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Maison de Melun (House of Melun, France)

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  • Elisabeth Le Riche, dite "de Melun", comtesse de Corbeil (c.930 - 1007)
    According to Jean-Baptiste-Pierre Jullien de Courcelles, Histoire généalogique et héraldique des pairs de France, Vol. 5 , "It is evident ... that Elisabeth had to be very close re...
  • Hervé, vicomte de Melun (995 - c.1084)
    2. Herve, viscount of Melun. He was still living in 1030 by report of the author of Miracles of Saint Liesne, and who was the father of Ursion, who follows. . Ursion I. He had Guillaume I. who follow...
  • Ursion I de Melun, vicomte de Melun (c.1018 - 1085)
    URSON (-[1085/94]). Vicomte de Melun . "…Ursio vicecomes Meliduni…" witnessed the charter dated 29 May 1067 under which Philippe I King of France confirmed the possessions of Saint-Mart...
  • Guillaume "le Charpentier" de Melun, vicomte de Melun (c.1065 - 1102)
    The known history of this man is primarily regarding his notoriety as a Crusader, defector, and butcher on the battlefield. Little to no evidence exists of his wife or wives and children. His nickname ...

Note: This information needs to be entered into the Geni tree to correct many less well-researched accounts.

Sources: Maison de Melun (French Wikipedia), Adolphe Duchalais' 1845 Charte inédite de l'an 1138, relative à l'histoire des vicomtes de Melun, Charles Cawley's Vicomtes de Melun (Medieval Lands Database), Jean-Baptiste-Pierre Jullien de Courcelles, Histoire généalogique et héraldique des pairs de France : des grands dignitaires de la couronne, des principales familles nobles du royaume et des maisons princières de l'Europe, précédée de la généalogie de la maison de France, Volume 5, 1825.

The House of Melun, originating from a village located in Île-de-France (Seine-et-Marne), is an ancient French noble family. The name of this House is spelled in Latin charters as "Meloduno, Meleduni, Melinudensis" and in older French writings as Meleun, Mellun, but more often Melun. The House has entered into alliances with branches of the families d'Artois, de Dreux et de Courtenay, descendants of the House of France, and even with princely Houses of Germany and the top families of medieval France.

Genealogical origins

Robert, monk of Saint-Remi de Reims, in his Histoire de la Terre-Sainte, said that the Meluns issued from a "royal race." The tradition of this historian, who lived during the time of the First Crusade in 1096, has been constantly perpetuated into the public with an undeniable authenticity. Indeed, in letters given by Charles VI in the month of November 1392 , confirming the order of Charles V of the 1374 year for the majority of the kings of France, the prince described the present Viscount Melun as "our kindred."

According to Jean-Baptiste-Pierre Jullien de Courcelles, Histoire généalogique et héraldique des pairs de France, "This house has formed several branches, of which the main have been mentioned in the History of the Great Officers of the Crown, by Pere Anselme, t. V, p. 221, in the Grand Dictionnaire Historique by Moréri, edition of 1759, vol. X, p. 32-53 Supplement, and several other historians.

"The object of this article is not to remember all details of these various branches of the House of Melun, mostly extinct today, but to supplement the silence of Pere Anselme on the only branch of the illustrious house that survived , whose shares have been ignored by the historian of the great officers of the crown, and about which Moréri's work has passed down some serious inaccuracies. The credentials of this branch were admitted to the honors of the court and presented to the King on May 8, 1731, were verified in 1821 by Mr. Cherin, lawyer, former chief clerk of the office of the Order of Saint Spirit, and nephew of the famous genealogist of the same name . The genealogy that follows is based on the memoire summary in these credentials, verified by Mr. Hozier according to his certificate of April 8, 1818, but as this memoire only establishes the lineage starting from Adam III, Viscount of Melun in 1244 (tenth degree of genealogy), and the generations that preceded have been reported in an incomplete manner by historians, it seems advisable to restore these early generations from a huge collection of materials for a general history of the house of Melun, and existing at the Bibliothèque du Roi, among the manuscripts of M. Clairambault, under the title Recueil de copies et d'extraits de titres, concernant les anciens vicomtes de Melun depuis le sixième siècle jusqu'en 1399. The fragments that follow, about the first owners of the land and the castle of Melun, are extracted from this collection. "

Early Counts of Melun

Aurélien, Chamberlain and Lord Chancellor (Attorney General) to Clovis I, was deputized by this prince in 494 to approach Gondebaud, King of the Bourguignons (Burgundians), to request from him the marriage of his niece Clotilde (465-545), daughter of King Chilpéric II, whom Gondebaud had murdered. The French king, to repay Aurélien for the success of this negotiation, gifted him with the château de Melun and the title of Count, as well as Ducal authority across the province.6

Gui-Baudouin, comte de Melun, is cited as one of a dozen valiant knights in France under Charlemagne.7 (see Paladin).

Donat I, comte de Melun in 830 was deprived of this benefit by Louis le Débonnaire, who invested in a seigneur named Aton; however, after his death, Charles le Chauve restored Donat as the Count of Melun.8 Donat, with his wife Landrade, had a son named Gorèbe. (Ibid, p. 465, 466, 467)

Erchanger, comte de Melun in 906, under Charles le Simple, fought in the Battle of Soissons in 923, and comported himself there in a manner so glorious, said Montluc and Belleforest, that the king armed him as a knight on the battlefield and soon after named him as his premier minister. He died in 939, leaving three sons of his wife, Fredegonde, daughter of the lord of Vernou-sur-Seine, none of which seems to have succeeded him in the title of Count of Melun.

