James Augustus Poultney

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James Augustus Poultney

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England
Death: Died in Dordrecht, Cape Colony
Immediate Family:

Son of Samuel Poultney and Lucy Poultney
Husband of Ann Poultney, SM/PROG
Father of Ann Lydia Halse; Eliza Halse; Jane Sarah Halse; James Augustus Poultney; John William Poultney and 4 others
Brother of Sarah Poultney

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About James Augustus Poultney

http://www.southafricansettlers.com/?p=1445

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NJ9D-L5T

From 1820settlers.com

Morgan's Party on Ocean Following from "Some Frontier Families", by Ivan Mitford-Barberton & Violet White, page 235.

"Quoted from a letter from Mrs Esme Glazebrook of Westville, Natal, to Ivan. Our venerable and dearly beloved great-great grandfather, James Augustus Poultney, came out on the same vessel as Thomas Henry Halse. Their two children married. Henry Halse, the eldest, married Ann Poultney, J.A.P's eldest daughter. These two were my great grandparents. Two further children, Sarah Jane Poultney and Fred Halse also married and they were Cecil Halse's great-grandparents. The Poultneys went up to Grahamstown, and farmed in the vicinity of Queenstown. They were all splendid men, and both names (Halse and Poultney) have come down the years quite unblemished in any way. They were sheep farmers, and periodically took the wool down to East London. They were sons of James Augustus. One of the Marks men (I don't know whether it was the famous Sammy Marks or not), offered to finance a trip back to England to enable old J.A.P. to visit his homeland once again, and when the wool was ready to be taken to the coast the old man prepared to go down with the wagons and board a vessel for England. They slept in the wagons on reaching the coast, and the sons, in the middle of the night, offloaded the wool, inspanned the horses and started off for home, as they could not bear to part with the old man, and so he never visited hi beloved England after all. Settler J.A.P., after the death of his wife, lived with his daughter Sarah Jane (Poultney) Halse. In his old age he lost the sight of one eye - cataract - and some time later the sight of the other, thus becoming totally blind. He remained in this state for some years, but in a letter from Sarah Jane in 1853 she mentioned that his sight had been partially restored. It was a time of great rejoicing as he was able to recognise his children again after years of darkness, and all the family came to see and be seen. "

Notes extracted from Gordon Keith Poultney's Web Page

_____________

JAMES AUGUSTUS POULTNEY and his wife ANN (nee Smith), aged 28 and 21 respectively, with their baby daughter, ANN, of four months, sailed on the ship "Ocean" from London in December 1819 or early January 1820. The River Thames had been frozen over for some weeks, so that the ships had been ice-bound. All the ships experienced very bad weather - some were nearly shipwrecked soon after leaving harbour. Several ships, including the Ocean, had to put in to Portsmouth for shelter. During the storm the Ocean broke from her moorings and collided with the "Northampton", but without any serious consequences. After the ships had passed through the Bay of Biscay the weather improved.

The party on the Ocean under the leadership of Dr N. Morgan numbered 41 - this was the Poultneys' group. There were three other parties on board - the total number of settlers being 206.

During the voyage, the Poultneys' ship called at Porto Praya, one of the Cape Verde Islands. Whilst lying at her anchorage there, in the dead of night, her passengers were rudely awakened by the booming of a cannon, followed by the tearing noise of the cannon ball through the rigging. One of the shore batteries had opened fire - this from a supposedly friendly port. While the scared passengers were wondering what was happening, a second discharge was heard, and this time the ball hit the ship, smashing through the side and entering a store-room just below one of the cabins. Excitement and consternation were intense. A third ball was fired and this one fell short, hissing as it entered the sea as if it were a red-hot shot. It turned out later that the shore batteries were "trigger happy" and had thought that the Ocean or another settler ship were the same as had fired on the port a few weeks previously. Fortunately the mistake was discovered before the Ocean was destroyed.

The ships had an uneventful voyage after this ! It took until 9th Apri1 1820 before the first ship dropped anchor in Algoa Bay - the last arrived late in June.

One of the passengers on the Poultneys' ship was Mr Bishop Burnett, a retired Royal Navy Lieutenant, who later achieved much notoriety by horse-whipping an army surgeon near Grahamstown. Lengthy legal proceedings resulted in the British Government to alter its constitutional policy in the Cape.

The Morgan (Poultney) party settled on a plot of land about 4 square miles in area, situated about 7 miles East of Grahamstown, to the right of the present national road as one travels from Grahamstown to Peddie.

Morgan's Party on Ocean

Following from "Some Frontier Families", by Ivan Mitford-Barberton &Violet White, page 235.

"Quoted from a letter from Mrs Esme Glazebrook of Westville, Natal, toIvan. Our venerable and dearly beloved great-great grandfather, James Augustus Poultney, came out on the same vessel as Thomas Henry Halse. Their two children married. Henry Halse, the eldest, married Ann Poultney, J.A.P's eldest daughter. These two were my great grandparents. Two further children, Sarah Jane Poultney and Fred Halse also married and they were Cecil Halse's great-grandparents. The Poultneys went up to Grahamstown,and farmed in the vicinity of Queenstown. They were all splendid men, and both names (Halse and Poultney) have come down the years quite unblemished in any way. They were sheep farmers, and periodically took the wool down to East London. They were sons of James Augustus. One of the Marks men (I don't know whether it was the famous Sammy Marks or not), offered to finance a trip back to England to enable old J.A.P. to visit his homeland once again, and when the wool was ready to be taken to the coast the old man prepared to go down with the wagons and board a vessel for England. They slept in the wagons on reaching the coast, and the sons, in the middle of the night, off loaded the wool, inspanned the horses and started off for home, as they could not bear to part with the old man, and so he never visited his beloved England after all. Settler J.A.P., after the death of his wife, lived with his daughter Sarah Jane (Poultney) Halse. In his old age he lost the sight of one eye - cataract - and some time later the sight of the other, thus becoming totallyblind. He remained in this state for some years, but in a letter from Sarah Jane in 1853 she mentioned that his sight had been partially restored. It was a time of great rejoicing as he was able to recognisehis children again after years of darkness, and all the family came to see and be seen. "

Came to S.A. on the ship Ocean in 1820, a member of Morgans party. They came from Bromsgrove, Worcestershire.

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James Augustus Poultney's Timeline

1792
January 1, 1792
Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England
November 5, 1792
Birmingham, Warwick, England
1817
November 16, 1817
Age 25
Horsleydown, Surrey, England
1819
June 19, 1819
Age 27
London, England
1822
July 14, 1822
Age 30
Cape, South Africa
1826
April 8, 1826
Age 34
Cape Town, Cape Colony
1827
September 7, 1827
Age 35
Cape, Cape Colony
1829
March 3, 1829
Age 37
Nicobar, India
1832
June 17, 1832
Age 40
Cape Town, Cape Colony
1835
July 2, 1835
Age 43