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Early Mormon Leaders Project

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Profiles

  • Arza Matson Adams (1804 - 1889)
    Biographical Summary: Adams, Arza (1804-1889) (son of Joshua Adams and Betsy Chipman of Canada). Born January 22, 1804. Came to Utah in 1848. 1: Married Sabina Clarke March 23, 1831, Augusta, Can. ...
  • Joshua Adams (1833 - 1906)
    He held many Church offices, from Deacon to High Priest. He was the husband of three wives, one of whom, Mary Hoggard Adams, survives him. Mr. Adams was the father of 32 children, 11 boys and 21 girls,...
  • Elijah Abel (1808 - 1884)
    Spelling of Name: "...According to two early manuscript sources, Elijah spelled his name alternatively as “Elijah Ables” and “Elijah Able.” ..." SOURCE: Wikipedia ...
  • Gordon B. Hinckley, President, Church of Jesus Christ of Later-day Saints (1910 - 2008)
    Wikipedia Biographical Summary: "... Gordon Bitner Hinckley (June 23, 1910 – January 27, 2008) was an American religious leader and author who served as the 15th President of The Church of Jes...
  • Austin Hammer (1804 - 1838)
    Updated from MyHeritage Family Trees by SmartCopy : Oct 23 2014, 3:04:51 UTC

Contents:

  1. Introduction
  2. Finding Aids
  3. Church Presidents
  4. Quorum of 12 Apostles before 1844
  5. Three Witnesses
  6. Eight Witnesses
  7. Current First Presidency
  8. Current Quorum of Twelve Apostles
  9. People Mentioned in Doctrine and Covenants
  10. Early Non-Mormons of Interest
  11. Early Mormon Leaders
  12. Haun's Mill Victims

Introduction:

The scope of this project is to complete accurate family trees on geni.com for early leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ( Mormon church). These families include but aren't necessarily limited to those of Joseph Smith Jr., Heber C. Kimball, Brigham Young, Parley and Orson Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, and John Taylor. A project goal would be to include all known spouses, children, siblings and parents of the individuals covered. Project participates will work with existing profile owners and encourage them to make their ancestor's profiles "public" and therefore accessible to all users.

A project goal is to include biographical information that helps place them in both their family context and their contribution to Mormon history. Because this is a broad survey project most of these biographies will be extracted from 3rd party sources initially in order to populate as many of the profiles with information as possible. Please document where the information is summarized from by linking to the original web page or providing a full citation.

In addition to prominent LDS leaders this project may also include profiles of non-Mormons whose history impacted the early church like Governor Boggs, Thomas L. Kane, E. B. Grandin and others. The project will also include profiles of those that became disaffected from the church like Sidney Rigdon and John C. Bennett.

This project will also includes profiles for the 136 people mentioned in the LDS edition of the Doctrine and Covenants.

Time Frame: The project covers Early Mormon church leaders form the time of Joseph Smith Jr. until the start of the 20th century (~1805-~1900) Although this project focuses on "early" church leaders and will not extensively cover leaders after Heber J. Grant ( the 7th president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints) later leaders will sometimes be included when their inclusion is found to be warranted.

The initial phases of the project will involve locating existing geni.com profiles of early Mormon Leaders starting with the cleanup of some of the more challenging family trees like Brigham Young. These are challenging because of the genealogical complications that resulted from polygamous marriage which were practiced for a time but which were discontinued in the 1890's.

Finding Aids

Church Presidents:

//photos.geni.com/p13/88/52/64/e4/53444839121a2b85/200px-joseph_smith_jr_t.jpg Joseph Smith Jr. (1805-1844)

//photos.geni.com/p13/8d/54/49/d1/53444838e431751a/vug55qiz_large_t.jpg Brigham Young (1801-1877)

//photos.geni.com/p4/4918/7200/534448363813e17f/mic78zip_t.jpg John Taylor (1808-1887)

//photos.geni.com/p9/4047/4802/534448379637b48c/482px-Wilford_Woodruff_1889_t.jpg Wilford Woodruff (1807-1898)

//photos.geni.com/p9/4047/4802/534448379be63960/Lorenzo_Snow_t.jpg Lorenzo Snow (1814-1901)

//photos.geni.com/p9/4047/4802/534448379726dfd0/446px-JFS_First_Presidency_1905_large_t.jpg Joseph F. Smith (1838-1918)

//photos.geni.com/p11/87/9d/43/15/5344483852df04ff/445px-Heberjgrantloc2_t.jpg Heber J. Grant (1856-1945)

//photos.geni.com/p13/a4/cc/20/bb/534448390c2915d9/george_albert_smith_t.jpg George Albert Smith (1870-1951)

//photos.geni.com/p13/3b/dc/b1/1a/53444838d389a256/david_o_mckay_t.jpg David O. McKay (1873-1970)

//photos.geni.com/p9/4047/4802/53444837973e0c61/JosephFieldingSmith_t.jpg Joseph Fielding Smith (1876-1972)

//photos.geni.com/p13/29/cc/d2/ac/5344483955d914e8/haroldblee_t.jpg Harold B. Lee (1899-1973)

//photos.geni.com/39/70/7f/50/3979435942960031146/ket24qik/39707f50b1c5a8cb_t.jpg Spencer W. Kimball (1895-1985)

//photos.geni.com/p4/8291/1711/534448362fdd5c2d/ruj59nih_t.jpg Ezra Taft Benson (1899-1994)

//photos.geni.com/p13/80/1d/02/24/53444839831c6fff/howard-w-hunter_t.jpg Howard W. Hunter (1907-1995)

//photos.geni.com/p4/9141/4022/534448363edf1733/gbhinkley_t.jpg Gordon B. Hinkley (1910-2008)

//photos.geni.com/p13/9a/a4/9f/fa/5344483982f7965b/thomas_s_monson_t.jpg Thomas S. Monson (1927-)

Quorum of 12 Apostles before 1844

Three Witnesses

Eight Witnesses

Current 1st Presidency

Current Quorum of Twelve Apostles

List of People Mentioned in the Doctrine and Covenants

The Doctrine and Covenants, along with the Old Testament, New Testament, Book of Mormon and Pearl of Great Price is considered scripture by Latter-Day Saints. The majority of the Doctrine and Covenants contains revelations dictated by Joseph Smith on a variety of subjects. About 135 individuals are referred to by name in these revelations.

SOURCE: http://ldsbooks.narod.ru/books/Whos-Who-in-the-Doctrine-and-Covenants-by-Susan-Easton-Black.html

  1. Major Noble Ashley
  2. Almon Whiting Babbitt
  3. Jesse Baker
  4. Wheeler Baldwin
  5. Heman A. Basset
  6. John Cook Bennett
  7. Ezra T. Benson
  8. Samuel Bent
  9. Titus Billings
  10. Lilburn W. Boggs
  11. Ezra Booth
  12. John F. Boynton
  13. Seymour Brunson
  14. Stephen Burnett
  15. Philip Burroughs
  16. Josiah Butterfield
  17. Reynolds Cahoon
  18. Gideon Hayden (Haden) Carter
  19. Jared Carter
  20. John Sims Carter
  21. Simeon Carter
  22. William Carter
  23. Joseph Coe
  24. Zebedee Coltrin
  25. Leman Copley
  26. John Corrill
  27. James Covill
  28. Oliver Cowdery
  29. Warren A. Cowdery
  30. Alpheus Cutler
  31. Amos Davies
  32. Asa Dodds
  33. David D. Dort
  34. Ruggles Eames
  35. James Foster
  36. Robert D. Foster
  37. Edson Fuller
  38. David Fullmer
  39. Isaac Galland
  40. Jesse Gause
  41. Algernon Sidney Gilbert
  42. John Gould
  43. Oliver Granger
  44. Selah J. Griffin
  45. Thomas Grover
  46. Levi Ward Hancock
  47. Solomon Hancock
  48. Emer Harris
  49. George Washington Harris
  50. Martin Harris
  51. Peter Haws
  52. Henry Harriman
  53. John A. Hicks
  54. Elias Higbee
  55. Solomon Humphrey
  56. William Huntington Sr.
  57. Orson Hyde
  58. Vienna Jacques
  59. George Fitch James
  60. Aaron Johnson
  61. John Johnson
  62. Luke S. Johnson
  63. Lyman Eugene Johnson
  64. Heber Chase Kimball
  65. * Spencer W. Kimball (1895-1985)
  66. Joseph Knight Sr.
  67. Newel Knight
  68. Vinson Knight
  69. William Law
  70. Ann Lee (Skipping as she was born to early for this project. Ann Lee (1736-1784) was the founder of the Shaker religious movement)
  71. Amasa Mason Lyman
  72. William Marks
  73. Thomas Baldwin Marsh
  74. William E. Mclellin
  75. Daniel Sanborn Miles
  76. George Miller
  77. Isaac Morley
  78. John Murdock
  79. Noah Packard
  80. Hiram Page
  81. John Edward Page
  82. Edward Partridge
  83. David W. Patten
  84. Ziba Peterson
  85. William Wines Phelps
  86. Orson Pratt
  87. Parley P. Pratt
  88. Zera Pulsipher
  89. Charles C. Rich
  90. Willard Richards
  91. Sidney Rigdon
  92. Burr Riggs
  93. Samuel Jones Rolfe
  94. Marion G. Romney
  95. Shadrach Roundy
  96. Symonds Ryder
  97. Jacob Scott
  98. Lyman Royal Sherman
  99. Henry Garlie Sherwood
  100. Alvin Smith
  101. Don Carlos Smith
  102. Eden Smith
  103. Emma Hale Smith
  104. George A. Smith
  105. Hyrum Smith
  106. John Smith
  107. Joseph Smith Jr.
  108. Joseph Smith Sr.
  109. Joseph F. Smith
  110. Samuel Harrison Smith
  111. Sylvester Smith
  112. William Smith
  113. John Snider
  114. Erastus Snow
  115. Daniel Stanton
  116. Northrop Sweet
  117. Nathan Eldon Tanner
  118. John Taylor
  119. Ezra Thayre
  120. Robert Blashel Thompson
  121. Joseph H. Wakefield
  122. Micah Baldwin Welton
  123. Harvey G. Whitlock
  124. David Whitmer
  125. John Whitmer
  126. Peter Whitmer Jr.
  127. Peter Whitmer Sr.
  128. Newel K. Whitney
  129. Lyman Wight
  130. Frederick G. Williams
  131. Samuel Williams
  132. Calves Wilson
  133. Lewis Dunbar Wilson
  134. Wilford Woodruff
  135. Brigham Young
  136. Joseph Young