Bouchard I de Vendôme (bouchardide), Count of Melun in 970, a favorite of kings Hugh Capet and Robert, married Elisabeth le Riche, widow of Aymon, Count of Corbeil (today Corbeil-Essonne), sister of the former concubine of Hugh the Great, and was the father of:

  • Bouchard II, Viscount of Melun, who died without issue before his father;
  • Ruinald or Renaud, Bishop of Paris and Count of Melun, Chancellor of France in 989, mentioned in charters of 998, 1000 and 1014, who died January 6, 1016;
  • Elisabeth, called "Adèle," wife of Fulk III, nicknamed "Nerra," Count of Anjou.

According to Jean-Baptiste-Pierre Jullien de Courcelles, Histoire généalogique et héraldique des pairs de France, "It is evident from the foregoing that Elisabeth had to be very close relative of King Hugh Capet, since the prince gave her the counties of Melun and Paris when she married for the second time to Bouchard I, Count of Vendôme and Montoire. Could we not reasonably conjecture that she was his aunt, and sister of Hedwig, whose father, Henry I, Duke of Saxony, 912, elected king of Germany in 919, descended from smoky Widukind? Be that as it may, it was averred, by the unanimous testimony of historians, that Elisabeth was a very close relative of Hedwig of Saxony, and she had by her first husband, the Earl of Corbeil, several children whose fate is unknown, except Albert, whose daughter named Germaine was married in 1013 to Mauger or Maugis, son of Richard I, Duke of Normandy, who was Earl of Corbeil after Bouchard I Count of Vendôme. We also know that this second husband of Elisabeth had two sons: Bouchard II, qualified as Viscount of Melun but who died before his father, and Rainald, Bishop of Paris, who died in 1016. There is reason to believe that after the death of Viscount Bouchard II, Salon and Josselin were invested successively as the Viscounts of Melun by Hugh Capet, and as they were relatives of the monarch, it is likely they were the sons of Elisabeth and Aymon, Count of Corbeil, her first husband. This is the only way to explain this ancient relationship of the house of Melun with the august house of France, consecrated by the testimony of contemporary historians. To make it more intelligible to the reader, we will establish the following table."

The following lists the relationships between the royals and the House of Melun:

Hedwige de Saxe, daughter of Henri Ier, King of Germany, and of Mathilde, comtesse de Ringelheim, his second wife, was married to Hugues le Grand, duc des Francs, son of King Robert I. This prince gave the comté de Corbeil as a dowry to Élisabeth, close relative of his wife, when she married Aymon. Hedwige was teh second wife of Hugues le Grand, who left her among other children, Hugues Capet.

   

Hugues Capet, King of France in 987, confirmed in favor of Josselin I, vicomte de Melun, the privileges of l'abbaye de Saint-Père de Melun. He died in 996.

   

Robert II, King of France in 996, died at Melun on 20 July 1030, having confirmed the same privileges to Hervé, vicomte de Melun.

Henri I, King of France in 1031, died in 1060, also confirmed the same privileges upon d'Ursion I, vicomte de Melun.

Philippe I, King of France, confirmed the same privileges in 1084 upon Guillaume I, called « le Charpentier » .

What follows is the narrative of the genealogy:

		

Élisabeth, close relative of Hedwige de Saxony, married first, with permission of Hugues le Grand, duc of the Francs, around 940, Aymon, comte de Corbeil. She married secondly, with permission of Hugues Capet, Bouchard I, comte de Vendôme, and through this marriage, comte de Melun et de Paris. She had many children from her first marriage, of whom were: Salon, vicomte de Melun in 991; Josselin I, who followed him; and Thibaut, abbot of Cormery then of Saint-Maur-les-Fossés.

   

Josselin I, vicomte de Melun in 998, was one of the benefactors of the Abbaye de Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, where he donned a religious habit toward the end of his life.

   

Hervé, vicomte de Melun, mentioned by the author of the book of Miracles de Saint-Liesne, in the year 1030, was killed in combat near Yvetot in 1045.

Ursion I, vicomte de Melun, was benefactor of the Abbaye de Saint-Aubert de Cambray in 1065, subscribing to a charter of the King Henri I in 1067.

Guillaume I, dit « le Charpentier » , vicomte de Melun in 1084, named as a cousin to Hugues le Grand, comte de Vermandois, by the monk Robert in his Histoire de la Terre Sainte, where Guillaume I had accompanied the prince.

Elder Branch of the vicomtes de Melun

NOTE: Most of this account is adapted from Courcelles and republished on French Wikipedia. As Curator, I have made some adjustments, as noted, based upon the opinions of other writers and interpreters. I've inserted some documentation from Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands Database and also some insights from Adolphe Duchalais (see links at top)--Pam Wilson, October 2013]

The descent of the vicomtes de Melun since Josselin I, as follows:

I. Josselin Ier, vicomte de Melun circa 992, probably brother and successor to vicomte Salon, who still lived in 991, holding rank among the grand seigneurs who composed the court of Hugues Capet and that of King Robert. In 998, with the consent of Bouchard I de Vendôme, vicomte de Melun, and of Rainald, Bishop of Paris, his son, le vicomte Josselin, gave the parish of Noisy-le-Sec to the church of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, where, some time later, in his old age, he took up the religious habit. He had as son and successor Hervé.

Charles Cawley writes of Josselin: Père Anselme records that "Joscelin I…vicomte de Melun" donated "le village de Noisy le sec" to Saint-Maur-des-Fossés abbey in 998, but gives no citation for the corresponding primary source. "Ansoaldi Divitis Parisii, Frederici, Roberti vicecomitis, Nanterii et Joscelmi eius filiorum…Joscelini Miliduni vicecomitis" witnessed the charter dated 1 Mar 1006 under which "Burchardus…castri comes Curboili…cum filio meo Rainoldi…Parisiensium episcopo" [Bouchard Comte de Corbeil] authorised donations to the abbey of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés.

