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Native American Diaspora

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  • Stand Watie, Brig. General, CSA, Principal Chief (c.1806 - 1871)
    Stand Watie (1806-1871) Born at Oothcaloga in the Cherokee Nation, Georgia (near present day Rome, Georgia) on December 12, 1806, Stand Watie's Cherokee name was De-ga-ta-ga, or "he stands." He als...

Overview

American Indians were sent all over the world, including Bermuda, Bahamas, the Caribbean, Europe and Northwest Africa. The Native Americans were not just pushed westward across North America, they were exiled to the West Indies, and even the Southwest Pacific (New Guinea).

Please follow the format of the project, and add people to the body. Also add people's profiles to the project. In this diaspora project, please only add Native Americans and their descendants who left their homelands or were exiled.

Interesting Stories

Leighton Ritch: I recently found the following information on the internet and thought it may be of interest. It seems that the facts about Lovers Leap may be a little different from the story commonly told. It also indicates that the gene pool in St. Elizabeth contains Cherokee. Some time ago a member of this site from St Elizabeth who did a DNA test indicated that North American Indian was part of his ancestry gene pool.

“After the American revolution, many American Indians who had sided with the British were sold as slaves to the British colonies. A group of Cherokees from Georgia were shipped to Jamaica, and sold to a John Bent who owned a plantation called Yardley Chase. Among the group were a married couple, their infant son, and the husband's mother. The couple was scheduled to be re-sold to different owners, so they planned to jump off a cliff with their child. The wife changed her mind and left the child with her mother-in-law, but she and her husband jumped to their deaths. The son later married into the slave population and became part of the Southfield gene pool. That part is based on verifiable facts. My great-grandmother used to tell stories about the Indians from Georgia, who would stand and look out over the sea at sunset because they thought they might be able to get a glimpse of their home as the sun went into the sea. I don't know if that part is fact or legend. Yardley Chase bordered Southfield Plantation and is now a very pleasant rural area.” (See http://groups.yahoo.com/group/St_Elizabeth_Jamaica/message/2718 ; and below at Latest Research ).

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