Early Non-Mormon Leaders with Wikipedia Entries who Impacted Mormon History

A

Charles Anthon (November 19, 1797 – July 29, 1867) was an American classical scholar, born in New York City. Charles Anthon is famous among members of the Latter Day Saint movement because of his interactions with Martin Harris concerning a fraction of Joseph Smith's translation of the Golden Plates, later known as the Anthon Transcript.

B

Lilburn Williams Boggs (December 14, 1796 – March 14, 1860) was the sixth Governor of Missouri from 1836 to 1840. He is now most widely remembered for his interactions with Joseph Smith and Porter Rockwell, and Missouri Executive Order 44, known by Mormons as the "Extermination Order"

President James Buchanan, Jr. (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th President of the United States from 1857–1861 and the last to be born in the 18th century. Taking the wildest rumors at face value and believing the Mormons to be in open rebellion against the United States, Buchanan sent the Army in November of that year to replace Brigham Young as Governor with the non-Mormon Alfred Cumming.

C

Abner Cole (17 August 1783 – 13 July 1835), also known by his pen name Obadiah Dogberry, Esq., was a 19th-century American newspaper editor. He is notable as one of the earliest critics of the spiritual claims of Joseph Smith, Jr., the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Alfred Cumming (1802–1873) was appointed governor of the Utah territory in 1858 replacing Brigham Young following the Utah War. Born in Augusta, Georgia and mayor of the city.

D

Alexander William Doniphan (July 9, 1808 – August 8, 1887) was a 19th century American soldier and political figure.

G

Egbert Bratt Grandin (March 30, 1806 – April 16, 1845) was a printer in Palmyra, New York, known for publishing the first edition of the Book of Mormon, a sacred text of the churches of the Latter Day Saint movement.

J

Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career United States Army officer, a Texas Army general, and a Confederate States general. He saw extensive combat during his military career, fighting actions in the Texas War of Independence, the Mexican-American War, the Utah War, as well as the American Civil War.

K

Thomas Kearns (April 11, 1862 - October 18, 1918) was a United States Senator from Utah from 1901 to 1905.

Thomas Leiper Kane (January 27, 1822 – December 26, 1883) was an American attorney, abolitionist, and military officer who was influential in the western migration of the Latter-day Saint movement and served as a Union Army colonel and general of volunteers in the American Civil War

R

Governor Thomas Reynolds was the succseesor to Governor Lilburn Bogs as the Governor of Missouri.

S

Thomas Coke Sharp (September 25, 1818 – April 9, 1894) was a prominent opponent of Joseph Smith, Jr. and the Latter Day Saints in Illinois in the 1840s. Sharp promoted his anti-Mormon views largely through the Warsaw Signal newspaper.

W

"Long" John Wentworth (March 5, 1815 – October 16, 1888) was the editor of the Chicago Democrat, a two-term mayor of Chicago, and a six-term member of the United States House of Representatives. Joseph Smith sent him a letter outlining the history of the church and it's beliefs or it's Articles of Faith.

Early Mormon Leaders with Wikipedia Entries

A

Elijah Abel (July 25, 1808 – December 25, 1885) was the first black elder and seventy in the Latter Day Saint movement, and one of the few black members in the early history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to receive the priesthood.

George Jones Adams (c. 1811–May 11, 1880) was the leader of a schismatic Latter Day Saint sect who led an ill-fated effort to establish a colony of Americans in Palestine.

James Adams (January 24, 1783 – August 11, 1843) was a nineteenth century Illinois lawyer and close friend of Mormon prophet Joseph Smith, Jr.

Hazen Aldrich (January 10, 1797 – 1873) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. After the death of Joseph Smith, Jr., Aldrich went on to lead a small denomination of Latter Day Saints known as the Brewsterites.

Richard Alldridge (1815-05-03 – 1896-02-14) was a Latter-day Saint hymn writer who wrote two hymns in the 1985 English edition of the hymnal of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. These are "Lord Accept Our True Devotion" and "We'll Sing All Hail To Jesus' Name".

Carl Christian Amussen (1825–1902), also referred to as Carl Christian Asmussen, and with Carl at times spelled Karl, was the first jeweler in Utah.

Milo Andrus (March 6, 1814 – June 19, 1893) was an early leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Sampson Avard (October 23, 1800 – April 15, 1869) was the leader of a band of Mormon vigilantes called the Danites, which existed in Missouri during the period of the 1838 Mormon War.

Daniel Avery (born 1 July 1798) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was a leader of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite) after the succession crisis of 1844.

B

Almon Whiting Babbitt (9 October 1812 – c. 7 September 1856) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement, a Mormon pioneer, and the first secretary and treasurer of the Territory of Utah

Rodney Badger (4 February 1823 – 29 April 1853) was the first Utah law enforcement officer to lose his life during the performance of his sworn duties. He died on April 29, 1853 trying to rescue a family whose wagon had overturned in the Weber River. He successfully rescued four children and their mother and died while trying to rescue two other children.

William James Barratt (25 January 1823 – 10 September 1889) was an English convert to Mormonism and became the first Latter Day Saint to live in Australia when he was sent there as a missionary of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. However, he ultimately apostatized from Mormonism.

John Cook Bennett (August 3, 1804 – August 5, 1867) was an American physician and a ranking and influential—but short-lived—leader of the Latter Day Saint movement, who acted as second in command to Joseph Smith, Jr. for a brief period in the early 1840s.

Ezra Taft Benson (February 22, 1811 – September 3, 1869) (commonly referred to as Ezra T. Benson to distinguish him from his great-grandson of the same name) was as an apostle and a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

John Milton Bernhisel (June 23, 1799 – September 28, 1881) was an American physician, politician and early member of the Latter-day Saint movement. He was a close friend and companion to both Joseph Smith, Jr. and Brigham Young. Bernhisel was the original delegate of the Utah Territory in the United States House of Representatives (1851–1859, 1861–1863) and acted as a member of the Council of Fifty of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Louis Alphonse Bertrand (January 8, 1808 – March 21, 1875), born John Francis Elias Flandin, was an early leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in France.

Titus Billings (March 25, 1793 – February 6, 1866) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement and a contemporary of both Joseph Smith and Brigham Young. He was one of the first converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Billings was present at many of the early events of the LDS church, and served as a church leader in Ohio, Missouri and Utah.

Thomas Biesinger (December 20, 1844 – May 9, 1931) was a German convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and a Mormon missionary to the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Biesinger was the first Mormon missionary to preach in the present-day Czech Republic and Hungary.

Francis Gladden Bishop (January 19, 1809 – November 30, 1864) was a minor leader in the Latter Day Saint movement after the 1844 succession crisis. Bishop claimed to be the rightful successor to Joseph Smith, Jr.; from the 1850s until his death, Bishop led a succession of small groups of Latter Day Saints and converts.

William Valentine Black (21 February 1832 – 1 April 1927) was a nineteenth century Utah pioneer, and one of the early settlers of Manti, Utah, Spring City, Rockville, and Deseret, Utah. He was also a close friend of Chief Kanosh the leader of the Pahvant band of the Ute Indians. He was also the first branch president of the LDS Church in Deseret, Utah.

John Farnum Boynton (September 20, 1811 – October 20, 1890) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an American geologist and inventor. He was one of the original members of the Latter Day Saint movement's Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Johann Theodore Brandley (December 7, 1851 – May 6, 1928) was a Mormon missionary and colonizer of Stirling, Alberta, Canada.

George Washington Brimhall (14 Nov., 1814-Sep. 30, 1895) was a politician in territorial Utah. He was the father of George H. Brimhall.

Jonathan Browning (October 22, 1805 – June 21, 1879) was an American inventor and gunmaker.

Seymour Brunson (September 18, 1798 – August 10, 1840) was an early Mormon convert. He is most noted since it was at a speech given at his funeral that Joseph Smith first presented the doctrine of Baptism for the Dead.