II. Hervé, vicomte de Melun in 1050, mentioned on that date by the author of Miracles de Saint-Liesne, is cited as a great warrior in the ancient chronicles, which report that he was killed in combat near Yvetot, in Normandy, in 1045. He had married Agnès, named as vicomtesse de Melun in a charter in 1030. He was father of Ursion I.

III. Ursion I, vicomte de Melun, is named prince in a charter from 1065, according to which he made a gift of a precious reliquary to the Abbaye de Saint Aubert de Cambrai. Ursion I subscribed, in 1067, to the l'église de Saint-Martin-he charter to the dedication of l'Eglise des-Champs, promulgated by King Philippe I. It was noted that Ursion signed immédiately after the young count Baudouin, Hugues III, comte de Meulan, Guillaume Busac, comte de Soissons and Rainaud, comte de Corbeil, and before Gui I de Montlhéry, Simon I de Montfort, Thibaud de Montmorency and all the Grands Officiers de la Couronne. An 1138 charter references the historical fact that in 1085, Ursion, with the consent of his wife (who was not named) in a ruling in favor of the abbot and the religious of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, to have no right to practice in the town and village of Moisenay and Courceaux.

Charles Cawley writes of Ursion I: "…Ursio vicecomes Meliduni…" witnessed the charter dated 29 May 1067 under which Philippe I King of France confirmed the possessions of Saint-Martin-des-Champs. Père Anselme records that "Urson I…vicomte de Melun" donated "un beau reliquaire à l´abbaye de S. Aubert de Cambray" and "est nommé dans une charte de l´abbaye de Ferrieres" dated 1070, but gives no citation for the corresponding primary sources. "Urso Milidunensis vicecomes atque sua uxor" acknowledged that they had no rights in land of Saint-Maur-les-Fossés by charter dated 1085, the same document recording that "vicecomes Adam" claimed these rights of his predecessor "cuius filiam in conjugium habebat" and from whom he inherited the viscomté dated 1138, the latter witnessed by "Matheus de Monmorenci, Milo de Cortenai...Fredericus de Corboilo…". m --- (-after 1085). The name of Urson´s wife is not known.

Ursion had as sons:

1. Guillaume I (see below)

2. Manassès de Melun, who allied himself with the châtelain de Cambrai against the Bishop and Chapitre of that city. He was still alive in 1120. Marguerite, daughter of Milon II de Bray, châtelain de Montlhéry, was married to Manassès de Melun, according to Moréri. What is certain is that the husband of this lady was named Manassès, and that he was vicomte de Sens. He could possibly be the Manassès who was the son of Ursion I. Manassès, vicomte de Sens, very probable son of Ursion I, vicomte de Melun, had the following offspring:

  • a son named Hilduin, seigneur de Marolles, in Brie, in 1120 ;
  • Salon, vicomte de Sens in 1145, son and successor to Manassès, and father of two sons:
    • Guerin, vicomte de Sens, dead in 1168. With his wife the vicomtesse Ermence, he had as son
      • Burchard II, successor of his uncle Burchard I as vicomte de Sens;
    • Burchard I, vicomte de Sens after his father.
    • Hugues de Melun, living in 1098 ;
    • Ursion de Melun, Bishop of Beauvais in 1085, died in April 1089

IV. Guillaume Ier, dit « le Charpentier » (en), vicomte de Melun, obtained from King Philippe I, en 1084, confirmation of privileges of the Abbaye Saint-Père de Melun, which the kings Hugues Capet, Robert le Pieux, and Henri I had accorded to vicomtes de Melun, his presecessors. He went on Crusade with Hugues I « le Grand », comte de Vermandois, in 1096, and during that expedition, he gained the nickname of "Carpenter" because, according to the chronicles of the time, he was not able to find any fighters who would resist the effort of his blows. Robert, monk of the Abbaye de Saint-Remi de Reims, who had noted this fact in his Histoire de la Terre-Sainte, and who was personally acquainted with vicomte Guillaume de Melun, noted in another passage, while speaking of the siège d'Antioche en 1098, "that [Guillaume] was of royal race and cousin of Hugues "le Grand" of France, Comte de Vermandois, brother of King Philip 1.

Charles Cawley writes: GUILLAUME "Carpentarius" (-after 1102). Vicomte de Melun. Philippe I King of France confirmed the privileges of Melun Saint-Père by charter dated 1094, the dating clause of which records "Willermo tunc Milidunensi vicecomite". Albert of Aix records that "Hugo, Drogo, Willelmus Carpentarius et Clareboldus" joined the army of Godefroi de Bouillon after their release from captivity in Constantinople, dated to end 1096. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "Guilelmus Carpentarius et Petrus heremita" fled from the siege of Antioch in 1098, adding that "Guilelmus iste fuit vicecomes Meleduni consanguineus Hugonis Magni". Albert of Aix records that "Willelmus Carpentarius, Willelmusque alter, quondam familiaris et domesticus imperatoris Constantinopolis, qui et sororem Boemundi principis Siciliæ uxorem duxerat", escaped "out of fear" from Antioch to Alexandretta, believing that the crusading army was doomed after it was besieged by Kerbogha atabeg of Mosul, dated to mid-1098 from the context. "Guilielmus Carpenter…" subscribed a charter dated 1101 under which "Tancredus princeps" granted land "Solini" to "consulibus Januensium". Albert of Aix records "Willelmus Carpentarius" among those who favoured the restoration of Patriarch Dagobert, dated to 1102 from the context.

Guillaume 1 had, among other children:

1. Ursion II (contested; see below);

2. Eudes de Melun, who in 1141 gave to the Abbaye de Honnecourt a right that he had at Villers-Guislain, and that he wished to be buried in that Abbaye, to which he made a gift of several relics of saint Damien and of saint Éloi.

