ad 823, youngest son of Louis the Pious. King of the West Franks who outlived his brothers and many of their heirs to become emperor in ad 875. He died in ad 877.

People > Columbia Encyclopedia - People Charles II or Charles the Bald, 823–77, emperor of the West (875–77) and king of the West Franks (843–77); son of Emperor Louis I by a second marriage. The efforts of Louis to create a kingdom for Charles were responsible for the repeated revolts of Louis's elder sons that disturbed the latter part of Louis's reign. When Lothair I, the eldest and heir to the imperial title, attempted to reunite the empire after Louis's death (840), Charles and Louis the German marched against their brother and defeated him at Fontenoy (841). Reaffirming their alliance in 842 (see Strasbourg, Oath of), they signed (843) with Lothair the Treaty of Verdun (see Verdun, Treaty of), which divided the empire into three parts. The part roughly corresponding to modern France fell to Charles. He was almost continuously at war with his brothers and their sons, with the Norsemen (or Normans, as they came to be known in France), and with rebellious subjects. When Charles's nephew Lothair, son of Lothair I and king of Lotharingia, died in 869, Charles seized his kingdom but was forced by the Treaty of Mersen (870) to divide it with Louis the German. In 875, at the death of his nephew Louis II, who had succeeded Lothair I as emperor, Charles secured the imperial crown. His reign witnessed the growth of the power of the nobles at the expense of the royal power and thus marked the rise of local feudalism. Charles's chief adviser was Archbishop Hincmar.

Reference > Wikipedia Charles the Bald

Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. 845-851, kept at the Bibliothèque nationale de France.Carolingian dynasty

Pippinids

  • 1. Pippin the Elder (+ 640)
  • 2. Grimoald (+ 662)
  • 3. Childebert the Adopted (+ 662)

Arnulfings

  • 1. Arnulf of Metz (+ 640)
  • 2. Chlodulf of Metz (+ 696)
  • 3. Ansegisel (+ before 679)
  • 4. Pippin the Middle (+ 714)
  • 5. Grimoald II (+ 714)
  • 6. Drogo of Champagne (+ 708)
  • 7. Theudoald (+ 714)

Carolingians

  • 1. Charles Martel (+ 741)
  • 2. Carloman (+ 754)
  • 3. Pepin the Short (+ 768)
  • 4. Carloman (+ 771)
  • 5. Charlemagne (+ 814)
  • 6. Louis the Pious (+ 840)

After the Treaty of Verdun (843)

  • 1a. Lothair I (Middle Francia)
  • 1b. Charles the Bald (Western Francia)
  • 1c. Louis the German (Eastern Francia)

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This article incorporates text from the Encyclopedia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

http://www.answers.com/topic/charles-the-bald

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http://www.genealogy.theroyfamily.com/p30183.htm

Charles II "the Bald" King of France was born on 13 June 828 in Frankford-on-Main, Germany. Sewell gives his birth date as 13 June 823.[4],[2],[3] He was the son of Louis I "the Fair" Emperor of the West and Judith of Bavaria.[1],[2],[3],[4]

Charles II "the Bald" King of France was crowned King of West Franks in 840.[4]

On 14 December 842 Charles married Ermentrude of Orléans, daughter of Eudes unknown Count of Orléans and Engeltrude.[4],[2],[3],[5]

By the Treaty of Verdun in 843, the Carolingian Empire was divided into three kingdoms, with Charles the Bald receiving the West Frankish Kingdom, Lothar receiving the Kingdom of Lothar, and Louis the German receiving the East Frankish Kingdom.[3]

Charles II "the Bald" King of France was crowned King of Burgundy in 869.[2]

On 25 November 870 Charles married Richardis of Metz, daughter of Budwine Count of Italy and Metz and Richilde of Arles.[2],[3]

Charles II "the Bald" King of France was crowned King of Italy in 875.[2]

He was crowned Emperor of the West in 25 December 875.[4],[2]

He died on Wednesday, 6 October 877 in Brides-les-Bains, Near Mt. Cenis in the Alps, at age 49 years, 3 months and 23 days.[4],[2],[3] He was buried in St. Denis, France.[2]

