Johannes "John" Hansen Nysveen (1851 - 1912) MP

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Nicknames: "John", "Johan"
Birthplace: Oyer, Rognstad Farm, Norway
Death: Died in At sea on the Titanic
Cause of death: Died in the sinking. Body Not Recovered
Occupation: Farmer
Managed by: P Isaksdotter
Last Updated:

About Johannes "John" Hansen Nysveen

http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/johan-hansen-nysveen.html

Mr Johan Hansen Nysveen


  • Born: Wednesday 17th September 1851
  • Age: 60 years
  • Last Residence: in Oyer Norway
  • Occupation: Farmer
  • 3rd Class passenger
  • First Embarked: Southampton on Wednesday 10th April 1912
  • Ticket No. 345364 , £6 4s 9d
  • Destination: Hillsboro United States
  • Died in the sinking.
  • Body Not Recovered

Johan H. Nysveen, 61, was a farmer from Strøm in Øyer, Norway. He had four children from his first marriage: Arnt, Elias, henry and Marie all of whom were grown-up and living in the USA. His first wife was dead.

Johan Nysveen was a U.S. citizen; after 27 years in North Dakota he returned to Norway where he married Pauline Regnstad. On 12 July 1911 she gave birth to twins, Jan. & Paul.

Nysveen was traveling from Øyer to Trail County, Grand Forks, North Dakota to wind up his business there and to give away his half of the farm to his son. He was not originally intending to travel on the Titanic and his wife did not know what had become of him until the final lists were produced some weeks after the catastrophe. By then his name had been distorted to Nyoven.

His widow had no income and insurance so life was hard for her after his death. The Mansion House Fund paid 2180.40 NKr (£120) on 17 January 1913. 2205 NKr ($625.75) damage claims were paid on 26 April 1916, and she received further payments of 607.50 NKr ($168.25) in 1917 and 25.41 NKr ($6.84) on 31 December 1927.

Johan's body was never found.

References Claes-Göran Wetterholm (1988, 1996) Titanic. Rabén, Stockholm

Acknowledgements Leif Snellman, Finland Claes-Göran Wetterholm, Sweden -------------------- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=nysveen&GSby=1860&GSbyrel=before&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=68030814&df=all&

Johannes Nysveen emigrated from Norway with his wife Kristiane Eriksdotter in 1885 to North Dakota to be near her sister, Sigrid and her husband Ole Moe. Johannes Nysveen died on the maiden voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic on April 15, 1912...his body was never found.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=nysveen&GSby=1860&GSbyrel=before&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=53540918&df=all&

Johan H. Nysveen, 61, was a farmer from Strøm in Øyer, Norway. He had four children from his first marriage: Arnt, Elias, henry and Marie all of whom were grown-up and living in the USA. His first wife was dead. Johan Nysveen was a U.S. citizen; after 27 years in North Dakota he returned to Norway where he married Pauline Regnstad. On 12 July 1911 she gave birth to twins, Jan. & Paul. Nysveen was traveling from Øyer to Trail County, Grand Forks, North Dakota to wind up his business there and to give away his half of the farm to his son. He was not originally intending to travel on the Titanic and his wife did not know what had become of him until the final lists were produced some weeks after the catastrophe. By then his name had been distorted to Nyoven.


Burial: Body lost at sea

JOHANNES HANSEN NYSVEEN A Story of Love, Life, Truth and Tragedy By Sergio Martinez Cotos Since he left his home in Norway to visit his children in North Dakota, from England, John Nysveen had written “All is well” on a telegram to his wife. He intended to travel to the United States on S.S. Megantic but the ship did not sail because of a shortage of coal. Days passed––April 11, April 12, April 13, April 14––John Nysveen had disappeared––there was no sign of him. There was no reason to believe that John was on the Titanic, and the family thought that he had left on another ship before Titanic’s voyage. Also, his name was not on the passenger lists published in the newspapers. Unfortunately, Nysveen was on Titanic and Sergio Martinez Cotos does a remarkable job researching the biography of a forgotten Third-class passenger in the biographical piece: Johannes Hansen Nysveen: A Story of Life, Truth and Tragedy.