V. Adam de Chailly, Vicomte de Melun [NOTE from Curator Pam Wilson: This section of French Wikipedia's tree, based upon Courcelles, is contestable, based upon a misinterpretation of the 1138 charter discussed in Duchalais (1840). The French Wikipedia account lists Ursion II, vicomte de Melun as son of Guillaume I as being Vicomte in 1132, and "recognized, in 1138, with the consent of his wife, who was not named in this charter, in favor of the abbot and the religious of Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, to have no right to practice in the town and village of Moisenay and Courceaux." Actually, the Charter of 1138 is referring to the earlier Ursion as having been Vicomte in 1085; he was long deceased by the time the Charter was written. I am replacing the Courcelles lineage here with that provided by Adolphe Duchalais in Charte inédite de l'an 1138, relative à l'histoire des vicomtes de Melun.

Several Vicomtes of Melun (unnamed), ending with one whose daughter, Mahaut or Mathilde de Melun, inherited the Vicomté and through her marriage, ADAM de CHAILLY became Adam I, Vicomte de Melun circa 1132 until c. 1150.

Charles Cawley writes: MATHILDE de Melun . "Adam de Chaalli…et uxor sua Mahaldis et filius eius Gilo" donated "terram de Fontanis" to Néronville, with the consent of "Joscelinus vicecomes Meleduni et Adam frater eius, nepotes memorati Ade", by undated charter. Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by a charter, which records firstly that "Urso Milidunensis vicecomes atque sua uxor" acknowledged that they had no rights in land of Saint-Maur-les-Fossés dated 1085, and that "vicecomes Adam" claimed these rights of his predecessor "cuius filiam in conjugium habebat" and from whom he inherited the viscomté dated 1138 . The document does not specify that Urson was the predecessor of Adam, and therefore father of Adam´s wife, but this is suggested. m ([1080/90]) as his first wife, ADAM de Chailly, son of ETIENNE & his wife --- ([1060/65]-after [1140]). Vicomte de Melun, de iure uxoris.]

Their son was (the following is from Cawley):

1. GILLES de Chailly, son of ADAM de Chailly & his first wife Mathilde de Melun (-before [1140]). "Fulcone vicecomite, Adam filio Stephani, Gilone filius eius…" witnessed the charter dated to [1100/10] under which "Lucia uxor Rainardi Pulcri et Amalricus filius eius et Agnes filia eius" donated property to the priory of Néronville. "Adam de Chaalli…et uxor sua Mahaldis et filius eius Gilo" donated "terram de Fontanis" to Néronville, with the consent of "Joscelinus vicecomes Meleduni et Adam frater eius, nepotes memorati Ade", by undated charter. "Gilo, filius Adam de Chaali" donated property to the priory of Néronville by charter dated to [1130/40]. "Dominus Adam de Cali, filius Stephani" donated property to the priory of Néronville, for the soul of "Gilonis filii sui", together with "duo nepotes eius Jocelinus et Adam, filii Gilonis, et Maheldis uxor Gilonis", by charter dated to [1140].

m MATHILDE, daughter of ---. "Dominus Adam de Cali, filius Stephani" donated property to the priory of Néronville, for the soul of "Gilonis filii sui", together with "duo nepotes eius Jocelinus et Adam, filii Gilonis, et Maheldis uxor Gilonis", by charter dated to [1140].

Gilles & his wife had [three] children:

a. JOSCELIN II de Melun, Vicomte de Melun. ([1110/15]-after 1157). "Dominus Adam de Cali, filius Stephani" donated property to the priory of Néronville, for the soul of "Gilonis filii sui", together with "duo nepotes eius Jocelinus et Adam, filii Gilonis, et Maheldis uxor Gilonis", by charter dated to [1140][2281].

b. ADAM de Melun, Vicomte de Melun. (-before 1150). "Adam de Chaalli…et uxor sua Mahaldis et filius eius Gilo" donated "terram de Fontanis" to Néronville, with the consent of "Joscelinus vicecomes Meleduni et Adam frater eius, nepotes memorati Ade", by undated charter[2282]. "Dominus Adam de Cali, filius Stephani" donated property to the priory of Néronville, for the soul of "Gilonis filii sui", together with "duo nepotes eius Jocelinus et Adam, filii Gilonis, et Maheldis uxor Gilonis", by charter dated to [1140][2283]. Vicomte de Melun.

c. [GILLES (-after 1146). Gilles and his descendants, as shown below, are set out by Père Anselme[2284]. Seigneur de Villefermoy.] m ---. The name of Gilles's wife is not known. French Wikipedia provides the following overview but places this Gilles as a son of Ursion II: Gilles de Melun, seigneur de « Villefermoix » (Villefermoy) in 1146, mentioned in 1147 in the act of founding the Abbaye de Barbeaux, for which he had ceded a domain. He was father of:

  • * Adam de Melun, Knight, seigneur de Villefermoix in 1189, avowed as protector of the land of Saint-Denis de Grand-Puy. He married Helvise ou Héloîse, dame de Nangis, widow of Pierre de Britaut, Knight, seigneur (because of her) de Nangis. He had by her second husband :
    • * Gilles de Melun, seigneur de Villefermoix in 1219 ;
      • Henri de Melun, living in 1219 ;
      • Dreux de Melun, living in 1219 ;
      • Marie de Melun, wife, in 1219, of Jean, seigneur de Saint-Vallery en Vermandois ;
      • Lucienne de Melun, mentioned with his brothers and sister in the charter of the Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, in the year 1208, and in another charter of Paraclet in the year 1219.