Children of Charles II "the Bald" King of France and Ermentrude of Orléans

  • 1. Hersent Princess of France+ [4],[2]
  • 2. Lothar [3]
  • 3. Ermentrude Abbess of Hasnon [3]
  • 4. Hildegard [3]
  • 5. Gisele [3]
  • 6. Rotrude of Poitiers Abbess of St Radegund [3]
  • 7. Drogo [3]
  • 8. Pippin [3]
  • 9. Judith of France+ (a 844 - a 870)[1],[4],[2],[3]
  • 10. Louis II "the Stammerer" Holy Roman Emperor+ (1 Sep 846 - 10 Apr 879)[4],[2],[3]
  • 11. Charles of Aquitaine King of Aquitaine (a 847 - )[3]
  • 12. Carloman Abbott of St Médard Soiss (a 849 - )[3]

Children of Charles II "the Bald" King of France and Richardis of Metz

  • 1. Charles [3]
  • 2. Roheut+ (a 870 - )[2],[3]
  • 3. Rothilde of Neustria+ (a 871 - a 22 Mar 928)[2]

Citations

1. Norr, Vernon M.. Some Early English Pedigrees. Washington DC: by author, 1968.

2. Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners, The Complete Known Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, King of England, and Queen Philippa. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.

3. Sewell Genealogy Site. Online http://www3.sympatico.ca/robert.sewell/sitemapweb.html

4. Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650. Fifth Edition. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1982.

5.. Moriarty, G. Andrews. "Genealogical Research in Europe: The Parentage of Count Wugrim of Angoulême", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume CX (January 1956).

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Carlos, "o Calvo". /// Morte: ou em Brides-les-Bains; "mourut, le 6 octobre 877 au village de Brios, l'actuel Avrieux au pied du Mont-Cenis en Savoie"; "died while crossing the pass of Mont Cenis at Brides-les-Bain, on 6 October 877" (data: ou em 5 de outubro - Wiki italiana). Sepultamento: "Il fut enterré à Saint-Pierre de Nantua et plus tard, en 884, ses ossements furent ramenés à l'abbatiale de Saint-Denis"; "According to the Annals of St-Bertin, Charles was hastily buried at the abbey of Nantua, Burgundy because the bearers were unable to withstand the stench of his decaying body. He was to have been buried in the Basilique Saint-Denis and may have been transferred there later. It was recorded that there was a memorial brass there that was melted down at the Revolution".

--------------------

Carlos II de Francia, llamado el Calvo fue rey de la Francia Occidentalis de 843 hasta 877 y Emperador romano de Occidente (Emperador carolingio) desde 875 a 877.

Era el menor de los hijos del Rey Luis I el Piadoso (también llamado Ludovico Pío) y de su segunda esposa, Judith de Baviera, y, por tanto, nieto de Carlomagno.

Rey y Emperador. El tratado de Verdún [editar]

En el 840, al morir el Emperador Luis I, empezaron de inmediato las batallas entre sus hijos a fin de repartirse el vasto imperio fundado por Carlomagno.

Luis el Germánico, hijo de Luis I el Piadoso en su primer matrimonio con Ermengarda de Hesbaye, se alía con Carlos el Calvo contra el primogénito Lotario I del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico en la batalla de Fontenoy-en-Puisaye (841), en la cual Lotario es vencido. Los Juramentos de Estrasburgo, primer testimonio escrito en una lengua romance, recogen esta alianza en proto francés y proto alto alemán. El tratado de Verdún en 843 divide definitivamente el imperio, que sólo fugazmente se reunificará.

A Lotario I le corresponderá una faja que abarcaba Italia, los valles del Ródano, del Saona, el Mosa, el Mosela y el curso bajo del Rin: fue llamada por su nombre, la Lotaringia. Conservaba el título de Emperador (aunque sin tener autoridad sobre sus hermanos) y tenía bajo su control las dos capitales imperiales: Aquisgrán y Roma.

A Luis el Germánico se le otorgará la Francia Orientalis o Germania (la futura Alemania), es decir, las zonas al este de la margen derecha del Rin, más la ciudad de Maguncia, en la margen izquierda.

Carlos el Calvo recibe la Francia occidental, Francia Occidentalis (futura Francia), o sea, las cuencas del Escalda, del Sena, del Loira y del Garona.

El Tratado de Verdún, origen de la fragmentación política de Europa que perdura hasta nuestros días, fue concebido como una solución transitoria a este enfrentamiento de hermanos, pero poco después sus estipulaciones fueron cambiando por el encadenamiento de los hechos.

En 869, tras la muerte de Lotario II, hijo de Lotario I, la Lotaringia se reparte entre Francia y Germania. En 875 muere Luis II, también hijo de Lotario I, y Carlos el Calvo es nombrado Emperador, reunificando el Imperio aunque no fuera más que por breve tiempo.