Ebenezer Bryce (November 17, 1830 – September 26, 1913) was a Mormon pioneer, best known as the person for whom Bryce Canyon National Park was named.

William Budge (May 1, 1828 – March 1, 1919) was a member of the Council of Fifty as well as the Idaho Legislature and was a Mormon mission president and stake president.

Thomas Bullock (December 23, 1816 – February 10, 1885) was a Mormon pioneer and a clerk in the Church Historian's Office of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Edward Bunker (August 1, 1822 – November 17, 1901) was a Mormon pioneer and community founder of Bunkerville, Nevada.

Robert Taylor Burton (October 25, 1821 – November 11, 1907) was a member of the presiding bishopric of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1874 until his death. He was also one of the principal officers in the Nauvoo Legion during its Utah reconstitution (including the Utah War) and led the territorial militia against the Morrisites during the 1862 Morrisite War.

Josiah Butterfield (March 13, 1795 – March 3, 1871) was an early Mormon leader and member of the Presidency of the Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

C

Reynolds Cahoon (April 30, 1790 – April 29, 1861) was an early leader in Latter Day Saint movement and later, in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was one of the inaugural members of the Council of Fifty, organized by Joseph Smith, Jr. in 1844.

John Thomas Caine (January 8, 1829 – September 20, 1911) was a delegate to the United States House of Representatives from the Territory of Utah.

David Orson Calder (June 18, 1823 – July 3, 1884) was a prominent early pioneer settler in Utah.

Anson Call (May 13, 1810 – August 31, 1890) was a Mormon pioneer and an early colonizer of many communities in Utah Territory and surrounding states.

Angus Munn Cannon (May 17, 1834 – June 7, 1915) was an early Latter Day Saint leader and pioneer.

George Quayle Cannon (January 11, 1827 – April 12, 1901) was an early member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), and served in the First Presidency under four successive presidents of the church: Brigham Young, John Taylor, Wilford Woodruff, and Lorenzo Snow.

George Edward Percy Careless (September 24, 1839 – March 5, 1932) was a prominent Latter-day Saint composer and conductor.

Albert Carrington (January 8, 1813 – September 19, 1889) born in Royalton, Vermont, was an apostle and member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and First Presidency in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was ordained as an apostle on July 3, 1870.

Duncan Spears Casper (December 8, 1824 – May 20, 1898) was an early Mormon pioneer and one of the first settlers of Holladay, Utah, the United States.

Welcome Chapman (July 24, 1805 – December 9, 1893) was an early Mormon leader born in Readsboro, Vermont. Chapman was the leader of the Mormon settlers in Manti, Utah, from 1854 to 1862, and helped broker peace between the settlers and Chief Wakara's tribe.

Carl Christian Anton Christensen (November 28, 1831 – July 3, 1912) was a Danish-American artist who is known for his paintings illustrating the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Of him it has been said that he "did more than any other person to capture the images of the history of Mormon migration to Utah and the life lived there"

Benjamin Lynn Clapp (August 19, 1814 – 1860) was an early Mormon leader and member of the First Seven Presidents of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Samuel Claridge (1828-1919) was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who was a prominent early settler of the Muddy River Valley in Nevada and also Thatcher, Arizona.

Sarah Marietta Kingsley Cleveland (born 20 October 1788) was the first counselor to Emma Smith in the presidency of the Relief Society from 1842 to 1844.

Hiram B. Clawson (Nov. 7, 1826–1912) was a Latter-day Saint businessman and Church leader in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Robert Clift, Jr. (January 4, 1824 – October 1859) was an American soldier and early settler in California. He was 3rd Lt. in Company C of the Mormon Battalion.

Harvey H. Cluff (1836–1916) was a business, civic and educational leader in late-19th-century Provo, Utah.

William Wallace Cluff (March 8, 1832 - August 21, 1915) was an American Latter-day Saint missionary and leader in the 19th Century, and a member of the Utah Territorial Legislature.

Oliver Hervy Pliny Cowdery (3 October 1806 – 3 March 1850) was, with Joseph Smith, Jr., a important participant in the formative period of the Latter Day Saint movement between 1829 and 1836, becoming one of the Three Witnesses of the Book of Mormon's golden plates, one of the first Latter Day Saint apostles, and the Second Elder of the church.

D

William H. Dame (born 1819) was the first mayor of Parowan, Utah, a member of the Utah Territorial Legislature and Commander of the Iron and Washington County Militia District. He was heavily involved in the Mountain Meadows massacre.

Daniel Coon Davis (February 23, 1804 – June 1, 1850) was the captain of Company E in the Mormon Battalion. He became an early leader of Davis County, Utah, which is named after him.

Edmund Durfee (Durfy) Sr. (October 3, 1788 – November 15, 1845) was an American settler and early member of the Latter Day Saint movement who is remembered as a martyr by Latter-day Saints

E

Ellis Eames (1809-1882) was the first mayor of Provo, Utah. Eames was born in Mentor, Lake County, Ohio. He joined the LDS Church in Jackson County, Missouri in 1834. He later resided in Clay County, Missouri and Nauvoo, Illinois.

Horace Sunderlin Eldredge (February 6, 1816 – September 6, 1888) was an early Mormon leader and member of the First Seven Presidents of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

F

Lorin Farr (July 25, 1820 – January 12, 1909) was a Mormon pioneer and the first mayor of Ogden, Utah.

William Jordan Flake (July 3, 1839 – August 10, 1932) was a prominent member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who helped settle parts of Arizona, and was imprisoned for polygamy.

Nathaniel Henry Felt (1816-1887) was a member of the Utah Territorial Legislature and a mid-level leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the 19th Century.

Joseph Fielding (March 26, 1797 – December 19, 1863) was an early leader of the Latter Day Saint movement. He served as the second president of the British Mission (1838–1840), coordinating the activities of missionaries in sections of the United Kingdom and parts of Europe. He was the brother of Mary Fielding, the second wife of Hyrum Smith, and an uncle of Joseph F. Smith, the sixth President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Hugh Findlay (Newmilns, Ayrshire, Scotland, June 9, 1822 – March 2, 1900 in Fish Haven, Idaho, USA) was one of the first two Mormon missionaries to enter India and initiated Mormon missionary work in the Shetland Islands.

William Fowler (May 9, 1830 – August 25, 1865) was the author of the popular Latter-day Saint hymn "We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet".

David Fullmer (July 7, 1803 – October 21, 1879) was an American politician, church leader, and farmer, born in Chillisquaque, Pennsylvania. He was the older brother of John S. Fullmer, another politician. Fullmer was a person of some importance in the early Latter Day Saint movement.

John Solomon Fullmer (July 21, 1807 – October 8, 1883), was an American politician and farmer, born in Huntington, Pennsylvania. He was the younger brother of David Fullmer, another politician.

G

Archibald Gardner (September 2, 1814 – February 8, 1902) was a 19th century pioneer and businessman who helped establish communities in Alvinston, Ontario, Canada, West Jordan, Utah and Star Valley, Wyoming based on flour mills and lumber mills. After 1858 he was a leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in a position that was held for 32 years.

Jacob Gates (May 9, 1811 – April 14, 1892) was an early Mormon leader and member of the First Seven Presidents of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

John C. Gaylord (July 12, 1797 – July 17, 1874) was an early Mormon leader and member of the Presidency of the Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Salmon Gee (October 16, 1792 – September 13, 1845) was an early Mormon leader and member of the Presidency of the Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

George Goddard (December 15, 1815 – January 12, 1899) was a Mormon pioneer and a leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

John Gould (11 May 1808 – 9 May 1851) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and is recognized by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as the first non-American person to serve as a general authority.

Oliver Granger (February 7, 1794 – August 27, 1841) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. He was the subject of one of the prophecies of movement founder Joseph Smith, Jr.

Sarah Melissa Granger Kimball (December 29, 1818 – December 1, 1898) was a 19th-century Mormon advocate for women's rights and early leader in the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Heber Jeddy Grant (November 22, 1856 – May 14, 1945) was the seventh president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Jedediah Morgan Grant (1816-02-21 – 1856-12-01) was a leader and an apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was member of the First Council of the Seventy from 1845 to 1854. He also served in the First Presidency under Church President Brigham Young from 1854 to 1856.

John Portineus Greene (3 September 1793 – 20 September 1844) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement.

Benjamin Franklin Grouard (1819–1894) was one of the earliest Latter Day Saint missionaries to the Society Islands, which now constitute French Polynesia.

Thomas Grover (July 22, 1807 – February 20, 1886) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement, polygamist, politician and pioneer.

Henry Grow (October 1, 1817 - November 4, 1891) was a Latter-day Saint ("Mormon") builder and civil engineer in pioneer-era Utah. His most notable achievement was aiding the construction of the Salt Lake Tabernacle on Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. Grow engineered the meeting hall's unique elongated dome roof.

Gudmund Gudmundson (Icelandic: Guðmundur Guðmundsson) (March 10, 1825 – September 21, 1883) was one of the first Icelanders to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and was among the first Mormon missionaries to preach in Iceland.