Gilles & his wife had [one child]:

1) [ADAM (-after 1189). Père Anselme names Adam as "seigneur de Villefermoy en 1189, advoué de la terre de S. Denis de Grandpuy"[2285]. Seigneur de Villefermoy.] m as her second husband, HELVISE Dame de Nangis, widow of PIERRE de Britaut, daughter of ---. Adam & his wife had [five] children:

i) [GILLES [II] (-after 1219). Père Anselme names Gilles as "beaufrere de Jean seigneur de Valery dans un titre de l´an 1219"[2286]. Seigneur de Villefermoy.]

ii) [HENRI (-after 1219). Père Anselme states that Henri and Dreux are named "avec leur frere dans le titre de l´an 1219"[2287].]

iii) [DREUX (-after 1219). Père Anselme states that Henri and Dreux are named "avec leur frere dans le titre de l´an 1219"[2288].]

iv) [MARIE (-after 1219). Père Anselme names Gilles as "beaufrere de Jean seigneur de Valery dans un titre de l´an 1219"[2289]. m JEAN Seigneur de Valery, son of ---.]

v) [LUCIENNE (-after 1219). Père Anselme records that Lucienne "est mentionnée avec ses freres et sa sœur dans les chartes de l´abbaye de S. Germain des prez de l´an 1208 et celle du Paraclet en 1219"[2290].]

Back to Courcelles' version, intermingled with Cawley as indicated:

VI. Josselin II, vicomte de Melun, successor to his grandfather Adam before 1150, and gave in 1156, to the Abbaye de Barbeaux, half of the forest of Fesc, with an annual income of 12 ecus. (Gallia Christ., t. XII, Instrumenta, colonne 42.) He is mentioned in a charter in 1152. His death is noted as June 20th in the obituary of the church of Notre-Dame de Melun. Cawley writes of him: JOSCELIN de Melun, son of GILLES de Chailly & his wife Mathilde --- ([1110/15]-after 1157). "Adam de Chaalli…et uxor sua Mahaldis et filius eius Gilo" donated "terram de Fontanis" to Néronville, with the consent of "Joscelinus vicecomes Meleduni et Adam frater eius, nepotes memorati Ade", by undated charter. His birth date is estimated working back from the dates on which his descendants are named, and also appears consistent with the estimated birth date of his paternal grandfather. "Dominus Adam de Cali, filius Stephani" donated property to the priory of Néronville, for the soul of "Gilonis filii sui", together with "duo nepotes eius Jocelinus et Adam, filii Gilonis, et Maheldis uxor Gilonis", by charter dated to [1140]. Vicomte de Melun. "Adam de Chaalli…et uxor sua Mahaldis et filius eius Gilo" donated "terram de Fontanis" to Néronville, with the consent of "Joscelinus vicecomes Meleduni et Adam frater eius, nepotes memorati Ade", by undated charter. Père Anselme records that "Joscelin II…vicomte de Melun" donated "la moitié de la forêt de Fereus" to Barbeaux abbey in 1157, but gives no citation for the corresponding primary source.

m ALPAIS, daughter of --- (-20 Jun ----). Père Anselme names Alpais as the wife of Joscelin, adding that she died 20 Jun "suivant le martyrologe de Notre-Dame de Melun".

Joscelin & his wife had three children:

1. Louis I (see below)

2. Jean, vicomte de Melun, who, in concert with his wife Pétronille, dame de Chartrettes, left 30 francs to the church of Barbeaux in 1180. He is believed to have been the father of :

  • * Henri de Melun, bienfaiteur de l'abbaye de Vermand en 1190. Béatrix, sa femme, en était veuve en 1197 ;
    • Guérin de Melun, mort le 15 des ides de novembre avant 1200, et inhumé dans l'église de Saint-Victor, à Paris;
    • Geoffroi de Melun, mort en 1200, et inhumé à Saint-Victor ;
    • Barthélemi de Melun, rappelé en 1233, comme ayant fait don à l'abbaye de Saint-Victor, à Paris, d'une maison sise à Garlande20. ;
    • Gertrude de Melun, inhumée à Saint-Victor ;
    • Yvette de Melun (« Yde »), mariée, vers 1190, avec Robinet, sire de Rambures ;

3. Adam de Melun, nommé dans une charte de Saint-Père en 1172. Il souscrivit, en la même année, une charte de Bouchard V, fils de Mathieu Ier, baron de Montmorency, par laquelle il fit don de la forêt de Merville à l'abbaye du Val-Sainte-Marie;

4. Gilles de Melun ;

5. Aveline de Melun, mariée, avant 1177, avec Philippe Ier de Villebéon, seigneur de Nemours et de Guercheville, dont elle était veuve en 1191. From Cawley, the following: AVELINE de Melun ([1155/60]-2 Jan 1191). Louis VII King of France divided l´Essart-Nantier between the abbey of Barbeaux and "Galterium camerarium nostrum", with the consent of "Ludovicus vicecomes Miliduni, et Petrus de Curtis, sed et filii Galterii, Guillelmus, Philippus et Ursus, et Avelina vicecomitis soror", by charter dated [16 Apr/10 Nov] 1172. Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated [24 Mar 1174/12 Apr 1175] under which Louis VII King of France confirmed the transfer of "terram de Chasteillon" to the abbey of Saint-Victor which names "Ludovico vicecomite Milidunensi…Walterii camerarii nostri…uxoris filii sui Philippi qui soror ipsius vicecomitis erat" and "Walterus…et fratris sui Stephani archiepiscopi Bituricensis…uxoris sue Aveline". A charter dated 1191 records the confirmations by "Guido…Senonensis archiepiscopus…[et] fratris nostri Stephani Noviomensis episcopi" of the testamentary dispositions made by "Avelina uxor Philippi fratris sui", in childbirth, in favour of Barbeau abbey, with the consent of "liberi predictorum Philippi et Aveline, Galterius et Agnes". A charter dated Aug 1191 records the confirmation by Philippe II King of France of the testamentary dispositions taken by "Stephanus Noviomensis episcopus" in the name of "Avelina quondam uxor defuncti Philippi fratris sui" in favour of Barbeau abbey. "Galterius domini regis Francorum camerarius" confirmed the donations to Barbeaux abbey by "Avelina uxor mea…Philippus filius meus…Avelina uxor Philippi…"by charter dated 1193. m ([16 Apr 1172/12 Apr 1175]) PHILIPPE [I] de Nemours Seigneur de Guercheville, son of GAUTHIER de Villebéon Seigneur de Nemours & his first wife Aveline Dame de Nemours (-Acre 18 Feb 1191).

