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Hanged in Colonial America

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Profiles

  • Wilmot Redd (c.1638 - 1692)
    Wilmot Redd (c1638 - 1692) - Wilmot was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, and executed for witchcraft by hanging on 22 September 1692 in Salem Towne, Essex County, Massachusetts. The wife of Samuel Re...
  • George Jacobs, of Salem (1612 - 1692)
    George Jacobs, Sr. (c.1620 – 1692) — George Jacobs was accused of witchcraft during the Salem witch trials in Salem Village, Massachusetts in 1692, and was found guilty and hanged on 19 A...
  • Susannah Martin (1621 - 1692)
    Susannah (North) Martin (baptized September 30, 1621 – July 19, 1692) was a woman executed for witchcraft during the Salem witch trials. Martin was the fourth daughter, and youngest child, o...
  • Rev. George Burroughs (c.1650 - 1692)
    Reverend George Burroughs (c1650 - 1692) - Executed for witchcraft in the infamous Salem witch trials, George Burroughs was born about 1650 in Suffolk County, England, the son of Nathaniel Burroughs (1...
  • William Eltonhead (1614 - 1665)
    William Eltonhead {1616-1655} left Sutton and St.Helens for Maryland in around 1640 to become the special envoy to Lord Baltimore , the proprietor of the Maryland colony whose interests he oversaw. Bac...

If you know of a profile representing someone hanged in Colonial America, please add to this project. Additional resource links welcome for the "overview."

John Billington is thought to be one of the first men to be hanged in New England. Billington was convicted of murder in September of 1630 after he shot and killed John Newcomen.[6]

During the Salem witch trials, most of the men and women convicted of witchcraft were sentenced to public hanging. It is estimated that seventeen women and two men were hanged as a result of the trials. However, modern scholars maintain that thousands of individuals were hanged for witchcraft throughout the American colonies.[7]

Hangings during the colonial era of America were mostly performed publicly in order to deter the behavior for which the criminals were hanged. Thousands of townspeople would gather around the gallows to hear a sermon and observe the hangings of convicted criminals. Such experiences were deemed as good lessons on morality for the children and townspeople.

Citations

  • 6. Bradford, William. Of Plymouth Plantation. The Vision Forum, Inc, 1999
  • 7. Stack, Richard A. Dead Wrong: Violence, Vengeance, and the Victims of Capital Punishment. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2006.

Resources