Zenas Hovey Gurley, Sr. (May 29, 1801 – August 28, 1871) was an important leader in the history of the Latter Day Saint movement. He led a branch of the church in Yellowstone, Wisconsin that affiliated with James J. Strang in the early years after the succession crisis, but he broke with Strang over the issue of plural marriage.

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Isaac Chauncey Haight(May 27, 1813 – September 8, 1886), an early convert to Mormonism, was a colonist of the American West remembered as a major conspirator of the Mountain Meadows massacre.

Jacob Vernon Hamblin (April 2, 1819 – August 31, 1886) was a Western pioneer, Mormon missionary, and diplomat to various Native American Tribes of the Southwest and Great Basin. During his life, he helped settle large areas of southern Utah and northern Arizona where he was seen as an honest broker between Mormon settlers and the Natives. He is sometimes referred to as the "Buckskin Apostle," or the "Apostle to the Lamanites."

Levi Ward Hancock (April 7, 1803 – June 10, 1882) was an early convert to Mormonism and was a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for nearly fifty years. He was also one of the witnesses of the Book of Commandments.

Abram Hatch (1830-1911). American Mormon pioneer and missionary and was a politicians in Utah Territory.

Martin Harris (May 18, 1783 – July 10, 1875) underwrote the first printing of The Book of Mormon and also served as one of Three Witnesses who testified that they had seen the Golden Plates from which Joseph Smith said the Book of Mormon had been translated.

Ephraim Knowlton Hanks (21 March 1826 – 9 June 1896) was a prominent member of the 19th-Century Latter Day Saint movement, a Mormon pioneer and a well known leader in the early settlement of Utah.

Peter Olsen Hansen (11 June 1818 – 9 August 1895) was the translator of the Book of Mormon into Danish.

Leonard Wilford Hardy (December 31, 1805 – July 31, 1884) was an early convert in the Latter Day Saint movement, a Mormon pioneer and a member of the presiding bishopric of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1856 until his death.

Appleton Milo Harmon (May 29, 1820 – February 27, 1877) was an early member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and a leading pioneer of the emigration to Salt Lake City and the settlement of Utah Territory.

Henry Harriman (9 June 1804 – 17 May 1891) was one of the First Seven Presidents of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1838 until his death. The town of Herriman, Utah was named after him.

Granville Hedrick (September 2, 1814 – August 22, 1881) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement after the 1844 succession crisis. In 1863, Hedrick became the founding leader of the Church of Christ (Temple Lot), which is one of many churches that claim to be a continuation of the Church of Christ founded by Joseph Smith, Jr. in 1830.

Joseph L. Heywood (1815-1910) was a local leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the 19th century, and the founder of Nephi, Utah.

William Adams Hickman, also known as "Wild Bill" Hickman (April 16, 1815 – August 21, 1883), was a frontiersman. He also served as a representative to the Utah Territorial Legislature.

Elias Higbee (October 23, 1795 – June 8, 1843) was an associate of Joseph Smith, Jr., a leader of the Danites, and an official historian and recorder in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

George M. Hinkle (1801–1861) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement.

August Joel Höglund (September 14, 1855 – December 12, 1926) was a Swedish convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was the first Mormon missionary to preach in Russia.

John Holladay (March 10, 1798-December 31, 1861)is a founder and namesake of the settlement of Holladay's Burg, Utah which became Holladay, Utah. He was an early pioneer in the western US in Colorado, Utah, and California.

William Henry Hooper (December 25, 1813 – December 30, 1882) was a U.S. Congressional delegate from the Territory of Utah.

Henry Howell (March 6, 1828 – November 24, 1896) was a Mormon pioneer and one of the founders of Fish Haven, Idaho, USA.

Jefferson Hunt (January 20, 1803 – May 11, 1879) was a U.S. western pioneer, soldier, and politician. He was a captain in the Mormon Battalion, brigadier general in the California State Militia, a California State Assemblyman, and a representative to the Utah Territorial Legislature.

Edward Hunter (June 22, 1793 – 16 October 1883) was the third Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1851 until his death. He served as Presiding Bishop longer than any other person in the history of the LDS Church.

Dimick Baker Huntington (May 26, 1808 – February 1, 1879) was a leading Indian interpreter in early Utah Territory. He also commissioned the Church History Panorama of C. C. A. Christensen to use in his presentations of the gospel to the Native Americans.

William Huntington (March 28, 1784 – August 19, 1846) was an early leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), most prominently during the time the Mormon pioneers were moving from Nauvoo, Illinois to Salt Lake City.

Philastus Hurlbut (February 3, 1809 – June 16, 1883) was a 19th-century Latter Day Saint dissenter. Hurlbut is best known for his collection of affidavits which in 1834 were published in Eber D. Howe’s anti-Mormon book Mormonism Unvailed [sic]. The purpose of these affidavits was to produce damaging evidence related to the character of Joseph Smith, Jr. Hurlbut had previously been excommunicated from the Latter Day Saint church on charges of sexual immorality.

Orson Hyde (January 8, 1805 – November 28, 1878) was a leader in the early Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from 1847 to 1875 and was a missionary of the LDS Church in the United States, Europe, and the Ottoman Empire.

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Anthony Woodward Ivins (September 16, 1852 – September 23, 1934) born in Toms River, New Jersey, was a high-ranking official of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

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Jane Elizabeth Manning James (September 22, 1822 – April 16, 1908) was an early African American member of the Latter Day Saint movement who lived with Joseph Smith, Jr. and his family for a time in Nauvoo, Illinois. James was the first documented African American woman to come to the Utah Territory as a Mormon pioneer.

John Jaques (January 7, 1827 – June 1, 1900) was a Latter Day Saint hymnwriter and missionary and an Assistant Church Historian for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Andrew Jenson, born Anders Jensen, (11 December 1850 – 18 November 1941) was a Danish immigrant to the United States who acted as an Assistant Church Historian of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) for much of the early-twentieth century. Jenson also served the church as president of the Scandinavian Mission.

Benjamin Franklin Johnson (July 28, 1818 – November 18, 1905) was an early member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and a member of the Council of Fifty.

Joel Hills Johnson (March 23, 1802 – September 24, 1883) was a Latter-day Saint (LDS) missionary and hymn writer, most famous as the author of "High on the Mountain Top" (hymn #5 in the 1985 LDS hymnbook, English edition). Johnson was also the founder of Enoch, Utah.

Joseph Ellis Johnson (April 28, 1817 – December 17, 1882) was an American Mormon activist as well as being a newspaper proprietor, councilor, and businessman who at various times had several enterprises across several states.

Luke Samuel Johnson (November 3, 1807 – December 9, 1861) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from 1835 to 1838. He served in the Quorum with his younger brother, Lyman E. Johnson and Orson Hyde, his brother-in-law.

Lyman Eugene Johnson (October 24, 1811 – December 20, 1859) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He broke with Joseph Smith, Jr. and Sidney Rigdon during the 1837-38 period when schism divided the early Church. He later became a successful pioneer lawyer in Iowa and was one of the town fathers of Keokuk, Iowa.

Dan Jones (August 4, 1810 – January 3, 1862) (often referred to as Captain Dan Jones) was an influential Welsh missionary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Jones is well known for having heard the "final prophecy" of Joseph Smith, Jr., namely, that Jones would fulfill a mission to Wales before he died.

Daniel Webster Jones (August 26, 1830 - April 20, 1915) was an American and Mormon pioneer. He was the leader of the group that colonized what eventually became Mesa, Arizona, made the first translation of selections of The Book of Mormon into Spanish, led the first Mormon missionary expedition into Mexico, dealt frequently with the American Indians, and was the leader of the group that heroically wintered at Devil's Gate during the rescue of the stranded handcart companies in 1856.

Samuel S. Jones (1837-1923) was mayor of Provo, Utah from 1898-1899.

John Kennedy, Jr. (Oct. 12, 1847- ) was the bishop of the Argyle Ward in Argyle, Utah during its entire existence, a member of the Utah State Legislature, the Rich County Commission and a justice of the peace.

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Joseph Knight, Sr. (November 26, 1772 – February 2, 1847) was a close associate of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement, and provided significant material support to Smith's translation and publication of the Book of Mormon.

Newel Knight(September 13, 1800 – January 11, 1847) was a close friend of Joseph Smith, Jr. and one of the first branch presidents in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Vinson Knight (March 14, 1804 - July 31, 1842) was an early leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He served as a counselor in the Bishopric in Kirtland, Ohio from 1835 to 1838, then as Bishop in Adam-ondi-Ahman in Daviess County, Missouri from 1838 to 1839, and finally as Bishop of the Lower Ward in Nauvoo. He served as Bishop in Nauvoo until his sudden death at age 38 in 1842.

Kanosh (1821 – December 24, 1884) was a nineteenth century leader of the Pahvant band of the Ute Indians.

Heber Chase Kimball (June 14, 1801 – June 22, 1868) was a leader in the early Latter Day Saint movement. He served as one of the original twelve apostles in the early Mormon church, and as first counselor to Brigham Young in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death.