VII. Louis Ier, vicomte de Melun, fut présent, en 1172, à l'accord que le roi Louis VII « le Jeune » fit conclure entre Gauthier de Villebéon, seigneur de Nemours, son chambellan, et l'abbé de Barbeaux. Il est encore nommé dans une charte de l'abbaye de Saint-Denis, de l'an 1183. From Cawley: LOUIS de Melun ([1130/40]-20 Aug after 1182). Vicomte de Melun. Louis VII King of France divided l´Essart-Nantier between the abbey of Barbeaux and "Galterium camerarium nostrum", with the consent of "Ludovicus vicecomes Miliduni, et Petrus de Curtis, sed et filii Galterii, Guillelmus, Philippus et Ursus, et Avelina vicecomitis soror", by charter dated [16 Apr/10 Nov] 1172. The necrology of the abbey of Barbeaux records the death "VIII Kal Sep" of "Ludovici vicecomitis Meledunensis". m GISLE, daughter of --- (-5 or 19 Aug ----). The necrology of the abbey of Barbeaux records the death "XIV Kal Sep" of "Gile vicecomitisse". The necrology of the Abbaye du Jard records the death "Non Aug" of "Gile vicecomitisse de Meleduno".

De Gisle, son épouse, dont le surnom est ignoré, il laissa six fils et deux filles :

1. Adam II, dont l'article viendra ; Cawley writes: ADAM [II] de Melun (-22/23 Sep 1217). Vicomte de Melun. “Adam vicecomes Meleduni” confirmed the donation to the chapter of Sens made by “Johannes archidiaconus Senonensis frater meus” by charter dated 1209.

2. Jean de Melun, chanoine et archidiacre de Sens en 1216, évêque de Poitiers en 1235. Il exempta, en 1246, Alfonse de France, comte de Poitiers, frère du roi saint Louis, de l'hommage que ce prince devait aux évêques de Poitiers pour le château de Civray. Il mourut dans un âge très-avancé en 1257, et fut inhumé dans l'abbaye du Jard, près de Melun, sépulture de ses ancêtres. Cawley writes of him: JEAN de Melun (-11 Sep 1257). Archdeacon of Sens. “Adam vicecomes Meleduni” confirmed the donation to the chapter of Sens made by “Johannes archidiaconus Senonensis frater meus” by charter dated 1209. Bishop of Poitiers 1235.

3. Renaud de Melun, chanoine de Sens en 1216. Cawley writes of him: RENAUD (-17 Mar ----). Canon at Sens. 1216. The necrology of the Abbaye du Jard records the death "XVI Kal Apr" of "domini Reginaldi de Meleduno canonici Senonensis" and his donation.

4. Guillaume de Melun, archidiacre de Sens en 1221 ;

5. Simon de Melun, qualifié chevalier en 1194. C'est sans doute le même que Simon de Melun, gouverneur de Saint-Quentin, inhumé, en 1231, dans l'abbaye du Mont-Saint-Martin (Gouy, aujourd'hui dans l'Aisne) avec Euphémie de Thourotle[réf. nécessaire], sa femme, selon Rosel ;

6. Raoul de Melun ;

7. Adélaïde de Melun, morte avant 1234, femme de Hugues, seigneur d'Égreville ;

8. Gisle de Melun, marié à Eudes de Montiers.

VIII. Adam II, vicomte de Melun en 1200, chevalier, transigea avec le prieur de Saint-Martin-des-Champs à Paris, au mois de novembre 1209, relativement aux différents qu'ils avaient ensemble pour la terre et les bois de Blandy. Cet acte est scellé du sceau du vicomte de Melun, représentant 7 besants, 3, 3 et 1, avec un chef. Dès l'année précédente, le vicomte de Melun avait été envoyé par le roi Philippe II « Auguste » en Poitou, contre Aimeri VII, vicomte de Thouars, commandant les troupes de Jean sans Terre, roi d'Angleterre, dans cette province, et contre Savary Ier de Mauléon, lesquels avaient fait une incursion et porté le ravage dans les terres du roi de France. Le vicomte de Melun les vainquit, les mit en pleine déroute, et fit prisonnier de guerre le vicomte de Thouars21. Le vicomte de Melun rendit des services non moins signalés à la bataille de Bouvines, en 1214, et les chroniques du temps ont consacré les prodiges de valeur, de sang froid, et de capacité qu'il fit dans cette journée. Ce fut lui, qui, à la tête de l'avant-garde, soutint la première attaque des ennemis, pour donner au roi le temps de ranger son armée ; ensuite il alla se replacer au front de la première ligne, avec le duc Eudes III de Bourgogne, Mathieu II de Montmorency et les comtes de Beaumont (Jean) et de Saint-Pol (Gaucher III de Châtillon)22. (Chroniques de Saint-Denis ; Recueil des historiens de France, t. XVII, p. 408.) L'année suivante, 1215, le vicomte de Melun accompagna Louis de France (depuis Louis VIII), en Languedoc, lorsque ce prince eut entrepris la croisade contre les Albigeois. Il accompagna ce même prince, en 1216, lorsqu'il passa en Angleterre pour y recevoir la couronne, à la sollicitation des barons et de la noblesse. Avant de s'embarquer à Calais, Adam fit dans ce port, le dimanche après la Saint-Nicolas, 11 décembre de la même année, un testament, par lequel il légua divers biens a l'abbaye du Jard, et fonda une chapelle dans son château de Blandy. Il en confia l'exécution à Jean de Melun, son frère, et à Gautier II de Villebéon, seigneur de Nemours, son cousin germain. Adam mourut en Angleterre le 22 septembre 1220, suivant Albéric, Philippe Mouskes et le martyrologe de l'abbaye de Barbeaux. Il avait épousé Aremburge, qui lui survécut, et dont il laissa :

1. Guillaume II, dont l'article suit ;

2. Adam de Melun, dont on ignore la destinée ;

3. Louis de Melun, qui fut père de :

  • *Hugues de Melun, chanoine de Saint-Victor, en 1245 ;
    • Rixende de Melun, vivante en 1242 ;

4. Héloïse de Melun, à laquelle son père légua pour la marier 100 livres de rente en fonds de terre, et 1 000 livres en argent. Elle épousa Jean de Garlande, chevalier.

