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Belarusian Jews-יהודי בילורוסיה

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  • Faitel Yakubovich (deceased)
    When Faitel was 80 years old, he visited all the cities where his children lived. At the time, he resided in Kuybishev (Samara), and visited Moscow, Minsk, Mogilev, Svedlovsk. Possible grave site:
  • Rose Altshuler (Gorelik) (1880 - 1942)
    Razel Gorelick (daughter of Israel Hyman Gorelick and Bella Rosenberg) was born January 08, 1880 in Kiev, and died May 22, 1942. She married Julius Altshuler, son of Samuel Altshuler and Esther. &#...
  • Israel Hyman Gorelick (c.1853 - d.)
    Learned Rabbi.
  • Sara Mysels (Gorelik) (1883 - 1962)
    Sarah was a singer. She also wrote a book of Yiddish poems - Copyright 1955, by the author Sarah Mysels. Printed by Berger Printing Company Pittsburgh PA. Book of Yiddish Poetry, by Sarah Mysels ...
  • Dina Simanovskaya (1892 - d.)

This is a place for all the descendants of the Belarusian Jews.

In loving memory to my wonderful grandmother, Sara Haya ("Haisore" as her mom used to call her in Yiddish) Potapovskaya nee Gorelik.

Sara Haya Gorelick's Family

  • Sara Haya was born in Zhlobin to the large Gorelik family.
  • She spent the years of the world war two in Orenburg along with her many family members.
  • In Orenburg she met my grandfather- Juda Leib Rabinovich, he was a soldier in the red army, they fell in love. He had lost his first wife and son at the war.
  • My grandparents got married in Riga and lived there, they had two daughters together.
  • My great-grandmother lived with them and used to visit the family in Belarus every year.
  • My gandfather died in Riga and in 1973 my grandmother came to Israel, she remarried and was the best grandmother to her grandchildren.
  • In 1992 she was happy to have her sister in Israel.

EXTENDED GORELIK FAMILY

Miscellaneous Belarus Gorelik information

Gorelik Authors in Bobroisk

  • My Poor Home by Ahron Gorelik (Yiddish)
  • Trefet A Ragnedi by Noah Gorelick (Yiddish)
  • Nicknames for Bobruisk by Y. Gorelik (Heb. Yiddish)
  • The Bobruisk Turnpike by Y. Gorelik (Yid)
  • An Old Revolutionary Visits Bobruisk in 1927 by Ahron Gorelik (Yiddish)
  • My Shtetl Paritch by by Shimkhe Gorelik (Yid.)
  • The Shtetl Starye Dorogi 1927 by Ahron Gorelik (Yiddish)
  • The Seeing Blind Man by Ahron Gorelik (Yid.)
  • A Letter From Parich by Shimkeh Gorelik (Yid.)
  • Stories of My Shtetl (Zhedrin) by Yankev Gorelik (Yid.)
  • Stormy Years (New York, 1945), byAhron Gorelik
  • Di mizreḥ zayṭ by Sarah Mysels (Gorelik)
  • Mikhl Gorelik, teacher and social leader
  • Moyshe Gorlik, author

Zionists, Artists, Authors, Socialist from Belarusia

Nakhman Gorelik organized the Lovers of Zion organization in Paritsh. He was a proud Jew, a gifted speaker full of temperment.

Moyshe Gorelik had literary ambition. His first step in Hebrew literature was the story After the Fire which won the Hatsofe contest and opened a series of contest stories

Zhame Mayzels, the Paritsher sculptor and painter, died in Paris of neck [shvinzukht] in his twenties. His work was a group of figures under the name "Gogol-types," won a prize at an art show in Minsk.

Revolutionaries from Bobroisk emigrate to America

In the beginning of the 20th century, in the days of revolutionary turmoil in Russia, the Jewish youth of Bobruisk streamed to America; especially those who were active in the revolutionary parties and had run afoul of the authority organs and police.

Almost all of them stemmed from hard-working and proletariat parents, "by the wetlands near Bobrulke [river], in small, leaning-over cabins at Sloboda, Minsk Plan, Berezina-bred," thus they were characterized in a greeting poem by Hillel Maytin, also an immigrant form Bobruisk.

They came from the Bund, form Yiskra, S.R., Lover of Zion, and S.S. Berl Katsenelson in his open letter mentions many of his comrades who, by way of the Land of Israel, came to America, and there they remained.

One of the Bobruisker immmigrants, Ahron Gorelik , in his memoir-book, Stormy Years (New York, 1945), writes broadly of this wave of immigration.

At first these radical immigrants were not organized, but when the oncoming news about the progress of the revolution in Russia was taken in, an upstanding group of Bund and S.D. organized under the name of "Bobruisker Revolutionary Union" with the goal of supporting the revolutionary movement in Bobruisk. The union would from time to time send money to help worker comrades, buy arms for self-defence, etc.

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