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William Law (8 September 1809 – 5 August 1892) was an important figure in the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement, holding a position in the early church's First Presidency under Joseph Smith, Jr. Law was later excommunicated from the church and was the founder of the short-lived True Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Christopher Layton (March 8, 1821 – August 7, 1898) was a Mormon colonizer and Patriarch who founded the cities of Kaysville, Utah, Layton, Utah, and Thatcher, Arizona. Layton, Utah is named after him.

Theodore Belden Lewis (November 18, 1843 – July 20, 1899) was an early Mormon leader who was called and sustained to the Presidency of the Seventy, but never served in the office and was not set apart.

Jesse Carter Little (26 September 1815 – 26 December 1893) was a Mormon pioneer and a member of the presiding bishopric of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Cornelius Peter Lott (September 22, 1798 – July 6, 1850) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement, father of one of Joseph Smith's plural wives, a member of the Council of Fifty and a Danite leader.

Elam Luddington, Jr. (also spelled Ludington) (November 23, 1806 – March 22, 1893) was a Mormon pioneer and was the first missionary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) to preach in Thailand.

Anthon Henrik Lund (15 May 1844 – 2 March 1921) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and a prominent Utah leader.

Amasa Mason Lyman (March 30, 1813 – February 4, 1877) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was an apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was also a counselor in the First Presidency to founder and president of the church Joseph Smith, Jr.

Francis Marion Lyman (12 January 1840 – 18 November 1916) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was the President of the Quorum from 1903 until his death.

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Thomas Baldwin Marsh (November 1, 1799 – January 1866) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Karl Gottfried Maeser (January 16, 1828 – February 15, 1901) was a prominent Utah educator and a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He is most famous for having served 16 years as principal of Brigham Young Academy, now Brigham Young University (BYU), where he is seen as the true founder of the institution.

George Manwaring (March 19, 1854 – July 7, 1889) was a hymnwriter of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (sometimes called the LDS or Mormon Church). Some of his works have become favorite LDS hymns and are found in the 1985 LDS Church hymnal.

Abraham Marchant (March 17, 1816 – October 6, 1881) was an early Mormon leader and one of the founders of Peoa, Utah.

William Marks (November 15, 1792 – May 22, 1872) was a leader in the early days of the Latter Day Saint movement and was a member of the First Presidency in the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Marks is mentioned in the Doctrine and Covenants in sections 117 and 124 of the LDS Church edition and in section 115 of the Community of Christ edition.

Peter Maughan (May 7, 1811 – April 24, 1871) was an early Mormon pioneer who settled the Cache Valley of Utah under the direction of Brigham Young.

John Daniel Thompson McAllister (February 19, 1827 – January 21, 1910) was a 19th century regional leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He is possibly most notable for having written the "Hand Cart Song".

Martha McBride Knight Smith Kimball (March 17, 1805 – November 20, 1901)] was a founding member of the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which was organized on her 37th birthday. She was married to early LDS Church leader Vinson Knight, by whom she had seven children. In 1842 she was sealed as a plural wife to Joseph Smith, Jr. In January 1846 she was married polygamously to Heber C. Kimball, by whom she had one child, a son, who was born at Winter Quarters and died there as an infant. She later emigrated to Utah, where she resided in various locations across the territory until her death at age 96. She was a witness to, and in some instances a key participant in, some of the pivotal events in early LDS Church history.

William Earl M'Lellin (January 18, 1806 – April 24, 1883) (often modernized to McLellin) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. One of the original members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, M'Lellin later broke with church founder, Joseph Smith, Jr.

Marriner Wood Merrill (25 September 1832 – 6 February 1906) born in Sackville, New Brunswick, was a pioneering settler of Cache Valley and a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

John Hamilton Morgan (August 8, 1842 – August 14, 1894), was an early educator in Utah Territory, an official of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), and a politician.

Daniel Sanborn Miles (July 23, 1772 – October 12, 1845) was an early Mormon leader and member of the Presidency of the Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

George Miller (November 25, 1794 – 1856) was a prominent convert in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the third ordained bishop in the Latter Day Saint church.

Louis Frederick Moench (July 29, 1847 – April 25, 1916) was the founder of Weber Stake Academy and the father of education in Northern Utah, on the same level of importance as John R. Park and Karl G. Maeser to the development of education in Utah.

Isaac Morley (March 11, 1786 – June 24, 1865) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement and a contemporary of both Joseph Smith and Brigham Young. He was one of the first converts to Smith's Church of Christ. Morley was present at many of the early events of the Latter Day Saint movement, and served as a church leader in Ohio, Missouri and Utah Territory.

John Murdock (July 15, 1792 – December 23, 1871) was an early convert to the Latter Day Saint movement and was a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He is mentioned twice in the Doctrine and Covenants. He was also the first mission president for the LDS Church in Australia.

John Riggs Murdock (September 13, 1826 – November 12, 1913) was the leader of the most Down-and-Back companies in Latter-day Saint history. The son of John Murdock, he not only lead several down and back companies but also served several missions in the eastern United States. He was also a prominent leader of the church in Beaver, Utah.

Joseph Stacy Murdock (June 26, 1822 – February 14, 1899) was an American colonizer, leader, and Latter-day Saint hymn writer. He wrote the words to "Come Listen to a Prophet's Voice.

Amos Milton Musser (May 20, 1830 – September 24, 1909) was a Mormon pioneer who served in many church and community roles, including as an Assistant Church Historian of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1902 until his death.

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Jonatana Napela or Jonathan Hawaii Napela (first name also spelled Lohatana, full name Napelakapuonamahanaonaleleonalani) (1813–1879) was one of the earliest Latter-day Saint converts in Hawai'i. He helped translate the Book of Mormon into Hawaiian with George Q. Cannon.

Alexander Neibaur (8 January 1808 – 15 December 1883) was one of the first Jewish persons to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was an educated man, fluent in 7 languages, and was a skilled dentist in his time, among the first dentists to practice in Utah.

Charles Wilson Nibley possible match (5 February 1849 – 11 December 1931) was the fifth presiding bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) between 1907 and 1925 and a member of the church's First Presidency from 1925 until his death.

Leonard John Nuttall (July 6, 1834 – February 25, 1905) was a private secretary for Brigham Young, John Taylor, and Wilford Woodruff and was a member of the Council of Fifty who kept a detailed journal of the early history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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Roger Orton (c. 1799 – c. 1851) was an early Mormon leader and non-functioning member of the First Seven Presidents of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

George Osmond (May 23, 1836 - ) was a leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, as well as a judge and state senator in Wyoming.

George Martin Ottinger (1833-1917) was a 19th-century artist, educator and actor in Utah.

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John Pack (May 20, 1809 – April 4, 1885) was a member of the Council of Fifty and a missionary in the early days of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Hiram Page (1800 – August 12, 1852) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement and one of the Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon's Golden Plates.

John Edward Page (February 25, 1799 – October 14, 1867) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement.

John Rockey Park (May 7, 1833 – September 29, 1900) was a prominent educator in the Territory and State of Utah in the late 19th century, and in many ways was the intellectual father of the University of Utah.

Warren Parrish (also Warren Parish) (1803–1887) was a leader in the early Latter Day Saint or Mormonism movement. Parrish held a number of positions of responsibility, including that of scribe to church president Joseph Smith Jr. Parrish and other leaders became disillusioned with Smith after the failure of the Kirtland Safety Society and left the Mormon church.

John Parry Sr. (February 10, 1789 – January 13, 1868) was an early Welsh convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and was the first musical conductor of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

Edward Partridge (August 27, 1793 – May 27, 1840) was the grandson of Massachusetts Congressman Oliver Partridge, Esq., and a member of a family noted for commercial, social, political, and military leadership in Western Massachusetts

Ralph Partington (March 16, 1806 – March 7, 1873) was a Mormon pioneer.

David Wyman Patten (sometimes referred to as David Warren Patten) (November 14, 1799 – October 25, 1838) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He was killed at the Battle of Crooked River and is one of the most celebrated martyrs of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Phoebe Ann Patten (also spelled as Phoebe Anne Babcock Patten, Ann Patten, and Phoebe Ann Patten Bently) was an early member and missionary of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, as well as a caretaker during the 1838 Mormon War and wife of early church leader and apostle David W. Patten.

Mary Goble Pay (1843–1913) was an early settler of both Nephi, Utah and Leamington, Utah.

Charles William Penrose (4 February 1832 – 16 May 1925) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from July 7, 1904. Penrose was also a member of the First Presidency of the church under Church Presidents Joseph F. Smith and Heber J. Grant from 1911 until his death.

Phoebe Ann Patten (also spelled as Phoebe Anne Babcock Patten, Ann Patten, and Phoebe Ann Patten Bently) was an early member and missionary of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, as well as a caretaker during the 1838 Mormon War and wife of early church leader and apostle David W. Patten.

Hans F. Petersen (1821–1882) was the first Latter-day Saint missionary to serve in Norway.

Hans Henry Petersen (25 December 1835-18 December 1909) was a Latter-day Saint hymnwriter. His most notable work is the hymn "Secret Prayer".

Canute Peterson (also Knud Peterson) (May 13, 1824 – October 14, 1902) was a Mormon pioneer settler of Utah Territory and was a leader in LDS Church.