IX. Guillaume II, vicomte de Melun, confirma, en 1220, aux religieux de l'abbaye de Vauluisant (ordre de Cîteaux, diocèse de Sens) le droit de salage, que le vicomte Louis, son aïeul, leur avait accordé. Il fit son testament au mois d'août de la même année, et fut inhumé le 4 mai 1221, dans l'abbaye du Jard, en la tombe de ses prédécesseurs II avait épousé, avant l'an 1211, Agnès, dame de Montreuil-Bellay, d'une maison qui florissait au XIIe siècle, et prétendait descendre des comtes d'Anjou. Elle était fille unique et héritière de Geraud III, seigneur de Montreuil-Bellay, et de Bathilde, sa femme. Elle se remaria à Waleran, baron d'Ivry, puis à Étienne de Sancerre, seigneur de Châtillon-sur-Loing, grand bouteiller de France, troisième fils d'Étienne de Champagne, comte de Sancerre. Elle avait eu du vicomte de Melun, son premier mari :

1. Adam III, dont l'article suit ;

2. Guillaume de Melun, chevalier, qui se rendit caution pour la somme de 500 marcs d'argent, comme garantie du traité conclu au mois d'octobre 1228, par l'entremise du cardinal Romain (Romain « de Saint-Ange ») (en italien : Romano Frangipani), entre le comte de Champagne et les Templiers. Lui et Perseysie, alias Persoïde, dame de Vaux, sa femme, confirmèrent, au mois de mars 1229, les aumônes que feu Gilles de Melun, seigneur de Givry, son frère, avait faites à l'Hôtel-Dieu de Melun. Ils eurent deux fils, suivant les mémoires de Dom Villevieille à la Bibliothèque du Roi, savoir :

3. Gilon de Melun, époux, en 1265, d'Isabelle;

4. Adam de Melun, dit « de Vaux », qui peut avoir été père de :

  • *Simon de Melun, seigneur de Vaux-le-Vicomte en 1336 ;
    • Marguerite de Melun, religieuse en 1336 ;
    • Jeanne de Melun, religieuse en 1336 ;

5. Gilles de Melun, seigneur de Givry, décédé avant 1229 ;

6. Mathilde de Melun, mariée, par contrat de l'année 1230, avec Anseau de Traînel, seigneur de Voucienne, en Champagne ;

7. Aremburge de Melun, religieuse à Longchamps en 1260.

X. Adam III, vicomte de Melun, seigneur de Montreuil-Bellay, etc., demeura quelque temps sous la tutelle d'Agnès, sa mère. Il promulgua une charte en faveur de l'abbaye du Jard, en 1244. Étant sur le point de faire le « voyage d'outre-mer » (septième croisade)23. Adam III fit, au mois de juillet 1249, son testament, par lequel il légua plusieurs biens à l'abbaye de Barbeaux, et dont il nomma exécuteurs son grand-oncle, Jean de Melun, évêque de Poitiers, l'abbé du Jard, Gilles de Villemarchais, Galeran de Chartrettes, chevaliers, et Comtesse, épouse de lui testateur24. La mort du vicomte Adam III est portée au 9 février 1250, (v. st.) dans le martyrologe de Notre-Dame de Melun. Il avait épousé 1°, vers 1235, Gertrude, morte sans enfants ; 2°, en 1239, « Comtesse » (ou Constance) de Sancerre (1221-127525), dame de Concressault, d'Esprennes, et en partie de Marcheville et de « La Louppe », fille d'Étienne II de Sancerre27, grand bouteiller de France, et d'Ænor de Nesle-Soissons, sa première femme. Par lettres du mois de mars de la même année 1239, Étienne II de Sancerre, père de Comtesse, lui assigna pour dot une rente de 200 livres, assise sur son château de Châtillon-sur-Loing, et sur ses autres domaines28. Cette dame, par acte du mercredi avant la Saint-Pierre-aux-Liens 1260, confirma à l'abbaye de Barbeaux les aumônes que son père avait faites à cette abbaye. L'acte est scellé d'un sceau représentant une dame debout, vêtue de menu-vair, tenant une fleur de lys, et autour de laquelle on lit cette légende : « S. Comitissœ vice comitissœ Melodunensis » avec les armes de Melun, 7 besants, 3, 3 et 1, et un chef pour contre-scel29. Elle et Alix de Sancerre, dame de Dangu, sa sœur, plaidaient au parlement en 1263, contre Étienne de Sancerre, leur frère. Comtesse vivait encore en 1275. Ses enfants furent :

