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  • Simón Bolívar, 3º presidente de Venezuela (1783 - 1830)
    Simón José Antonio de la Santísima Trinidad Bolívar Palacios Ponte y Blanco, mejor conocido como Simón Bolívar, (Caracas, 24 de julio de 1783 — Santa Ma...
  • Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt, 26th President of the USA (1858 - 1919)
    Theodore Roosevelt became the first American President to take seriously the concept of the preservation of nature. As President from 1901 to 1909, he designated 150 National Forests, the first 51 Fede...
  • Grover Cleveland, 22nd and 24th President of the USA (1837 - 1908)
    Born: 18 March 1837 Birthplace: Caldwell, New Jersey Died: 24 June 1908 (heart failure) Best Known As: The 22nd and 24th president of the United States Grover Cleveland is the only U.S. president e...
  • Ulysses S. Grant, 18th President of the United States (1822 - 1885)
    Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877) as well as military commander during the Civil War and ...
  • James K. Polk, 11th President of the USA (1795 - 1849)
    James Knox Polk (pronounced /ˈpoʊk/ POKE; November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) was the 11th President of the United States (1845–1849). Polk was born in Mecklenburg County, N...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monroe_Doctrine

The Monroe Doctrine is a policy of the United States introduced on December 2, 1823. It stated that further efforts by European nations to colonize land or interfere with states in North or South America would be viewed as acts of aggression, requiring U.S. intervention.[1] The Doctrine noted that the United States would neither interfere with existing European colonies nor meddle in the internal concerns of European countries. The Doctrine was issued at a time when nearly all Latin American colonies of Spain and Portugal had achieved independence from the Spanish Empire (except Cuba and Puerto Rico) and the Portuguese Empire. The United States, working in agreement with Britain, wanted to guarantee no European power would move in.[2]

President James Monroe first stated the doctrine during his seventh annual State of the Union Address to Congress. It became a defining moment in the foreign policy of the United States and one of its longest-standing tenets, and would be invoked by many U.S. statesmen and several U.S. presidents, including Theodore Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Ronald Reagan and others.

The intent and impact of the Monroe Doctrine persisted with only minor variations for almost two centuries. Its primary objective was to free the newly independent colonies of Latin America from European intervention and control that would make the New World a battleground for the Old. The doctrine put forward that the New World and the Old World were to remain distinctly separate spheres of influence, for they were composed of entirely separate and independent nations.

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