Charles Sreeve Peterson (July 28, 1818 – September 26, 1889) was an early Mormon leader who was the first settler of Utah's Morgan Valley, a member of the Utah Territorial Legislature, and one of the first settlers in the Mormon colonies in Mexico.

Ziba Peterson (died 1849) was an early American Latter Day Saint best known as one of the four initial missionaries sent by Joseph Smith in 1830 to preach to Native Americans in Indian Territory

William Wines Phelps (February 17, 1792 – March 7, 1872) was an early leader of the Latter Day Saint movement. He was an assistant president of the church in Missouri, scribe to Joseph Smith, Jr., and a church printer, editor, and song-writer.

William Hill Pitt (August 16, 1813 – February 21, 1873) was a prominent bandleader in the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. His band, known as the Nauvoo Brass Band, was the main band in Nauvoo, Illinois, and played an important role in the crossing of Iowa during the Mormon pioneer trek.

Chief Pocatello (1815–October 1884) was a leader of the Shoshone, a Native American people in western North America. He led attacks against early settlers during a time of increasing strife between emigrants and Native Americans. After making peace with the United States, he moved his people to their present reservation in Idaho and led the Shoshone during their struggle to survive following their relocation. The city of Pocatello, Idaho is named in his honor.

Arnold Potter (January 11, 1804 – April 2, 1872) was a self-declared Messiah and a leader of a schismatic sect in Latter Day Saint movement. Potter referred to himself as Potter Christ.

Addison Pratt (1802-02-21 – 1872-10-14) was an early Latter-day Saint convert and missionary. Pratt preached in French Polynesia from 1844 to 1848 and from 1850 to 1852, and is recognized by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as the first Mormon missionary to preach in a language other than English.

Louisa Barnes Pratt (Nov. 10, 1802-1880) was a prominent advocate for women's vote and other related causes in the 19th century as well as a Latter-day Saint missionry.

Orson Pratt (September 19, 1811 – October 3, 1881) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of Twelve Apostles. He was born in Hartford, New York, USA, the son of Jared and Charity Dickenson Pratt.

Parley Parker Pratt (12 April 1807 – 13 May 1857) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from 1835 until his murder in 1857.

Sarah Sarah Marinda Bates Pratt (February 2, 1817 – December 25, 1888) was the first wife of Mormon Apostle and polygamist Orson Pratt and a later a critic of Mormon polygamy. She was a founder of the Anti-Polygamy Society in Salt Lake City and called herself a Mormon apostate.

William Bowker Preston (24 November 1830 – 2 August 1908) was the fourth Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) between 1884 and 1907.

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Enoch Reese (1813–1876) was an early leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, member of the Utah Territorial Legislature, and early Nevada settler.

George Reynolds (January 1, 1842 – August 9, 1909) was a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), a longtime secretary to the First Presidency of the LDS Church, and a party to the 1878 United States Supreme Court case Reynolds v. United States, the first freedom of religion case to issue from that court.

Charles Coulson Rich (August 21, 1809 – November 17, 1883) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and served as an apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Leonard Rich (1800–1868) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and one of the inaugural seven Presidents of the Seventy.

Franklin Dewey Richards (April 2, 1821 – December 9, 1899) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Franklin Snyder Richards (June 20, 1849 – September 4, 1934) was the general counsel for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon or LDS Church) in the late 19th century and early 20th century. He was closely connected with the defense against charges of polygamy of many leading LDS Church figures.

Jane S. Richards (1823-1912) was a counselor to Zina D. H. Young in the General Relief Society Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1888-1901.

Levi Richards (April 14, 1799 – June 18, 1876) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was a member of the Council of Fifty and Anointed Quorum and served as a physician for movement founder Joseph Smith, Jr. and others during the years the Latter Day Saints were established in Nauvoo, Illinois. Richards was an older brother of church apostle Willard Richards.

Phinehas Howe Richards (November 15, 1788 – November 25, 1874) was an early leader in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and in Utah Territory.

Samuel W. Richards (1824-1909) was a religious and political leader in 19th-century Utah and in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Willard Richards (June 24, 1804 – March 11, 1854) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and served as Second Counselor in the First Presidency to church president Brigham Young in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1847 until his death.

Darwin Charles Richardson (June 29, 1812 – November 13, 1860) was an early convert to the Latter Day Saint movement, a Mormon pioneer, and was among the first Mormon missionaries to preach on the island of Jamaica.

Joel Ricks (February 18, 1804 – December 15, 1888) was a Mormon Pioneer and community leader who helped settled the Salt Lake Valley and Cache Valley, Utah. He was the father of Thomas E. Ricks.

Thomas Edwin Ricks (July 21, 1828 – September 28, 1901) was a prominent Mormon pioneer, a community leader, and a settler of the western United States.

Sidney Rigdon (19 February 1793 – 14 July 1876) was an important figure in the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement. Rigdon's influence over the early years of the movement is considered by many historians to have been nearly as strong as that of church founder Joseph Smith Jr.

William Robbins (July 14, 1848–1933) was an early settler of the Curlew Valley of Utah and Idaho. He was a veteran of the American Civil War and assisted in the building of the transcontinental railroad.

[B. H. Roberts http://www.geni.com/people/B-H-Roberts/6000000000867586555] (March 13, 1857 – September 27, 1933). Mormon leader, historian, and politician who published a six-volume history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and was denied a seat as a member of United States Congress because of his practice of plural marriage.

George W. Robinson (May 14, 1814 – February 10, 1878) was the first secretary to the First Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was also a Danite leader and an official church recorder in the 1830s and was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the Rigdonite church established in 1845.

Orrin Porter Rockwell (June 28, 1813, or June 25, 1815 – June 9, 1878) was a figure of the Wild West period of American History and a law man in the Utah Territory.

Albert Perry Rockwood (June 5, 1805 – November 25, 1879) (also referred to as A. P. Rockwood) was an early Mormon leader and member of the First Seven Presidents of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Morris David Rosenbaum (11 July 1831 – 10 August 1885) was a prominent businessman in early Utah and one of the few Jewish people to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) during the 19th century.

Isaac Russell possible match (April 13, 1807 – September 25, 1844) was a leader in the early Latter Day Saint movement. Russell held a number of positions of responsibility, including being one of the first missionaries to England, with Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, Orson Hyde, and Joseph Fielding. He also organized the Alston Branch in 1837

Joseph Russell (August 17, 1786 – March 10, 1855) was a Scottish-born businessman and shipbuilder in New Brunswick.

S

Chief Sagwitch , his name meant "Orator", (1822– March 20, 1887) was born in 1822 on the lower Bear River (in today's Box Elder County, Utah). He was a nineteenth century chieftain of a band of Northwestern Shoshone that converted to Mormonism. His group were the ones killed in the Bear River Massacre. Sagwitch himself was injured in the massacre but survived.

Robert Sands (April 15, 1828 – December 7, 1872) was the first conductor of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir after the building of the Salt Lake Tabernacle on Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. Prior to Sands taking over as conductor, the choir was led by Charles J. Thomas and performed in the "Old Tabernacle" which was also on Temple Square.

Charles Roscoe Savage (August 16, 1832 – February 4, 1909) was a British-born landscape and portrait photographer who produced images of the American West. He is best known for his 1869 photographs of the linking of the first transcontinental railroad

Paul August Schettler (August 13, 1827 – November 3, 1884) was a 19th century Latter-day Saint leader and interpreter.

John Sharp (9 November 1820 – 23 December 1891) was a 19th-century leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Utah Territory. Sharp was the LDS Church's representative in negotiations regarding the construction of the First Transcontinental Railroad through Utah Territory. He represented the LDS Church and its president, Brigham Young, at the driving of the final golden spike of the railroad on 10 May 1869 at Promontory Summit, Utah.

Patty Bartlett Sessions (February 4, 1795 – December 14, 1892) was a Mormon midwife. She was one of the wives of Joseph Smith, Jr. while still married to her first husband, David Sessions. She was the mother of Perrigrine Sessions, founder of Bountiful, Utah. She is best known for her diaries.

Lyman Royal Sherman (22 May 1804 – January or February 1839) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement, an inaugural member of the Seven Presidents of the Seventy, and was called to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles but died before being informed and ordained.

Ellis Reynolds Shipp (January 20, 1847 – January 31, 1939) was one of the first female doctors in Utah. She founded The School of Nursing and Obstetrics in 1879, and was on the board of the Deseret Hospital Association.

Edward Lennox Sloan (1830–1874) was a Latter-day Saint editor and publisher. He also was the arranger of the text of the hymn "For the Strength of the Hills" into the version currently contained in the hymnal of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Janne M. Sjödahl (1853-1939) was a Swedish convert to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and was the author of influential commentaries on LDS Church scriptures. Sjödahl was among the first commentators to advance a "limited geography model" for the theorized geography of the Book of Mormon.

James Sloan (October 28, 1792 – October 24, 1886) was an official historian and recorder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, a secretary to Joseph Smith, Jr., and one of the first Mormon settlers in Nauvoo, Illinois.

Bathsheba Wilson Bigler Smith (3 May 1822 – 20 September 1910) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement. She was the fourth general president of the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), a matron of the Salt Lake Temple, a member of the Board of Directors of Deseret Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah, and a leader in the western United States woman's suffrage movement.