Johannes Hansen Nysveen (†) var født utenfor ekteskap i Øyer i Gudbrandsdalen i 1851. Han giftet seg i 1877 med piken Kristiane Eriksen på nabogården. I 1885 bestemte paret, som nå hadde to barn, seg for å følge etter Kristianes søster til USA. Johannes og Kristiane slo seg ned i Nord-Dakota og fikk etterhvert mange barn. Kristiane døde i 1901, men Johannes og de barna som levde opp, fortsatte driften av den gården de hadde bygget opp. Omkring 1910 var Johannes tilbake i Gudbrandsdalen og berettet om sin suksess i USA. I Norge giftet han seg på nytt med Pauline Rognstad og fikk i 1911 tvillingene Jan og Paul. I 1912 skulle Johannes tilbake til USA og sørge for at barna hans der formelt fikk overta den gården de hadde bygget opp. Johannes var imidlertid blant dem som omkom da Titanic gikk ned. Pauline fødte sitt tredje barn i september 1912, fem måneder etter mannens død. Pauline og barna ble boende i Øyer der Pauline døde som enke i 1966. Sønnen Paul var senere en tur over Atlanteren og besøkte familiene til sine halvsøsken.

English Translation: John Hansen Nysveen (†) was born out of wedlock in Islands in the Gudbrandsdal Valley in 1851. He married in 1877 with the girl Kristiane Eriksen on the neighboring farm. In 1885 the couple, who now had two children, decided to follow Christ Anes sister to the United States. John and Kristi settled in North Dakota and eventually had many children. Kristiane died in 1901, but John and the children who survived the continued operation of the farm they had built up. Around 1910 John was back in Gudbrandsdal and recounted his success in the United States. In Norway he married again with Pauline Rognstad and received in 1911 the twins Jan and Paul. In 1912 John was back to the States and to ensure that his children which formally took over the farm they had built up. John, however, was among those who died when the Titanic went down. Pauline gave birth to her third child in September 1912, five months after her husband's death. Pauline and the children remained in the islands where Pauline died a widow in 1966. Son Paul was later a trip across the Atlantic and visited the families of their siblings.

-------------------- JOHAN H. NYSVEEN DIED ON THE TITANIC his story follows as told in a book on Norwegians on the S/S Titanic

Grew up on Boshaugen in Rognstad, which lies a bit up the mountnainside in loer Gudbrandsdalen. Performed his service with the army together with his half-brother, then worked as a farm and woods worker. He received no proper schooling and never learned to read or write.

After he married Kristiane they moved further south in the valley and bought Sveagarden, which was also called Nysvea or Nysveen. Until then he had used Boshaugen as a surname but from now on he was called Nysveen.

The men of Oyer were rather tough, but the early 1880s were very hard time for the farmers of Gudbrandsdalen. Kristiane's sister, Sigri and her husband Ole Moe had already immigrated from Oyer to America and found themselves a lucrative farm in Clifford in North Dakota. The conditions were so idyllic that Sigri sent a letter with ticket money home to the Nysveen family. They couldn't resist the temptation so in the beginning of 1885 they left Oyer with a horse and cart in the direction of Kristiania (tody's Oslo). The trip was long but nothing better awaited them on the emigrant ship. They had to fend for themselves and, additionally, overcome the heavy seas and poor hygiene. It was probably the most unpleasant for Kristiane. Not only did she have to keep an eye on her two small sons, but she was expecting her third one fairly soon.

Nysveen emigrated during a period of massive emigration from Norway. From 1881 to 1885 the average annual emigration to America was 21,129 and considering the population, Fristiana Amt - now Oppland County - had the greatest emigration to the period with 1.6% of the population.

The emigrant ship sailed up the St. Lawrence River and arrived in Detroit in Michigan sometime in June 1885. From there Nysveen went by train to Fargo and then by oxcart to Norman County right at Clifford where they were to remain a yearwith Kristianes' sister Sigri and her husband Ole Moe. After the birth of their third son in 1885 the family moved futher on and took over a sod hut on the splendid prairie in Wold County near Cummings in Dakota Territory. Here Kristiane gave birth to her first daughter in 1887 and a year later in 1889 a fifth child was born. The famiily was surrounded by Norwegian settlers, so Norwegian culture and traditions were well preserved.

A few months after Johannes and his family emigrated from Norway, his half-brother Thorsetn followed. He settled in Nielsville in Minnesota. Neither would his mother, Anne, stay in the fatherland. She emigrated with a Norwegian family from Oyer and lived with her youngest son. Anne, who was now a widow, had come often to visit Johannes.

