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Quartermaster Hall of Fame

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  • Colonel Warren Whitside (1875 - 1964)
    Warren Webster Whitside was a career U.S. Army Colonel who served as a Cavalry and Quartermaster officer. He was posthumously inducted into the Quartermaster Hall of Fame in 2010.
  • Maj. Gen. David E. Watts (1928 - 2014)
      Tombstone Inscription: David Edward Watts Maj Gen U.S. ARMY World War II Korea Vietnam June 14, 1928 Feb 17, 2104 DSM LM BSM PH Quartermaster Hall of Fame: Major Genera...
  • Timothy Pickering, U.S. Postmaster General, Secretary of War and State (1745 - 1829)
    Timothy Pickering. He was born, July 17, 1745, Salem, Mass., and died Jan. 29, 1829, Salem, Ma. American Revolutionary officer and Federalist politician who served (1795-1800) with distinction in the f...
  • Brig. Gen. Richard N. Batchelder (USA), Medal of Honor (1832 - 1901)
    Richard Napoleon Batchelder (July 27, 1832 – January 4, 1901) was a United States Army Officer and the 18th Quartermaster General of the United States Army. Brigadier General Batchelder was ...
  • Major General Henry G. Sharpe (1858 - 1947)
    Henry Granville Sharpe (April 30, 1858 – July 13, 1947) was the 24th Quartermaster General of the United States Army from 1916 to 1918. Biography Sharpe was born in Kingston, New Yor...

Quartermaster Hall of Fame

Logistics-once defined simply as "gitten stuff" --entails what many perceive as the unglamorous side of war. Its successes are often taken for granted, while even the slightest failure is deemed unpardonable. General Brehon B. Somervell, head of the Army Service Forces in World War II, had it about right when he said:

"Good logistics alone can't win a war. Bad logistics alone can lose."

For more than two centuries the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps has sustained the Army with vital supplies and field services, without which victory in our many past conflicts would not have been possible. Rommel's oft-quoted remark that "the battle is fought and decided by the quartermasters before the shooting begins," is a shrewd bit of advice applicable even today.

Few Quartermasters, though, can ever hope to achieve the kind of instant notoriety or long-term recognition accorded their combat arms brethren. The brilliant Revolutionary War strategist Nathanael Greene knew all too well what he was being asked to sacrifice, when, as a favor to General George Washington, he agreed to become Quartermaster General of the Continental Army in the wake of Valley Forge. His lament at the time-"No body ever heard of a Quarter Master in History"-still resonates. There have been exceptions, of course, but they are few and far between.

http://www.qmfound.com/hof.htm

The Quartermaster Hall of Fame Program recognizes retired military and civilians who have made lasting, significant contributions to the Quartermaster Corps. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartermaster_Corps_(United_States_Army)

Their exceptional contributions also serve to foster Regimental esprit and to perpetuate the history of the Quartermaster Corps. The Hall of Fame program reminds all Quartermasters of their proud heritage and provides sterling examples of Quartermasters "Supporting Victory".

The Quartermaster Hall of Fame was established in November 1985, by MG Eugene L. Stillions, the Quartermaster General, as part of the Quartermaster Regimental honors program. On 12 June 1986, General Richard H. Thompson, Commander of the U.S. Army Material Command and MG Stillions opened the Hall of Fame in Mifflin Hall at Fort Lee. This permanent display of Quartermaster Hall of Fame inductees includes each inductees’ name, their photograph and a narrative of their major achievements.

During his remarks at the opening ceremony, General Thompson stated that the purpose of the Hall of Fame was to recognize outstanding leaders who have contributed the most to the overall achievement, tradition and history of the Quartermaster Corps. "The location here at Mifflin Hall was selected because it will serve as a constant reminder and a source of inspiration to the thousands of Quartermaster soldiers and family members who pass through these corridors each year." General Thompson said.

Each year a selection board reviews nominations for the Hall of Fame. Official announcement of selectees are made at an induction ceremony each year. During this ceremony new Hall of Fame members or their proxy are presented with a Quartermaster Hall of Fame medallion.

Current members of the Quartermaster Hall of Fame:

http://www.qmfound.com/hof.htm

U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum:

http://www.qmmuseum.lee.army.mil/