Don Carlos Smith (March 25, 1816–August 7, 1841) was the youngest brother of Joseph Smith, Jr. and a leader, missionary, and periodical editor in the early days of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Elias Smith (September 6, 1804 – June 24, 1888) was one of the early leaders in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Emma Hale Smith Bidamon (July 10, 1804 – April 30, 1879) was married to Joseph Smith, Jr., until his death in 1844, and was an early leader of the Latter Day Saint movement, during Joseph Smith's lifetime and afterward as a member of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (RLDS, now the Community of Christ). She was also named in 1842 as the inaugural president of the Ladies' Relief Society of Nauvoo, a women's service organization.

John Smith (July 16, 1781 – May 23, 1854), known as Uncle John, was an early leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Smith was the younger brother of Joseph Smith, Sr., uncle of Joseph Smith, Jr. and Hyrum Smith, father of George A. Smith, grandfather of John Henry Smith, and great-grandfather of George Albert Smith.

John Henry Smith (September 18, 1848 – October 13, 1911) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was a prominent politician in Utah and played an important role in the process whereby Utah made the transition from a territory to a state of the United States.

George Albert Smith (June 26, 1817 – September 1, 1875) (commonly known as George A. Smith to distinguish him from his grandson of the same name) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and served in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and as a member of the church's First Presidency.

Hyrum Smith (February 9, 1800 – June 27, 1844) was the older brother of Joseph Smith, Jr. and a leader in the early Latter Day Saint movement.

Joseph Smith Sr. (July 12, 1771 – September 14, 1840) was the father of Joseph Smith, Jr., the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. Joseph Sr. was also one of the Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon.

Lot Smith (May 15, 1830 – June 21, 1892) was a Mormon pioneer and American frontiersman.

Lucy Mack Smith (July 8, 1775 – May 14, 1856) was the mother of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. She is most noted for writing an award-winning memoir: Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith, the Prophet, and His Progenitors for Many Generations. She was an important leader of the movement during the life of Joseph.

Mary Fielding Smith Kimball (July 21, 1801 – September 21, 1852) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement, the second wife of LDS Church leader Hyrum Smith and the mother of Joseph F. Smith.

Samuel Harrison Smith (13 March 1808 – 30 July 1844)] was one of the younger brothers of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. Samuel was a leader in his own right and a successful missionary. Smith is commonly regarded as the first Latter Day Saint missionary following the organization of the Church of Christ by his brother Joseph. One of the Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon's golden plates, Samuel Smith remained devoted to his brother and his church throughout his life.

Sylvester Smith (March 28, 1806 – February 22, 1880) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and one of the inaugural seven Presidents of the Seventy.

William Smith (also found as William B. Smith) (March 13, 1811 – November 13, 1893) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and one of the original members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

William Reed Smith (11 August 1826 – 15 January 1896) was a Utah territorial politician and a leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Utah Territory.

Abraham Owen Smoot (February 17, 1815–March 22, 1895) was a Mormon pioneer, the second mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah, mayor of Provo, Utah, and an early supporter of Brigham Young Academy (later called Brigham Young University)

Eliza Roxcy Snow Young (January 21, 1804 – December 5, 1887) was one of the most celebrated Latter-day Saint women of the nineteenth century. A renowned poet, she chronicled history, celebrated nature and relationships, and expounded scripture and doctrine.

Erastus Fairbanks Snow (November 9, 1818 – May 27, 1888), born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1849 to 1888. Snow was also a leading figure in Mormon colonization of Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico.

Lorenzo Snow (April 3, 1814 – October 10, 1901) was the fifth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1898 to his death. Snow was the last president of the LDS Church in the nineteenth century.

Zerubbabel Snow (March 29, 1809 – September 27, 1888) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement, a Mormon pioneer, and an Attorney General of the Territory of Utah.

Daniel Spencer (July 20, 1794 – December 8, 1868) was the last mayor of Nauvoo, Illinois prior to the revocation of its first charter.

Orson Spencer (March 14, 1802 – October 15, 1855) was a prolific writer and prominent member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He served in several highly visible positions within the church and left an extensive legacy of theological writings. Orson Spencer is one of the examples William Mulder cites of highly educated people becoming Mormons during the time of Joseph Smith, Jr.

Edward Stevenson (May 1, 1820 – January 27, 1897) was a prominent Mormon missionary of the 19th century. He also served as a general authority in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) as one of the seven presidents of the Seventy.

Hosea Stout (September 18, 1810 – March 2, 1889) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement, a Mormon pioneer, and a lawyer and politician in Utah Territory.

James Jesse Strang (March 21, 1813 – July 9, 1856) was an American religious leader, politician and self-proclaimed monarch who founded the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite).

T

James E. Talmage (September 21, 1862 – July 27, 1933). Author. Member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1911 until his death in 1933.

Agnes Taylor Rich Hoagland Schwartz (October 2, 1821 – December 11, 1911) was a Mormon pioneer who played a key role in helping her brother, LDS Church president John Taylor, evade authorities during the federal crackdown on polygamy in the mid-1880s.

Anstis Elmina Shepard Taylor(September 12, 1830 – December 6, 1904) was the first general president of what is today the Young Women organization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and was a founding member of the National Council of Women.

John Taylor (November 1, 1808 – July 25, 1887) was the third president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1880 to 1887.

John Whittaker Taylor (May 15, 1858 – October 10, 1916) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and was the son of John Taylor, the third president of the church. While he was an apostle, he was excommunicated from the LDS Church for opposing the church's abandonment of plural marriage.

Joseph Edward Taylor (1830–1913) was a member of the Utah House of Representatives and the leading Sexton in Salt Lake City.

Margaret Young Taylor (24 April 1837 – 3 May 1919) was a member of the inaugural general presidency of what is today the Young Women organization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1880 to 1887. She was married to John Taylor, a president of the LDS Church.

William Whitaker Taylor (September 11, 1853 – August 1, 1884) was a member of the Utah Territorial Legislature, member of the Presidency of the Seventy in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), and a son of LDS Church president John Taylor.

George Teasdale (8 December 1831 – 9 June 1907) born in London, England, was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Moses Thatcher (2 February 1842 – 21 August 1909) was an apostle and a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Ezra Thayre (also spelled Thayer) (October 14, 1791–?) was an early convert and leader in the Latter Day Saint movement.

Charles John Thomas (November 20, 1832 – March 31, 1919) was the director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir for part of the 1860s, and was involved in several other musical endeavors in early Utah.

Robert Blashel Thompson (October 1, 1811 – August 27, 1841) was an associate of Joseph Smith, Jr., a Danite and leader in the Latter Day Saint movement, and an official historian of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Tio-van-du-ah (died 1863), who was often called Chief Snag, was a Shoshoni Chief in what is today known as the Lemhi Valley of Idaho. This area was so named by Mormon missionaries who established Fort Limhi in the area in 1855. Tio-van-du-ah joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints along with about 100 of his fellow Shoshoni.

Joseph Toronto (born Giuseppe Taranto) (June 25, 1818 – July 6, 1883) was the first Italian convert to the Latter Day Saint movement and was one of the first missionaries of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in Italy.

Tuba (also Toova or Tuvi) (c. 1810 – 1887) was a Hopi leader in the late 19th century. Tuba was the headman of the small Hopi village of Moencopi, roughly fifty miles west of the main villages on the Hopi mesas. However, he apparently was an important person in the village of Oraibi as well. Eventually, Tuba joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and later received his endowment in the St. George Utah Temple. Tuba City, Arizona was named in his honor.

Edward Wheelock Tullidge (September 30, 1829 – May 21, 1894) was a literary critic, newspaper editor, playwright, and historian of Utah Territory.

John Elliott Tullidge, Sr. (November 29, 1806 – January 17, 1873) was the first music critic in Utah Territory and was a Latter Day Saint musician and hymnwriter.

Tutsegabit was a 19th century leader of the Piedes bands of the Paiute tribe. In 1857 Tutsegabit was the chief of six bands of Piedes.

U

David King Udall, Sr. (September 7, 1851 – February 18, 1938) was a representative to the Arizona Territorial Legislature and the founder of the Udall political family. His great-grandsons Mark and Tom currently represent the Colorado and New Mexico in the United States Senate, respectively.

V

John Van Cott (September 7, 1814 – February 18, 1883) was a prominent member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints serving as a member of the Quorum of the Seventy, as one of the Seven Presidents of the Seventy, and also as president of the Scandinavian Mission.

William Van Orden (November 15, 1804 - August 1844) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint Movement. He was born in New York where he joined the church founded by Joseph Smith Jr.. He married Julia Ann Haight and later moved to Nauvoo, Illinois.

W

Chief Colorow Ignacio Ouray Walkara (aka Wakara or Walker) (ca. 1808 - 1855) was a Native American leader of a Ute Timpanogo band, with a reputation as a diplomat, horseman and warrior, and a military leader in the Walker War.

Charles L. Walker (1832–1904) was a Latter-day Saint hymnwriter, most noted for having written the words to the hymn "Dearest Children, God is Near You".

Luman Walter (c. 1789 – June 2, 1860) is known for his connection with the family of Joseph Smith, Jr., the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement.