Dislocada la Lotaringia, sólo restaron los territorios que comprenderían los reinos que son la base de las actuales Francia y Alemania, cuyo origen debe buscarse precisamente en la partición de Verdún.

En su reinado, Carlos el Calvo hubo de enfrentar en su territorio las invasiones normandas entre 856 y 861.

El 16 de junio de 877 firmó la capitular de Quierzy, con la que se pretende regular la buena marcha del imperio, estableciendo la heredad de los principados y cargos condales, lo que da paso al nacimiento del feudalismo

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http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_der_Kahle

Karl der Kahle

Stifterbild aus dem Gebetbuch Karls des Kahlen

Karls des Kahlen Reich nach dem Vertrag von Verdun 843

Karls des Kahlen Reich nach dem Vertrag von Meersen 870

Karl II. thront zwischen zwei Waffenträgern und weiblichen Personifikationen der Länder Francia und Gotia, Miniatur, Reims um 870. Daran angelehnt ist die Darstellung Kaiser Heinrichs II. in seinem Sakramentar, Darstellung im Codex aureus

Zwischen Wächtern und Beratern empfängt Karl II. eine Delegation von Mönchen aus dem Kloster Tours. Sie übergeben ihm im Auftrag des Abtes Vivian eben die Handschrift, in der sich diese Miniatur befindet

Karl II., der Kahle (* 13. Juni 823 in Frankfurt am Main; † 6. Oktober 877 in Avrieux bei Modane) aus dem Adelsgeschlecht der Karolinger war von 843 bis 877 westfränkischer König und von 875 bis 877 König von Italien und römischer Kaiser.

Leben

Karl war der jüngste Sohn Ludwigs des Frommen aus dessen zweiter Ehe mit Judith. (Viel später aber, als Karl 844 den Grafen Bernhard von Septimanien hinrichten ließ, berichtete eine Legende, Karl habe Bernhard auch aus Rache für dessen Ehebruch mit Karls Mutter Judith getötet, möglicherweise war Karl also gar nicht Ludwigs leiblicher Sohn, sondern Bernhards Sohn, eine vor allem von Karls rivalisierenden Brüdern aufgebrachte Behauptung.) Sein Beiname könnte darauf hindeuten, dass Karl von seiner Geburt 823 bis zum Reichstag in Worms 829 im Gegensat --------------------

* Wikipedia English: Charles the Bald

* Wikipedia Français: Charles II le Chauve

*Wikipedia Nederlands: Karel de Kale

-------------------- 2. Charles II King of France, [Karl The Bold], b. 15 Jul 823, Frankfurt, H-Nss, Prussia, d. 5 Oct 877, Brios, , , France Family 1 Ermentrude Queen of France, b. Abt 825, Orleans, , , France, d. 6 Oct 869

Carl II den skallige, f. 823, konung av Frankrike, Romersk kejsare 875, död 877 g.1. 842 (843) m. Irmintrud, död 869. He became West Francian king from 843-877, and emperor from 875-877. He tried to take advantage of Lorraine when Louis the German died, but was defeated at the battle at Andernach in 876.


Vedi padre Ludvig den Fromme. (......Carlo Magno).

-------------------- Charles II King of France, [Karl The Bold], b. 15 Jul 823, Frankfurt, H-Nss, Prussia, d. 5 Oct 877, Brios, , , France Family 1 Ermentrude Queen of France, b. Abt 825, Orleans, , , France, d. 6 Oct 869 -------------------- Charles II "The Bald" King of the Franks [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 was born 13 Jun 823 in Frankfurt am Main, Hessen, Germany. He died 6 Oct 877 in Brides-les-Bain, Savoy, France. Charles married Ermentrude of ORLEANS on 14 Dec 842 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.

   Other marriages:
       METZ, Richilde of

Ermentrude of ORLEANS [Parents] 1, 2 was born 829 in Orleans, Loiret, France. She died 6 Oct 869 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. Ermentrude married Charles II "The Bald" King of the Franks on 14 Dec 842 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.