1. Guillaume III, vicomte de Melun, seigneur de Montreuil-Bellay, etc., qui, par acte du 4 janvier 1264, du consentement de Comtesse, sa mère, et d'Adam et Jean de Melun, ses frères, alors majeurs, confirma et ratifia la donation que Jean de Villemineur, chantre de l'église Notre-Dame de Melun, avait fait par son testament à son église, de la dîme d'Aubigny. Le sceau du vicomte Guillaume, apposé à cet acte, le représente à cheval, l'épée nue à la main, et ayant un bouclier, chargé de 7 besants, 3, 3 et 1, avec un chef ; au revers est une croix pour contre-scel, et autour, cette légende : « Sig. Guilelmi, vicecomitis Melodunensis ». En 1270, le vicomte de Melun accompagna le roi Saint-Louis au voyage d'Afrique, avec 3 bannières et 12 chevaliers, ayant 5 000 livres d'appointements et bouche à cour à l'hostel du roy30. Il rendit aussi d'importants services à Charles de France, roi de Naples et de Sicile, qui, pour le récompenser, lui donna le comté de Corse. Guillaume III mourut sans postérité en 1278, et fut inhumé en l'abbaye du Jard ;

2. Adam IV, vicomte de Melun, seigneur de Montreuil-Bellay, lequel a continué la branche aînée, devenue comtes de Tancarville, barons de Varenguebec, etc., éteinte au commencement du XVe siècle.

3. Jean Ier de Melun, auteur de la branche des seigneurs de La Borde-le-Vicomte ;

4. Simon de Melun, maréchal de France en 1290, et précédemment Grand-maître des arbalétriers31, à son retour de la huitième croisade (1270) de Saint Louis, auteur de la branche des seigneurs de La Loup(p)e et de Marcheville, éteinte dans la personne de son arrière-petit-fils, Simon de Melun, décédé sans postérité après l'année 1383. Ce rameau, ce rameau qui portait pour brisure 3 merlettes de sable sur le chef, s'était allié aux maisons de Beaumont-Luzarches, de Champagne-Sancerre et Sully, de Coutes, de Mornay, de Préaux, de La Sableiges de La Salle-Viévy, de Husson, et de Vaux-le-Pénil ;

5. Robert de Melun, mort sans postérité après 1298 ;

6. Philippe de Melun, mort sans enfants après 1312 ;

7. Jeanne de Melun, mariée a Henri Ier, sire de Trainel, mort en 1281 ;

8. Aliénor ou Éléonore de Melun, femme de Gauthier IV de Villebéon, surnommé « le Chambellan », seigneur de Nemours, fils de Gautier III et d'Alix de Vierzon ;

9. Comtesse de Melun, abbesse de Notre-Dame du Lys, en 1276, morte en 1300.

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Translated Notes on Charte inédite de l'an 1138, relative à l'histoire des vicomtes de Melun by Adolphe Duchalais (1845): Duchalais Adolphe. Charte inédite de l'an 1138, relative à l'histoire des vicomtes de Melun.. In: Bibliothèque de l'école des chartes. 1845, tome 6. pp. 239-276.

This charter of Moisenai, conserved in the royal archives, contains two notices, both of which are destined to prove that the Vicomtes of Melun did not possess any rights over the mayors of Moisenai and Courceaux (neighboring villages and dependencies of the Abbey of Saint-Maur-des-Fosses). The first notice tells us about Vicomte Ursion or Urson (written both ways) in 1085; the second about a later Vicomte named Adam in 1138. By 1138, Ursion had been dead a long time and several other Vicomtes had succeeded him; Adam had married the daughter of his predecessor through which he had become Vicomte. "These words, as we come to see, formally contradict all that has been advanced by historians and genealogists of Melun."

The first author who gave a list of Vicomtes of Melun was Sebastien Rouillard in 1628. Other lists were made by Pere Anselm and M. Michelin (author of Statistics of the Department of Seine-et-Marne).

Rouillard listed: Salon, Josselin, Herve, Guillaume, Walleran, Ursion, Manasses.

Anselm listed: Josselin, Herve, Ursion, father of, Guillaume 'le charpentier', Ursion II, father of, Adam I, who died without children and was succeeded by his brother Josselin II

Michelin listed: Salon, Gosselin, Herve, Ursion, Guillaume I, Manasses, Hilduin, Garin, Ursion II, Jean, Adam, and Gosselin II (son of Adam)

Discusses problems with medieval annalists and copyists making errors in copying lists, etc. and proposes a corrected listing:

Josselin. 998. aka Gosselin or Rosselin. named 13 May 998 in a document from King Robert regarding the monastery of Saint-Maur-des-Fosses. Not long after, Josselin became a monk at the monastery and died there the 19 March (year uncertain).

Ursion 1085, followed by many Vicomtes, the last who is father of Mahaut, married in 1138 to Adam de Chailli, who is Vicomte 1138-1141, father of Gilles who died before his father. Gilles was father of Josselin, Vicomte de Melun, and Adam.

Duchalais' corrected chart:

I Maison de Melun.

  • Josselin I. 998. Died 14 April (no year)
  • Guillaume I, living c 1000
  • Ursion I, living 1067, 1070, 1080, 1085. His sons included Guillaume II and perhaps Manasses.
  • Guillaume II, 1094, still living c. 1100.
  • Various Vicomtes 1100-1138

II Maison de Melun

  • Adam de Chailli, 1138-1141, vicomte by right of his wife Mahaut, heiress of Melun. They had son Gilles or Gilon, dead before 1141, father of Josselin II and Adam.
  • Josselin II, 1156

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Duchalais summarizes the work of Courcelles, following Clairambault:

  • Salon, 991
  • his brother Josselin I, 992.
  • His son Herve, 1030, married to Agnes, (named as Vicomtesse in a charter of 1030), parents of
  • Ursion I (1065), father of
  • * Guillaume le Charpentier succeeded father in 1084, had sons Ursion II and Eudes (established in Cambresis in 1141)
  • * Manasses (living in 1120)
  • * Hugh de Melun (living in 1080)
  • * Ursion Bishop of Beauvais 1085, died in 1089

But Duchalais goes on to provide evidence against Agnes as Herve's wife (claiming that the date was mistranscribed and it was rather 1238) and other claims.