Chief Washakie (c. 1798 – February 20, 1900) was a renowned warrior first mentioned in 1840 in the written record of the American fur trapper, Osborne Russell. In 1851, at the urging of trapper Jim Bridger, Washakie led a band of Shoshones to the council meetings of the Treaty of Fort Laramie (1851). Essentially from that time until his death, he was considered the head of the Eastern Shoshones by the representatives of the United States government.

George Darling Watt (May 12, 1812 – October 24, 1881) was the first convert to Mormonism baptized in the British Isles. As a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), Watt was a secretary to Brigham Young, the primary editor of the Journal of Discourses and the primary inventor of the Deseret Alphabet.

William Weeks (March 11, 1813 – March 8, 1900), was the first church architect of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and is best known as the architect of the Nauvoo Temple.

Daniel Hanmer Wells (October 27, 1814 – March 24, 1891) was an apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and the third mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, United States.

Emmeline Blanche Woodward Harris Whitney Wells (February 29, 1828 – April 25, 1921) was an American journalist, editor, poet, women's rights advocate and diarist. She served as the fifth general president of the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1910 until her death.

Chauncey Walker West (February 6, 1827 – January 9, 1870) was a Mormon pioneer and was a leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Utah Territory. He was among the first Mormon missionaries to preach in Sri Lanka.

Cyrus Hubbard Wheelock (February 28, 1813 – October 11, 1894) was an early leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Among other positions he was the first president of the Northern States Mission. He also wrote the words to the Latter-day Saint hymn "Ye Elders of Israel."

Harvey G. Whitlock(1809–1874) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement and one of the witnesses to the Book of Commandments. He was among those Latter Day Saints driven by mobs from Jackson County, Missouri in the summer of 1833. From 1835 he was in and out of multiple Latter Day Saint groups several times.

David Whitmer (January 7, 1805 – January 25, 1888) was an early adherent of the Latter Day Saint movement who eventually became the most interviewed of the Three Witnesses to the Book of Mormon's Golden Plates.

Christian Whitmer (1798–1835) was the eldest son of Peter Whitmer, Sr. and Mary Musselman. He is primarily remembered as one of the Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon's Golden Plates.

Jacob Whitmer (1800–1856) was the second born child of Peter Whitmer, Sr. and Mary Musselman. He is primarily remembered as one of the Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon's Golden Plates.

John Whitmer (August 27, 1802 – July 11, 1878) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. He was one of the Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon's Golden Plates. He was also the first official Church Historian and a member of the presidency of the church in Missouri.

Peter Whitmer, Sr. (1773–1854) was an early member of the Latter Day Saint movement, and father of the movement's second founding family.

Elizabeth Ann Whitney (January 26, 1800 - 1882), born Elizabeth Ann Smith, was an early Latter Day Saint leader, and the wife of Newel K. Whitney, another early Latter Day Saint leader.

Newel Kimball Whitney (February 5, 1795 – 24 September 1850) (first name sometimes found as Newell) was a prominent leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and an American businessman.

Thomas Levi Whittle (May 21, 1812 – July 3, 1868) was an early Mormon pioneer who crossed the American Great Plains in the mid-19th century among the first company of pioneers to enter and settle near Salt Lake City, Utah Territory.

Lyman Wight (May 9, 1796 – March 31, 1858) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. He was the leader of the Latter Day Saints in Daviess County, Missouri in 1838. In 1841, he was ordained a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

William Willes (1814–1890) was an early Latter-day Saint songwriter and, along with Hugh Findlay, was one of the first Mormon missionaries to enter India.

William Sydney Smith Willes (March 18, 1819 – February 3, 1871), familiarly known as Sidney Willes, was a Mormon pioneer, member of the Mormon Battalion, and a founder of Lehi, Utah.

Frederick Granger Williams (October 28, 1787 – October 10, 1842) was a leader in the early Latter Day Saint movement and served in the First Presidency as Second Counselor to church president Joseph Smith, Jr. from 1833 to 1837.

James Grey Willie (November 1, 1814 – September 9, 1895) is one of the most well-remembered leaders of the Latter-day Saint handcart pioneers.

Benjamin Winchester (August 6, 1817 – January 25, 1901) was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. Winchester was the youngest adult member of Zion's Camp, an original member of the first Quorum of the Seventy, editor of the first independent Mormon periodical, the Gospel Reflector, president of a large branch of the church in Philadelphia, a zealous missionary who baptized thousands, a Rigdonite Apostle, and ultimately a dissenter who repudiated Mormonism altogether.

John Rex Winder (December 11, 1821 – March 10, 1910) was a leader and general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was Second Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric from 1887 to 1901, and First Counselor in the First Presidency to Church President Joseph F. Smith from 1901 until his death.

Daniel Wood (October 16, 1800 - April 15, 1892) was a Mormon pioneer and a settler of the western United States.

Emily Hill Woodmansee (March 24, 1836 – October 18, 1906) was a nineteenth century Mormon poet and hymnwriter. Although only one of her hymns "As Sisters In Zion" is included in the 1985 LDS English language edition of the LDS Church's hymnbook, previous LDS Church hymnbooks have included more of her works.

Wilford Woodruff, Sr. (March 1, 1807 – September 2, 1898) was the fourth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1889 until his death. Woodruff's large collection of diaries provide an important record of Latter Day Saint history.

Edwin Dilworth Woolley, Sr. (June 28, 1807 – October 12, 1881) was a Mormon pioneer, an early Latter-day Saint bishop in Salt Lake City, and a businessman in early Utah Territory who operated mills.

Y

Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was an American leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and a settler of the western United States. He was the President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1847 until his death and was the founder of Salt Lake City and the first governor of Utah Territory, United States. Brigham Young University was named in his honor.

Joseph Young (April 7, 1797 – July 16, 1881) was an early convert to the Latter Day Saint movement and was a missionary and longtime general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). He was an elder brother of Brigham Young.

Phineas Howe Young (also found as Phinehas) (16 February 1799 – 10 October 1879) was a prominent early convert in the Latter Day Saint movement and was later a Mormon pioneer and a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Phineas Young is an older brother of Brigham Young, who was the president of the LDS Church and the first governor of the Territory of Utah.

Zina Diantha Huntington Jacobs Smith Young (31 January 1821 – 28 August 1901) was an American social activist and religious leader who served as the third general president of the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1888 until her death. She was a polygamous wife of Joseph Smith, and later Brigham Young, each of whom she married while she was still married to her first husband, Henry Jacobs.

Zion's Camp

Zion's Camp Participants

Haun's Mill

http://www.nortonfamily.net/fluvanna-ky-utah-davidjr-hauns.htm

  1. Hiram Abbott
  2. Elias Benner
  3. John Byers
  4. Alexander Campbell
  5. Simon Cox
  6. Josiah Fuller (age 32)
  7. Austin Hammer
  8. Benjamin Lewis (age 35)
  9. Thomas McBride (78)
  10. Charley Merrick (age 9)
  11. Levi Merrick
  12. William Napier
  13. George Spencer Richards (1823-1838) (age 15)
  14. Sardius Smith (September 26, 1828 - October 30, 1838) (age 10)
  15. Warren Smith
  16. John York

People with BYU Studies Biography Articles:

BYU Studies the original Mormon Studies journal, has been published continuously for over 50 years. It often includes articles of biography and reviews of biographical books of interest to Mormon Studies. This is a partial list of people who have had biographical articles written about them in the journal.

  • Alexander William Doniphan
  • Andrew Jenson
  • Antonio Lebolo
  • Benjamin Franklin Johnson
  • Brigham Young
  • Charles C. Rich
  • Charles Shumway
  • Charles W. Penrose
  • Christopher Layton
  • David Hyrum Smith
  • Edward Partridge
  • Ellis Shipp
  • Emily Wells Grant
  • Emma Smith
  • Emmeline B. Wells
  • Frederick Granger Williams
  • Frederick William Hurst
  • George Francis Train
  • George Q. Cannon
  • George W. Bean
  • George Reynolds
  • George D. Watt
  • Heber C. Kimball
  • Henry Caswall
  • Henry William Bigler
  • Ina Coolbrith
  • Isaac Galland
  • James Barratt
  • James Jesse Strang
  • Jesse Gause
  • John de Baptiste
  • John Hyde Jr
  • John Lyon
  • Joseph Knight
  • Joseph Smith III
  • Karl G. Maeser
  • James E. Tallmage
  • Jedediah Morgan Grant
  • John Henry Smith
  • Louisa Barnes Pratt
  • Lyman Sherman
  • Lewis C. Bidamon
  • Martin Harris
  • Minerva Teichert
  • Newel K. Whitney
  • Orrin Porter Rockwell
  • Orson Hyde
  • Parley P. Pratt
  • Patty Bartlet Sessions
  • Paul A. Schettler
  • Rachel R. Grant (article)
  • Robert Lang Campbell
  • Rowland Rider
  • Samuel Claridge
  • Sidney Rigdon
  • Solomon Chamberlain
  • Thomas Bullock
  • Thomas L. Kane
  • Thomas B. Marsh
  • Wilford Woodruff
  • William Bigler
  • William Clayton
  • William Law
  • William Weeks
  • Willard Richards
  • William W. Phelps
  • Wilson Law

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