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El Shatt - WWII refugee camps

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El Shatt

The El Shatt was a complex of World War II refugee camps in the desert of the Sinai peninsula, in Egypt.[1] Residents lived there from the summer of 1944 to the beginning of 1946. The region of Dalmatia (in today's modern Croatia, then Yugoslavia) was evacuated by the Allies, ahead of a German invasion in 1944. The camp was disbanded in 1946 after the war ended.

Background

Fleeing the German offensive in the beginning of 1944, a large number of civilians (over 30,000) in fear of reprisals, escaped to the island of Vis. Vis had been established as the Headquarters for the Partisan army. The allied British army was not able to accept so many people who were fleeing to Italy. It was decided that the non-combatant population of the island and evacuated refugees would be sent to southern Italy. Firstly they were sent to Bari, and then to Taranto. The refugees were mostly from Makarska (around 6000), Vodice, Hvar, Vis, Korčula, Ravni Kotari and Bukovica. There was heavy fighting in Italy between the Allied forces and the Germans. It was decided to transfer the refugees to Egypt, which was then under the British control.

The camp

The camp was located near the Suez Canal. It was divided into five smaller bases. Refugees were housed in tents (average one to two families per tent). Although far from home and living in poor conditions, they tried to preserve the illusion of normal life. They established schools, various workshops, a shared laundry,and issued a newspaper (Our Paper/Naš List). One tent was designated as a church. Josip Hatze, a famous Split-born composer and conductor, who was in his later years, spent his time organizing choirs. People from Dalmatia had difficulty adjusting to desert conditions, especially children who suffed from intestinal diseases. Many of them died. The British government also kept a strict regime, allowing exit from the complex only with passes. On several occasions, the area of El Shatt was bombed.

More than 30,000 people lived in the refugee camp for a total of 18 months. During their time in the camp, there were 300 marriages. Additionally 650 children were born.They returned home at the beginning of 1946 when the war was over and a more stable political situation in Yugoslavia was established. At the place of their exile rests a graveyard with 825 graves of people who did not withstand the tough conditions of life in the desert.

Legacy

John Corsellis, a British worker (who later became an author) at the camp wrote, "People mysteriously appeared and disappeared with a frequency reminiscent of a popular transit hotel". He also added, "I must not give the impression that these people created a little paradise here on the desert with their resourcefulness. Their extreme lack of everything only makes what they do more impressive, standing as it does against such a background." The refugees were mostly women and children.

The Refugee cemetery was seriously damaged in the Arab-Israeli War. Finally, in 2003 with the support of the Croatian government, a memorial site was established.[2][3] An ethnographic collection of objects from the El Shatt are on display at the local Center for Culture in the town of Vela Luka.[4]

See also History of Croatia Sinai peninsula Dalmatia

List of people in El Shatt taken from family histories and for Makarska region from the book 'Makarski primorci u zbjegu 1943-1946' by Velimir Urlic, published 2003.

Anušić

Babic

Ban

Batos

Begovic

Beus

Bilas

Boric

Conda

Damjan

Dean

  • Dean Stanko p. Lovre, 1891 Podgora
  • Dean Mare Stanka 1904 Podgora
  • Dean Tomci Stanka 1930 Podgora
  • Dean Nevenka Stanka 1933 Podgora

Devcic

Dulcic

  • Petar Dulčić (1878-1944), born in Starigrad, Hvar, died in El Shatt

Erceg

Franičević

Gareljic

Gojak

Grgic

Hrabar

Jakic

Jugovic

Juretic

Jurlina

both sisters grand-daughters of Kate Veža, who died at El-Shatt in 1944.

Kirigin

Kokic

  • Kokic Nevenka 1920 Podgora

Kovacevic

Krsic

Krzanic

Kunac

Kurtic

Lampic

  • Lampic Milan Ivana 1913 Podgora
  • Lampic Anka Milana 1912 Podgora
  • Lampic Ivan p. Jure 1871 Podgora
  • Lampic Nedjeljko Ivana 1928, Podgora

Letica

Livajic

Lupis

Lunjevic

Lucic

Lucijetic

Marinovic

Mihotic

Milicic

  • Milicic Vica z. Dinka 1906 Podgora
  • Milicic Ivan Dinka 1937 Podgora
  • Milicic Faustina Dinka 1939 Podgora

Misic

Mlikota

Mrkusic

Mrsic

Nola

  • Joze Nola (1866-1944), born in Podgora, died in El Shatt
  • Ante Nola (1932-1990), born in Podgora

Odak

Papic

Paunovic

Pavlinovic

Pivac

Radojkovic

Radonic

Ribicic

Rosandic

Roscic

Sanko

Sisaric

Skako

Srzentic

Stojkovic

Sumić

Suhor

Sulic

Spanje

Sunde

Vodanovic

Vela

Ivan Leo Vela (1930 -2005 ),born in Podgora

Vjencani u zbjegu Married in refugee camp

Umrli u El - Shatu (iz Bacine)

  • Jure Begovic (1878-1945)
  • Anelija Bogunovic (1943-1944)
  • Ante Bogunovic (1938-1944)
  • Darinka Bogunovic (1925-1944)
  • Istocna Bogunovic (1942-1944)
  • Jurica Giljevic (1939-1944)
  • Jela Katic (1869-1944)
  • Danica Krilic (1916-1944)
  • Istocna Krilic (1940-1945)
  • Maksim Krilic (1943-1944)
  • Pavao Krilic (1943-1944)
  • Jela Marinovic (1887-1944)
  • Jure Marinovic (1882-1944)
  • Mijo Marinovic (1940-1944)
  • Milivoj Marinovic (1942-1944)
  • Vicko Marinovic (1939-1944)
  • Jelka Tomasevic (1943-1944)
  • Jure Tomasevic (1869-1945)
  • Manda Tomasevic (1872-1945)

Umrli u El - Shatu (iz Živogošće)

Umrli u El - Shatu (iz Gradca)