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Profiles

  • Jack Kushner (1923 - 2003)
    donated a jeep to New Orleans' World War II museum.
  • Ida Koltun (1901 - 1998)
  • Harry Joseph Wallick (1896 - 1958)
    One of the owners of the Jefferson Bottling Co. -- brother-in-law to the two others, Irbin & Morris.
  • Shirley Eason (1926 - 2014)
    Obituary from the New Orleans Advocate September 15, 2014 Shirley Heiman Ermon Eason passed away on Saturday, September 13, 2014. Beloved wife of the late Jesse Angus Eason, Jr.; mother of Merrill Er...
  • Gerson Saltz (1928 - 1998)
    Optometrist. Also was forensic photographer for Tangipahoa Parish Sheriff's Office.

This is an umbrella project for all projects related to Jews from Louisiana.

Notes

From Pushcarts and Plantations: Jewish Life in Louisiana

In the early 1700s, Sephardic traders journeyed up from the Caribbean and became the first Jews to settle in Louisiana. The small community thrived despite of the infamous "Black Code" of 1724 that officially expelled all Jews from the French colony.

A second wave of immigration (1820-1870) deposited German peddlers in virtually every small town in the state. Jacob Bodenheimer, one of the first Jews to settle in northern Louisiana, came to America as a castaway. He encouraged other German Jews to follow and soon there was a substantial Jewish presence in the area. Because they were among the first of any faith to settle this region, northern Louisiana has experienced little anti-Semitism.

The arrival of Eastern Europeans marked the third great wave of immigration (1870-1920). During this period’s high water mark--the first decade of the 20th century--Louisiana found itself with a substantial Russian and Polish community. The traditionalism of these newcomers contrasted sharply with the assimilated French and Germans. They often were a source of embarrassment to those Jews who had worked so hard to blend into the styles and customs of the gentile world. They maintained their traditions, however, and established thriving orthodox communities throughout the state.

Notables

Resources

  1. History of the Jews of Louisiana Published 1903 in New Orleans . Written in English.
  2. Gefilte Fish in the Land of the Kingfish: Jewish Life in Louisiana
  3. Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities - Louisiana
  4. The Alsace-Lorraine Jewish Experience in Louisiana and the Gulf South" by Anny Bloch-Raymond
  5. The True Story of Eunice (Louisiana) Excerpt about the Wright family.
  6. New Orleans Cemeteries
  7. Louisiana Archives search