They had the following children:

     		M 	i 	Louis II "The Stammerer" King of the Franks was born 844 and died 10 Apr 879.
     		F 	ii 	Judith was born 846 and died after 870.
     		M 	iii 	Charles Duke of Aquitaine 1, 2 was born 848 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. He died 29 Sep 866 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		M 	iv 	Carloman 1, 2 was born 850 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. He died 876 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		M 	v 	Lothar 1 was born 852 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. He died 865 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		F 	vi 	Ermentrude Abbess of Hasnon 1 was born 854 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		F 	vii 	Rotrude 1 was born 856 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		F 	viii 	Hildegarde 1 was born 859 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		F 	ix 	Rothaut was born 862.
     		F 	x 	Gisela 1 was born 865 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		F 	xi 	Hersent was born 868 and died 888.

Charles II "The Bald" King of the Franks [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 was born 13 Jun 823 in Frankfurt am Main, Hessen, Germany. He died 6 Oct 877 in Brides-les-Bain, Savoy, France. Charles married Richilde of METZ on 25 Nov 870 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.

   Other marriages:
       ORLEANS, Ermentrude of

Richilde of METZ [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 849 in Metz, Moselle, France. She married Charles II "The Bald" King of the Franks on 25 Nov 870 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.

They had the following children:

     		F 	i 	Rothilde Abbess of Chelles was born 871 and died 22 Mar 928.
     		M 	ii 	Pepin 1 was born 872 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		M 	iii 	Drogo 1 was born 874 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. He died 874 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.
     		M 	iv 	Carlus 1 was born 10 Feb 876 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France. He died 877 in Paris, Ile-de-France, France.

-------------------- Keizer, Koning der Franken, Roi, De Kale koning,later Keizer, koning van Franrijk, later keizer -------------------- Emperor Charles (empereur auguste) was King of West Francia (from 842) and was Holy Roman Emperor (from 875).

He was also known as “Charles the Bald” (or Charles le Chauve, or Karl der Kahl), not because of any lack of hair but rather because of his temporarily empty inheritance.

He was the brother of Princess Gisela of France and the half-brother (and first cousin?? ) of both Holy Roman Emperor Lothair I and of Hildegard--all of whom are our ancestors as well.

Charles received homage as heir in 837 from the nobles (at his father’s insistence).

After a 2-year civil war (840-842), Charles was recognized as ruling the Kingdom of West Francia.

He was forced to flee to Burgundy in 858 but was able to return. He was forced to suppress numerous rebellions and to pay heavy tribute to invading Vikings.

Charles was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 875 by Pope John VIII.

His first marriage was in 842 to our ancestor Ermentrude of Orléans, by whom he sired our ancestors Judith of Flanders, Hersent of France, and King Louis II of France.

Charles was widowered in 869; then, in 870, he married our ancestor Richilde of Provence, by whom he sired our ancestor Rothildis des Francs Occidental.


See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_the_Bald for considerably more information.

Also see "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p312.htm#i5064 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- King Of Neustria Between 843 and 877 Charles II of The FRANKS Between 875 and 877 Nickname: The Bald -------------------- Charles the Bald[1] (13 June 823 – 6 October 877), Holy Roman Emperor (875–877, as Charles II) and King of West Francia (840–877, as Charles II, with the borders of his land defined by the Treaty of Verdun, 843), was the youngest son of the Emperor Louis the Pious by his second wife Judith.

He was born on 13 June 823 in Frankfurt, when his elder brothers were already adults and had been assigned their own regna, or subkingdoms, by their father. The attempts made by Louis the Pious to assign Charles a subkingdom, first Alemannia and then the country between the Meuse and the Pyrenees (in 832, after the rising of Pepin I of Aquitaine) were unsuccessful. The numerous reconciliations with the rebellious Lothair and Pepin, as well as their brother Louis the German, King of Bavaria, made Charles's share in Aquitaine and Italy only temporary, but his father did not give up and made Charles the heir of the entire land which was once Gaul and would eventually be France. At a diet near Crémieux in 837, Louis the Pious bade the nobles do homage to Charles as his heir. This led to the final rising of his sons against him. Pepin of Aquitaine died in 838, whereupon Charles at last received that kingdom, although Pepin's son Pepin II would be a perpetual thorn in his side.

The death of the emperor in 840 led to the outbreak of war between his sons. Charles allied himself with his brother Louis the German to resist the pretensions of the new emperor Lothair I, and the two allies defeated Lothair at the Battle of Fontenay-en-Puisaye on 25 June 841. In the following year, the two brothers confirmed their alliance by the celebrated Oaths of Strasbourg. The war was brought to an end by the Treaty of Verdun in August 843. The settlement gave Charles the Bald the kingdom of the West Franks, which he had been up till then governing and which practically corresponded with what is now France, as far as the Meuse, the Saône, and the Rhône, with the addition of the Spanish March as far as the Ebro. Louis received the eastern part of the Carolingian Empire, known as the East Francia and later Germany. Lothair retained the imperial title and the kingdom of Italy. He also received the central regions from Flanders through the Rhineland and Burgundy as king of Middle Francia.