11 November 1889 - a week after the Dakota Territry joined the union as the split states of North and South Dakota - Johannes sought American Citizenship. His application was approved seven years later. In 1891 the Township, where they built a house and ran a farm with three other Norwegian families (a quarter each). In their new home, in 1891, they had their last child. In 1892, Johannes and Kristiane were among those in Norway Township who contributed to the establishmet of Norway Lutheran Church. Inn addition to services, the building was used as a shcool for the many children in the little community.

The Nysveen family did not get a good start in the new century. On 20 September 1901 Fristianne died of goiter and two year later, 20 October 1903 the family was struck by futher tragedy when the eldest son died in a work accident on the farm. The same year Johannes had bought up the whole farm and got thereby, dominion over all of section 11 in Norway Township.

Gloomy periods for the family continued. The 21 January 1906 Johannes' daughter, Caroline, died of tuberculosis, so Martha who was then only 13 became the family's mother. For fear that the tuberculosis might strike Arnt or Elias, Johannes send them to Colorado to work for a year. Johannes later got good help from his three sons in keeping the relatively large farm in operations. He had 28 cows and worked much as a butcher.

In 1909 Johannes visited Norway for the first time in 24 years. By that time his half-sister Johanne had settled in North Dakota so he had no near relatives in the old country. Back in Oyer Johannes was received as a seasoned traveler. With his impressive overcoat and long beard he was easily recognized as a man from America. He traveled around the farms and told about his adventurous experiences in the Pomised Land of the west. It was probably when he visited his home farm of Rognstad that Johannes became entranced by the 28 year old Pauline Jonsdatter Rognstad, who was a nurse at the local hospital. It was love at first sight.

Johannes returned to the States in 1910, but in May of the same year he was back in Norway. On the 26th of January Johannes and Pauline were married in Oyer Church. Pauline and Johannes bought Sveagarden in Oyer. The place was rather isolated so it was poblematic to transport goods to and from the farm. On 12 July 1911, the couple had twins, Paul and Jan.

While their father was in Norway, the four children were responsible for the farm in North Dakota. Early in 1912 Johannes had decided that Oyer would be his permanent home, but first he had to make a quick trip to the USA to lease the farm to his children. He had promised to the back for good in September 1912, when the couple expected their third child.

Johannes paid 250 kroner to General Agent Ferdinand J. Elster of Kristiania for a ticket to Fargo. Of the L6 4s. 9d. was for the trip across the North Atlantic as a passenger on the R.M.S. titanice - Maiden Voyage - April 10, 1912 - he was not a survivor.

  • information from Encyclopedia Titanica

According to a letter written by Karl Albert Midtsjo, a survivor of Titanic, when the accident occurred he and Johan Nysveen went up to the deck. Johan who was 61 year of age, realised that he probably couldn't be saved so he gave his coat and watch to Karl Albert. Karl Albert was given permission by First Officer Murdoch to climb down the tackle and into lifeboat 15. After some days in the hospital in New York he travelled by train to Chicago. Shortly after this, Karl Albert travelled to Cummings, North Dakota to give back to the relatives of Johan Nysveen is coat and watch. He stayed with them for some weeks, and told them about Johan Nysveen's last day on the Titantic. This was very much apapreciated by the. His widow had no income and insurance so life was hard for her after his death. The Mansion House fund paid 2180.40 NKr (L120) on 17 January 1913. 2205 NKr ($625.75) damage claims were paid on 26 April 1916 and she received further payments of 607.50 NKr ($168.25) in 1917 and 25.41 NKr ($6.84) on 31 December 1927. Johan's bady was never found.

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Johannes "John" Nysveen's Timeline

1851
September 17, 1851
Oyer, Rognstad Farm, Norway
1869
May 23, 1869
Age 17
Oyer Church, Norway
1877
November 15, 1877
Age 26
Oyer
1878
May 16, 1878
Age 26
Oyer, Sveagarden, Norway
1882
September 14, 1882
Age 30
Oyer, Sveagarden, Norway
1885
July 28, 1885
Age 33
Clifford, Traill, North Dakota
1887
June 28, 1887
Age 35
Cummings, Wold , North Dakota
1889
December 28, 1889
Age 38
Cummings, Wold, North Dakota
1891
November 2, 1891
Age 40
Mayville, Traill, North Dakota, United States
1911
July 12, 1911
Age 59
Norway