The first years of Charles's reign, up to the death of Lothair I in 855, were comparatively peaceful. During these years the three brothers continued the system of "confraternal government", meeting repeatedly with one another, at Koblenz (848), at Meerssen (851), and at Attigny (854). In 858, Louis the German, invited by disaffected nobles eager to oust Charles, invaded the West Frankish kingdom. Charles was so unpopular that he was unable to summon an army, and he fled to Burgundy. He was saved only by the support of the bishops, who refused to crown Louis the German king, and by the fidelity of the Welfs, who were related to his mother, Judith. In 860, he in his turn tried to seize the kingdom of his nephew, Charles of Provence, but was repulsed. On the death of his nephew Lothair II in 869, Charles tried to seize Lothair's dominions, but by the Treaty of Mersen (870) was compelled to share them with Louis the German.

Besides these family disputes, Charles had to struggle against repeated rebellions in Aquitaine and against the Bretons. Led by their chiefs Nomenoë and Erispoë, who defeated the king at the Battle of Ballon (845) and the Battle of Jengland (851), the Bretons were successful in obtaining a de facto independence. Charles also fought against the Vikings, who devastated the country of the north, the valleys of the Seine and Loire, and even up to the borders of Aquitaine. Several times Charles was forced to purchase their retreat at a heavy price. Charles led various expeditions against the invaders and, by the Edict of Pistres of 864, made the army more mobile by providing for a cavalry element, the predecessor of the French chivalry so famous during the next 600 years. By the same edict, he ordered fortified bridges to be put up at all rivers to block the Viking incursions. Two of these bridges at Paris saved the city during its siege of 885–886.

In 875, after the death of the Emperor Louis II (son of his half-brother Lothair), Charles the Bald, supported by Pope John VIII, traveled to Italy, receiving the royal crown at Pavia and the imperial insignia in Rome on 29 December. Louis the German, also a candidate for the succession of Louis II, revenged himself by invading and devastating Charles' dominions, and Charles had to return hastily to Francia. After the death of Louis the German (28 August 876), Charles in his turn attempted to seize Louis's kingdom, but was decisively beaten at Andernach on 8 October 876.

In the meantime, John VIII, menaced by the Saracens, was urging Charles to come to his defence in Italy. Charles again crossed the Alps, but this expedition was received with little enthusiasm by the nobles, and even by his regent in Lombardy, Boso, and they refused to join his army. At the same time Carloman, son of Louis the German, entered northern Italy. Charles, ill and in great distress, started on his way back to Gaul, but died while crossing the pass of Mont Cenis at Brides-les-Bains, on 6 October 877.

According to the Annals of St-Bertin, Charles was hastily buried at the abbey of Nantua, Burgundy because the bearers were unable to withstand the stench of his decaying body. He was to have been buried in the Basilique Saint-Denis and may have been transferred there later. It was recorded that there was a memorial brass there that was melted down at the Revolution.

Charles was succeeded by his son, Louis. Charles was a prince of education and letters, a friend of the church, and conscious of the support he could find in the episcopate against his unruly nobles, for he chose his councillors from among the higher clergy, as in the case of Guenelon of Sens, who betrayed him, and of Hincmar of Reims.

It has been suggested that Charles' nickname was used ironically and not descriptively; i.e. that he was not in fact bald, but rather that he was extremely hairy.[2] In support of this idea is the fact that none of his enemies commented on what would be an easy target. However, none of the voluble members of his court comments on his being hairy; and the Genealogy of Frankish Kings, a text from Fontanelle dating from possibly as early as 869, and a text without a trace of irony, names him as Karolus Caluus ("Charles the Bald"). Certainly, by the end of the 10th century, Richier of Reims and Adhemar of Chabannes refer to him in all seriousness as "Charles the Bald".[3]

An alternative or additional interpretation is based on Charles' initial lack of a regnum. "Bald" would in this case be a tongue-in-cheek reference to his landlessness, at an age where his brothers already had been sub-kings for some years.

Charles married Ermentrude, daughter of Odo I, Count of Orléans, in 842. She died in 869. In 870, Charles married Richilde of Provence, who was descended from a noble family of Lorraine.

With Ermentrude:

   Judith (844–870), married firstly with Ethelwulf of Wessex, secondly with Ethelbald of Wessex (her stepson) and thirdly with Baldwin I of Flanders
   Louis the Stammerer (846–879)
   Charles the Child (847–866)
   Lothar (848–865), monk in 861, became Abbot of Saint-Germain
   Carloman (849–876)
   Rotrud (852–912), a nun, Abbess of Saint-Radegunde
   Ermentrud (854–877), a nun, Abbess of Hasnon
   Hildegard (born 856, died young)
   Gisela (857–874)

With Richilde:

   Rothild (871–929), married firstly to Hugues, Count of Bourges and secondly to Roger, Count of Maine
   Drogo (872–873)
   Pippin (873–874)
   a son (born and died 875)
   Charles (876–877)

-------------------- King of Neustria, 838-840. King of the Western Franks, 840×3-877. King of (western) Lorraine, 870-877. King of Italy, 875-877. Emperor, 875-877. The youngest son of the emperor Louis I, much of the reign of Charles involved a struggle with his brothers for fragments of the dismembered empire, a struggle which was only partially settled by the Treaty of Verdun in 843, which gave Charles the western third of the empire. In 870, following the death of his nephew king Lothair II of Lorraine, he came to an agreement with his brother over the division of Lorraine. In 875, having heard about the death of his nephew, the emperor Louis II, king of Italy, Charles advanced into Italy, where he received the submission of most of the men of Italy. He then went to Rome where he was received by the pope at St. Peter's on 17 December. Charles was then crowned as emperor by pope John VIII on Christmas day, 875. -------------------- Karl II eller Karl den skaldede (født 13. juni823 i Frankfurt am Main, død 6. oktober 877 i Avrieux ved Modane) var vestfrankisk konge 843-877 og tysk-romersk keiser fra 875-877.

Segl Charles II

Charles II er begravet i St. Denis, Frankrig. --------------------------------------------- Charles II eller Karl den Skaldede ,823-77, kejser af Vesten (875-77), og kongen af Vesten Franks (843-77), søn af kejser Ludvig I af en anden ægteskab. Indsatsen fra Louis for at skabe et kongerige for Charles var ansvarlige for de gentagne opstande i Louiss ældre sønner, der forstyrrede den sidste del af Louis regeringstid. Når Lothair jeg, den ældste og arving til den kejserlige titel, forsøgte at genforene riget efter Ludvigs død (840), marcherede Karl og Louis den tyske mod deres bror og besejrede ham ved Fontenoy (841). Bekræfter deres alliance i 842 (se Strasbourg, ed), underskrev de (843) med Lothair traktaten Verdun (se Verdun, traktaten), som delte riget i tre dele. Den del nogenlunde svarer til moderne Frankrig faldt til Charles. Han var næsten uafbrudt i krig med sine brødre og deres sønner med nordboerne (eller normannerne, som de kom til at blive kendt i Frankrig) og med oprørske emner. Da Charles nevø Lothair, søn af Lothair I og Kongen af Lothringen, døde i 869, Charles greb hans rige, men blev tvunget af traktaten Mersen (870) for at opdele det med Louis de tyske. I 875, ved død af sin nevø Louis II, som havde overtaget Lothair I som kejser Karl sikrede den kejserlige krone. Hans regeringstid var vidne til væksten af den strøm af adelen på bekostning af kongemagten, og dermed markerede fremkomsten af lokale feudalisme. Charles chef rådgiver var ærkebiskop Hincmar.

-------------------- Charles the Bald was the King of West Francia (843–77), King of Italy (875–77) and Holy Roman Emperor (875–77, as Charles II). After a series of civil wars that began during the reign of his father, Louis the Pious, Charles succeeded by the Treaty of Verdun (843) in acquiring the western third of the Carolingian Empire. He was the youngest son of Louis the Pious by his second wife, Judith.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_the_Bald

Leo: Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 82.

view all 57

Charles II "the Bald", Western Emperor's Timeline

820
820
823
June 13, 823
Frankfurt, Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany
June 13, 823
June 13, 823
June 13, 823
Frankfurt, Hessen-Nassau, Europe
823
Franfurt, Hessen-Nassau Prussia
823
Frankfort - Son of Louis the Pious
823
Frankfort,Germany
840
June 20, 840
- October 6, 877
Age 17
842
December 14, 842
Age 19
France